Use Cases and application scenarios for independent living applications

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D2.1.1

Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


1


OASIS


Open architecture for Accessible


Services Integration and Standardization

GRANT AGREEMENT # 215754


Use Cases and application scenarios for
independent living applications


Deliverable No.

D2.1.1

SubProject No.

SP2

SubProject Title

Ind
ependent living
applications

Workpackage No.

WP2.1

Workpackage Title

Benchmarking,
application scenarios and
use cases on Elderly
independent living

Activity No.

A2.1.
1
-
A2.1.3

Activity Title

Technological
Benchmarking on
Independent Living
applications

User experience
modelling

Use Cases and
application scenarios

Authors (per company, if more
than one company provide it together)

Silvio Bonfiglio (PHILIPS), Evangelos Bekiaris,
Mary Panou(CERTH/HIT), Mª Pilar Sala, Juan Bautista
Mocholí Agües (ITACA), Ma
ría García Robledo
(SIEMENS), Karel Van Isacker (MCA), Mª Fernanda
Cabrera, Viveca Jiménez Mixco (LST
-
UPM), Cristina
de la Maza (INNOVALIA), Benjamin Staehli
(Conncept
-
Swiss)

Status (F: final; D: draft; RD:
D




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D2.1.1

Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


2

revised draft):

File Name:

OASIS Deliverable
D2_1_1
.doc

Project start date and duration

01 January 2008, 48 Months





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D2.1.1

Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


3

Document History


Version

Date

Comments

Author

1.0

24.09.08

Use cases descriptions

ITACA, PHILIPS,
SIEMENS,
CONNCEPT SWISS,
INNOVALIA, LST
-
UPM, CERTH/HIT

1.1

02.10.08

Review and c
omments

MCA

1.2

05.11.08

New use cases definitions.
Comments to the previous
version added

LST
-
UPM

1.3

29.12.08

Use cases descriptions and UMLs
diagrams

ITACA, PHILIPS,
SIEMENS,
INNOVALIA, LST
-
UPM, CERTH/HIT

1.3

30.12.08

Section “Overview of the SP2
UC
s in terms of users interests
added”

LST
-
UPM

1.4

23.01.09

Review and comments

MCA

1
.5

01.02.09

Draft version of D2.1.1

LST
-
UPM

2.0

05.03.09

Results from Local User Forums
added.

MCA, LST
-
UPM





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D2.1.1

Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


4


Table of
Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
................................
................................
........................

12

1.
-

INTRODUCTION

................................
................................
........................

13

2.
-

BENCHMARKI NG

................................
................................
......................

14

2.1.
-

Methodology
................................
................................
...........................

14

2.2.
-

Structure of the database

................................
................................
........

15

2.3.
-

Search possibilities

................................
................................
.................

16

2.4.
-

Results
................................
................................
................................
...

17

3.
-

USER MODELLING

................................
................................
...................

18

3.1.
-

Independent Li ving applicatio
ns survey

................................
....................

19

3.1.1.
-

Age, gender, educati on and other information on the participants
.......

19

3.1.2.
-

Intervi ews to the primary users
, the elderly

................................
.......

20

3.1.2.1.
-

Attitude towards ageing
................................
...............................

20

3.1.2.2.
-

Familiarity with technology

................................
..........................

21

3.1.2.3.
-

The social net work of the el derly
................................
..................

22

3.1.2.4.
-

The elderly and thei r care to health and wellbeing
.........................

24

3.1.2.5.
-

The elderly and thei r interaction with the domestic environment
.....

28

3.1.2.6.
-

The elderly and the work

................................
.............................

29

3.1.2.7.
-

Elderly and a continuous learni ng

................................
................

31

3.1.3.
-

Intervi ews to the caregi vers

................................
.............................

31

3.1.3.1.
-

Attitude of the el derly toward
s the ageing

................................
.....

32

3.1.3.2.
-

The role of ICT

................................
................................
...........

34

3.1.3.3.
-

The elderly and the work

................................
.............................

38

3.1.3.4.
-

The “agei ng population problem” and the Institutions

....................

39

3.2.
-

Summary of User requi rements

................................
...............................

40

4.
-

O
VERVIEW OF THE SP2 U
CS IN TERMS OF USERS

INTERESTS

.............

42

5.
-

SP2 USE CASES AND AP
PLICATION SCENARIOS
................................
...

49

5.1.
-

Use Cases defi nitions

................................
................................
.............

49

5.2.
-

Methodology
................................
................................
...........................

50

5.3.
-

Use cases prioritization

................................
................................
...........

50

5.4.
-

Use Cases clustering

................................
................................
..............

51

5.5.
-

Use cases generic diagrams
................................
................................
....

54

5.6.
-

Use Cases analytical descriptions

................................
............................

59

5.6.1.
-

Category 1: Nutritional advisor

................................
.........................

59

5.6.1.1.
-

Nutritional profile defi nition & personalization
................................

59

SP2
-
1.

Create a nutritional habits profile, collect info explicitly
.................

59

SP2
-
2.

Create a nutritional habits profile, collect info implicitly
.................

60




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D2.1.1

Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


5

SP2
-
3.

Managing questionnaires
................................
...........................

62

5.6.1.2.
-

Nutritional Plan builder

................................
................................

64

SP2
-
4.

Create a nutrition
al plan

................................
............................

64

SP2
-
5.

Edit a nutritional plan
................................
................................
.

66

SP2
-
6.

Accessing to the nutritional plan

................................
.................

68

5.6.1.3.
-

Nutritional Empowerment & assessment

................................
......

70

SP2
-
7.

Nutritional coachi ng
................................
................................
...

70

SP2
-
8.

Manage Messages
................................
................................
....

72

5.6.1.4.
-

Shopping and cooking assistant

................................
..................

74

SP2
-
9.

Generati ng the Shopping list

................................
......................

74

SP2
-
10.

Accessing to the Shoppi ng List

................................
................

76

SP2
-
11.

Going shopping


1 buying by himself

................................
......

77

SP2
-
12.

Going s
hopping


2 buying via e
-
commerce
..............................

79

SP2
-
13.

Going shopping


3 an assistant buys

................................
......

81

SP2
-
14.

Updating the shopping list

................................
.......................

82

SP2
-
15.

Guide to cook a recipe
................................
.............................

84

5.6.2.
-

Category 2: Acti vity Coach

................................
..............................

86

5.6.2.1.
-

Activity monitori ng multisensory system

................................
.......

86

SP2
-
16.

Activity monitori ng from sensors
................................
...............

86

5.6.2.2.
-

Activity character
ization

................................
..............................

88

SP2
-
17.

Recognition of movements

................................
......................

88

SP2
-
18.

Characterization of the acti vity

................................
.................

90

5.6.2.3.
-

Activity
Management

................................
................................
..

93

SP2
-
19.

Consultation of the user acti vity profile
................................
......

93

SP2
-
20.

Charact
erization of user status
................................
.................

95

SP2
-
21.

Exercising for overall wellbei ng and better quality of life
.............

97

SP2
-
22.

Coaching/training for

di abet es and/or CVD

..............................
102

5.6.2.4.
-

Rehabilitation support system
................................
.....................
107

SP2
-
23.

Monitorisation of physical exercise

................................
..........
107

SP2
-
24.

Coaching for rehabilitati on

................................
......................
109

5.6.2.5.
-

Fall and other accidents detection
................................
...............
113

SP2
-
25.

Fall prevention and detection

................................
..................
113

SP2
-
26.

Feedback to the user
................................
..............................
116

SP2
-
27.

Feedback to the medical centre

................................
..............
118

SP2
-
28.

Warning

................................
................................
................
119

5.6.3.
-

Category 3: Brai n and skills trainer
................................
..................
122

5.6.3.1.
-

Specific cogniti ve trai ning exercises and acti vities
........................
122

SP2
-
29.

Memory and mental exercises

................................
................
122

SP2
-
30.

Trai
ni ng pl an
................................
................................
..........
126




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Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


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5.6.3.2.
-

Stress Management
exercises
................................
....................
128

SP2
-
31.

Measurement of stress level

................................
...................
128

SP2
-
32.

Stress reduction exercises

................................
......................
131

SP2
-
33.

Education for stress management

................................
...........
133

5.6.3.3.
-

Dai
ly acti vities simulation

................................
...........................
135

SP2
-
34.

Improving skills in daily activities (preparing the meal hopping,
transport and buying tickets)

................................
................................
............
135

SP2
-
35.

Traini ng reminder
................................
................................
...
138

5.6.4.
-

Category 4: Social communities platform

................................
.........
140

5.6.4.1.
-

Enhanced Web Experience

................................
........................
140

SP2
-
36.

Experience and compet ence sharing
................................
.......
140

SP2
-
37.

Feeling secure (Collecti ve security feeli ng)

..............................
142

5.6.4.2.
-

Collaborati ve Web Experience
................................
....................
144

SP2
-
38.

Personal behaviour extraction

................................
.................
144

SP2
-
39.

Matching behavi our

................................
................................
146

SP2
-
40.

Alarm in case of no match or strange behavioural pattern

.........
148

5.6.4.3.
-

E
-
learning and Infota
inment Environments

................................
..
150

SP2
-
41.

Connected family and friends
................................
..................
150

SP2
-
42.

Travelling partner

................................
................................
...
152

5.6.4.4.
-

Recreation for the el derly

................................
...........................
154

SP2
-
43.

Leisure and social acti vity co
-
creation

................................
.....
154

5.6
.5.
-

Category 5: Health monitori ng

................................
........................
158

5.6.5.1.
-

Healt h profil e definition and personalisation
................................
.
158

SP2
-
44.

Create the health pro
file implicitly

................................
............
158

SP2
-
45.

Create the health profile explicitly

................................
............
160

SP2
-
46.

Healt h profil e input by the medical doctor

................................
162

5.6.5.2.
-

Healt h remote monit oring

................................
...........................
164

SP2
-
47.

Recording acti vity
................................
................................
...
164

SP2
-
48.

Vital signs monitoring (body temperature, pulse rate, respiration
rate, blood pressure…)

................................
................................
....................
166

5.6.5.3.
-

Healt h Coach

................................
................................
............
169

SP2
-
49.

Your physician on line

................................
............................
169

SP2
-
50.

Medication manager
................................
...............................
171

SP2
-
51.

On demand information service
................................
...............
174

SP2
-
52.

Healt h coach

................................
................................
.........
176

SP2
-
53.

Planni ng acti vity

................................
................................
.....
178

5.6.5.4.
-

Alerting and assi
sting applications

................................
..............
180

SP2
-
54.

Alerting and assisting the user

................................
................
180

SP2
-
55.

Alerting the medical doctor

................................
.....................
183




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Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
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G.A. 215754


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SP2
-
56.

Alerting the relati ves
................................
...............................
185

5.6.6.
-

Category 6: Environmental control

................................
..................
187

5.6.
6.1.
-

In
-
door user localisation

................................
.............................
187

SP2
-
57.

Automatically detect the user in the house and his/her exact
position

187

5.6.6.2.
-

Environmental cont rol applications
................................
..............
190

SP2
-
58.

Check the status of home appli ances

................................
......
190

SP2
-
59.

Change the status of home applian
ces

................................
....
192

5.6.6.3.
-

Intelli gent home Management

................................
....................
194

SP2
-
60.

Monitoring and automatically change of the status of home devices

194

5.6.7.
-

Cross SP use cases
................................
................................
.......
197

6.
-

USER FORUMS

................................
................................
........................
198

6.1.
-

Methodo
logy
................................
................................
..........................
198

6.2.
-

User forum feedback
................................
................................
..............
199

6.2.1.
-

Belgium
................................
................................
.........................
199

6.2.1
.1.
-

Nutritional Advisor

................................
................................
.....
199

6.2.1.2.
-

Activity Coach

................................
................................
...........
199

6.2.1.3.
-

Brain and skills trainer
................................
................................
200

6.2.1.4.
-

Social Communities Platform
................................
......................
200

6.2.1.5.
-

Healt h Monitoring

................................
................................
......
201

6.2.1.6.
-

Environment
al Cont rol

................................
...............................
201

6.2.2.
-

Comparati ve results from local user forums

................................
.....
202

6.2.2.1.
-

Nutritional Advisor

................................
................................
.....
202

6.2.2.2.
-

Activity coach

................................
................................
............
203

6.2.2.3.
-

Brain and skills trainer
................................
................................
203

6.2.2.4.
-

Social com
munities plat form
................................
.......................
204

6.2.2.5.
-

Healt h monitoring

................................
................................
......
204

6.2.2.6.
-

Environmental cont rol

................................
................................
205

6.2.3.
-

Concl usions

................................
................................
..................
206

7.
-

CONCLUSION

................................
................................
..........................
207

8.
-

REFERENCES

................................
................................
..........................
208

ANNEX 1: BENCHMARKI N
G TEMPLATE

................................
............................
209

ANNEX 2: DATABASE MA
NUAL

................................
................................
.........
214

ANNEX 3: SP2 UCS TEM
PLATE

................................
................................
..........
215





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D2.1.1

Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
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G.A. 215754


8

List of figures

Figure 1.

Structure of OASIS database
................................
...........................

15

Figure 2.

Database entry form
-

selection of Area
................................
.............

16

Figure 3.

Distribution of entri es per type and per domai n

................................
.

17

Figure 4.

Age of the intervi ewed el derly

................................
..........................

19

Figure 5.

Education level

................................
................................
...............

19

Figure 6.

Marital status

................................
................................
..................

20

Figure 7.

Approach towards th
e ageing

................................
..........................

20

Figure 8.

Approach to the agei ng per country of origi n
................................
.....

21

Figure 9.

Use of main ICT devices/applications per countr
y

............................

21

Figure 10.

Probl ems in using the PC

................................
................................

22

Figure 11.

Loneliness perception in the el derly (per country)
..............................

22

Figure 12.

Elderly and socialization (per country)

................................
..............

23

Figure 13.

“Virtual community” experience (per country)

................................
....

23

Figure 14.

Elderly and the percepti on of their physical status

.............................

24

Figure 15.

Elderly and the percepti on of their mental status

...............................

24

Figure 16.

Concern for the worsening of the health status (per country)
.............

25

Figure 17.

Check of the blood pressure (per country)

................................
........

25

Figure 18.

Check of the body’s weight (per count ry)

................................
..........

26

Figure 19.

Frequency in visiting the family doctor (per country)

..........................

26

Figure 20.

Healt h and lifestyle (opinions of the elderly per country)

....................

27

Figure 21.

Physical exercises per country
................................
.........................

27

Figure 22.

Willingness to subscribe health
-
rel ated services per country

..............

28

Figure 23.

The interaction with the domestic envi ronment
................................
..

28

Figure 24.

Intervi ewed el derly still working (per country)

................................
...

29

Figure 25.

Intervi ewed ol der adults willing to continue to work (per country)
........

2
9

Figure 26.

Interest in tele
-
working (per country)

................................
................

30

Figure 27.

Interest to a “on
-
line collaborati ve proj ect” (per count ry)

....................

30

Figure 28.

Interest to remot e learning per country

................................
.............

31

Figure 29.

Preferred disciplines (per country)
................................
....................

31

Figure 30.

Intervi ewed caregi vers per country
................................
...................

32

Figure 31.

Top six concerns for the el derly (per count ry)

................................
...

33

Figure 32.

Approach to the agei ng (per country)

................................
...............

33

Figure 33.

Approach to the agei ng (per country)

................................
...............

34

Figure 34.

Where ICT can
hel p (answers per country)

................................
.......

35

Figure 35.

Main concerns of the elderly and ICT effecti veness
...........................

35

Figure 36.

Impact of ICT per coun
try

................................
................................

36

Figure 37.

Impact of ICT per country

................................
................................

36




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Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
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Figure 38.

Top 6 ICT services (per country)

................................
......................

37

Figure 39.

Top six barri ers in the uses of ICT by elderly

................................
....

38

Figure 40.

Elderly and work (per country)

................................
.........................

39

Figure 41.

User needs
................................
................................
.....................

40

Figure 42.

A model of segmentation of the older popul ation

...............................

41

Figure 43.

Nutritional Advisor ge
neric Representation Di agram
..........................

55

Figure 44.

Activity Coach generic Representation Di agram
................................

56

Figure 45.

Brain and Skills Trainer
generic Representation Diagram

..................

56

Figure 46.

Social Communities Platform generic Representation Di agram

..........

57

Figure 47.

Healt h mon
itoring generic Representation Diagram
...........................

57

Figure 48.

Environmental Cont rol generic Representation Diagram
....................

58

Figure 49.

SP2
-
1 Re
presentation di agram

................................
........................

60

Figure 50.

SP2
-
2 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

62

Figure 51.

SP2
-
3 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

64

Figure 52.

SP2
-
4 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

66

Figure 53.

SP2
-
5 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

68

Figure 54.

SP2
-
6 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

70

Figure 55.

SP2
-
7 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

72

Figure 56.

SP2
-
8 Representation Diagra
m

................................
.......................

74

Figure 57.

SP2
-
9 Representation Diagram

................................
.......................

75

Figure 58.

SP2
-
10 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

77

Figure 59.

SP2
-
11 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

79

Figure 60.

SP2
-
12 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

81

Figure 61.

S
P2
-
13 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

82

Figure 62.

SP2
-
14 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

84

Figure 63.

SP2
-
15 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

85

Figure 64.

SP2
-
16 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

88

Figure 65.

SP2
-
17 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

90

Figure 66.

SP2
-
18 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

92

Figure 67.

SP2
-
19 Representation Diagram

................................
.....................

95

Figure 68.

SP2
-
20 Repres
entation Diagram

................................
.....................

97

Figure 69.

SP2
-
21 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
102

Figure 70.

SP2
-
22 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
107

Figure 71.

SP2
-
23 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
109

Figure 72.

SP2
-
24 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
112

Figure 73.

SP2
-
25 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
116

Figure 74.

SP2
-
26 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
117

Figure 75.

SP2
-
27 Representati
on Diagram

................................
....................
119

Figure 76.

SP2
-
28 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
121




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Open architecture for Accessible Services

Integration and Standardization
-

G.A. 215754


10

Figure 77.

SP2
-
29 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
126

Figure 78.

SP2
-
30 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
128

Figure 79.

SP2
-
31 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
131

Figure 80.

SP2
-
32 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
133

Figure 81.

SP2
-
33 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
135

Figure 82.

SP2
-
34 Representation Di
agram

................................
....................
137

Figure 83.

SP2
-
35 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
139

Figure 84.

SP2
-
36 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
142

Figure 85.

SP2
-
37 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
144

Figure 86.

SP2
-
38 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
146

Fi
gure 87.

SP2
-
39 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
148

Figure 88.

SP2
-
40 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
150

Figure 89.

SP2
-
41 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
152

Figure 90.

SP2
-
42 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
154

Figure 91.

SP2
-
43 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
157

Figure 92.

SP2
-
44 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
160

Figure 93.

SP2
-
45 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
162

Figure
94.

SP2
-
46 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
164

Figure 95.

SP2
-
47 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
166

Figure 96.

SP2
-
48 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
169

Figure 97.

SP2
-
49 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
171

Figure 98.

SP2
-
50 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
173

Figure 99.

SP2
-
51 Representation Diagram

................................
....................
176

Figure 100.

SP2
-
52 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
178

Figure 101.

SP2
-
53 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
180

Figure 102.

SP2
-
54 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
183

Figure 103.

SP2
-
55 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
185

Figure 104.

SP2
-
56 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
187

Figure 105.

SP2
-
57 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
190

Figure 106.

SP2
-
58 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
192

Figure 107.

SP2
-
59 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
194

Figure 10
8.

SP2
-
60 Representation Diagram

................................
...................
197

Figure 109.

Nutri onal advisor
-

User Forum, Brussels, Belgium

.........................
199

Figure 110.

Activity coac
h
-

User Forum, Brussels, Belgium
..............................
200

Figure 111.

Brain and skills trainer
-

User Forum, Brussels, Belgium

..................
200

Figure 112.

Social

communities plat form
-

User Forum, Brussels, Belgium

........
201

Figure 113.

Healt h monitoring
-

User Forum, Brussels, Belgium

........................
201

Figu
re 114.

Environmental cont rol
-

User Forum, Brussels, Belgium

..................
202

Figure 115.

Nutri onal advisor
-

User Forums, Consolidated results

....................
203




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Figure 116.

Activity coach
-

User Forums, Consolidated results

........................
203

Figure 117.

Brain and skills trainer
-

User Forums, Consolidated results

............
204

Figure 118.

Social communities plat form
-

User Forums, Consolidat ed results

...
204

Figure 119.

Healt h monitoring
-

User Forums, Consoli dated results
...................
205

Figure 120.

Environmental cont rol
-

User Forums, Consolidated results
.............
205





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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


The overall aim of OASIS project is to develop

an open and innovative reference
arch
itecture, based upon ontologies and semantic services, that will allow plug and play and
cost
-
effective interconnection of existing and new services in all domains required for the
independent and autonomous living of the elderly and their
q
uality of
l
ife
enhancement.

More
specifically,
OASIS will develop a set of services oriented to maintain the independence of the
ageing persons by means of sharing of a common living context.

This document presents the definition of relevant scenarios and use cases (UCs
) for
the Independent Living Applications (ILA) in the context of OASIS project. The work has been
performed within SP2, more specifically in WP2.1. “Benchmarking, application scenarios and
use cases on Elderly independent living”.

The methodology followed

to extract and define the
use cases is based on the global User
-
Centred Design concept used for the whole project
and defined in SP5. The different steps of the methodology are similar to the ones used in
SP3 for defining use cases for “Autonomous Mobilit
y and Smart Workplaces applications”
, but
with the n
ecessary changes and alignments

due to the differences between the application
areas
.

The process for defining use cases has followed several phases. First, a technological
benchmarking of the relevant t
echnological systems, projects and services in the domain of
Independent Living has been conducted. Then, for the user modelling phase, a set of
interviews has been carried out in five European countries in order to extract users needs and
preferences. The

result of these interviews has been the basis for the definition of the initial
use cases. Then, different user forums have been held in 7 countries to get feedback from
users and evaluate the preliminary defined use cases.

As result of the whole process,

60 final use cases have been defined for the area of
Independent Living Applications, as well as 3 cross
-
SP use cases, which relate SP2 use
cases (“Independent Living Applications”) with SP3 ones (“Autonomous mobility and Smart
Workplaces Applications”).

The ILA use cases have been clustered in categories according
to the 6 domains covered (Nutritional Advisor, Activity Coach, Brain and Skills trainer, Social
Communities Platform, Health monitoring and Environmental Control) and prioritized based
on a thr
ee level scale (
essential, secondary,

and supportive). These UCs will be the basis for
further developments and pilots deployments within the project.






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1.
-

INTRODUCTION

OASIS Subproject 2 (SP2) is focused on the
develop
ment of

services oriented to
maintain t
he independence of the ageing persons by means of sharing of a common living
context.

This document focus on the work performed in WP2.1. “Benchmarking, application
scenarios and use cases on Elderly independent living”, in which relevant scenarios and use

cases for independent living applications have been defined.

The document has been
structured as follows:



Chapter 1 is an introduction that locates this documentation in the context of OASIS
and summarizes the scope of the work.



Chapter 2 presents the OA
SIS
on
-
line database
, which
contains the state of the art of
systems, projects and
services in the area of Independent Living Applications.



Chapter 3 summarizes the methodology and the results obtained from the interviews
that took place in 5 countries in

order to extract preliminary user requirements.




Chapter 4 gives an overview on the use cases in term of user interests, based on the
results from the interviews (Chapter 2).



Chapter 5 is a detailed description of the Use Cases and application scenarios
.



Chapter 6 describes the results on the local user forums carried out in 7 countries in
order to get feedback from users on the use cases and scenarios.



Chapter 7 summarizes the conclusions, and chapter 8 includes the references used
in the deliverable.




Annex 1 presents the Database template.



Annex 2 is the manual database manual



Annex 3 presents the UCs template.

The process for defining use cases and application scenarios has included the same
steps in Subprojects 2 and 3, both for the Independent Li
ving Applications and
Autonomous
mobility and Smart Workplaces Applications
. Therefore, t
he reader will find similarities
between this document and Deliverable D3.1.1. “Use cases and application scenarios for
mobility and smart workplaces”. Some informatio
n has been considered significant enough to
be included in both documents, in order to facilitate the reading.










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2.
-

BENCHMARKING

This section presents the Technological benchmarking on Independent Living
Applications that has been performed within OASIS.
A thorough investigation was carried out
on the relevant technological aids, systems and services able to support independent living as
well as the lack or existence of relevant ontologies in the different domains. A similar
benchmarking ran in parallel i
n the Autonomous Mobility and Smart Workplaces area, and
therefore, a common template was defined including all the relevant information for both of
them.

As result, an online database has been implemented to facilitate the compilation of
information and a
nalysis of all the existing Products, Services and Research Projects in the
area of Independent Living Applications that are appropriate for elderly people. The database
interface was implanted in MS SQL Server 2005. It can be accessed through the project
web
site (www.oasis
-
project.eu), and it can be considered as an active tool, where the user is able
not only to search on
-
line for entities that he/she is interested in, but also to insert new ones.
In other words, the “edit” and “search” functions are sup
ported.


The database does not require installation of specific software on the computer of the
user, which increases significantly both its accessibility and the usability. While in order to
add, edit or delete an entry, a specific username and password i
s needed, the database

contents are public and can be viewed by all, without the need of access codes.

The methodology used to define the template and the implementation of the database,
as well as a summary of the findings per ILA area is detailed below

2.1.
-

M
ethodology

The objective of the benchmarking was to perform a desktop research on
products/solutions, services and research projects aiming at offering independent living
applications to elderly, or that could be applied to cover elderly needs. The aim was

to define
the context framework in which the UCs of OASIS Independent Living Applications would be
specified.

The first step was to create a template in order to determine the most relevant
information needed. The template is included at the end of this d
eliverable (see
Annex 1
).

Based on the template, the structure of a common database was defined. This
database was implemented as an online tool to help with the gathering of information, and will
be kept online for quick reference and continuous update.

There are 3 main areas and more sub
-
areas defined, based on which each result is
clustered. These areas cover all the main development workpackages of OASIS (i.e. the WPs
where innovative systems are to be developed). These areas are listed below:


-

User m
onitoring



Activity monitoring (WP2.3)



Health remote monitoring (WP2.6)

-

Assistive applications



Home automation (WP2.7)



Personal sustaining program (e.g. memory trainer, etc.) (WP2.2, WP2.4)



Support @ work (WP3.5)



Leisure and social events (WP2.5, WP3.4)




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-

Mo
bility support



Travel information services (WP3.2, WP3.4)



Route guidance (WP3.3, WP3.4)



Driver support services (WP3.4)

-

Other (define categories and sub
-
categories if a database entry is not covered by the
above areas)


For each entry, several data files a
re included, such as description, technical
specifications, product and manufacturer name, indicative cost, technical limitations,
specification of ontology communication interface, end
-
user category, etc.

The database contains also some fields with busin
ess and market issues questions,
such as ‘Which companies could benefit from the technology/product/service/R&D
-
Projects?’,
‘Who could be the possible end users from the technology/ product/ service/ R&D
-
Projects?’,
etc..

2.2.
-

Structure of the database

The data
base, as explained before, has been implemented as an online tool to help
with the gathering of information. It was designed in order to include also information about
the existing ontologies, thus covering also WP1.1. The template is divided in 3 areas:
p
roducts, services and research results. Most fields are common for these 3 categories, but
there are also some different fields for each. In addition, there are certain areas defined,
according to the services offered by the project, which are common for t
he 3 categories.
Finally, the search options (by which the users will be able to search the content of the
database) are provided. The following figure shows the structure of the database
.



Figure 1.

Structure of OASIS database


According to the figure above, the

database consists of five main tables, i.e.:

-

User table (restricted): list of users details plus each username and password.

-

General Questions table (public): table where the answers of the general questions
form are stored.

-

Products table (public): tabl
e where the answers of the products form are stored.

-

Services table (public): table where the answers of the services form are stored.

-

Research Results table (public): table where the answers of the research Results
form are stored.




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2.3.
-

Search possibilities

A user can search the database according to the following criteria, which is common for
all 3 categories):


-

Keyword

-

Name of product/service/project Home automation (WP2.7)

-

Area

-

Manufacturer

-

End
-
user category (drop
-
down list):



Elderly



Family members



Forma
l care givers

-

Types of aging
-
related problems covered (e.g. visual, physical, cognitive)

-

Ontology existing (Yes/No)

-

View all


The following figure is a screenshot of the database entry form where the user is
required to select one of the defined areas:


Figure 2.

D
atabase entry form
-

selection of Area


More screenshots are included in Annex 2, where the manual for using the database is
included
.




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2.4.
-

Results

As result of this activity a total of 121 entries have been inserted in the database related
to the different IL d
omains, of which 58 correspond to products, 15 to services and 48 to
research projects
.



Figure 3.


Distribution of entries per type and per domain


The detailed results can be found in OASIS IR 2.1.1.Technological Benchmarking on
Independent Living Applications
. [1]





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3.
-

USER MODELLING

In order to model users experience and to define their needs and preferences, two surveys
were conducted among elderly and caregivers in five European countries (Bulgaria, Germany,
Italy, Romania and Spain) in the context of task A2.1
.2. The surveys were related to the
approach of older adults towards the ageing. More specifically:


-

how the older adults deal with the ageing process,

-

the familiarity and the perception they have about technology,

-

Their desires and needs with regard to se
rvices helping them to maintain
independent living.


The involved people cover a wide spectrum of primary and secondary users (elders and
carers respectively) by including older adults living both in sheltered homes and at their
homes (alone, in pair or w
ith relatives) and carers with various responsibilities and roles.

In Bulgaria the interviews were carried out with a total of 35 participants (25 elders and
10 carers) in the elderly care house in Glavinitza village

Pazardzhik
-
, the daily care home for
elderly people in Plovdiv and Sliven and people who live alone in Plovdiv, Sliven and
Panagiurishte.

In Germany, elderly living alone were interviewed in large cities (Berlin, Dusseldorf) and
in small towns in eastern Germany (Chemnitz and other towns and

villages in the Rhein/Main
area such as Aschaffenburg and Hochheim).
Elderly living in elderly homes and carers were
interviewed at the Westpfalz
-
Klinikum Seniorenresidenz in Kaiserslautern. A total of 89
interviews were carried out (50 elders and 39 car
ers).

In I
taly 106 persons (84 elders and 23 carers) were interviewed. The interviews to the
elderly living alone were carried out in Buscate, a small town near Milan, and in Florence. All
the elderly living in sheltered homes were interviewed at the Elder
ly Care Home “Il Nuovo
Focolare” located in Milan.

In Romania 20 people (10 elders and 10 carers) were interviewed in Bucharest and
Calarasi, a small city located 100 Km far from Bucharest.

Finally, in Spain, 116 interviews (88 elders and 28 carers) were

carried out in the area
of Valencia, Madrid, Leon and Bilbao.

The participation to the survey was on a voluntary basis; it was clearly mentioned to the
contacted persons the purposes of the survey and the high level of confidentiality ensured
with regard
to the information received from the interviewed people. All the respondents
signed a “consensus declaration”.

This section gives an overview of the results obtained from all the interviews through a
comparative study. Additional data can be found in the c
orrespondent report, OASIS IR2.1.2
Preliminary set of user requirements
[2]





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3.1.
-

Independent Living applications

survey

3.1.1.
-

Age, gender, education and other information on the
participants

A good mix in the age of the interviewed elderly was achieved:

33 % of “you
ng elderly”
(55
-
65 years old), 37% of elderly (66 to 75 years) and 30% of “old elderly” (76 years and
older).



Figure 4.

Age of the interviewed elderly


56% of the elderly were female and 44% male; the percentage of women was higher
among the elderly living in she
ltered homes (64%) and was balanced by a lower percentage
among the elderly living alone (50%).

A good mix was also achieved in terms of education level: 45% of the elderly had a
primary school degree, 28% a secondary school degree and 27% an university de
gree.


Figure 5.

Education level


Less than 20% of all the

older adults

were affected by some kind of significant disability;
the percentage was larger among the elderly living in sheltered homes (33%).

Only 13
% of
the interviewed persons were

still working (10% st
ill on a full time basis).

With regard to the marital status, 50% of the elderly was married (of them 78% were
living at their home together with the wife or the husband), 38% widowed and 12% was
divorced or single.




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Figure 6.

Marital status


3.1.2.
-

Interviews to the prim
ary users, the elderly

3.1.2.1.
-

Attitude towards ageing


Generally the
interviewed

elderly

showed a “positive” approach to the ageing:

More
than 80% of them feel reasonably well and they see some positive aspects in the ageing:
more time to take care of themsel
ves (61%), new interests (54%),
and more

time to read
(71%). More than 50% of them like to stay active; 60% of them disagree on the statement that
“after having done a lot during the life, it is now time to have a rest”.



Figure 7.

Approach towards the ageing





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Figure 8.

A
pproach to the ageing per country of origin


3.1.2.2.
-

Familiarity with technology

We listed a series of ICT devices and asked the older adults to indicate the level of
familiarity they have in using them; obviously


as we expected


television, radio, fixed
phone
were the most popular ones.

It was surprising the percentage of the interviewed elderly using the mobile phone (in
total 75% with 64% among the elderly living in sheltered homes and 84% among the elderly
living alone at home). This finding is certainly enc
ouraging for the introduction of “mobile
services” for the older adults.

Less popular was the use of the PC and of
Internet:


a.

The personal computer was used by 35% of the interviewed persons mainly by those
living at home (49%) rather than by the guests of

Elderly Homes (just 16%
);


b.

the average percentage of elderly being capable to use the PC is even higher (44% in
total with a 25% among the elderly living in sheltered homes and a 58% among the
elderly living at home);

c.

Internet was used by 30% of the elder
ly (42% among the elderly living alone and 14%
among those living in sheltered homes).


The following graph shows the differences per country with regard to the use of the PC,
the Internet and the mobile phone:


Figure 9.

Use of main ICT devices/applications per c
ountry




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Obviously there are some problems the older adults face

in using the ICT
: the mostly
mentioned ones are the fast advance of the technology and the continuous introduction of
new software releases or new software applications. Complexity in the inte
raction with the PC
(graphic user interfaces, keyboard, mouse, small screen) represents the other main problem
evidenced by the older PC users.



Figure 10.

Problems in using the PC


3.1.2.3.
-

The social network of the elderly


The elderly we interviewed showed a good level
of Socialization: only 36% feel isolated
(this percentage was just 9% among the guests of the elderly homes)
;
87% indicated that they
have a lot of friends and enjoy
being

in touch with them
. Figures 11 and 12 show the results
per country:


Figure 11.

Loneliness perc
eption in the elderly (per country)




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Figure 12.

Elderly and socialization (per country)


Only few people showed a pessimistic and skeptical behaviour (“each one is living for
himself” (14%), “I do not need to keep relationship with persons other that the few living

with
me” (28%), “I prefer to have contacts with younger people” (23%) ).

For the elderly we interviewed the telephone remains the most common communication
tool with friends and relatives; they do it frequently (for 72% of them at least once a week).

Peop
le living at home have daily contacts with their neighbors; less frequent are the
personal contact with relatives.

As average, 21% of the elderly we interviewed showed an interest in participating
through Internet to a “virtual community” but another 29%
-

even if they do not know what this
means


indicated their availability to try this new experience.



Figure 13.


“Virtual community” experience (per country)





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3.1.2.4.
-


The elderly and their care to health and wellbeing


In general the older adults we interviewed feel r
easonably well:


-

60% of them have no or small concern about the limitations they have in their
daily life because of their health status;

-

Only 28% have hearing problems, 36% visual impairments and 42% have a
medium / high concern in being obliged to stay
at home,

-

Approx. 30 to 40% of the people are concerned about their mental status (27%
feel confused, 34% start to “forget everything”, 41% admit a cognitive decline,
only 19% feel stressed).




Figure 14.

Elderly and the perception of their physical status


Figure 15.

Elderl
y and the perception of their mental status





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Figure 16.

Concern for the worsening of the health status (per country)


The generally satisfactory health status (or at least its perception) is probably the
reason of a lack of discipline in regularly checking importa
nt physiological parameters such as
the blood pressure (only 50% do it) and the body’s weight (only 34%). In the same way the
elderly we interviewed are visiting or receiving
the

visit of their family doctor not regularly
(36%
of

them meet the doctor onl
y when ill).

Differences were found among the various countries where the interviews were carried
out

:


Figure 17.

Check of the blood pressure (per country)






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Figure 18.

Check of the body’s weight (per country)



Figure 19.

Frequency in visiting the family doctor (per country)


The l
arge
majority (82%) of the people interviewed thinks

that healthier habits could
enhance wellbeing and prevent complications but 13% of them recognize the need of training
and continuous motivation to keep adherence to healthier lifestyle.

Only 13% of the
interviewed elderly feel that the decline is the unavoidable
consequence of the ageing and that nothing will modify the degeneration of their own health
status.

44% of the interviewed persons are willing to subscribe an on
-
line Health Monitoring
service an
d among them 57% would like to complement it with a Health Coach service.




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The persons who were not interested justified their answer with the absence of a
specific need (“I hope to stay healthy and active”) or with their poor capability of using PC and
Int
ernet.

67% of the elderly we interviewed indicated that regularly they do physical exercises;
33% of them
do it at home
, 24% of them is frequenting a gym and 43% is doing other physical
activities such as swimming, bicycling, etc.

27% of the interviewed pe
ople showed an interest in subscribing an on
-
line Activity
Coach
Service. T
he unavailability of a PC and the lack of capability in using Internet was one

of the mostly mentioned problems

together with the preference to keep a physical contact
with a traine
r and with other persons in a gym.

Only 33% of the interviewed elderly were in diet; the lack of a variety of foods, the lack
of knowledge of the caloric content of each food and the need of a lot of self
-
discipline were
mentioned among the main problems i
n following a dietary regimen. 41% of the persons
indicated their interest in subscribing a Nutritional Coach on line service.

The following figures give an overview of the attitude of the older adults towards health
in relation to their country of origin.


Once again


given the reduced sample


it is hard to derive general conclusions from
the reported data.



Figure 20.

Health and lifestyle (opinions of the elderly per country)




Figure 21.

Physical exercises per country




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Figure 22.

Willingness to subscribe health
-
related service
s per country


3.1.2.5.
-

The elderly and their interaction with the domestic environment

All the elderly we interviewed feel safe at home, not only those living in a sheltered
home but also the older adults living at their home regardless if alone or with relatives
.

Few of them have some worries but


in any case


with a limited influence in their
generally safe
behaviour. Among these worries:



-

the doubt of having left the door and the windows open,

-

some difficulties in controlling the various domestic appliances,

-

some problem
s

with the TV remote control.


Figure 23.

The interaction with the domestic environment





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3.1.2.6.
-

The elderly and the work

As average, only 17% of the interviewed people are still working and roughly half of
them on a full
-
time basis. This percentage changes dep
ending on th
e specific country (see
figure
).



Figure 24.

Interviewed elderly still working (per country)


Only 20% of the elderly we interviewed showed interest to continue to work after
retirement or to start again to work even if on a part
-
time basis.

The negati
ve attitude to have a job was explained with health problems, other interests,
the desire of more freedom, the belief that
-

after having worked a lot during the life
-

“it is now
time to rest”.

The next figure

shows the different answers received dependin
g on the country of origin
of the interviewed persons.


Figure 25.

Interviewed older adults willing to continue to work (per country)





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For those with a more positive approach, several are the reasons justifying a
continuation of the working activity (regardless of t
heir willingness to continue or not); the
reasons mostly mentioned during the interviews were: to feel useful and offer his own
experience to the community, to be busy, to establish new relationships.

The benefit of having an additional income was not amon
g the top motivations.

Only 15% of the interviewed persons were interested in tele
-
working but 35% indicated
an interest to participate to an on
-
line “collaborative project” experience mainly if related to
topics of their interest (economy, sales, administ
ration and accounting, etc.). Differences
were found in the different countries.




Figure 26.

Interest in tele
-
working (per country)




Figure 27.

Interest to a “on
-
line collaborative project” (per country)


With the only exception of Romania, there is a small interest in

continuing to work even
at home by using teleworking tools. On the contrary there is a certain interest (again with
some exceptions such those found in Germany and Italy) in participating to a collaborative
project. Probably the “socializing” aspect of a
collaborative on line activity , the much higher
freedom and the limited commitment are the reasons of the preference of being involved


together with other persons
-

in a project on topics of common interest rather than being
forced to a more structure
d and binding remote work.




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3.1.2.7.
-

Elderly and a continuous learning

A
s an average a 48% of the elderly we interviewed showed an interest to follow


through Internet


remote training programs.

Use of computer, Travels and Geography,
history were the top 3 d
isciplines.

From a geographical point of view this interest in a
continuous learning is common to all the countries with the only exception of Germany.

Once again the highest levels of acceptance were found in Spain and Romania.


Figure 28.

Interest to remote learn
ing per country


Figure 29.

Preferred disciplines (per country)


3.1.3.
-

Interviews to the caregivers

The survey
-

carried out in the same five countries selected for the interviews to the
elderly i.e. Bulgaria, Germany, Italy, Romania and Spain


involved carers with vario
us roles
(from medical doctors to assistants, nurses, managers of Elderly Care Homes and Elderly
Centers, administrative personnel and other).




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The following graph and table show the participation in the different countries.



Figure 30.

Interviewed caregivers per c
ountry


The interviews were carried out directly by the involved Partners or through third party
organizations and addressed four main areas:

-

The attitude of the elderly towards the ageing process,

-

The impact of ICT technology on ageing,

-

The elderly and th
e work,

-

The awareness of the problem and the actions plan of the public Institutions.

Several questions were similar to those asked to the elderly; the purpose was to get the
perspective of the carers on some key topics.


3.1.3.1.
-

Attitude of the elderly towards th
e ageing

According to the carers the main concerns of the persons entering into or being already
in the “elderly age” are related to the perception of a bad health status, the physical and
mental decline, the feeling of being alone, the lack of self
-
estee
m.

As indicated in the following graph, the ranking of the main concerns was slightly
different in the various countries where we conducted the survey among the caregivers.





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Figure 31.




Top six concerns for the elderly (per c
ountry)


The carers were less optimistic than the elderly themselves in judging the approach of
the older adults towards ageing. According to the
carers
only a minority of them has a positive
attitude with regard to self
-
esteem (feeling useful), involvemen
t in the community, desire of
being continuously updated on what is happening around them, acceptance of the ageing,
confidence about the future, openness to the change.

Some differences were evidenced among the various countries as shown in the
following
graphs.


Figure 32.

Approach to the ageing (per country)





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4


Figure 33.

Approach to the ageing (per country)


3.1.3.2.
-

The role of ICT

According to the carers, ICT can support the ageing process and mitigate the concerns
of the elderly; according to the carers, the main areas of interve
ntion are:


-

generation of new interests or avoidance of the lack of interests by the older adults,

-


avoidance or reduction of the loneliness and promotion of a more active involvement
in the society,

-

slowing down of the cognitive / mental decline,

-

enha
ncement of the health status of the elderly or avoidance of the perception of a
bad health.

The following graph highlights the differences among the answers collected in the
various countries.






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Figure 34.

Where ICT can help (answers per country)


By combining the

data
the main concerns for the elderly
with th
ose of the figure “Where
ICT can help”,

we can identify the most effective and useful intervention of ICT solutions and
services in supporting the ageing process (see graph in the following figure).



Figure 35.

Main co
ncerns of the elderly and ICT effectiveness


The interviewed persons identified the following new technologies as those with the
higher impact in the management of the ageing process and in general in healthcare:


-

Assistive ICT technology in general,

-

Mobi
le Point of Care,

-

Sensors technology,

-

Wireless communications,

-

Digital hospital and Electronic Medical Record,




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-

RFID

The following graphs indicate the differences among the countries of origin of the
interviewed carers.


Figure 36.

Impact of ICT per country



Figure 37.

Impact

of ICT per country

According to the interviewed caregivers, the Internet is a powerful tool and could
support the ageing process of the older adults with services specifically designed for them
such as (in order of expected benefits):


-

Medication Planner,

-

Health Monitoring,

-

Brain Trainer,

-

E
-
mail,

-

Internet browsing,

-

Domotics,




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-

Activity Coach,

-

Health Coach,

-

Relaxing, gaming,

-

News,

-

Chatting,

-

Nutritional Coach,

-

Travel Planning,

-

Shopping


Some differences were evidenced among the countries (s
ee graph)



Figure 38.

Top 6 I
CT services (per country)



By considering specifically the services of Remote Health Monitoring and Health
Coach, the carers we interviewed highlighted the following benefits:


-

Timely alerting in case of degenerative episodes,

-

Huge availability of medical

data for the Medical Community,

-

Better adherence to keep under control important health indicators ,

-

better adherence to treatments and medications,

-

Reduction in the number of ambulatory visits and hospitalization (prevention),

-

Enhanced quality
-
of
-
life f
or the elderly,

-

Cost saving in healthcare (through prevention),

-

Personalization in healthcare,

-

Empowerment of the patients in managing their own health.


All the carers we interviewed recognized the existence of barriers in the use of ICT by
the older pop
ulation. Among them the mostly mentioned were:

-

poor digital literacy of the older adults,




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-

poor usability of the ICT devices / solutions ,

-

the difficulties of the elderly in following the fast and continuous advance of the
technology,

-

the lack of ICT servic
es specifically addressed and designed for the elderly,

-

the cost of the proposed solution,

-

the lack of personalization,

-

the lack of interoperability of the solutions available in the market.




It is interesting to note the low concern about security / pri
vacy; this is contradictory
with the general opinion of experts indicating serious concerns about the infringement of the
privacy of the users by assistive services and health services requiring exchange of patients’
data. Moreover experts think that “ful
l respect for the personal autonomy of a potential ILS
(Independent Living Service) user requires that they ensure the right to overrule the service:
switch off features should built in, potential users should be given the choice not to use these
services
if that is their wish” (see report “User needs in ICT Research for Independent Living,
with a focus on health aspects”, issued by the European Commission in 2006).


Some differences were found in the answers received from the various countries as
shown in
the following graph where for each country we reported the top 6 barriers to the use
of ICT by the elderly.


Figure 39.

Top six barriers in the uses of ICT by elderly


3.1.3.3.
-

The elderly and the work

The majority of the carers we interviewed (70%) were in favour of the co
ntinuation of
the working activity by the older adult:

33% of them see in any case a positive impact and a way to keep motivated the elderly;
another 23% is in favour but under a tight control by the carer to prevent negative effects and
14% are in favour
of the extension of the working age of the older adults but only for no more
than 2 hours a day and without a firm commitment by the elderly.




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Some differences were found in the answers received from the various countries (see
following graph):



Figure 40.

Elderly a
nd work (per country)


3.1.3.4.
-

The “ageing population problem” and the Institutions

We asked the interviewed carers to give their judgement on the policies the Institutions