Chapter 8

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6 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 7 μέρες)

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Chapter

8

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Compliance


Operational effectiveness and efficiency


Strategy





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Figure 8.1

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Stage One: Develop an IM policy.


Stage Two: Articulate operational components.


Stage Three: Establish information stewardship.


Stage Four: Build information standards.





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Provides guidance for accountabilities,
quality, security, privacy, risk tolerances,
and prioritization of efforts for IM.


Should be established at a senior
management level.


Helps to identify gaps in existing
practices.






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Figure 8.2

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Clearly articulate IM roles and
responsibilities.

Information stewards are responsible for
meaning, accuracy, timeliness,
consistency, validity, completeness,
privacy and security, and compliance of
information.

Information stewards should be business
people.





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Standards ensure quality, accuracy and
control goals can be met.


Use metadata repositories to cross
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reference models, processes, and
programs that reference information.


Standards help reduce information
redundancy.





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Culture and Behavior

Information Risk Management

Information Value

Privacy

Knowledge Management

The Knowledge
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Doing Gap





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Integrity


defines the information usage
boundaries.


Formality


enables accurate and
consistent information.


Control


establishes trust in the
information.





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Transparency


describes the level of trust
to speak about errors.


Sharing


exchange of sensitive and non
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sensitive information amongst employees.


Proactiveness


creates an alertness to
picking up new information about
business conditions.






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Determine internal and external
interdependencies.


Determine level of information security
needed and cost to implement.


Develop an information security strategy.






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Information
Protection
Center

Risk
Management

Standards

Education &
Awareness

Compliance

Identity
Management

IM VALUE PROPOSITION
SHOULD ADDRESS:

Strategic

Tactical

Operational

Information Value is
difficult to quantify.


It takes time for an IM
Investment to pay off.


IM Value is a subjective
assessment.





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Privacy regulations affect current and
long
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term IM initiatives.


Organizations must be in compliance with
many new privacy regulations.


Many countries now require a chief
privacy officer.

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+ Context

+ Judgment

+ Intuition

Knowledge

Information


Knowledge is a Fluid Mix of Framed Experience, Values, Contextual
Information, and Expert Insight that provides a Framework for Evaluating and
Incorporating New Experiences and Information. It Originates and is Applied
in the Minds of Knowers
……Thomas Davenport and Larry Prusak, 1998

Knowledge Is the Capability to Take Effective Action

=

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It is assumed that better information will
lead to better decisions.


There needs to be a clear link between
desired actions and the acquisition and
packaging of specific information.

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Start with what you have.


Ensure cross
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functional coordination
among all stakeholders.


Get the right incentives.


Establish and model sound information
values.







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Strategy

People

Processes

Technology and Architecture

Culture and Behaviors

Governance





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External Environment

Strategic Planning

Information Life Cycle

Planning

Program Integration

Performance Monitoring





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Roles and Responsibilities

Training and Support

Subject
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Matter Experts

Relationship Management





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Project Management

Change Management

Risk Management

Business Continuity

Information Life Cycle

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Collect, create and capture

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Use and dissemination

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Maintenance, protection, and preservation

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Retention and disposition






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IM Tools

Technology Integration

Information Life Cycle Organization

Data Standards





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Leadership

IM Awareness

Incentives

IM Competencies

Communities of Interest





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Principles, Policies, and Standards

Compliance

IM Program Evaluation

Quality of Information

Security of Information

Privacy of Information





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Organizations face many challenges in
implementing information management
practices.


Although IT can take a lead in developing
an information management plan, the
business area must ultimately be involved
in its implementation and the stewardship
of information within the organization.





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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written
permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America.

Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall