Melanie Kieffer

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Melanie Kieffer

Marketing 6000

Professor Wayne Roberts

5/24/05




Annotated Bibliography

Marketing the Arts

THEATRE



1)
Barnes, Brooks
.
“To Push
Musicals, Producer Shakes Up Broadway Tactics.”

Wall Street Journal
-

Eastern Edition
;

3/10/2005
, Vol. 245 Issue 48, pA1, 0p, 2bw


Profiles Jeffery B. Seller and Kevin McCollum who are shaking up Broadway with their
aggressive efforts to fill
theater

seats and allegedly buy Tony Awards. How they started a
policy of offering a limited number of $20 fr
ont
-
row tickets to attract a younger crowd;
His insertions of ads into the set of "La Boheme"; Experiments with the airline
-
style
pricing of
theater

seats; Belief of some that they won the Tony award for best musical for
"Avenue Q" after giving parties, gi
fts and advertising to the voters;
Marketing

which is
vital to the ailing Broadway economy where attendance has been stagnant; Critics who
hate to see change and think the
marketing

efforts are tacky.



2)
Green, Jesse
. “
Broadway's Society Of Repeat Attenders.


New York Times
;
2/13/2005, Vol. 154 Iss
ue 53124, Section 2 p1, 0p, 1c, 3bw


Focuses on young fans who repeatedly attend shows such as "Brooklyn the Musical" at
the Plymouth
Theater
.

The attraction of Broadway
theater

to youthful audiences; Views
of fans Bowlegged Lou, Ashley Pines, Susan Van Pr
aag, and Dan Yoffe; Comments from
actor Eden Espinosa, writer Mark Schoenfeld, and webmaster Damian Bazadona; How
these young fans with discretionary money are an audience segment being targeted by the
shows' marketers; Other shows that have repeat attende
rs.


http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16060044




3)
Joseph V. Melillo
.
Market the arts!


Rev.
ed., 1995 / edited by Patricia Lavender.

194
p.

Originally published by FEDAPT, Foundation for the Extension and Development of the
American Professional Theatre, 1983.



Marketing the performing arts: a personal view / Patricia Cox
--

Relationship buildin
g in
your community / Ruby Lerner
--

Audiences / Robert Schlosser
--

The marketing plan
and a plan for planning / Douglas Eichten
--

The marketing mix / Michael W. House
--

Making the marketing plan and mix work / Michalann Hobson
--

Financial needs in
mar
keting / Cora Cahan and Elizabeth Cashour
--

Computers and test marketing / Charles
Ziff
--

Essentials of effective public relations / Bill Rudman
--

Design promotional

materials that work / David J. Skal. Production: working with an agency / Michael
Prewi
tt
--

Media: print and electronic / Harry Clark
--

Telephone campaigns / Mark
Arnold
--

Theatre: a case history (McCarter Theater Company) / Linda Kinsey
--

Opera:
the people's theater (Minnesota O
pera) / Edward Corn
--

Music: p
r
o
duct, market, media,
messa
ge (The Cleveland Orchestra) / David Levenson
--

Dance: management, marketing,
and schizophrenia (Paul Taylor Dance Company) / Robert Yesselam
--

Ballet and the art
of marketing (The Hartford Ballet) / John Simone
--

Touring / Rena Shagan.

Performing arts
centers (Arvada Center for the Arts) / Frank J
acobson
--

Sponsors and
presente
rs: community groups (Cultural Resources Council of Syracuse and Onondaga
County) / Joseph Golden.

Sponsors and presente
rs: community groups (Cultural Resources Council of Syracu
se and
Onondaga County) / Joseph Golden.




4)

There’s No Place Like Home
.


Fortune
;

5/16/2005, Vol. 151 Issue 10, p210, 1p


Comments on product placement in Broadway s
hows. The author's distaste for the
marketing

strategy, despite its effectiveness; Discussion of the author's views on cultural
commercialization; The allure of branded products; Idea that people no longer care how
invasive advertising is.



5)
Putler, Dan
iel S.

Lele,
Shilp
.


An Easily Implemented Framework for Forecasting
Ticket Sales to Performing Arts Events.


Marketing Letters
; Dec2003, Vol. 14 Issue
4, p307, 14p



This paper presents an easily used framework for modeling ticket sales to performing
arts and entertainmen
t events. Unlike existing efforts in this area, our framework allows
us to: (1) model demand for events that consist of more than a single performance; (2)
account for the influence of promotional effort on ticket sales; and (3) account for
"sellouts" of s
ome performances. The framework is applied to ticket sales for a university
theater

company, where it predicts ticket sales well in both an estimation and holdout
sample. We discuss how the framework has influenced the company's
marketing

decisions. [
ABSTR
ACT FROM AUTHOR
]




6)
Snyder, Diane
.

Getting with the program: Raising funds with program...


Back
Stage
;

12/8/95, Vol. 36 Issue 49, p3, 2p


Reports that performers and performing arts companies are now using their shows'
program to tap into a potential source of funding. Difficulties i
n finding willing
advertisers for a program; Success of the Pearl
Theatre

Company in attracting restaurant
advertisers; Cabaret singer Jeff Harnar's
marketing

strategies
;
Off
-
Off
-
Broadway's
Lightning Strikes
Theatre

Company's

marketing

strategies
.


http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&an=9512271791




7)
Wernick, Ilana
.

Off
-
B'way Pulls Out the Stops to Attract A
udiences.


Back Stage
;
1/13/95, Vol. 36 Issue 2, p3, 2p


Reports on the
mar
keting

strategies

by Off
-
Broadway
theater

companies. Collaboration
for a ticket stub exchange program; Free advertising for participating companies; Waiver
of cover charges for night performances.


http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&an=9502021879





8)

Horlick, Geoffrey R.
,
Hise, Richard
.

Investing In Broadway
.


Business Horizons
;

Feb80, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p19, 9p, 1 chart, 2 diagrams


Focuses on the invest
ments made by investors in Broadway productions in New York
City. Factors attracting investors to Broadway; Method for reducing the risks of failure of
a Broadway production;
Marketing

strategies

for the plays.


http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&an=4530742





9)
Dietl, Dick
.


Not the World as it

is...the world as it should be
.


J
ournal of
Rehabilitation
;

Oct
-
Dec82, Vol. 48 Issue 4, 2bw


Highlights the Kids on t
he Block, a puppet show participated by handicapped children in
Virginia. Production of the puppet show; Characteristics portrayed by the puppets;
Marketing

strategies

of the show. INSET: Everybody is somebody with the Kids on the
Block


http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=5016399



10)
George, Liann
e
.
“Is Kiefer Sutherland Trying To Sell You Something.


Maclean's
; 2/21/2005, Vol. 118 Issue 8, p30, 6p, 7c

This article focuses on product placement within tele
vision programs and the extent to
which programs are controlled by companies that sponsor them. If there's one TV
character you want on your side in the event of a national security threat, it's Jack Bauer,
chief terrorist thwarter on the hit Fox series 24
. Played with cool efficiency by Canadian
Kiefer Sutherland, Bauer is the kind of guy who can crack computer codes, infiltrate
criminal rings and avert nuclear devastation faster than most people can make a
sandwich. By any definition, he's an all
-
American

hero. Naturally, he drives a Ford.
That's because, after the first season of 24 emerged as a sleeper hit, the Ford Motor Co.
signed a multi
-
million
-
dollar advertising deal with Fox
--

the most far
-
reaching of its
kind at the time
--

to secure a piece of B
auer's cred for its brand. Ford only enforces one
hard rule: no bad guys driving Fords. In some ways, Ford's arrangement with 24 seems
old hat. Product placement has been around in television since the '40s, when advertisers
bought entire time slots for br
anded shows like The Texaco Star
Theater
.
More recently,
we've become accustomed to seeing familiar brands littered throughout TV families'
kitchens and living rooms to add realism to the set. But increasingly, embedded
advertising
--

or "product integrati
on"
--

is becoming fundamental to how TV programs
are conceived and produced. In a recent interview, CBS chairman Les Moonves predicted
that within three or four TV seasons, up to 75 per cent of all scripted, prime
-
time network
shows will star products or
services paid for by advertisers. As a result, the branded
entertainment industry, which barely existed a few years ago, is booming. The key to
making such partnerships between advertisers and television programs work, especially
in scripted shows, is to k
eep the embedded ads believable and seamless.


http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16133466