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14 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 17 μέρες)

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Discussion Posts 8484



I have worked on survey questions as a preliminary study to help guide my work for the official
study that I can do with the target

population at my own school.
I do plan on a 2nd part to this
survey as soon as I compile the
information and see what the data suggests. I plan on creating a
qualitative open ended questionnaire and/or interview about the classroom uses of technology of
my participants.
The real study will be tweaked based on preliminary data responses to the
surve
y #1.


I do plan on asking more Quantitative open ended questions to the teachers and students
about their understanding of uses for mobile technology in their classroom.
Ideally, the
qualitative and quantitative data will be collected by surveying students

and

teachers in my
school as this is my target population
-

I am looking to do a local study on a smaller scale for the
school of fine arts teachers that I work with to show them the benefit of utilizing technology into
ALL classrooms
.


The summer months
make it difficult to accomplish this so I will test with this class and get an
idea from this population as a sample representation!


.


Some concerns and comments I have encountered from other teachers about the study in which
I hope to address with this
research!




I am having a hard time figuring out how cell phones in the classroom will have
enough benefits to outweigh the negatives.




I understand that most students already have them and use them in school even
when they are not supposed to. The question

that comes to mind is who pays for it.




The school I teach at is a Title I school and if we many of the students there do not
have
Smartphones
.



If cell phones in the classroom is going to work the first thing that has to happen is
to have both teachers a
nd students on board with what is the proper use of phones
at school.



teachers need to

address this issue

of using phones inappropriately
, but how do the
teachers enforce it?



You are absolutely right

about starting the discussion on smartphone integration

in
the classroom!



The mobile technology introduced the tablet and pad which is now becoming more
widely used in the schools for many great reasons.




There are so many useful tools in utilizing this technology.



The cost factor is most c
ertainly a variable that I am concerned and interested in

learning about.


In my experience with the middle and high school students at least 85% of the
classes had the mobile technology available. That means students most likely had
use of their own mob
ile device. I
cannot

say the same about our computer lab as we
had 4 computers in the classroom.



Students that did not have an available phone are able to partner/group up with
someone that does. In regards to your concerns about phone etiquett, that has

always been a matter of teaching students proper phone etiquette and having good
classroom management skills.


The main thing I am learning is that we will never expect to teach children how to
respect these devices if we force them to keep them turned of
f and away at all
times! We must start early and agree that their truly are some worthwhile uses in
the classroom if we provide the proper education on them!


I hope to be able to show the many positive attributes to utilization to the
stakeholders of mob
ile technology in my school with the data results from my
research!


Barry


Good points!


Just wondering if the technology can be the motivator to make students read. So if that is
the case, what is that technology?


Have you thought what kind of question
s you would like to ask your participants?
Remember that you need your a sample of your instrumentation in your appendix.


In Reply to: J.Smith
-

Methods, Data and Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Case Methods and
Data Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4, 2011 11:43 PM

Good question! There should be enough literature out there to get you started. I guess,
from my end, I wonder why administrators don't
pay attention to what is already written
and research about lack of use of the technology in the classroom.


In Reply to: Case Methods and Data Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Bartlett_methods, data and instrumen
ts

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4, 2011 11:45 PM

Interesting question. How does your field define technology? It is easy to assume that when
we think of technology, we think of computers. But the bas
ic premise of technology as a
tool opens the door wide for lots of interpretation.


In Reply to: Bartlett_methods, data and instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Fishel Methods, Data, and Instruments

Topic:

Post 3:
Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4, 2011 11:47 PM

Good thinking. Now you got to operationally define integration of technology so everyone is
in the same page. I like the idea though that it is making a difference by
making students
learn new material.


In Reply to: Fishel Methods, Data, and Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Martin Methods

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4, 2
011 11:50 PM

There are several things in this question that you need to define so that others are in the
same page with you. What do you mean by available technology? How about "effectively"?
Does primary classroom include kindergarteners? Quite a big dif
ferent between the K and
3rd graders.


In Reply to: Martin Methods


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Subject:

Reply:McDowell
-
Methods, Data, Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4,
2011 11:53 PM

After reading your posting here, it looks like your subquestion 1 proves to be interesting to
me. Why are the students struggling with AR? Once you know the answer to this question
then you can proceed in finding the right strategy.


In
Reply to: McDowell
-
Methods, Data, Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Bishop
-
Methods, Data, Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4, 2011 11:55 PM

I believe
that "how" as a question lends itself better to the qualitative approach. However, if
you ask "how much" then it is more of a quantitative approach.


In Reply to: Bishop
-
Methods, Data, Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Hensley
-

Methods, Data, and Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 4, 2011 11:56 PM

This is a big question
--

a good one though. Maybe difficult to measure? How do you control
confounding va
riables.


In Reply to: Hensley
-

Methods, Data, and Instruments


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Subject:

Re:Stephenson
-

Methods, Data, Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5,
2011 12:00 AM

Big question! You need to choose 1 or 2 technology to study. Can't overwhelm yourself with
too many things.


In Reply to: Stephenson
-

Methods, Data, Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:
DSmith
-
Methods, Data, Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:03 AM

I think you have 2 questions in 1. First
--

What is the influence of unlimited user access to
ebooks in a high school s
etting?


Second, Which program better serve high school students, unlimited user access or limited
access?


In Reply to: DSmith
-
Methods, Data, Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Crawford
-
Methods, Data and Instrument
s

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:04 AM

Good question but not sure where is the technology in it.


In Reply to: Crawford
-
Methods, Data and Instruments


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allowed)

Subject:

Reply:Munoz
-

methods, data, and instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:05 AM

Like my comments to Milton
--

I need you to define your technology as well as the task it
s
upports.


In Reply to: Munoz
-

methods, data, and instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Conner
-
Methods, Data, and Instruments

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011
12:07 AM

Interesting question. Looking forward to how your research plan shapes up.


In Reply to: Conner
-
Methods, Data, and Instruments


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Subject:

Reply:Levie
-

Methods, Data, and Instruments
-

Post 3

Topic:

Post 3: Methods, Data and Instruments

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:10 AM

I believe you need to define what you mean by professional development
--

is training, in
-
service or something else. Also you need to identify your target popul
ation and subject area
(context).


In Reply to: Levie
-

Methods, Data, and Instruments
-

Post 3


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Subject:

Re:Via
-
articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:31 PM

I had
no idea that there were studies done on differences between online and blended
learning. After experiencing online learning I immediately felt like the blended approach
would be better because I miss being able to work with others. It does get lonely sitti
ng by
yourself at a computer for hours doing work.



I see that the results are similiar to what I initially thought when I first read about your
study.


In Reply to: Via
-
articles


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Subject:

Re:Via
-
Data
Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:32 PM

Hope,


What academic courses are you going to use this with?


In Reply to: Via
-
Data Collection Strategies


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Subject:

Re:Case


Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:37 PM

Rob,


I thought that you gave an excellent summary of what you intend to research. I was
wondering though if you are going
to be working with media specialists in order to train or
teach them how to collaborate more effectively or are you just documenting what you see
happening?


In Reply to: Re:Case


Data & Data Collection Strategies


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llowed)

Subject:

Re:Martin Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:51 PM

Lisa,


I thought both of your articles were great since we both have the special education factor.
Sight word recognition is often difficult
for my students so I can relate. The article that I
read was different in that one thing it focused on what teaching vocabulary. After reading
about your article it's made me wonder though if there would be a difference between the
flash card or smart boar
d approach. You could use the smart board to flash the word and
then the next slide could have the definition and then you could even have a slide that used
the word in sentence context. It would certainly seem like it could work but after seeing
your arti
cle it makes me wonder.


In Reply to: Martin Articles


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Subject:

Re:Hensley
-

Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:42 PM

Shannon,


I found your first article to
have some relevance to an article I read and wrote about for
another class. It was called "The Principal Factor" and basically discussed collaboration
between the media specialist and the principal. That article is different than yours because it
stated th
at the only way principals understand the SLMS position is by learning about it
directly from the SLMS. Principals are not required to take classes on the role of the SLMS
and educational journals written for principals usually do not cover the SLMS role.
I can see
how the SLMS must work towards getting the principal on board in order to keep the media
center running smoothly and with principal support. I did not realize that there could be an
impact though when it came to then collaborating with other teac
hers.


In Reply to: Hensley
-

Articles


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Subject:

Re:Crawford
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:45 PM

I am doing my research on reading
with students but mine is different because my focus is
on what can be done while at school. I think 6th grade is a perfect grade to study. I think
the more often parents of elementary students are more consistent with their children in
their expectations
and as their kids get older and more independent they slack off. Sixth
grade students are in the middle of still being a child and also becoming more grown up and
independent. It will be interesting to see if there is a correlation between reading motivati
on
and parental involvement.


In Reply to: Crawford
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies


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Subject:

Reply:Lusk
-
Data and Collection Strategies

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data Collection Strategies

Author:

Danilo Dr.

B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:12 AM

Since this is for the research plan, then you need to focus your timeline to a regular term
instead of a summer term.


In Reply to: Lusk
-
Data and Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Reply:Case
-

Data and Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data Co
llection Strategies

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:14 AM

Given that this is a research plan, then don't write that you will do this in the summer.
Provide us with the best possible scenario so that the implementation of this research
study
is a success.


In Reply to: Case
-

Data and Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Reply: Launey
-
Data and Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data Collection Strategies

Author:

Danilo Dr. B Baylen

Date:

July 5, 2011 12:16 AM

I agree that the focus of this study is quite
large. However, you can still write the best
research plan and don't have to implement it. Just make sure all your sections are tight and
aligned.


In Reply to: Launey
-
Data and Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Hensley
-

Post 4: Data and Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data
Collection Strategies

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 3, 2011 9:21 PM

Post 4

Given what you post in POST 3, discuss the challenges, issues or limitations that you may
encounter in collecting your data. Also, discuss in this posting how you will collec
tive
quantitative data as well as qualitative data. Provide an acceptable justification for your
choices.


Then, post 1 major challenge, and 1 issue/limitation that will hinder or prevent you from
collecting good quality quantitative data and/or qualitativ
e data.


I hypothesize that 5th grade students will have greater achievement levels in the content
areas of Science and Social Studies as a result of collaboration between the SLMS and the
classroom teacher. I will use quantitative data collected from the
CRCT Science and Social
Studies scores. Last school year, 2010
-
2011, no collaboration between SLMS and the 5th
grade Science and Social Studies teacher occurred. Those scores will be compared to the
2011
-
2012 CRCT Science and Social Studies scores after th
e treatment (collaboration) has
been administered. I think the 2010
-
2011 scores will be my control group since no
collaboration took place during that school year. Scores from the 2011
-
2012 school year will
be the experimental group. I will compare the per
centage of all 5th grade students in the
meets and exceeds category from each year to determine if an increase in achievement was
present after the treatment year. My sample will be the population of all 5th grade students
at my school.

I will use qualitat
ive data to determine the level of collaboration. I will use interviews,
surveys, and/or questionnaires with the teacher and SLMS to determine the levels of
collaboration throughout the treatment school year. Since the media specialist and the
Science and
Social Studies teacher will be the same in the year 2011
-
2012 as it was in the
year 2010
-
2011, I could include some questions that compare the collaboration between the
two years (non
-
existent to existent).

My qualitative data will be weak, in that there a
re only two people involved, so the sample
will be very small. The two people being questioned or interviewed about the collaboration
are the media specialist and the Science/Social Studies teacher. I think this will be limiting.
Another limitation is that

the 2011
-
2012 group of students are rising 5th graders and the
2010
-
2011 group are now rising 6th graders, so I will be comparing CRCT test data from
two different groups of students.

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Subject:

McDowell
-
Data Collection

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data Collection Strategies

Author:

Elisabeth McDowell

Date:

July 3, 2011 10:18 PM

Research Question: Are shared reading strategies an effective method of increasing reading
comprehension for primary Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students? The other issue I have is on
how to accurately record results qualitatively. I

am currently planning on using Accelerated
Reader because I can control the grade level of the tests and the treatment which I will
administering by using the Interuppted time
-
series design. I do not have a different type of
test that can be used. I had c
onsidered using DRA but there are a limited amount of levels
and carryover will definitely occur because of the design method I am using. Being able to
record weekly scores for before, during, and after the treatment will strengthen my study.
Since there a
re limited amounts of students and they all differ in their reading ability I need
to find a way that shows their individual changes quantitatively. The students will all use the
same book each week and will take the AR test individually. Qualitatively I w
ill use the
interview process afterwards to question the students about how they feel before the
research is started, during the treatment phase and also at the conclusion. I would like to
determine if students think the strategies taught are relevant to t
hem and will they likely
use them in the future. 1 Challenge: The biggest challenge will be finding weekly books that
are at the right grade level so that all of the students can read the book. Because they will
be 2nd graders but still read at the 1st gra
de level there will not be as much content in the
books as those for older grade students. This will impede the use of shared reading
strategies that can be used; such as teaching vocabulary as mentioned in article 7 I
reviewed. 1 issue/limitation: After d
iscussing this last week with another Deaf/Hard of
Hearing teacher she does not feel that there will be a significant different in AR scores due
to the DHH students language delays. This is an issue because I do want to find strategies
that will work.

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Subject:

Crawford
-
Data and Data Collection St
rategies

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data Collection Strategies

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 3, 2011 11:04 PM

To address the role of parental involvement in reading motivation for students, I plan to
collect both quantitative and qualitative data. In
addition to quantitative data from Lexile
reports (student reading scores), my initial data collection will come from a survey to
parents of sixth grade students. Quantitative data will include how much time they spend
reading personally and how much time
they spend reading with their children. Qualitative
data will include the types of reading material (e.g., books, magazines, and newspapers)
and how they interact with their children regarding reading. I think both types of data are
necessary to obtain a b
road view of the role of parents in their children’s reading
motivation. I will attempt to obtain from the parents on their survey active consent for
students to take a similar survey at school, but I will also include a statement of passive
consent. A cha
llenge that I may encounter is getting surveys returned from parents. I plan
to offer an incentive for students, such as a homework pass or BuzzBucks, a reward through
our Positive Behavior Support program. Students could complete the parent survey to get
the reward, but I think that would be unlikely since they will be completing a similar survey
at school.



One issue regarding data collection is whether to have only a paper survey or to offer the
survey electronically. An electronic survey could provide
quicker data analysis, but not all
parents would have access to it. I could use an electronic survey for students, but unless
they will be in the computer lab they would not be able to take it all at once. However, the
reading classrooms have additional co
mputers for taking AR tests, and the teachers will
probably be willing to cooperate with me and allow them to take the survey a few at a time
while working on a class assignment.


After the initial data collection from the surveys, I plan to purposively sa
mple students and
their parents to obtain more detailed information on parental involvement. I had intended to
interview each set of parents with their child, but I may use focus groups instead. One
group would consist of “good” readers to gain ideas for p
arental involvement

to find out
what works. Another group would be the readers that are in need of motivation. Ideas
learned from the first group would be shared with this group. Parents would be encouraged
to increase their time spent with their child rea
ding. I would ask them to keep a log of their
reading time (quantitative data) and record any issues/concerns they have (qualitative
data). This group would meet periodically to discuss what has worked/not worked and what
successes/challenges they have fac
ed (qualitative data). I am uncertain how frequently
Lexile scores can be assessed; however, student participation in AR can be monitored for
quantitative performance data (e.g., test scores, average book level, number of books
read/tests taken, points ear
ned).


Major Challenge

getting parents to participate. The first challenge is getting them to
complete and return the survey. Offering an incentive to students may improve the
response rate. However, I am more concerned with getting parents involved in the

second
phase of the project, particularly the group with students in need of reading improvement.
If the parents are not readers, they may not be willing to participate, and some may lack
reading skills and feel incapable of participating or even embarras
sed. A focus group may be
able to provide support for each other as Bauman and Wasserman demonstrated with a
group of fathers (2010). Nonetheless, if participation becomes a problem, I can attempt
interviews or simply parent conferences.



Issue Hindering
Data Collection

keeping the survey short enough to obtain honest
participation but enough depth to obtain a broad range of the desired data. I plan to obtain
more detailed information after the survey, but the sample will be much smaller. I will pilot
test

the parent survey with teachers at a grade
-
level meeting using the think
-
aloud
technique (Johnson & Christensen, 2012). I may use former students for a pilot test of the
student survey.



Bauman, D., & Wasserman, K. (2010). Empowering fathers of disadvant
aged preschoolers
to take a more active role in preparing their children for literacy success at school. Early
Childhood Education Journal, 37(5), 363
-
370. doi: 10.1007/s10643
-
009
-
0367
-
3


Johnson, B., Christensen, L. (2012). Educational Research (4th ed.)
Los Angeles: Sage
Publications

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Subject:

B
ishop
-
Post 4 Data and collections strategies

Topic:

Post 4: Data and Data Collection Strategies

Author:

Frances Bishop

Date:

July 3, 2011 11:21 PM



The challenges that I would face with collecting data for my research problem included
limited research

studies that are available on distance education and its impact on public
education. Many of the journal articles that I have been able to locate are case study
narrative. I have located several quantitative research studies. Therefore, I am concern that
my research will be limited in scope which is the case for much of the research related to
distance education.



To assist with this limitation I have consider going back and reviewing several of the
journal articles cited in studies that I have reviewe
d for additional information. Since much
of the journal articles that I have reviewed are narrative that I consider as a strategy to
locate journal articles are quantitative studies.



By focusing on articles that are quantitative will allow me to locat
e the instruments that
were used in these studies and cross
-
reference any journal articles that used the same
instruments then determine if any of articles and instruments are available that related to
distance education.



Another strategy that I could
use is to review with qualitative studies cited to review
other possible studies to see what instruments were used and see if any of the studies have
implications or related to my research problem. In both situations using a backward design
can be used to
address these limitations.



The major challenge to collecting good qualitative data is finding a sample of case studies
to review for my research problem. As stated before there are a limited number of research
studies available related to distance educ
ation and its impact on public education. Much of
the research studies related to distance education are very diverse and also there are
multiple definitions of distance education that exist in research.



The major issue related to data collection for q
ualitative is limited implication for my
research problem. Additional research will be needed to get the full impact of the research
and its results. This based on number of the articles that I have read that suggested
additional research is needed because

the research is limited.




I understand the concern and and you are right about understanding all logistics!


I have based my research project on the experience I have had in my own classroom.


I am not positive but I am close to thinking that 90 percent

of the students have some type
of Mobile device, phone, ipod, itouch or other device.



The students will use their own device. I am not talking about a laptop cart or Ipad dock for
the class, although these are great for integration as well, If schools
have these technology
programs available then they should be used.


I am considering the fact that since most kids (90%) in my high school theater class have
them, they should/could be integrated to motivate the students.



I am well aware that this is ver
y different in elementary and even middle school, but this is
also changing. If the money in each school is available then they should set up mobile
laptops or netbooks for use while cell phone integration can be an added bonus. I have read
much informatio
n on how convenient cell phones can be for storage because the students
carry them around and they are always with them. This means they have access to their
data and information as welll at all times. If a student uses a school laptop and does the
work he
/she also has to think about saving and storing that information to continue working
at a later time!


I have had much success in utilizing what we already have (cell phones) in my classroom
and I hope that teachers can at least see the benefit for student
s as there are so many new
applications and learning tools available!


Barry

Your research topic is a very interesting one. What I am wondering is, where is the funding
for this kind of program? Cell phones for every student? Would this take the place of
other
technology tools in the classroom? Would students be required to provide their own mobile
device? What about students who were unable to afford one? Don't get me wrong; it sounds
like a potentially highly engaging program. I just always consider the
logistics.
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According to Johnson and Christensen (p. 51), "it is wise to collect multiple sets of data
using different research methods,

epistemology, and approaches in such a way that the
resulting mixture or combination has complementary strengths and non overlapping
weaknesses." Therefore, I am going to attempt to include both qualitative and quantitative
methodologies in my research st
udy. I will utilize observation and interview techniques to
collect qualitative data. I will most likely use stratified sampling methods by dividing the
population into 2 groups
-

those in blended learning classrooms and those who are not and
then attempt
to randomly select my sample from these two groups.


This study compared 322 fifth graders who completed a year of AR with 270 children who
had regular reading instruction. All were considered “low” readers. The study measured
student attitudes toward read
ing and reported that students who used AR had more positive
attitudes toward academic reading than comparison students did, but there was no
difference in their attitudes toward reading for recreation.


The researchers studied the impact of AR on ten four
th and fifth grade ESL students after
three months of use. Five students showed gains in reading level, ranging from 0.4 to 1.9
years.



Researchers investigated the impact of AR on low SES third
-
fifth graders over one academic
year. Those who were high AR users did quite well, gaining 2.24 years on a standardized
reading test. Average users gained 1.52 years, and low users gained .73 years
. This seems
impressive until we consider the fact that only 12 percent of the children were high users,
and only 36 percent were average users. In other words, AR did not succeed in encouraging
reading for 52 percent of the students. The low group read fe
wer than three books over the
entire year.



Krashen, S. (2005) Accelerated Reader: Evidence Still Lacking. Knowledge Quest 33 (3).
Retrieved June 20, 2011 from EBSCOhost.



This study involved the collection of questionnaires and focus group data designed

to
investigate whether factors contributing to student underachievement existed with the AR
program. The first step of the study was to collect questionnaires from students who
returned signed Parent Consent forms.



After the questionnaires and focus gro
ups were completed, the author transcribed the tapes
from the focus groups. She conducted an intertextual analysis to identify the recurring
themes between the focus group results and the data from the questionnaires. Then, she
summarized the findings and
shared her report with the school principal.


These two prevailing issues were found:

1. The way that the program was being implemented

had been counterproductive and had actually made some students who had previously
enjoyed reading develop an aversion to

reading for fun.

2. The program had led to widespread cheating on the required tests.


Thompson, G., Madhuri, M., & Taylor, D. (2008) How the Accelerated Reader program can
become counterproductive for high school students. Journal of Adult and Adolescent

Literacy. 51 (7). Retrieved June 20, 2011 from EBSCOHost.




Teresa Franklin,

Colleen Sexton,

Young Lu,

&

Hongyan Ma.

(2007). PDAs in Teacher Education: A
Case Study Examining Mobile Technology Integration.

Journal of Technology and Teacher
Education,

15
(
1),

39
-
57.


Retrieved June 22, 2011, from Research Library. (Document
ID:

1184989841).





Based on the readings of Johnson and Christensen (p. 51), " We view the use of multiple
perspectives , theories and research methods as a strength in educational research. In fact,
we view the quantitative and qualitative as complimentary to each other; i
t is wise to collect
multiple sets of data using different research methods and approaches in such a way that
the resulting mixture or combination has complementary strengths and non overlapping
weaknesses."



My questions have been narrowed down through
the help of further reading and comments
from peers and Dr. Baylen.

I plan on researching my data using b
oth qualitative and
quantitative methodo
logies. Important data questions will be answered through the
questionnaire about the mobile technology used at

Douglass, pre and post testing and most
importantly, personal interview using open and closed ended questions.



Quantitative Performance: measures on certain pre/post tests will be measured. % of Data
plans available in each classroom.


Qualitative:
social adjustment/growth working on using the technology

Important data needed:

student demographics, Phone specifications, What is their
experience with technology outside the classroom? How do they feel about the utilization of
mobile technology compare
d to the computer lab?

What can be done to prevent distractions with the technology


The discussion Post # 2 question that I decided to provide the research for was:


How will mobile technology devices and programs motivate students to learning?


Sub ques
tions to be answered:


What is their experience with technology outside the classroom?


How do they feel about the utilization of mobile technology compared to the computer lab?

What can be done to prevent distractions with the technolo
gy?




Based on the

readings of Johnson and Christensen,

I

still

f
eel that utilizing these research
methods will most likely

get the best and most fair and accurate data results.


As I continue to research my topic I am learning of Data Analysis tools that are easy to use
i
nvolving the latest technology. I would like to incorporate a mobile technology presentation
integrated with a web 2.0 tool that has been discussed in the data. I think this would have a
major impact and effect for all stakeholders. A PowerPoint will be u
sed for basic information
and sharing along with a student/data generated technology tool : Xtranormal
presentations, Comic Life or VoiceThread tools to enhance the delivery. Teacher surveys and
question and interviews will be utilizing the Google Document

technology



The same data observations, pre and post surveys and interview techniques discussed and
used in article 5 will guide me with my research questions used to collect qualitative data.




As I continue to research my topic I am learning of Data

Analysis tools that are easy to use
involving the latest technology. I would like to incorporate a mobile technology presentation
integrated with a web 2.0 tool that has been discussed in the data. I think this would have a
major impact and effect for all

stakeholders. A PowerPoint will be used for basic information
and sharing along with a student/data generated technology tool : Xtranormal
presentations, Comic Life or VoiceThread tools to enhance the delivery. Teacher surveys and
question and interviews

will be utilizing the Google Document technology!























M
y research study involves the use of the more modern and advanced mobile devices such
as the Smartpho
ne and its use in the classroom

. I plan on researching my data using b
oth
qualitative and quantitative methodo
logies.

I

f
eel that this
he data and research methods
that I will most likely utilize to get the best and most fair and accurate data results.


The same data observations, pre and post surveys and interview techniques discussed and
used in article 5 will guide me with my research questions used to collect qualitative data.


The following questions will be studied and developed during my research

of the
use of mobile technology to motivate students in the classroom!


Organizing and planning: Can using MOBILE TECHNOLOGY help students better organize
and plan their schoolwork and time?


Gathering and analyzing: What tools and other software do stude
nts' use with mobile
devices to gather and analyze information for school work?


Learning and self
-
improvement: Does mobile technology provide opportunities to students
for self
-
improvement and continued learning outside the classroom?


Communicating: What

types of communications do students use...social versus educational
communication?


Teaming and collaborating: Does the use of the mobile applications promote teamwork and
collaboration?


Technology integration and transfer: Are skills from mobile technol
ogy transferable to the
desktop and vice versa.


Are teachers able to develop lesson plans and implement the use of Smartphones in PreK
-
12 classrooms?


My research questions are based off the independent research institute, SRI International at
Stanford U
niversity(SRI International, 2002,)




Tina,

Your articles this reflects some questions that I must consider as part of my research. The
questions related to the digital dive is similar to article that I read about Barriers to distance
education in rural
school district.


Questions related to the digital dive are very similar to issues that rural school districts must
face at one level and at another level funding, expertise among faculty and is distance
education a priority for the school district is anot
her.

Your post made me think about narrowing my topic but I am afraid that I will not find
enough information. This is a problem both James and myself face. Much of the articles I
am finding are narratives.


In Reply to: Launey
-
Data Used in the Articles

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Subject:

Re:Levie
-

Data & Data Collection

Straegies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 1:48 PM

Hi Lindsey,

You seem to have a thorough plan for your data collection. Our collection strategies are
different in that you will collect qualitative data, while I will co
llect both qualitative and
quantitative data.

On a personal note, I really enjoy using my interactive white board (Promethean Board). I
have had it for several years and the projector quit working at the end of last school year.
As it turns out, it was det
ermined that I needed a new projector (it would not be cost
effective to repair the broken one). And, as you know, money/funds are tight everywhere
and I was worried I might not get a new one... I have come to rely on it and need it!! Well,
luckily, my pri
ncipal agreed so now I have a new projector to start next year with (phew!).


Shannon


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-

Data & Data Collection Straegies

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y

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Subject:

Re:Levie
-

Data & Data Collection Straegies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 2, 2011 5:04 PM

Lindsey,


Our planned
approaches to our research are quite similar even though our topics are very
different. I plan to collect data through surveys and interviews on parental involvement.
After a period of working with parents to improve their involvement in their child's read
ing,
I plan to collect additional data, as you have also proposed, to see if improvement has been
made on the child's reading. Our questions and resulting data will certainly be different, but
our methodologies are rather similar.


Good luck with your rese
arch!

Susan


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Re:Levie
-

Data & Data Collection Straegies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Katie Adams

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:26 PM

Lindsey,


Your research plan and mine are very similar because we will both be conducting mixed
researc
h via a teacher/student survey and interviews. We are both trying to determine the
perceived effectiveness of technology according to students and teachers.


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Subject:

Re:Levie
-

Data & Data Collection Straegies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

David Moon Munoz

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:45 PM

Levie, ur topic is very interesting to me, because at my school the technology integration
has occurred in the past two years and no professional development. The development of
the faculty has been
challenging at times, but the technology has been implemented at the
class level. Are the kids losing sometime in this process? I think so...maybe u can prove it.
Please let me know so I can pass the info to the higher paychecks at school. Thanks


In Repl
y to: Levie
-

Data & Data Collection Straegies

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rward

Subject:

Re:Levie
-

Data Used in Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Milton Stephenson

Date:

July 2, 2011 12:49 PM

Lindsey, you read some articles that can be very useful in my research. With your 1st article
you made a very good point about th
e teachers in the study. I definitely agree with you
about the teacher who conducted the professional development for the whiteboards. The
study may have produced stronger conclusion if the teachers interviewed were in the infant
stages of using technology

in the classroom. This teacher, we can assume, is already an
advocate for technology in teh classroom.


For your second article, I can attest to the conclusions that were made. After 2+ years of
using the Promethean software, it has shaped the way I teach

lessons in my classroom.


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Data Used in Articles

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Subject:

Re:Via
-
articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tonia Conner

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:27 PM

Hope:


My research topic is looking at the effectiveness of
online learning at my county's local
night
-
time alternative high school. In most of my articles researching my topic, I have seen
similar findings to what you shared in your reviews this week. The blended approach to
online (web
-
based) learning appears to
give the best results.


Tonia


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-
articles

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Re:Via
-
Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Milton Stephenson

Date:

July 2, 2011 2:53 PM

Hope, our research approaches are very similar. We both want to get responses from
students and teachers to gain
feedback on a teaching method, and we also want to be able
to compare this data with quantitative information. Your approach should give you a clear
picture of the difference between scores of teachers who use blended instruction and those
who do not becau
se you are covering all angles of the instructional process.


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Data Collection Strategies

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Re:Via
-
Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 2, 2011 4:50 PM

Hope,


Our research questions are quite different, but I have learned
from your approach how I
could possibly improve my approach. I am intending to use surveys to obtain initial data
and had planned to interview students and parents for more detailed information. However,
the time involved for several interviews could be a
limitation, but focus groups could be
more effective. You may have mentioned using focus groups before, but I had not thought
about them for my research until I just read this post.



Thank you for the information! Good luck with your research!

Susan


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-
Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Re:Lusk
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

William Brett Dotson

Date:

July 2, 2011 4:32 PM

Delyn,


My research is different from yours in two ways. One, you're focusing on the students and
I'm focusing on the
teachers. Two, I'll be using a mixed approach and you're only collecting
quantitative data. Good Luck!


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-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Re:Lusk
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tonia Conner

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:21 PM

Delyn:


While
our topics are similar in nature regarding using technology for testing and online(web
-
based) learning, we are taking different approaches to our research. My research will take a
mixed research approach, collecting both quantitative and qualitative data.
Good luck with
your research! I'm interested to see what you find out. My middle school is beginning to
offer EOCTs for Math 1 and Physical Science for high school credit but are still fearful of
leaving the paper
-
pencil.



Tonia


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-
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Data Collection Strategies

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Re:Case


Data Used in the Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Floyd Fishel

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:12 PM

Robert,


How will the information gathered from article 8 impact your questionnaire that will gather
information for the quantitative portion of y
our study? It seams you could create subsets of
questions that align to provide specific feedback to either all or some of the 8 ingredients of
collaboration. In doing so a bridge could be built towards further research that researches a
connection between

the 8 ingredients and determining if one of the 8 areas is essential for
any of the other 7 to exist or if they all exist independent of each other. Once again,
another quality article to provide a clear and definite approach to your study.


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Case


Data Used in the Articles

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Re:Case


Data Used in the Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

David Moon Munoz

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:38 PM

Rob, I'm a big proponent of communication among all stakeholders to achieve a richer
experience. In ur 7th, this concept is apparent
as the professionals worked together to
accomplish growth. I suggest u do the same moving forward in proving ur topic. I think the
articles r solid and in the right direction.


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Subject:

Re:Launey
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Fo
ur

Author:

Milton Stephenson

Date:

July 2, 2011 2:45 PM


Tina, though we are both focused on a mixed approach, our research studies are different in
that I am focused on teachers and students while you are focused on the responses of
media specialists. Y
our research topic is very large in that you are interested in data for all
of Cobb County, and I was intrigued by one the questions you asked in your post: is better
to sacrifice the sample size in favor of obtaining more precise data, or focus on getting

a
larger number of responses to less specific questions. That is a very important question that
will guide your research going forward. How will you answer that question?



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-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Re:Case


Data & Data Collection S
trategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 9:51 PM

Rob,

Our research is similar in that we are looking at some aspect of the school media center. In
your case, the school library media specialist will use available
technology. In my case, the
school library media specialist will collaborate with the classroom teacher. And, similarly, we
will both collect data that is qualitative and quantitative.

I am interested to see what types of online technology you will use and

how. At first, I
really wanted to include the use of technology into my research, and I still am, but I don't
know that any data will be collected on that topic. I hope you will share your findings with
us so we can use those technologies as well :)


Than
ks!

Shannon


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Data & Data Collection Strategies

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Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Floyd Fishel

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:02 PM

Robert,



Our areas of study have common thread that focuses on the effect of proper implementation
of

available technologies and the overall result it has on the student. A collaborative
experience should benefit the student for it to be effective. At times, educators collaborate
for the sake of collaboration and the ends don't always justify the means. T
herefore, the
focus of your study will bring to light areas for improvement as well as strengths that are
already present. I look forward to the end results.


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Subject:

Re:J. Smith
-

Data used in Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

James Bartlett

Date:

July 2, 2011 7:12 PM

Jennifer,



I found both of your article summaries interesting. The one on sustained silent reading
shows that students of any age have to be held accountable. I have a class right

now ( not
this one) that has lots of weekly reading. However, NONE of the assessments are drawn
from the reading. Some people didn't even buy the $85 book. I wish,I was one of
them.There is little point in asking most third graders to sit and read silentl
y, without
requiring feedback. Of course there will be a few that may love to read, but the majority are
still still emerging as readers. Few kids realize that reading is a survival skill and they need
lots of practice. Most need extrinsic motivation, befo
re the intrinsic motivation sets in , if it
ever does.


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Re:J. Smith
-

Data used in Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Frances Bishop

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:08 PM

Jennifer,

I enjoyed reading your post this week on motivation and its
impact on reading. My articles
this week were different from your articles, they focused on interaction among online
learners and barriers to distance education in rural schools. The first article stated student
interaction is dictated by each content area

or discipline. I found this interesting because it
counted students questions and comments among student interaction. It is similar in way to
a point made student sharing books. If students are more likely share books they are more
likely to read.


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ply to: J. Smith
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Re:J.Smith
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tina Launey

Date:

July 1, 2011 9:20 PM

Jennifer, you and I are both interested in understanding what motivates children to read.
You are approaching this topic from the
perspective of exploring how Accelerated Reader
impacts student motivation, while I am interested in learning whether or not reluctant
readers are more motivated to read eBooks than print books. Are you only surveying
students, or will you be talking with
teachers and/or the media specialist as well?


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Re:J.Smith
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 2, 2011 1:03 PM

Jennifer,


I read your reply to Katie, and I have had similar experiences. My daughter's elementary
school had promoted AR and seemed to have wonderful results. I thought all students were
encouraged by AR. When she was in 2nd grade, the classes had contests and list
ed the top
students in each class each week in their parent newsletters. Then it came out that some of
the students were taking tests for others
--
I couldn't believe cheating in the 2nd grade!
Some other teachers said the 2nd grade teachers brought it on th
emselves. Our middle
school requires a password so that teachers can make sure that students are only taking
tests for themselves. My daughter (now going into the 7th grade) and some of her friends
have discussed that they would never take tests for someon
e else. Why give someone else
credit for what you've read?



I am interested in hearing the results of your research. I hope that AR proves to be effective
since I like it and hope to promote it when I become a media specialist. However, I have
learned
through yours and other students' discussions that it doesn't necessarily work well
for everyone. I hope we can all find something that works well and takes different learning
styles into account (but when dealing with students is there ever "a one size fi
ts all"
program?). Maybe we won't have to completely do away with AR but just find an alternative
for other students. Do you think sustained silent reading could be incorporated into AR?


Good luck with your research!

Susan


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-
Data & Da
ta Collection Strategies

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Re:J.Sm
ith
-
Data & Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tonia Conner

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:12 PM

Jennifer:


At first glance our research topics seem to differ, yet there are some similarities between
them. While yours looks at student readin
g and mine at online learning, they both focus on
using technology
-
based tools. Motivation plays an essential role in both of their successes.
You mentioned several reasons for what motivates students to learn and to read in your
second article review. Did

the article mention anything regarding a media or technology link
to motivating to students?


Tonia


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-

Data Collection Strategies

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Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 1:36 PM

Jennifer,

I
certainly hope the results will show an effectiveness using this strategy!


Thanks,

Shannon


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-

Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Re:Hensley
-

Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 1:35 PM

Hi Delyn,

Yes it does app
ear that our data collection will be similar.

As far as the qualitative data to determine the levels of the collaboration, I may be able to
include questions that compare the levels of collaboration from the years 2010
-
2011 and
2011
-
2012 since the media sp
ecialist and the teacher will be the same for both academic
years.

I'm not planning on collecting any of the data this summer. I'm actually not sure of the
timeline of our research, ie when we will be implementing our research. I'm hoping Dr.
Baylen will c
larify this for us.

Thanks for your question!


Shannon


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Data Collection Strategies

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Re:Hensley
-

Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 1:40 PM

Lisa,

I think it would be easier if I only included
quantitative data. But, like you said, there is a
need for qualitative data and it would be more comprehensive to include it. So, I am going
to try my best to use it to determine the levels of the collaboration.


Shannon


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llection Strategies

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Re:Hensley
-

Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

David Moon Munoz

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:30 PM

Shannon, I think it will be prudent to use face
-
to
-
face interaction to gather the quantitative
data. I believe it gives more validity to your argument
.


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-

Data Collection Strategies

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Subject:

Re:DSmith
-
Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Katie Adams

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:45 PM

Doreen,


Reading your post was very enlightening. I had
never heard of DRM before. You did an
excellent job explaining what it is and why it is relevant for the eBook market. It is definitely
a concern that eBook publishers should seriously consider. Nice post!


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Articles

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Re:DSmith
-
Data Collection Strategies

Topic:

Discuss
ion Four

Author:

Tina Launey

Date:

July 1, 2011 9:17 PM

Doreen, I continue to be very interested in your research process! While we are both
interested in eBook implementation in public school settings, your sample population is
much smaller (which will
work in your favor, I think!). You are also interested in finding out
whether the print or electronic book is preferred, while I am exploring the possible impact of
socioeconomic status in accessing these resources.


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rategies

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Subject:

Re:Martin Data

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Milton Stephenson

Date:

July 2, 2011 2:24 PM

Lisa, your research approach is different from mine in that I am looking at more of a mixed
approach, and I will be dealing with students who are in the middle school range. I want to
u
se quantitative data, as you do, but I also want to use qualitative data in the form of
surveys/questionnaires and interviews. A major part of what I want look at is student
commentary, but in your case, I do not think that would be very effective. The res
ponses of
K
-
2 students would not add a tremendous amount to your research findings.


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Subject:

Re:Martin Data

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

William Brett Dotson

Date:

July 2, 2011 4:38 PM

Lisa,


Your study is similar to mine in that you want to know about teachers'
using technology.
Where we differ is you have narrowed your focus down to a certain group and program. I'm
also concerned about my topic being too broad and might have to narrow my focus as well.
Good Luck with your research!


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Subject:

Re:Martin Data

Topic:

Discussion
Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:00 PM

Wow Lisa,

You have a lot of available technology! That is great! This will come in handy for your study
so that you can utilize current, up to date, strategies for your treatment.

I can understand
your statement about wanted to collect qualitative and quantitative data. I
want to do that, too, but I'm not exactly sure how to do it for the qualitative data, yet. Well,
I know how, but I'm not sure how effective it will be. I want to use surveys, quest
ionnaires,
and/or interviews to determine the level of collaboration that happens between the media
specialist and the teacher, but that would only be two people (myself and the media
specialist). Because it would only include two people, I'm not sure if t
he data would be
remarkable...

Similarly, we will both collect quantitative data. Like you, I find quantitative data to be
cleaner. It is cut and dry... what you see is what you get, cold hard facts. Personally, I like
the cold hard facts approach because
it is decisive and clear.

Best of luck!


Shannon


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Subject:

Re:Hensley
-

Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 1:10 PM

Hi Rob,

Don't be embarrassed. I'm sure many of us (including myself) didn't think about the
frequency of
collaboration between media specialist and administration versus that between
the media specialist and teachers.

But, after I read this information, I immediately thought about all the "projects" that our
principal has asked our media specialist to do... S
omeone has to do them and our principal
doesn't want to ask teachers to perform another task...

Your research really could prove a valuable tool for teachers and media specialists to
employ in order to increase the quality and quantity of collaboration. I
sure hope it is
effective :)


Shannon


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-

Articles

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Subject:

Re:Hensley
-

Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Frances Bishop

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:38 PM

Shannon,

I enjoyed reading your articles this week.
I really enjoyed reading the first article about
collaboration. I think the level of collaboration does depends on the willingness of the
teachers and the media specialist, time for planning and relationships. I also agree that
collaboration is strong admi
nistration and will vary among teachers. I am still not really sure
how social networking fits into collaboration.


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Articles

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Subject:

Re:Adams
-
data used in articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tina Launey

Date:

July 1, 2011 9:26 PM

Katie, I find it very interesting
that the authors in your second article found that AR's
effectiveness decreases as students age. It prompts me to wonder what methods can be
used to motivate students to read as they move from elementary school into middle and
high school? Is there somethi
ng in particular that makes AR *less* effective for older
students?


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data used in articles

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Subject:

Re:Adams
-
data used in articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 2, 2011 12:06 PM

Katie,


In regards to your first article su
mmary, what types of software was being used? I have
observed schools who used software for math and reading, but I think most has been to
help struggling students. The ones I remember had each student at a computer progressing
through the programs at his/
her own pace. Did the programs in the articles have every
student at a computer or did the teachers implement through an interactive board? I think
the finding that teachers at the higher schools viewed the reports is significant to our paying
attention to

data of our students.


Your second article about AR stated that "no extrinsic incentives were used." Others in this
class have commented that they have been associated with schools who promote and
encourage AR and schools who use it but don't really promo
te it. My children's elementary
school used to have an AR carnival, which seemed to be a motivating factor. The more
points you earned, the more activities you could do or rides you could ride at the carnival. A
certain level of points for each grade level

gave a student unlimited access to everything at
the carnival. I'm curious if the AR participation has been affected by discontinuing the
carnival. Students now have prizes throughout the year, but they don't seem to match the
carnival. Will your study ac
count for different levels of promotion of AR by the
teachers/schools? Do you think the motivation will be different in schools depending on the
emphasis of AR by the school?



Good luck with your research!

Susan


In Reply to: Adams
-
data used in articles

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Subject:

Re:Munoz
-

Data

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 2, 2011 5:27 PM

David,


While I think we both have a goal of improving the quality of life for our students (yours the
physical health and mine the reading ability), our research projects are quite
different. I
want to improve parental involvement in children's reading habits; so technology may or
may not be involved in my research, depending on the parent/child interactions. I think
encouraging the use of technology to promote physical education is
a great idea. I know my
daughter loves DDR! She likes to improve her rating on each dance that she does, and she
likes doing the "workout mode." I can see where it can be motivating to students.



Good luck with your research!

Susan


In Reply to: Munoz
-

Data

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Subject:

Re:Munoz
-

Data

Topic:

Disc
ussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 8:22 PM

David,

I have to agree with Susan in that our research is aimed at helping students, but in different
ways. I hope to see students increase achievement in the subjects of Science and Social
Studies while you are hoping to improve their physical fitness and health levels. Honestly, I
beleive if your body is healthy (and functioning properly) your brain will have what it needs
to be more successful academically as well.

I am excited about your
research and hope your findings are significant.


Shannon


In Reply to: Re:Munoz
-

Data

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Subject:

Re:Munoz
-

Data

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Katie Adams

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:21 PM

David,


I love your idea of integrating technology games like Dance, Dance Revolution! into the
Physical
Education curriculum. I think kids would really respond well to this type of
program.



Your study and mine will be different because yours will be experimental, with a control
group and comparison group, and mine be non
-
experimental, with only one group o
f
participants.



I really love your plan for your study, and I can't wait to see what you discover!


In Reply to: Munoz
-

Data

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Subject:

Re:Munoz
-

Data

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tonia Conner

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:37 PM

David:


Your research uses an interesting approach to add technology
to enhance your physical
education curriculum. My research differs from your in that technology is essentially the sole
element of the curriculum as I am studying the effectiveness of online (web
-
based) learning
at my county's local night
-
time alternative
high school.


Tonia


In Reply to: Munoz
-

Data

Reply

F
orward

Subject:

Re:Bishop
-
Data

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Shannon Hensley

Date:

July 2, 2011 8:29 PM

Lisa,

Interestingly something similar happened to me, too. I thought I was only going to be
looking at quantitative data for my research by comparing

Science and Social Studies CRCT
scores from last year when there was no collaboration between the media specialist and
classroom teacher to next years scores while there will be collaboration. However, through
the review of the literature I realize that t
here are different levels of collaboration and that it
would be beneficial to look at the level of collaboration taking place during this treatment...
so I have decided that some qualitative data in the form of a questionnaire/interview/survey
might be hel
pful to determine the level of collaboration taking place.

It's ironic that we both came to a similar conclusion in the same week. Good luck!


Shannon


In Reply to: Re:Bishop
-
Data

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Subject:

Re:Bishop
-
Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

James Bartlett

Date:

July 2, 2011 6:52 PM


Frances,



You first article echos some of the content of my first article. Both article raise questions
about student interaction in online classes. My journal article was about online music
learning, however, due to the kids' ages they could not be at home alone. T
he research was
done in a classroom;each kid at a computer.Even though they were in the same room the
students were encouraged to use e
-
mail to communicate.


I do think it is the format and not the subject that will dictate interaction. Distance learning
p
latforms with chat rooms and, discussion, board and e
-
mail will facilitate if not encourage
student interaction.


What you wrote about descriptive research, fits a lot of

my articles. I have not found any articles that use purely quantitative research. Des
criptive
research IS very specific and difficult to generalize. I tend to agree with you that if it is
limited in scope as to not have interdisciplinary applications, why bother? However,I have
found that it is difficult to find research on my topic that h
as depth. I'm finding lots of
questionnaire and surveys and narratives, but not a lot of numbers.



In Reply to: Bishop
-
Articles

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Subject:

Re:Bishop
-
Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Frances Bishop

Date:

July 2, 2011 9:44 PM

James,

When was conducting my research also I found alot of
narratives too. Narratives are great
for background information but I am not sure how they fit into the overall research
structure.


In Reply to: Re:Bishop
-
Articles

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Re:Bishop
-
Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tonia Conner

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:32 PM

Frances:


The information you

shared from your second article bears some importance to my research
study, especially the section on "Distance Education in Rural Schools" and the "Methods"
section at the end. I'm researching the effectiveness of online learning at my county's local
alt
ernative night
-
time high school. With the number of courses that are offered there and
the limited amount of classrooms and faculty, online learning was a good option. I will take
the information from this article into consideration as I continue with my r
esearch proposal.
Thanks for sharing!


Tonia


In Reply to: Bishop
-
Articles

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Subject:

Re:Bishop
-
Articles

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Frances Bishop

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:40 PM

Tonia,

You are very welcome.


In Reply to: Re:Bishop
-
Articles

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Subject:

Re:Adams
-
Data & Data Collection St
ategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tina Launey

Date:

July 1, 2011 9:30 PM

Katie, you and I are both interested in understanding what motivates students to read.
Whereas you are planning to study the impact of reading incentive programs, I am focusing

on technologies that allow students to interact with texts in new ways and what, if any,
impact technology (specifically, eBooks and eReaders) can have on reluctant readers. I'm
curious to know what the older students will say in their reflections on what

motivates them
to read...to what degree will they be aware of what motivates them and how much it
changes over time?


In Reply to: Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

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Subject:

Re:Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Susan Crawford

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:41 AM

Katie,


Our projects and our methods are very similar. We could almost take our questions and
swap "parental involvement" and "Accelerated Reader" and have the same projects. I am
planning to collect quantitative and qualitative data through surveys and
interviews, as well.
Our main difference is your use of teachers and my use of parents.


Good luck with your research!

Susan


In Reply to: Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

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Subject:

Re:Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Milton Stephenson

Date:

July 2, 201
1 1:07 PM

Katie your well
-
rounded research approach is similar to the type of approach that I am
focused on. Being able to get personal accounts of how effective the Accelerated Reader
program is as well as what motivates students are important in measuri
ng effectiveness.
Coupled with quantitative data, the effects of Accelerated Reader program can really be
examined in a way that can help our students.


In Reply to: Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

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Subject:

Re:Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Frances
Bishop

Date:

July 2, 2011 10:12 PM

Katie,

I think your research question is a good one. I notice that you have done a great job of
narrowing your focus. I notice that you doing a mixed approach to your research topic
which I think is great idea. I am very

interested in your results because Accelerated reader
is such a hot topic among the media specialist that I know.


In Reply to: Adams
-
Data & Data Collection Stategies

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Subject:

Re:Articles 7 and 8

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

William Brett Dotson

Date:

July 2, 2011 4:26 PM

Hope,

The one indi
vidual that was chosen was considered to be the best for the research. There
was a criteria the researcher was looking for and the one teacher's paper fit that criteria. I
couldn't understand why the research wouldn't want to use all the data that was coll
ected.
From all that we have read results are more valid with more data and a large population.


In Reply to: Re:Articles 7 and 8

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Subject:

Re:Articles 7 and 8

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Floyd Fishel

Date:

July 2, 2011 11:02 PM

William,



How will the findings of the second article i
nfluence the creative of your questionnaire? It
might be interesting to classify 10 questions per major category and then do a statistical
analysis for each area to find out the variations between each subset of questions. In doing
so, it might offer insig
ht for future studies to gain a better understanding about each of the
six categories and how they individually influence the integration of technology.


In Reply to: Articles 7 and 8

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Subject:

Re:Fishel
-

Data and Strategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Milton Stephenson

Date:

July 2, 2011
12:24 PM

Floyd, one again I have learned something from you. Last week I 'borrowed' your idea
about adding a closed
-
ended survey to my research approach, specifically because it can
help me narrow the focus of the interviews that I have later in my resear
ch. Mentioning the
sequence of your questioning and the sampling are concepts that I was not focused on.
Your research approach seems to be very strong and I can strengthen my approach by
concentrating on the same things.


In Reply to: Fishel
-

Data and
Strategies

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Subject:

Re:Fishel
-

Data and S
trategies

Topic:

Discussion Four

Author:

Tonia Conner

Date:

July 2, 2011 9:43 PM

Floyd:


My research study will focus on the effectiveness of online learning at the local alternative
night
-
time high school. Similar to your study, I will also be using a m
ixed research
approach. One of the things I'm hoping to find as a part of my qualitative data is the same
as your main focus of how the use of technology in the learning environment effected
students' perception of the learning experience. I think that wil
l be a key factor in
determining the effectiveness of the online learning in my research.


Tonia


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Data and Strategies

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Data and Strategies