EEE572 - Advanced Power Electronics

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24 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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EEE572
-

Advanced Power Electronics

Spring 2004


Instructor

:

Dr. Raja Ayyanar

Class hours

:

MWF 11:40 AM


12:30 PM

Office

:

ERC587

Class room

:

SCOB 105 (also on internet)

Email

:

rayyanar@asu.edu

Office hours

:

MTWTh 2:00


3:00 PM or by
appointmen
t

Phone

:

(480) 727
-
7307

Web page

:

http://class.eas.asu.edu/eee572a


Scope:

Power electronics is a critical enabling technology with numerous applications. The
main focus of this course is on design
-
oriented analysis of topologies and control methods
for
various power electronic converters in important applications such as switch
-
mode power
supplies in any electronic equipment, adjustable speed drives and interface of fuel cells. This
course is intended as a second course in power electronics. However,

several lectures will be
devoted initially to the fundamentals of switch
-
mode power conversion such that students without
a formal course on power electronics can also follow the course easily. PSpice based simulations
will be used extensively to reinforc
e the basic concepts, and as a design tool as well. Power
semiconductor devices such as MOSFETs and IGBTs will be discussed briefly.


Pre
-
requisite:

Open to electrical engineering graduate students, and undergraduate seniors
with instructor consent.


Tex
tbook:



N. Mohan, T.M. Undeland, W.P. Robbins, “
Power Electronics: Converters,
Applications and Design
,” John Wiley and sons, third edition, 2003.


Reference:

R.W. Erickson, D. Maksimovic, “
Fundamentals of Power Electronics

Kluwer Academic Publishers, s
econd edition.


IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, Industry applications, Industrial
Electronics


Major topics:




Basic principles of switch
-
mode power conversion (3)

Introduction to switching converters, concept of steady state, volt
-
second and amper
e
-
second
balance, ideal switches



Analysis of basic dc
-
dc converters (non
-
isolated) using a building
-
block approach (4)

Analysis and design of buck, boost, buck
-
boost and SEPIC converters, based on the model of
a power pole



Modeling and control of dc
-
dc con
verters (5)

Review of linear control theory, small
-
signal average model of converters, control design
techniques


voltage mode and current mode control, brief discussion on digital control



Power management (4)

Switching regulators for modern processors, c
ontrol techniques for high dynamic
performance, voltage regulator modules (VRM), multi
-
phase converters, linear LDO
regulators and charge pumps for low power applications



Magnetics (3)

Basic magnetic circuits, applications in isolated converters, design of

inductors and
transformers, integrated magnetics



Switch mode power supplies with isolation (4)

Design and analysis of forward, fly
-
back, push
-
pull and full
-
bridge converters, introduction
to soft switching



Semiconductor devices (2)

Characteristics and sel
ection criteria for diodes, MOSFETs and IGBTs, gate drive circuits



Modern rectifiers (2)

Power quality issues, boost converter based power factor correction circuits (PFC)



Voltage source inverters (VSI) (4)

Topology, PWM techniques, control methods of VSI
, applications in low frequency synthesis



Modern applications of power electronic converters (5)

High performance, adjustable speed electric drives

Interface of distributed energy sources such as fuel cells

Automotive applications



Practical issues in powe
r electronic converters (2)

Thermal management, control ICs, EMI and layout issues


Homework:


About eight detailed h
omeworks will be assigned, and the solutions will be
posted later on the class web page. Many of the homework assignments will involve PS
pice
simulations. Students are expected to typically spend about 8 hours on each homework.


Mini
-
project:

A significant part of the grade is based on a required mini
-
project. Students can choose either a
detailed simulation project or a hardware project
, after consulting with the instructor. A final
report is required on the last day of class. (Presentation to the class is optional).


Grading:

Homework


20%






>85 %

A

Project



25%






70


84 %

B

Midterm exam

20%






55


69 %

C

Final exam


35%