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Marketing







Career Field Technical Content

Standards Document




With

Academic Content Standards in

English Language Arts, Mathematics and Social Studies






June 2008











ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Program Description



Foreword

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

v



Acknowledgements

................................
................................
................................
.................

vii



Marketing Career Field Technical Content Standa
rds Document

................................
............

ix



Academic Review Panel Participants

................................
................................
........................

x



Marketing Futuring Panel

................................
................................
................................
.........

xi



Marketing Business Panels

................................
................................
................................
.....

xiii



Marketing Educator Panel

................................
................................
................................
....

xviii



Marketing Stakeholder Panel

................................
................................
................................
..

xx



Academic Alignment Panel

................................
................................
................................
....

xxi



Philosophy and Principles

................................
................................
................................
.....

xxii



Ohio Career Field Init
iative

................................
................................
................................
..

x
x
iii



Ohio Career Field Technical Content Standards

................................
................................
..

x
x
iii



Career Pathways

................................
................................
................................
...................

x
x
i
v



Structure and Format

................................
................................
................................
............

xxvi



Definitions and Codes

................................
................................
................................
........

xxviii



Sample Competency

................................
................................
................................
.............

xxi
x



Marketing Definitions

................................
................................
................................
...........

xx
x

Marketing Instructional Units

................................
................................
........................

xxxiii

Marketing Competency Chart

................................
................................
........................

xx
xvi


Marketing Career Field



SHARED COMPETENCIES

................................
................................
................................
................

1



Business Law

................................
................................
................................
.............................

2



Communication Skills

................................
................................
................................
...............

7



Customer Relations

................................
................................
................................
.................

12



Economics

................................
................................
................................
...............................

14



Emotional Intelligence

................................
................................
................................
............

22



Entrepreneurship

................................
................................
................................
.....................

27



Financial Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...................

32



Human Resources Management

................................
................................
..............................

39



Information Management

................................
................................
................................
........

43



Marketi
ng

................................
................................
................................
................................

55



Operations

................................
................................
................................
...............................

57



Professional Development

................................
................................
................................
.......

63



Strategic Management

................................
................................
................................
.............

68



Channel Management

................................
................................
................................
..............

70



Distribution

................................
................................
................................
..............................

71



Marketing
-
Information Management

................................
................................
......................

7
4



Market Planning

................................
................................
................................
......................

81



Pricing

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

84



Product/Service Management

................................
................................
................................
..

8
5



Marketing Communications

................................
................................
................................
....

8
8



Selling

................................
................................
................................
................................
......

93



MARKETING M
ANAGEMENT PATHWAY

................................
................................

107


iii



Financial Analysis

................................
................................
................................
.................

108



Human Resources Management

................................
................................
............................

110



Information Management

................................
................................
................................
......

111



Operations

................................
................................
................................
.............................

1
12



Professional Development

................................
................................
................................
.....

1
14



Strategic Management

................................
................................
................................
...........

1
15



Channel Management

................................
................................
................................
............

1
16



Marketing

Information Management

................................
................................
....................

1
18



Pricing

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

1
23



Product

and
Service Management

................................
................................
.........................

1
25



Marketing Communication

................................
................................
................................
....

1
29



Selling

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

1
32



INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS PATHWAY

............................

1
33



Business Law

................................
................................
................................
.........................

1
34



Communication Skills

................................
................................
................................
...........

1
35



Emotional Intelligence

................................
................................
................................
..........

1
37



Financial Analysis

................................
................................
................................
.................

1
39



Human Resources Management

................................
................................
............................

1
41



Information Management

................................
................................
................................
......

1
42



Marketing

................................
................................
................................
..............................

1
44



Operations

................................
................................
................................
.............................

1
45



Professional Development

................................
................................
................................
.....

1
48



Marketing

Information Management

................................
................................
....................

1
50



Market Planning

................................
................................
................................
....................

1
53



Pricing

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

1
54



Product

and
Service Management

................................
................................
.........................

1
56



Marketing Communications

................................
................................
................................
..

1
58



Selling

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

1
7
0



PROFESSIONAL SALES

and
SALES MANAGEMENT PATHWAY

........................

1
72



Professional Development

................................
................................
................................
.....

1
73



Selling

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

1
7
4



MERCHANDISING PATHWAY

................................
................................
......................

1
79



Information Management

................................
................................
................................
......

1
80



Operations

................................
................................
................................
.............................

1
81



Distribution

................................
................................
................................
............................

1
82



Marketing

Information Management

................................
................................
....................

1
85



Pricing

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

1
87



Product

and
Service Management

................................
................................
.........................

1
89



Marketing Communications

................................
................................
................................
..

1
92



Selling

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

1
94



M
ARKETING RESEARCH PATHWAY

................................
................................
........

1
95



Human Resources Management

................................
................................
............................

1
96



Operations

................................
................................
................................
.............................

1
97



Professional Development

................................
................................
................................
.....

1
98



Strategic Management

................................
................................
................................
...........

1
99



Ma
rketing Information Management

................................
................................
....................

200



PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN
MANAGEMENT
(PALS) EMBEDDED TCP
PATHW
AY

................................
........

PALS


iv



Complete
PALS Embedded
Technical Competency Profile

................................
...........

PALS2


Appendices



Appendix A

Review Panels

................................
................................
................................

209



Appendix B

Professional Associations and Certifications

................................
.................

214



Appendix

C

References

................................
................................
................................
......

218



v

FOREWORD


The
Marketing Career Field Technical Content Standa
rds

form the curricular framework for
Ohio College Tech Prep and career
-
technical education programs in marketing. This document
reflects the career field framework outlined in Ohio Administrative Code 3301
-
61
-
03 (Criteria for
Secondary
Workforce Developme
nt Programs), adopted by the State Board of Education in 2004.


This document represents a collaborative effort of the following professional partners: the Ohio
Department of Education’s Office of Career
-
Technical and Adult Education, the Ohio Board of
Reg
ents, the Marketing Education Resource Center

and the Ohio Resource Center
for
Mathematics, Science and Reading.
Secondary and postsecondary educators, along with
businesses and industry professionals, also participated in the development of the technical
content standards.


The
Marketing Career Field Technical Content Standards

combine business and industry
standards (reflecting English language arts, mathematics, social studies, science and technology),
academic content standards (English language arts, m
athematics and social studies) and the
business process framework to develop technical literacy in marketing. The Marketing Career
Field is comprised of six pathways leading to technically
-
based careers in:




Integrated marketing communications
;




Marketing
management
;




Marketing research
;




Merchandising
;




Professional sales/sales management
; and




Procurement, acquisition, logistics and supply chain (PALS)

management
.


This document delineates competencies that outline the knowledge and skills needed for care
er
success in the above six pathways. It includes a) shared marketing competencies that span the
career field pathways and occupational levels, addressing critical workplace skills
;

and b)
pathway competencies that describe specific occupational knowledge
and skills in integrated
marketing communications; marketing management; marketing research; merchandising;
professional sales/sales management; and procurement, acquisition, logistics and supply chain
(PALS)

management.


PALS TCP

The PALS Technical Compe
tency Profile
(TCP), created in 2004,
is being included as the sixth
p
athway and a single, stand
-
alone document. This document, which
was no
t revised with the rest
of the technical content s
tandards
, will change along with a revised pathway at a later date
.
Therefore, t
he shared competencies have not been removed from this pathway document nor has
it been separated in the same way as the rest of the document.
Additionally, this PALS document
has not yet been embedded with
the Ohio
English Language Arts Acad
emic Content Standards,

the
Mathematics Academic Content Standards

and the
Social Studies Academic Content
Standards

as have the other five pathways.



vi

The Marketing Technologies document seeks to provide the basis for educational programming
that will fost
er the development of what Doug Bush, vice president and chief technology officer,
Intel Corporation, refers to as the “T
-
shaped” employee. The “T
-
shaped” employee combines
broad knowledge, insight and understanding of business processes, academic attainme
nt and
workplace readiness (the crossbar of the “T”) with depth of knowledge and expertise in a career
specialty (the post of the “T”). The “T
-
shaped” employee is needed to ensure that Ohio’s
marketing workforce of tomorrow will be competitive in a global
environment that required
specialized skills in a broader context aimed at the innovation of new products and services in an
ever
-
changing economy.


This document forms the basis for developing an integrated delivery system that provides
opportunities for
new and challenging programs and courses. It is hoped that the document will
enhance and expand career
-
technical education, College Tech Prep, and postsecondary degree
programs in marketing and related fields.


The document is available on the Internet at
www.techprepohio.org

and through the Ohio
Department of Education career field initiative Web pages at
www.ode.state.oh.us
.


Kathy Shibley

Director

Office of Career
-
Te
chnical and Adult Education

Ohio Department of Education

Jonathan Tafel

Vice Chancellor for Educational Linkages and
Access

Ohio Board of Regents



vii

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



A number of individuals contributed their time and expertise to the development of the
M
arketing
Career Field Technical Content Standards
. Special thanks go to all the business representatives
and educators named in the section entitled “Development of Marketing.” Further
acknowledgement is due to:




David Burns, Executive Director, Secondary
Education and Workforce Development,
Ohio Department of Education;



Jonathan Tafel, Vice Chancellor for Educational Linkages and Access, Ohio Board of
Regents;



Kathy Shibley, Director, Office of Career
-
Technical and Adult Education, Ohio
Department of Educa
tion;



Deborah Roshto, Director, Office of Curriculum and Instruction, Ohio Department of
Education:



Rick Mangini, Associate Director, Pathways, Programs and Services, Office of Career
-
Technical and Adult Education, Ohio Department of Education
;



Anthony Lan
dis, Administrator, College Tech Prep and Carl D. Perkins Programs, Ohio
Board of Regents;



Neena Davis, Consultant, College Tech Prep, Office of Career
-
Technical and Adult
Education, Ohio Department of Education
; and



Dee Sturgill, Consultant, Marketing Car
eer Field, Office of Career
-
Technical and Adult
Education, Ohio Department of Education

The individuals listed above provided vision and implementation support for the
Marketing
Career Field Technical Content Standards

document and Ohio’s marketing educati
on programs.


Also, special thanks are due to the following professional partners in this project:



James R. Gleason, President, MarkED/Career Paths;



Beth M. Osteen, Vice President, Research and Development, MarkED/Career Paths;



Carmel Martin, Executive Ass
istant, MarkED/Career Paths;



Margaret Kasten, Executive Director
, Ohio Resource Center for Mathematics, Science
and Reading, The Ohio State University;



David Majesky, Associate Director
, Ohio Resource Center for Mathematics, Science and
Reading, The Ohio S
tate University;



Carol Brown Dodson, Outreach Specialist,

Ohio Resource Center for Mathematics,
Science and Reading, The Ohio State University;



Ellen Cahill, Social Studies Consultant, Ohio Resource Center for Mathematics, Science
and Reading, The Ohio Sta
te University;


viii




Sheila Cantlebary, English Language Arts Content Specialist, Ohio Resource Center for
Mathematics, Science and Reading, The Ohio State University;



Judy Spicer, Mathematics Content Specialist, Ohio Resource Center for Mathematics,
Science an
d Reading, The Ohio State University;



Sharon Keller
,

English Language Arts Consultant, Office of Curriculum and Instruction,
Ohio Department of Education;



William Muthig,
Social Studies Consultant, Office of Curriculum and Instruction, Ohio
Department of E
ducation; and



Brian Roget,

Mathematics Consultant, Office of Curriculum and Instruction, Ohio
Department of Edu
cation;


The people listed above contributed significant research, subject matter, expertise and facilitation
to the development of the
Marketing

Career Field Technical Content Standards

document.


ix

MARKETING CAREER FIE
LD

TECHNICAL CONTENT ST
ANDARDS


The development process for the
Marketing Career Field Technical Content Standards

began in
April

2006 with the convening of a futuring panel and cul
minated in
August 2007 with the work
of a panel of business representatives and educators focusing on academic correlation.

Over the
course of 2006
-
2007, numerous business and industry representatives, as well as secondary and
postsecondary educators from
across the state of Ohio, took part in the formal development
process. The following summarizes the various stages of the development process.

Futuring Panels

April 25, 2006
,

and May 5, 2006

The Marketing futuring panel brought together key business and in
dustry representatives from
across the state to advise the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Board of Regents on
future trends impacting the marketing career field and to suggest ways in which those trends
could be incorporated into a marketing car
eer field technical content standards document.

Business Review Panels

May 23, 2006; May 24, 2006; May 25, 2006; June 5, 2006; June 6, 2006; September 21,
2006; September 22, 2006; October 11, 2006; October 17, 2006; and December 12, 2006

Nearly 70 Ohio bu
siness and industry representatives participated on the panels. Drawn from
diverse industrial sectors and regions of the state, the panel identified what marketing employees
should know and be able to do in five marketing pathways: integrated marketing
com
munications, marketing management, marketing research, merchandising, and professional
sales/sales management. The panels built upon work outlined by the futuring panel, identifying
essential and recommended knowledge and skills.

Educator Review Panel

Octo
ber 24, 2006

This panel was composed of representatives from secondary and postsecondary institutions across
Ohio. The panel determined
when

in the educational process (i.e., high school or college)
competencies should be addressed and to
what depth
. In ad
dition, the educator panel members
noted questions they had on decisions made by the business review panel and formulated
suggestions for additions, deletions and editorial changes to the draft document.

Stakeholder Review Panel

February 8, 2007

Representa
tives from the business review and education review panels addressed issues that
educators raised during the October 24, 2006, meeting. Suggestions for additions, deletions and
editorial changes were reviewed to ensure that the document provided a cohesive

and deliverable
set of competencies for marketing professionals at both secondary and postsecondary exit points.
The stakeholder review provided a forum to ensure that the final document facilitates the
seamless education of students interested in pursuin
g a career in integrated marketing
communications, marketing management, marketing research, merchandising, and professional
sales/sales management.


x


Academic Review Panel

October 30
,
2007

The academic review panel brought together business representative
s, secondary and
po
stsecondary technical educators

and academic educators to identify benchmarks from the
Ohio
Academic Content Standards for English Language Arts, Mathematics and Social Studies

that are
embedded within the technical competencies. This in
corporation of academic content standards
with career field technical content standards provides an opportunity for instructional integration
of content, helping to contextualize learning for students and providing the basis for collaboration
across discip
lines.


xi

Marketing Futuring Panel


Thomas L. Allen

Vice President of Marketing

Skyline Chili, Inc.

Fairfield, Ohio

Pamela Foster

Vice President

Community Development

Fifth Third Bank

Columbus, Ohio

Bill Kistner

President

Bill Kistner & Co., LLC

Lewis Cente
r, Ohio

David Baldwin

President

Aquarian Technology Systems

Lexington, Ohio

Tasos Georgopoulos

Marketing Manager

Pierre Foods

Cincinnati, Ohio

Beverly Martin

Senior Vice President

Hicks Partners

Columbus, Ohio

Eleanor E. Biddulph

Vice President, Client
S
ervices

Progressive Medical

Westerville, Ohio

Don Gorman

President

Don Gorman Advertising, Inc.

Gahanna, Ohio

Dave Murray

Executive Vice President

Marketing Research Services,
Inc.

Cincinnati, Ohio

Mary Cusick

Senior Vice President

Bob Evans Farms, Inc.

C
olumbus, Ohio

Gary Grubert

Vice President of Sales and
Marketing

Gasket Resources, Inc.

Hamilton, Ohio

Rodger Roeser

Vice President

Justice & Young Advertising

Cincinnati, Ohio

Frank Deaner

Executive Director

Ohio Newspaper Association

Columbus, Ohio

Susa
n Harrington

President

Idealine

Cincinnati, Ohio

Nita Rollins

Executive Director of
Marketing

Resource Interactive

Columbus, Ohio

Joseph DiMartino

Vice President Product
Research

Grange Insurance

Columbus, Ohio

Tom Heiby

Chief Executive Officer

Clary Com
munications

Columbus, Ohio

Michelle Tufford

Associate Vice President,
Research, Corporate
Marketing

Nationwide Insurance

Columbus, Ohio

John Drake

President

Affirmative Mortgage
Solutions

Cincinnati, Ohio

Jessica Homan

Vice President,

Marketing Director

C
ommerce National Bank

Columbus, Ohio

Ursula Vermillion

Executive Vice President

The Wasserstrom Company

Columbus, Ohio

Barbara Eickmeyer

Sales Manager

Time Warner Cable, Media
Sales

Norwood, Ohio

Kim Kelly
-
Bartley

Vice President, Marketing and
Site Develo
pment

White Castle System, Inc.

Columbus, Ohio

Donna Vorce

Owner

First Impressions

Columbus, Ohio


xii

Monica Zoerner

Proposal Specialist

Gates, McDonald & Co.

Columbus, Ohio







xiii

Marketing Business Panels


Professional Sales/Sales Management


Dick Boisseau

President (Manufacturer’s rep)

DG Technical Sales

Canal Winchester, Ohio

Ken Herr

Vice President, Corporate Development

Shook National Corp.

Dayton, Ohio

Richard Brock

General Sales Manager

Specialty North American

Lewis Center, Ohio

Kevin Lehr

President

Kevin Lehr & Associates

Columbus, Ohio

Cathy Burris

Master Sales

Sibcy Cline Realtors

Dayton, Ohio

Jeff Lightner

Brower Insurance Agency

Dayton, Ohio

Andrew Courtice

President/Owner

Digisale

Centerville, Ohio

Polly Petricola

Sales Manager/President

Ad P
roducts of Dayton

Dayton, Ohio

Paul Deibel

Sales Manager

Atlas Machine & Supply

Columbus, Ohio

Jim Rizzo

Regional Marketing Manager

The Wasserstrom Company

Columbus, Ohio

Robert Eubanks

Telecom Network Services

Reynoldsburg, Ohio

Dennis Smith

Director of

Sales

Lion Apparel Inc.

Dayton, Ohio

Dotsy Griffith

Senior Sales Representative

Eli Lilly/NovaQuest

Columbus, Ohio

Jim Zawodny

Sales Executive

D.B. Hess

London, Ohio

Ray Heap

Partner

Teleco Columbus

Powell, Ohio





xiv

Marketing Communications


Ida Abda
lkhani

Assistant Brand Manager

Procter & Gamble

Cincinnati, Ohio

Kathy Jankoski

Director of Communication Services

Attach
é

Columbus, Ohio

Cindy Carvour

Management Supervisor

HGA, Inc.

Columbus, Ohio

Chris McGovern

President

Emerging Marketing

Columbus, Oh
io

Sandy Croucher

Account Director

GJP Advertising

Cincinnati, Ohio

Jeff Milgrom

President

Event Marketing Strategies

Dublin, Ohio

Amy Dawson

Senior Vice President

Fahlgren, Inc.

Columbus, Ohio

Monika Roberts

Senior Account Manager

Creatives on Call

Cinc
innati, Ohio

Andrea Fisher

Marketing Communications Manager

Burke Inc.

Cincinnati, Ohio

Janine Robinson

Director of Operations

Triad, Inc.

Westerville, Ohio

Mindy Hedges

President

Media Solutions, Inc.

Delaware, Ohio

Lenere Shrieves

Vice President, Human

Resources

SBC Advertising

Westerville, Ohio

Larry Holt

President

Max Marketing and Promotions

Milford, Ohio

Marilyn J. Tomaasi

Sr. VP, Columbus Operations Officer

Edward Howard & Co.

Columbus, Ohio





xv

Merchandising


Mike Baker

President/Manager

Baker

Hardware

Okeana, Ohio

Bruce Harlan

CEO

Buckeye Corner

Columbus, Ohio

Pete Brophy

Store Sales Manager

Finish Line #282

Dublin, Ohio

Dave Schwab

Store Sales Manager

Finish Line

Columbus, Ohio

Trish Elkind

Owner

d敮eral⁍慮ag敲

健m⁐敯灬e

C潬畭扵猬⁏桩b

Te
rry Snyder

Store Manager

Steinmart

Columbus, Ohio

Andrew Graham

Owner

The Outdoor Source

Columbus, Ohio









Marketing Core


Mike Anderson

Sr. Manager, Marketing Research

The Longaberger Co.

Newark, Ohio

Ann Flynn

VP & Partner

Beyond Data, Inc.

Cinc
innati, Ohio

Pete Brophy

Store Sales Manager

Finish Line #282

Dublin, Ohio

Jessica Homan

Vice President, Marketing Director

Commerce National Bank

Columbus, Ohio

Andrea Fisher

Marketing Communications Manager

Burke Inc.

Cincinnati, Ohio







xvi

Marketin
g Management

Bob Barnes

Vice President

US Bank

Columbus, Ohio

Kevin McCalla

Director, Marketing

Liebert Corp.

Delaware, Ohio

Karri Benishek

Field Marketing Manager

Wendy’s Midwest Region

Dublin, Ohio

Chris McGovern

President

Emerging Marketing

Columbus, O
hio

Gunther Brinkman

Vice President of Marketing

Norse Dairy Systems, L.P.

Columbus, Ohio

Becky Migas

Director of Marketing

Jackson Hewitt Tax Services

Columbus, Ohio

Bruce Crocco

Executive Director, Marketing

OCLC

Dublin, Ohio

Cynthia Paskoff

Marketing
Coordinator

Speer Mechanical

Columbus, Ohio

Leslie Gullet

Director of Marketing

Korda/Nemeth Engineering, Inc.

Columbus, Ohio

Jennifer Simon

Manager Marketing Services

Inoveris, LLC

Dublin, Ohio

Erika Kahler
-
Fahy

Marketing Manager

Bovis Lend Lease

Columb
us, Ohio

Gwenette Stafford

Customer Services and Marketing

American Electric Power

Gahanna, Ohio

Megan Knox

Manager, Marketing and Communications

Siemens Airfield Solutions, Inc.

Columbus, Ohio

Bob Stoops

Client Development Manager

Elford, Inc.

Dublin, Oh
io

Robin Butler Leonard

Executive Director of Marketing

WD Partners

Columbus, Ohio

Debbie Trager

Director of Marketing

Escape Enterprises, Ltd.

Columbus, Ohio

Jeff Levine

Assistant Zone Marketing Manager

State Farm Insurance

Newark, Ohio

Kim Tyndall

Mark
eting Consultant

Westerville, Ohio

John Lewis

Corporate Information Marketing Manager

The Dispatch Printing Company

Columbus, Ohio



xvii

Marketing Research


Chris Boring

Consultant

Boulevard Strategies

Columbus, Ohio

Neil Lewbel

Startup and Marketing Consul
tant

Columbus, Ohio

Regina Braden

Director, Market Research, Corporate
Marketing

Nationwide

Columbus, Ohio

Jeff Shick

President

Technology and Economic Development
Services

Powell, Ohio

Lara Lebeiko

Communications and Research

Kelly Allan LTD

Columbus, O
hio

Annette Whittemore

VP, Asset Management Americas Research

JPMorgan Asset Management

Columbus, Ohio

Melody Leidheiser

Project Management Consultant

Sensory Insight

Columbus, Ohio






xviii

Marketing Educator Panel

October 24, 2006


Jenifer Black

Marketin
g Teacher

Auburn Career Center

Concord Twp, Ohio

Tim McCabe

Marketing Teacher

Badin High School

Hamilton, Ohio

Lee Blyth

Supply Chain Management Coordinator

Columbus State Community College

Columbus, Ohio

Karen Oberlander

Marketing Teacher

Licking County
JVS

Newark, Ohio

Russell Cochrane

Marketing Teacher

Gahanna Lincoln High School

Gahanna, Ohio

Cara Paulette

Marketing Teacher

Scott High School

Toledo, Ohio

Constance Cooper, CPA

Department Head, Business & Commerce Dept

University of Cincinnati

Cincinna
ti, Ohio

Greg Perry

Marketing Teacher

Beachwood High School

Beachwood, Ohio

Anna Diekman

Marketing Teacher

Clay High School

Oregon, Ohio

Linda Varga

Marketing Teacher

Lorain County Career Center

Oberlin, OH

Jeanne Getz

Marketing Teacher

Beachwood High Sc
hool

Beachwood, Ohio

Carolyn Waits

Program Co
-
chair

Business Management
Technology

Cincinnati State Community College

Cincinnati, Ohio

Robin Holweger

Marketing Teacher

Kettering Fairmont High School

Kettering, Ohio

Julie Woeste

Marketing Teacher

Edgewood
High School

Trenton, Ohio

Debra Laughlin

Marketing Teacher

Centerville High School

Centerville, Ohio

Jim Wood

Marketing/Management Program Chair

Cincinnati State Community College

Cincinnati, Ohio

Ted Light

Instructor

Miami University

Oxford, Ohio

Ned Yo
ung

Marketing/Management Program Chair

Sinclair Community College

Dayton, Ohio


xix

Kathleen Lower

Marketing Teacher

Glen Oak High School

Canton, Ohio




xx

Marketing Stakeholder Panel

February 7, 2007



Mike Anderson

Sr. Manager, Marketing Research

The Longaber
ger Co.

Newark, Ohio

Deb Laughlin

Marketing Teacher

Centerville High School

Centerville, Ohio

Lee Blyth

Supply Chain Management Coordinator

Columbus State Community College

Columbus, Ohio

Robin Butler Leonard

Executive Director of Marketing

WD Partners

Co
lumbus, Ohio

Dick Boisseau

President (Manufacturer’s Rep)

DG Technical Sales

Canal Winchester, Ohio

Karen Oberlander

Marketing Teacher

Licking County JVS

Newark, Ohio

Gunther Brinkman

Vice President of Marketing

Norse Dairy Systems, L.P.

Columbus, Ohio

J
im Rizzo

Regional Marketing Manager

The Wasserstrom Co.

Columbus, Ohio

Leslie Gullet

Director of Marketing

Korda/Nemeth Engineering, Inc.

Columbus, Ohio

Lenere Shrieves

Vice President, Human Resources

SBC Advertising

Westerville, Ohio

Bruce Harlan

CEO

Th
e Buckeye Corner

Columbus, Ohio

Jim Wood

Management/Marketing Program Chair

Cincinnati State Community College

Cincinnati, Ohio

Ken Herr

Vice President, Corporate Development

Shook National Corp.

Dayton, Ohio

Ned Young

Management/Marketing Program Chair

S
inclair Community College

Dayton, Ohio




xxi


ACADEMIC REVIEW PANE
L PARTICIPANTS

Academic Alignment Panel

October 30, 2007


Kristin Allen

English
Teacher

Kettering Fairmont High School

Kettering, Ohio

Robin Holweger

Marketing

Education Teacher

Kettering Fai
rmont High School

Kettering, Ohio

Mike Anderson

Research Manager Marketing, Planning, and
Research

The Longaberger Company

Newark, Ohio

Deb Laughlin

Marketing

Education Teacher

Centerville High School

Centerville, Ohio

Laura Atherton

Mathematics

Teacher

C
-
TEC

of Licking County

Newark, Ohio

Kathy Lower

E
-
Commerce Marketing
Teacher

Glen Oak High School

Canton, Ohio

Lee Blyth

Supply Chain Management Coordinator

Co
lumbus State Community College

Columbus, Ohio

Angel Lynskey

Social Studies
Teacher

Central Cros
sing High School

Grove City, Ohio

Jeanne Bolton

Social Studies

Teacher

C
-
TEC
of Licking County

Newark, Ohio

Anne Mikesell

Mathematics

Consultant

Ohio Resource Center

Columbus, Ohio

Pete Brophy

General Sales Manager

Finish Line #282

Dublin, Ohio

Karen Obe
rlander

Marketing

Education Teacher

C
-
TEC
of Licking County

Newark, Ohio

Constance Cooper

Pathway Manager Business/E
-
Commerce
Technologies

University of Cincinnati/Greater Cincinnati

Tech Prep

Cincinnati, Ohio

Greg Perry

Marketing

Education Teacher

Beachw
ood High School

Beachwood, Ohio

Anna Diekman

Marketing Education/DECA

Teacher

Clay High School

Oregon
, Ohio

Loretta Raduege

English Language Arts

Consultant

Ohio Resource Center

Columbus, Ohio

Susan Everhart

Marketing

Education Teacher/DECA Advisor

GlenO
ak High School

Canton, Ohio

Julie Woeste

Marketing

Education Teacher

Butler Tech/Edgewood High School

Trenton, Ohio


xxii

Jean Getz

Marketing

Education Teacher

Beachwood High School

Beachwood, Ohio

James Wood

Manag
ement/Marketing Program Chair

Cincinnati State
Technical and Community
College

Cincinnati, Ohio

Mindy Hanson

English
Teacher

C
-
TEC
of Licking County

Newark, Ohio

Mollie Yoskey

Mathematics

Teacher

Glen Oak High School

Canton, Ohio

Joanne Henningsen

English
Teacher

Clay High School

Oregon
, Ohio

Ned You
ng

P
rofessor Business and Marketing

Sinclair Community College

Dayton, Ohio



xxiii


PHILOSOPHY AND PRINC
IPLES



Ohio Career Field Initiative


The overarching framework for career
-
technical education in Ohio is outlined in the Ohio
Revised Code and subsequent a
dministrative rules, which specify career
-
technical programming
based on 16 career fields. To view the full text of the rule, go to
www.ode.state.oh.us

and
keyword search:
Ohio Career
-
Technical and Adult Education

Administrative Rules
. These fields
provide the framework for an Ohio career field initiative that seeks to foster the educational shift
needed to respond to the needs of a rapidly changing global environment.


A career field is a “grouping of occupations
and broad industries based on commonalities” (see
www.careerclusters.org
). Career fields are the basis for developing both broad and specialized
technical content standards that serve as a framework for curric
ulum, instruction, assessment and
program design, addressing the needs of an entire industry and business sector. Ohio’s 16 career
fields align with national efforts to broaden career
-
technical education, integrate career
-
technical
education with academic
study and reflect the workforce needs of today and tomorrow. For
today’s students to be adequately prepared for tomorrow’s workforce, they must have an
education that:


1.

incorporates a broad, long
-
term conception of work in combination with the depth
of spe
cialization skills;

Employees need a comprehensive understanding beyond a single occupational area.
Occupationally focused programming needs to be provided in a larger context, so
students can generalize learning, make connections between education and wor
k, and
adapt to changes in their careers. Workplace knowledge and skills are needed to prepare
employees for collaborating and problem solving while contributing to the broader
business process.

2.

emphasizes the acquisition of strong academic knowledge and s
kills; and

Academic skills provide the foundation for career success. The integration of academic
content standards with career field technical content standards helps to contextualize
learning for students, making English language arts, mathematics and so
cial studies
relevant to students as a means to an important end

success at work and in life.

3.

facilitates high school to postsecondary transitions.

A lifetime of change means a lifetime of learning, including postsecondary education.
Students need knowledg
e and skills for success in a variety of postsecondary options,
including industry credentialing through adult education, two
-

and four
-
year college
degree programs and graduate school.



Ohio Career Field Technical Content Standards


Career field technica
l content standards outline the knowledge and skills needed for success
within a career field and multiple pathways. Validated by Ohio business and industry
representatives in conjunction with Ohio educators, these standards are the basis for developing
ed
ucational programming in Ohio secondary and postsecondary schools. The standards also serve

xxiv

as the framework for developing strong career pathways that connect secondary, adult and
postsecondary education systems with the workplace.


While mirroring the di
verse nature of each career field, all career field technical content standards
documents will delineate competencies that outline the knowledge and skills that span the career
field (shared competencies), as well as those that relate to specific career fi
eld pathways (pathway
competencies).

Additionally, academic benchmarks from the
Ohio Academic Content Standards for English
Language Arts, Mathematics
and
Social Studies

are correlated with the career field technical
content standards. The embedded benchma
rks have been determined by business representatives
and academic and technical educators from secondary and postsecondary institutions to be
strongly related to specific knowledge and skill statements or competencies for the given career
field.


Key featu
res of Ohio Career Field Technical Content Standards include:


1.

Broad as well as specialized technical competencies;

2.

Embedded benchmarks for the English Language Arts, Mathematics and Social
Studies Academic Content Standards; and

3.

Workplace readiness compet
encies.

These competencies include communications, customer relations, emotional intelligence
and professional development.



Career Pathways


A key component of the Ohio Career Field Initiative is a career pathway: a series of academic and
technical caree
r
-
focused coursework and other learning experiences leading to a career specialty
and employment in a career field. Pathways facilitate a seamless transition from high school to
postsecondary education (including adult education, two
-

and four
-
year college
s and graduate
school) and from postsecondary education to the workplace.


To effectively facilitate the transition from secondary to postsecondary education and career, high
school career pathways should encompass:


1.

Challenging technical course work in a
chosen career field, based on career field
technical content standards;

2.

Rigorous academics that meet Ohio’s academic content standards and grade
-
level
expectations;

3.

Electives that relate to career objectives;

4.

Instructional enhancements, such as experientia
l and authentic learning opportunities
(e.g., work
-
based learning, mentorships, internships) and career
-
technical student
organization participation;

5.

Opportunities (when appropriate) for program and student certification and licensure;

6.

Preparation for tran
sition to further study that includes college readiness and
opportunities to earn college credit while in high school;


xxv

7.

Preparation for transition to employment with advancement opportunities; and

8.

Performance targets that include both high school academic
and technical testing/exit
requirements and postsecondary entry/placement requirements.



Additional Information


For additional information on the Career Field Initiative, including Ohio Career Field Technical
Content Standards and Career Pathways, go to
www.ode.state.oh.us

and
keyword search:
Ohio
Career Field Initiativ
e
.



xxvi

Structure and Format



The
Marketing Career Field Technical Content Standards

document is composed of a series of
units, competencies and de
scriptors as follows:




Units

are a grouping of competencies sharing a common subject or theme;




Competencies

are specific knowledge and skill statements that outline the knowledge and
skills needed for career success; and




Descriptors

follow each competenc
y and serve to define what is meant by the related
competency.


Also included in the document are selected benchmarks from Ohio’s Academic Content
Standards for English Language Arts, Mathematics and Social Studies that correlate with specific
technical co
mpetencies (except in PALS until revision). This incorporation of academic content
standards with career field technical content standards provides an opportunity for instructional
integration of content, helping to contextualize learning for students and
providing the basis for
collaboration across disciplines.


Competencies that are common across the career field and/or are critical for success in the
marketing career field are referred to as shared competencies. These shared competencies
represent all oc
cupational levels from marketing specialist to management. They serve to provide
a broad view of the career field and facilitate career readiness and long
-
term career success by:




Providing the basis for effective collaboration, teamwork and communication
across
pathways;




Laying the groundwork for successful transfer of knowledge and skills across pathways,
thereby facilitating horizontal and vertical career success; and




Equipping students and workers with the skills needed to transition to new and emergi
ng
careers throughout a working lifetime.


In the marketing document, shared competencies include those focusing on the following:




Business Law



Channel Management



Communication Skills



Customer Relations



Economics



Emotional Intelligence



Entrepreneurship



Fi
nancial Analysis



Marketing Communications



Marketing Information Management



Market Planning



Operations


xxvii



Pricing



Product/Service Management



Professional Development



Selling



Strategic Management



Pathway competencies

are specific to one pathway within the lar
ger career field. They
differentiate the academic, technical and workplace knowledge and skills that are more specific
than those that are relevant to the entire career field, yet they prepare students for multiple
occupational specialties.


The
Marketing
Career Field Technical Content Standards

are built around six pathways:




Integrated Marketing Communications
;



Marketing Management
;



Marketing Research
;



Merchandising
;



Professional Sales/Sales Management
; and



Procurement, Acquisition, Logistics and Supply C
hain Management
.


Three of those pathways


integrated marketing communications
, marketing
management and
procurement, acquisition, logistics and supp
ly chain management (PALS)


can
be implemented
at the secondary level. The remaining three pathways

marke
ting research, merchandising, and
professional sales/sales management



identify

competencies that would be addressed in
postsecondary programs. However, secondary programs can choose to address additional
competencies identified in the postsecondary pathw
ays in this document based on collaborative
decision
-
making with business/industry representatives and postsecondary partners.


Shared and pathway
-
specific competencies form the basis for developing secondary and
postsecondary programs, facilitating transi
tion from one educational level to the next and to the
workplace.


In the
Marketing Career Field Technical Content Standards
, business and labor representatives
have designated competencies as
essential

or
recommended

within specific pathways and
occupatio
nal areas. Educators have designated
when

(by the end of the 12
th

grade and/or associate
degree) and

to what depth

(introduced, reinforced, proficient) competencies should be addressed.
Definitions used to make these designations appear on the following pa
ge, followed by a sample
competency illustrating the layout of an actual competency.


.

xxviii

Definitions and Codes



Importance of Competencies


All of the competencies in this document represent the minimum requirements for a College Tech
Prep program. It is t
he responsibility of the local consortia to further define and/or expand, as
needed, the descriptors for each competency. Each competency must be taught at the Proficient
level (P) by the completion of the College Tech Prep program, which is an Associate D
egree
(AD). A minimal number of competencies have been identified as Introduce (I) at the Associate
Degree level. These may require further higher education.


This document integrates college prep academics with technical skill. Technical skills are a
requ
ired component.



Determined by Business, Industry and Labor Panel (BIL)


Essential (E) Competency

E

= Competency is needed to ensure minimal level of employability. Entry
-
level employees
(defined as graduates of an associate degree program) should be able

to perform this competency
for career success.


Recommended (R) Competency

R

= Competency should be included but is not essential for minimal level of employability or is
related only to a subspecialty within a pathway.



Determined by Educator Panel (EDU
)


Grade Level

10

=

by the end of grade 10

12

=

by the end of grade 12

AD

=

by the end of the associate degree program


Depth

I

=

Introduce the competency

R

=

Reinforce or add depth after introducing a competency, OR

after proficiency

P

=

Proficient or ac
hievement of the competency; ability to apply

knowledge of and/or perform the competency



Determined by Academic Review Panel


As rigorous programs of study, College Tech Prep and Career
-
Technical programs required
academics to be taught at a college pre
paratory level, and contextually within the technical
content. State academic
English language arts, mathematics and social studies

benchmarks are
embedded within the Career Field Technical Content Standards.


xxix

Sample Competency





BIL:

Essential or Recommended


EDU:

10

12

AD


I

P



Competency 1.1:

Acquire information about business laws and regulations to
show command of their

nature and scope.


Descriptors:


1.1.1

Describe legal issues affecting businesses


1.1.2

Describe the nature of legally binding contracts



Business, Industry and
Labor Panel

Competency is essential or
recommended.

Descriptors lead to
competency profi
ciency.

Unit Number

Competency Number

Descriptor Number

Competency should be
introduced

by the end of
12
th

grade with
proficiency

achieved by the end of the
associate degree.


xxx

Marketing Definitions



Marketing and Marketing Education

Educational programs in marketing prepare learners for career opportunities whose activities help
to identify and understand target audience needs or wants; generate target audience demand;
and/or get a good, service, id
ea, or experience to that audience through the execution of
marketing plans. According to the American Marketing Association (2004), “marketing is an
organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating, and delivering value
to custom
ers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and
its stakeholders.” These career pathways include marketing communications, marketing
management, marketing research, merchandising, and professional sales/sales managemen
t.


Integrated Marketing Communications

Educational programs in marketing communications prepare learners for marketing

careers that inform, remind, and/or persuade a target audience. Examples of marketing
communications activities include advertising, di
rect marketing, public relations, sales promotion,
sponsorship, cause marketing, and multimedia marketing communications. Sample occupations
include:

Account Executive
-

Advertising

Account Executive, Sr.
-

Advertising

Advertising Coordinator

Advertising
Manager

Advertising Sales Director

Assistant

Account Executive

Assistant Media Buyer

Associate Account Executive

Director of Client Services

Director of Development

Electronic Marketing Manager

Events/Promotion
s

Coordinator

Exhibit Display Coordinator

Exhibit Display Manager

Field Marketing Manager/Director

Field Marketing Specialist

Marketing Communication Manager

Media Buyer

Media Coordinator

Media Director

Media Planner

Media Supervisor

Packag
e Design Manager

Public Relations Director

Public Relations Manager

Public Relations Specialist

Sales Promotions Manager

Sales Promotions Coordinator

Trade Show Manager

Marketing Management

Educational programs in marketing management prepare learners for

careers requiring broad,
cross
-
functional knowledge of marketing and management. These functions include sup
ply
-
chain
management, marketing
information management, pricing, product/service manag
ement,
marketing communications

and selling. Sample occupatio
ns include:

Brand Ambassador

Chief Marketing Officer

Marketing Director

Marketing Manager

Marketing Specialist

Product/Brand Manager

Relationship Manager



xxxi

Marketing Research

Educational programs in marketing research prepare learners for marketing caree
rs that utilize
qualitative and quantitative research methods to interpret information to
provide insights and to
help

determine and measure ma
rketing trends, problems, needs

and issues. This includes the
ability to design data
-
collection processes, collec
t data, analyze data, and present data to be used
to make business decisions. Sample occupations include:

Assistant Market Analyst

Assistant Product Analyst

Competitive Intelligence Specialist

Customer
-
Insights Specialist

Market Research Interviewers

Mark
eting Research Analyst

Marketing Research Director

Marketing Research Manager

Marketing Research Supervisor

Primary Data Analyst

Secondary Data Analyst

Trends Specialist


Merchandising

Educational programs in merchandising prepare learners for careers in

retailing that focus on
efficient and effective product planning, product selection, buying, licensing, and inventory
control. Sample occupations include:

Associate Buyer

Buyer

Buyer Trainee

General Merchandise Divisional
Manager

Merchandise Allocator

Me
rchandise Manager

Merchandiser

Merchandise Planner

Merchandising Assistant

Merchandising Coordinator

Professional Sales/Sales Management

Educational programs in professional sales/sales management prepare learners for careers in
businesses that offer serv
ices, equipment, machines, supplies, parts, and finished goods to other
businesses to use for business operations, for the manufacture of other products, for samples
passed on to others, or for resale to others. These occupations require in
-
depth knowledge

of the
target customer
,

such as the customer’s needs, business, competitors, and products; pre
-
sales
activities; sales processes and techniques; and servicing after the sale. Sample occupations
include:

Account Manager

Broker

Director of Sales

District S
ales Manager

Industrial Sales Agent

Marketing Sales Consultant

National Sales Manager

Regional Sales Manager

Sales Agent

Sales Engineer

Sales Executive

Sales Representative

Territorial Sales Manager

Vice President of Sales/Marketing

Manufacturer’s Represe
ntative



Procurement, Acquisition, Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Definitions


The Procurement, Acquisition, Logistics and Supply Chain Management industry continues to
evolve
,

and as it does, new terms and definitions emerge. As a result, the ind
ustry does not yet
have one standard definition that the Ohio Business Review panels could identify. The panels
recommended that the industry title include the four areas of procurement, acquisition, logistics
and supply chain management
,

and that this doc
ument reference various views of the industry.
Listed below are four definitions from national associations and government agencies. These

xxxii

definitions serve, as a group, to provide definition for this career area. This document covers all
essential compete
ncies across all areas of this industry.


Four Definitions


“The
supply chain

a term commonly used internationally

encompasses every effort involved
in producing and delivering a final product or service, from the supplier’s supplier to the
customer’s cust
omer. Supply Chain Management includes managing supply and demand,
sourcing raw materials and parts, manufacturing and assembly, warehousing and inventory
tracking, order entry and order management, distribution across all channels, and delivery to the
cus
tomer.”

The Supply
-
Chain Council

(www.supply
-
chain.org)




Logistics

is the part of the supply chain process that plans, implements, and controls the
efficient, effective forward and reverse flow and storage of goods, services, and related
information betw
een the point of origin and the point of consumption in order to meet customers’
requirements.”

The Council of Logistics Management

(www.clml.org)



“The Government realm of
acquisition

includes not only the act of acquiring, but also any
development effor
t necessary to design an item, the actual production process, getting the item to
the troops in the field, and ensuring that the items can be operated and maintained in the field.
Acquisition begins at the point when agency needs are established and includ
es the description of
requirements to satisfy agency needs, solicitation and selection of sources, award of contracts,
contract financing, contract performance, contract administration, and those technical and
management functions directly related to the p
rocess of fulfilling agency needs by contract.”

Defense Acquisition University

(www.dau.mil)


“The
official ISM definition of supply management is the
identification, a
cquisition, access,
positioning

and management of resources the organization needs or po
tentially needs in the
attainment of its strategic objectives.”

Institute for Supply Management

Formerly called the National Association of Purchasing Management

(
www.napm.org
)


Account Director




Integrated Logistics
Planner

Claims Associate




Inventory Control Manager

Purchasing Analyst




Warehouse Operations Supervisor

Contract Specialist




Customer Service Manager

Operations Supervisor




Traffic Manager

Expedited Cargo Sales




Distribution Area Manager

Product
Manager

Tracing and Tracking

Import/Export Analyst

Materials Manager




Supply Chain Engineer

Order Fulfillment Supervisor



International Logistics Specialist


xxxiii

Marketing Instructional Units


Page

Unit

#

Unit

1


MARKETING CAREER FIELD SHARED COMPETENCIES

2

1

Business Law

7

2

Communication Skills

12

3

Customer Relations

14

4

Economics

22

5

Emotional Intelligence

27

6

Entrepreneurship

32

7

Financial Analysis

39

8

Human Resources Management

43

9

Information Management

55

10

Marketing

57

11

Operatio
ns

63

12

Professional Development

68

13

Strategic Management

70

14

Channel Management

71

15

Distribution

74

16

Marketing Information Management

81

17

Market Planning

84

18

Pricing

85

19

Product/Service Management

88

20

Marketing Communications

93

21

Selling

107


MARKETING MANAGEMENT PATHWAY

108

22

Financial Analysis

110

23

Human Resources Management

111

24

Information Management

112

25

Operations

114

26

Professional Development

115

27

Strategic Management

116

28

Channel Management

118

29

Marketing
-
Information Management


xxxiv

Page

Unit

#

Unit



MARKETING MANAGEMENT PATHWAY

(CONT’D)

123

30

Pricing

125

31

Product/Service Management

129

32

Marketing Communications

132

33

Selling

133


INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS PATHWAY

134

34

Business Law

135

35

Com
munication Skills

137

36

Emotional Intelligence

139

37

Financial Analysis

141

38

Human Resources Management

142

39

Information Management

144

40

Marketing

145

41

Operations

148

42

Professional Development

150

43

Marketing
-
Information Management

15
3

44

Market Planning

154

45

Pricing

156

46

Product/Service Management

158

47

Marketing Communications

170

48

Selling

172


PROFESSIONAL SALES/SALES MANAGEMENT PATHWAY

173

49

Professional Development

174

50

Selling

178


MERCHANDISING PATHWAY

180

51

Information Management

181

52

Operations

182

53

Distribution

185

54

Marketing
-
Information Management

187

55

Pricing

189

56

Product/Service Management

192

57

Marketing Communications

194

58

Selling


xxxv

Page

Unit

#

Unit

195


MARKETING RESEARCH PATHWAY

196

59

Human Resou
rces Management

197

60

Operations

198

61

Professional Development

199

62

Strategic Management

200

63

Marketing
Information Management

PALS

TCP

Units 1
-
25

PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN
MANAGEMENT
(PALS)
TECHNICAL COMPETENCY PROFI
LE

PATHWAY
(to be revised with academic standard embedding)


xxxvi

Marketing Competency Chart



At the end of the secondary program (12) and associate degree (AD) each competency is coded:

I = Introductory; P = Proficient; R = Reinforce. In addition, the busine
ss, industry, and labor
(BIL) partnership
validated each competency: BIL:
E = Essential; R = Recommended



Marketing Career Field Shared Competencies


Competency

10

12

AD

BIL

Unit 1: Business Law





1.1

Acquire information about business laws and regul
ations to
show command of their nature and scope.


P

R

R

1.2

Explain the civil foundations
for

the legal environment of
business.


P

R

E

1.3

Explore the regulatory environment of United States’
扵獩n敳s敳K


I

P

R

1.4

Describe types of business ownership
.

P

R

R

R

1.5

Select
a
form of business ownership.

I

R

P

R

1.6

Acquire knowledge of commerce laws and regulations to
continue business operations.


I

P

R

1.7

Explain human

resources laws and regulations to facilitate
business operations.


I

P

E

1.8

Exp
lain tax laws and regulations to adhere to government
requirements.



I

R

1.9

Comply with laws and regulations to continue business
operations.



I

R

Unit 2: Communication Skills





2.1

Read to acquire meaning from written material and to apply
the inf
ormation to a task.

P

R

R

E

2.2

Apply active listening skills to demonstrate understanding of
what is being said.

P

R

R

E

2.3

Apply verbal skills to obtain and convey information.

P

R

R

E

2.4

Record information to maintain and present a report of
busine
ss activity.

I

R

P

E

2.5

Write internal and external business correspondence to obtain
and convey information effectively.

I

P

R

E

2.6

Prepare complex written reports.

P

R

R

E

2.7

Communicate with co
-
workers and supervisors to clarify
workplace objectiv
es.


P

R

E

2.8

Communicate with employees to clarify their duties and
responsibilities.


I

P

E

Unit 3: Customer Relations





3.1

Foster positive relationships with customers to enhance
company image.

P

R

R

E

3.2

Respond appropriately to customers
to foster positive
relationships.

P

R

R

E

3.3

Resolve conflicts with

and
for customers to encourage repeat
business.

P

R

R

E


xxxvii

Competency

10

12

AD

BIL

3.4

Reinforce the company’s image to exhibit the company’s
brand promise.

P

R

R

E

3.5

Explain management's role in customer rela
tions.

I

P

R

E

Unit 4:

Economics





4.1

Explain fundamental economic concepts to obtain a foundation
for employment in business.

P

R

R

R

4.2

Discuss the interactions of supply, demand and price.

P

R

R

E

4.3

Describe the nature of business to show its
contributions to
society.

P

R

R

E

4.4

Differentiate among economic systems to understand the
environments in which businesses function.

P

R

R

E

4.5

Discuss the impact of government on business activities to
make informed economic decisions.


I

P

R

4.6

D
iscuss productivity to understand its impact on business
decision

making

I

P

R

E

4.7

Analyze cost/profit relationships to guide business decision

making.


P

R

R

4.8

Explain economic indicators to measure economic trends and
conditions.

P

R

R

R

4.9

Deter
mine global trade’s impact on business decision
-
making.

P

R

R

E

4.10

Identify the effects of global trade on retailing.

I

P

R

E

4.11

Describe the evolution of retailing to demonstrate knowledge
of the retail environment.

I

P

R

R

Unit 5: Emotional Intell
igence





5.1

Foster self
-
understanding to recognize the impact of personal
feelings on others.

P

R

R

E

5.2

Develop personal traits to foster career advancement.

P

R

R

E

5.3

Apply ethics to demonstrate trustworthiness in working with
others.

P

R

R

E

5
.4

Exhibit techniques to manage emotional reactions to people
and situations.

P

R

R

E

5.5

Identify with others’ feelings, needs and concerns to enhance
interpersonal relations.

P

R

R

E

5.6

Use communication skills to foster open, honest
communications.

I

R

P

E

5.7

Use communication skills to influence others’ point of view.

I

P

R

E

5.8

Apply problem

solving techniques to obtain solutions to issues

and
questions.

I

R

P

E

5.9

Manage stressful situations to minimize negative workplace
situations.

I

R

P

E

5.10

Implement teamwork techniques to accomplish goals.

I

P

R

E

5.11

Employ leadership skills to achieve workplace objectives.

P

R

R

E

5.12

Manage internal and external business relationships to foster
positive interactions.

I

P

R

E

Unit 6: Entrepreneu
rship





6.1

Employ entrepreneurial discovery strategies to generate
feasible ideas for business ventures.


I

P

E

6.2

Develop
a
concept for
a
new business venture to evaluate its
success potential.


I

P

E


xxxviii

Competency

10

12

AD

BIL

6.3

Determine needed resources for a new busine
ss venture to
contribute to its start
-
up viability.


I

P

E

6.4

Explain considerations in launching
a
new business venture to
generate profit and/or meet objectives.


I

P

E

6.5

Select harvesting strategies to identify
the
entrepreneur’s role
in the busine
ss venture.


I

P

E

Unit 7: Financial Analysis





7.1

Describe the fundamental principles of money needed to make
financial exchanges.

P

R

R

E

7.2

Analyze financial needs and goals to determine financial
requirements.

P

R

R

E

7.3

Manage personal financ
es to achieve financial goals.

P

R

R

E

7.4

Explain the use of financial

services providers to aid in