A Semantic Approach for Classification of Web Ontologies - It works!

jumentousmanlyInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

21 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 22 μέρες)

59 εμφανίσεις

liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
1
1
A Semantic Approach 
for Classification of Web 
Ontologies 
M. Fahad, N. Moalla, A. Bouras
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
2
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
3
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
3
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Virtual communities on Semantic Web
•Notion of ontologies
–conceptualization and elicitation of the domain 
knowledge
–in a machine understandable and processable 
manner
•Due to their capacities of decidability and 
expressiveness, ontologies have played a fundamental 
role for describing semantics of data  every where, for 
Information storage, processing, retrieval, decision 
making
•Significant no of online ontologies raise new challenges
4
Introduction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Searching the relevant knowledge is one of the main 
problems for the current and the emerging semantic web and 
ontology based knowledge management business 
applications, too.
•This requires proper classification of the web ontologies that 
is essential to many tasks, such as:
–development of ontologies directories on web [Dmoz, 07],
–focused crawling for ontology retrieval [Ehrig, 05],
–improving quality of search [Pan, 06],
–concept specific modular ontology analysis [Seidenberg, 
06]
5
Introduction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Classificationis traditionally defined as a 
supervised learning problem in which a set of 
labelled data is used to train a classifier that 
can be used to label future examples  
[Mitchell, 97].
•Ontology Classificationis a challenging 
problem for efficient and effective ontology 
management and retrieval for the semantic 
web and enterprise ontology based business 
applications.
6
Introduction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Prior to Ontology classification, much work has been done 
for web page classification that aims at assigning a web 
page to one or more predefined category labels 
[Chakrabarti, 02].
•The current web is a heterogeneous infrastructure 
containing unstructured or semi‐structured data of various 
types. This opens up other number of classification 
research problems:
–web site classification [Peng, 02; Glover, 02],
–blog classification [Qu, 06], 
–image classification [Bosch, 07],
–semantic web page classification, etc. 
7
Introduction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•In recent years, many semantic web portals are 
developed to facilitate ontology searching, ranking 
and classification. 
•But, these existing approaches exploit keywords, 
phrases and termsabout ontologies rather than the 
semantic knowledge hidden within the structureof 
ontologies for their classification.
•The consequence is that the semantic of 
information knowledge is not understandable by 
machine and become a bottleneckin the process of 
ontology searching and retrieval on the Web.
8
Introduction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•This requires new approaches for ontology classification 
based on structural knowledge and semantics to meet the 
requirements and core challenges for current landscape of 
ontology based research.
•Thus, our main idea behind this work is to replace the plain 
text classificationalgorithm in the process of ontology 
classification with ontology specificclassification algorithm. 
•The proposed approach uses category ontologyrather than 
bag‐of‐words for classification of arbitrary ontology by 
analysing structure of knowledge hidden in ontologies.
9
Introduction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
10
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
10
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•There are many applications that make use of 
ontologies for the classification of web documents, 
emails, text categorization and many other tasks for 
knowledge management and retrieval.
•Grobelnik and Mladenic (2005) report
–classification of Web documents into large topic ontology
–exploiting content of the document to be classified
–information on the web page context which is obtained 
from the link structure of the Web 
11
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Taghva et al. (2003) propose
–ontology‐based system for classification of emails, 
–employing ontology that is later on applies rules for 
identification of features for classification of emails. 
–From the training set of emails, associated probabilities for 
features are calculated and used as a part of the feature 
vectors for an underlying Bayesian classifier.
•Wu et al. (2003) describe 
–A methodology for ontology‐based text categorization,
–In which the domain ontologies are automatically acquired 
through morphological rules and statistical methods.
12
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•The role of ontologies is magical in classifying objects in various 
enterprise applications and improving system‘s overall 
performance
•But, ontology classification itself is a problemwhich should be 
addressed in a semantic way for its own efficient management 
and retrieval for emerging semantic web.
•Learn from the experirences of current web,  if we dont focus on
key issue than emerging web would also suffer 
•With the passage of time semantic web is gaining much 
popularity and hence there is a significant growth seen in the 
ontology development and reuse.
•This increases the demands for searching of the relevant domain 
ontologies over the web.  
13
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Ontologies, especially those developed in OWL 
–Significantly complex data structures than mere web pages,
–OWL builds up several levels of complexity on top of the XML of
conventional web data.
–Constructs taxonomy, properties, relations, axiomatic 
definitions, etc.. 
•Moreover by defining terms on similar or the same concepts, often 
these ontologies overlap with each other. 
•For example, as mentioned in one of the research studies for the
development of web portal, Swoogle, searches over 300distinct 
terms that appear to stand for the only ‘Person’concept [Ding, 05].
•It is likely that large and complex ontologies will require a novel 
solution and a central index of ontologies for fulfillment of sound 
semantic web vision.
14
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Ontokhoj, a semantic web portal. [Patel, 03; Supekar, 03]
–allows engineers and software agents to retrieve trustworthy 
ontologies,
–expedite the process of ontology engineering through extensive reuse 
of ontologies
–exploits and extends the strategy of ranking based on citationsas 
used by Google PageRank, 
–uses semantic crawling technique to search and retrieve ontologies. 
–treats ontology as plain text and uses text classification algorithms for 
ontology classification
–which is the biggest drawback for ontology classification especially for 
overlapping ontologies because plain text classification algorithms 
only use keywords that results in poor performance and hence 
classifier’s accuracy compromises.
15
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Swoogle, a semantic web search engine. [Ding, 05]
–based on metadata engine and retrieval system for the 
semantic web
–makes use of multiple crawlers to find semantic web 
documents and ontologies by meta‐search. 
–does not  provide classification mechanism and does not 
use ontology context specific search for finding ontologies. 
16
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Ontosearch2 , a ontology search engine. [Pan, 06]
–developed to address the problem of finding ontologies 
appropriate for desired domains.
–makes use of the semantic entailments for searching 
rather
 
than only using keywords or metadata like
 
SWOOGLE and Ontokhoj.
–provides restricted query interface by keyword search 
only, and for ranking they use the citations to an ontology
 
or links to an object
 
within 
the
 Abox (assertional box) of 
ontology.
–provides Tbox (terminological box) searching facility, Abox 
searching mechanism and other
 
search directives by
 
allowing these restrictions
 
on the 
search
 query, and 
performs the search on the desired portion. 
17
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Ontolingua, ontology server. [Ontolingua, 10]
–facilitates us a distributed collaborative 
environment to browse, edit, create, modify and 
use ontologies
–requires user to first gets registered and then 
perform the desired piece of work
18
Related Work
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
19
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
19
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Ontologies, especially that are developed in OWL,
–are more than texts
–contain a lot of structural and context information
–in terms of classes, datatype properties, object 
properties, parent‐child relationships, description 
logic (DL) axioms, individuals, etc. 
•Therefore, plain text classification algorithms that 
benefit the web page classification are not much 
useful for ontology classification and searching 
on the semantic web. 
20
Ontology Classification Problem
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Hence, few recent developments are seen in literature for 
meeting the current challenges of semantic web.
•However, very little work has been done specifically for 
ontology classification, so first we define specific terms of 
ontology classification for promoting understandability based 
on terminology used in web page classification.
•The general problem of ontology classification can be divided 
into more specific problems depending upon
–the number of classes in the problem of interest,
–domain knowledge modeled in ontologies,
–and number of classes that can be assigned to ontology 
instance, etc.
21
Ontology Classification Problem
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Based on the number of classes in the problem, 
classification can be divided into binary, ternary, or 
multiclass ontology classification.
–Binary ontology classification
•Categorizes instance ontologies into exactly one of two 
classes. 
–Multiclass ontology classification
•Associates instance ontologies with more than two 
classes or categories.
22
Types of Ontology Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
23
Ontology Repository
Binary Classification
RDF
OWL
Example of Binary Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Based on the number of classes that can be assigned 
to instance ontology, classification can be divided 
into single‐label and multi‐label ontology 
classification.
–Single‐label strategy
•deals with assigning one and only one class label to 
each instance ontology
–Multi‐label strategy 
•deals with assigning more than one class to instance 
ontology 
24
Types of Ontology Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Based on the type of class assignment, 
classification can be divided into hard or soft 
ontology classification.
–Hard ontology classification
•determines whether an instance can either be or not 
be in a particular class.
–Soft ontology classification
•predicts an instance to be in some class with some 
likelihood and often a probability distribution across all 
classes.
25
Types of Ontology Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
26
Ontology
 
Repository
Sports
Music
B
usiness
Arts
Multi

Class
 
and
 
Single

Label
 
Hard
 
Classification
Example
 
of
 
Multi

Class
 
and
 
Single

Label
 
Hard
 
Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Based on the organization of categories, ontology 
classification can be taken as flat classification 
scheme or hierarchical classification.
–Flat ontology classification
•deals with the categories that are considered parallel.
–Hierarchical ontology classification
•deals with the categories that are organized in a hierarchical 
tree‐like structure (e.g., RDF(S) ontology), in which each 
category may have a number of subcategories.
27
Types of Ontology Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
28
Example of Flat Classification
Arts 
Sport
Movie
Magazine
Music       
Flat Classification
28
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
29
Example of Hierarchical Classification
29
Rock
29
Arts 
Sport
Movie
Magazine
Hierarchical 
Classification
Metal
Pop
Classical
Soft
Music       
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
30
Example of Hierarchical Classification
30
Rock
30
Arts 
Sport
Movie
Magazine
Hierarchical 
Classification
Metal
Pop
Classical
Soft
Music
       
Le
v
e
l
 
1
Le
v
e
l
 
1
Le
v
e
l
 
2
Le
v
e
l
 
2
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Based on the domain knowledge modeled in ontologies, 
classification can be divided into
 
subject, functional and
 
sentimental ontology
 
classification.
–Subject ontology classification
•categorizes ontologies depending on what is the domain and topicof 
ontologies, e.g., art, disease, business, sports, etc.
–Functional ontology classification
•determines the role that the ontology plays, e.g., admission ontology, 
personal home page ontology, patient examination ontology, etc.
–Sentimental ontology classification
•determines the messages or opinion that is presented in ontologies, 
e.g., message between business processes or stock exchange 
conditions, interaction between multi‐vendor semantic systems, 
author’s attitude in blog ontology, etc. 
31
Types of Ontology Classification
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
32
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
32
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•A semantic based ontology classifier, ONTCLASSIFIRE, aims at 
classifying ontologies in one or more predefined categoriesfor 
efficient ontology management and search. 
•First, there is a category ontologycontaining all the predefined 
categories as concepts
•Second, for each predefined category, there is a representative 
domain ontologyrather than bag of words for classification.
•ONTCLASSIFIREmatches domain ontology with the arbitrary 
ontologiesand calculates the match rank. 
•To meet the needs, we adopted a soft classification approach, 
where instance ontology is predicted to be in some class with 
some likelihood with a probability distribution across all classes.
33
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•For example, assume there are only four predefined 
categories, it specifies Match Rankfor multi‐class soft 
ontology classification of an arbitrary instance ontology Oa
across all domain ontologies of interest.
34
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
MatchRank Oa {
(book_ontology,  0.38),
(journal_ ontology,  0.58),
(ScientificMagazine_ontology,  0.24), 
(ConferenceProceeding_ontology,  0.74) 

liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
35
Example of Multi‐Class Soft Classification
Proceeding
Soft Classification
Arbitrary 
Ontology 
Journal
Book
Magazine
Rank: 0.24
Rank: 0.58
Rank: 0.74
Rank: 0.38
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Match Rank Calculations by ONTCLASSIFIRE
–The ONTCLASSIFIREgets the arbitrary ontology Oa
for 
classification. It starts the semantic similarity computation 
between the Oa and domain ontologies {Od1, Od2,…,Odn} of 
predefined categories. 
–It employs all the syntactic, structural and semantic 
knowledge present in the ontologies to compute the 
match rank so that arbitrary ontology should be assigned 
with a pre‐defined category label.
36
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
Where,
–Lcc’: Concept label similarity between c and c’
–Dcc’: Datatype properties similarity between c and c’
–Occ’: Object properties similarity between c and c’
–Pcc’:  Parent concepts similarity c and c’
–Hcc’: Children concepts similarity c and c’
–Acc’: DL Axiom similarity between c and c’
37
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
Sim (c, c’) = αLcc’+ βDcc’+ γOcc’+ µPcc’+ ΘHcc + ΩAcc’
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Once the similarities between the concepts of domain 
ontology Od
and arbitrary ontology Oa
are calculated, 
ONTCLASSIFIREthen calculates the match rank between Od
and Oa
by aggregating the weights of Sim (c, c’)as shown 
below.
38
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
MatchRank(Od 
, Oa) =  ∑
i=1..n
Sim (c, c’)i
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Concept Label Similarity (Lcc’).
–Label of concept is highly significant that comprise the 
utmost weight in the description of concepts. Lcc’
computes the correspondences between labels of 
concepts c and c’of ontologies Oa
and Od
.
•Concept Properties Similarity (Dcc’and Occ’).
–It is computed on basis of (i) Property name (ii) Range of 
property and (iii) Tags associated with that property. 
–Likewise, similarity between object properties (Occ’) is 
computed between concepts. 
39
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Concept Parent and Children similarity (Pcc’and Hcc’). 
–OWL ontology
•starts from top concept Thingthat captures 
everything. 
•allows multiple inheritances,
•Hence, Parent similarity requires computation of 
correspondences between all parent concepts. 
–Pcc’analyses whether the parents of concept c and c’
are semantically similar or not
–Hcc’checks their children concept similarity.
40
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•DL Axiom Similarity (Acc’).
–OWL classes are described through so‐called class 
descriptions (equivalent to DL axioms), e.g., 
–DL axioms define the context of concept increases the 
ability of classifier to make more accurate reasoning on 
concept for their semantic similarities
41
A Semantic approach for Classification of 
Web Ontologies
Publication concept can be represented as
{ Thesis ∏∃WrittenBy.Student } OR
{ Paper ∏∃ReviewedBy.Committee ∏∃>8 haslimit.Pages }  
accordingly to its context. 
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
42
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
42
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Firstly, we built the hierarchical category ontology for 
Librarythat contains several categories, e.g., Book,
 
Proceeding, Thesis, Journal, etc.
43
Experiment –Preliminary Results
Magazine
Journal
Proceeding
Th
esis
       
Book
Library
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Secondly, each category is elaborated with the domain ontology 
that enriches the semantics and differentiates the categories 
themselves. Figure 2 shows the fragment of category ontology, and 
domain ontologies of two categories Bookand Proceeding.
44
Experiment –Preliminary Results
BookProceeding
category
These categories are overlapping and hence The 
domain ontologies share common vocabulary in 
terms of concepts (e.g., Author, Publisher, etc.), 
properties (ISBN, Title, Price, etc.)and relations 
(e.g., collectionOf, formatType, etc.)between 
them.
These
 
cat
e
gories
 
are
 
overlapping
 
and
 
he
nce
 
The
 
domain
 
ontologies
 
sha
r
e
 
common
 
vocabulary
 
in
 
terms
 
of
 
concepts
 
(e.g.,
 
Author
,
 
Publisher
,
 
etc.)
,
 
properties
 
(
ISB
N
,
 
Title
,
 
Price
,
 
etc.)
and
 
relations
 
(e.g.,
 
collectionOf
,
 
formatType
,
 
etc.)
be
twee
n
 
them.
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•These categories are overlapping and hence the domain 
ontologies share common vocabularyin terms of concepts
 
(e.g., Author, Publisher, etc.), properties
 
(ISBN, Title, Price, 
etc.) and relations (e.g., collectionOf, formatType, etc.)
 
between them.
•The differentiated concepts and properties between these 
categories are assigned weights in domain ontologies so
 
that classification can be done more accurately on basis of 
specific differentiating aspects of each category.
–For example, concepts (Academic_Papers, Organizing 
Committee, Conference, etc.) and properties (presentedAt, peer
 
ReviewedBy, feedback, 
etc.)
 differentiate the category 
Conference Proceedingfrom Book, and hence provided with 
some weights. 
45
Experiment –Preliminary Results
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•When the arbitrary ontology Oa
comes, 
ONTCLASSIFIREcomputes the similarities 
between the domain ontologies and arbitrary 
ontology.
•Finally, on basis of calculated highest match rank, 
arbitrary ontology is assigned a label Proceeding, 
but the match rank is preserved in the knowledge 
base which could be used for future perspective 
of query answering for ontology retrieval.
46
Experiment –Preliminary Results
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
47
Arbitrary 
ontology
Arbitrary
 
ontology
Experiment
 

P
reliminary
 
Results
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
48
Experiment –Preliminary Results
Match Rank 
Calculation
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
49
Outlines
Introduction
Related Work 
Ontology Classification Problem
Semantic based Ontology Classifire
Preliminary Results/Experiment
Lessons to Learn and Conclusion
49
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Classification practice has long been adopted in digital libraries and 
information systems to facilitate user in clarifying his information need 
and to structure search results for browsing.
•From last decade, it has received great attention in the context of helping 
users to cope with the vast amount of information on the Web. For 
emerging semantic web, complex structure and semantics of ontologies 
presents additional challenges as compared to traditional text 
classification and web page classification. 
•One of the core challenges of current semantic web research is to develop 
semantic web portals that assist individual knowledge engineers to search 
terms and ontologies, and serve tools and web‐agents seeking data and 
knowledge in sound semantic manner
•But, state‐of‐the‐art ontology semantic web portals are not effectively 
meeting the demands of ontology classification for ontology based 
enterprise business applications and upcoming semantic web. 
50
Conclusion
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•Classification of ontologies is essential for ontology, concept or 
information management and retrieval tasks on semantic web.
•It improves the quality of web search for specific ontologies and 
concepts.
•In addition, classification of the web ontologies is crucial tasks to promote 
focused crawling for ontology retrieval and concept specific modular 
ontology analysis.
•Usually search results are presented in a ranked list for assistance to 
users. Soft classification mechanism exploited by ONTCLASSIFIREcould be 
more useful to users in this aspect. 
•The use of ontology matching for ontology classification provides higher 
accuracy of classification especially in the case of overlappingontologies.
•This work can benefit construction, maintenance or expansion of 
ontologies directories on the semantic web. 
51
Conclusion
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
•ONTCLASSIFIREmakes use of context specific similarity measures to fit the 
ontologies into a predefined directory of general categories. 
•It replaces the plain text classification algorithm in the process of ontology 
classification with ontology specific classification algorithm. 
•Instead of using keyword search with bag‐of‐words, it uses basic domain 
ontology for each predefined category and benefit from ontology 
matching research to find the correspondences between the domain
ontology and arbitrary ontology for classification purpose.
•Preliminary results show that, ONTCLASSIFIRE, forms a suitable basis for 
ontology classification. One of the ongoing researches is to train the 
ONTCLASSIFIREon real world ontology repository dataset such as dmoz, 
and present the empirical result of our semantic based techniquefor 
classification of ontologies. At the same time, we are building the retrieval 
mechanisms of proposed framework.
52
Conclusion and Future Direction
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
References
•[Bosch, 07] Bosch, A., Zisserman, A., Munoz., X.: Image classification using random forests and 
ferns. In ICCV, 2007
•[Chakrabarti, 02] Chakrabarti, S., Joshi, M.M., Punera, K., Pennock, D.M.: The structure of broad 
topics on the web. In Proc. 11th Intl. Conference on WWW, NY, 251–262. ACM 2002
•[Ding, 05] Ding, L., Pan, R., Finin, T., Joshi, A., Peng, Y., Kolari, P.: Finding and Ranking Knowledge on 
the Semantic Web, In Proc. 4th International Semantic Web Conference. Springer LNCS 3729, 156–
170 2005
•[Dmoz, 07] Corporation, N.C., (2007). The dmoz open Directory Project (ODP).    
http://www.dmoz.com/.
•[Ehrig, 05] Ehrig , M., and Maedche, A.: Ontology‐Focused Crawling of Web Documents, In Proc. 
ACM symposium on Applied computing, Melbourne, Florida, 1174 –1178 2005
•[Fahad, 07] Fahad, M., Qadir, M.A., Noshairwan, M.W., Iftakhir, N.: DKP‐OM: A Semantic Based 
Ontology Merger. In Proc. 3rd International Conference I‐Semantics 2007, Graz, Austria, 313‐322
•[Glover, 02] Glover, E.J., Tsioutsiouliklis, K., Lawrence, S., Pennock, D.M., Flake, G.W.: Using web 
structure for classifying and describing web pages. In Proc.  11th Intl. Conference on World Wide 
Web, NY, 562–569 ACM 2002
•[Grobelnik, 05] Grobelnik, M., Mladenić, D.: Simple classification into large topic ontology of Web 
documents, Journal of Computing and Information Technology,Vol. 13(4) 2005
•[Mitchell, 97] Mitchell, T.M.: Machine Learning. New York, McGraw‐Hill 1997
•[Ontolingua, 10] Ontolingua Website, 
http://www.ksl.stanford.edu/software/ontolingua/
53
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
References
•[Pan, 06] Pan, J.Z., Thomas, E., Sleman, D.: ONTOSEARCH2: Searching and Querying Web 
Ontologies. In: Proc. of WWW/Internet’06. pp. 211–218 2006 
•[Patel, 03] Patel, C., Supekar, K., Lee, Y., Park, E.K.: OntoKhoj: A semanticWeb portal for ontology 
searching, ranking and classification. In Proc. of the 5th ACM Intl. Workshop on Web Info. and Data 
Management, 58–61 2003
•[Peng, 02] Peng, X., Choi, B.: Automatic web page classificationin a dynamic and hierarchical way, 
In Proc. IEEE International Conference on Data Mining (ICDM’02), Washington, DC, 386–393. IEEE 
CS 2002
•[Qu, 06] Qu, H., Pietra, A.L., Poon, S.: Automated blog classification: Challenges and pitfalls, 
Computational Approaches to Analyzing Weblogs, AAAI Press 2006
•[Seidenberg, 06] Seidenberg, J., Rector, A.: Web ontology segmentation: Analysis, classification and 
use. In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the World Wide Web (WWW). ACM, 
New York, 13–22 2006
•[Supekar, 03] Supekar, K., Patel, C., Lee, Y.: Characterizing Quality of Knowledge on Semantic Web, 
University of Missouri ‐Kansas City, Technical Report, 2003
•[Taghva, 03] Taghva, K., Borsack, J., Coombs, J., Condit, A., Lumos, S., Nartker,T.: Ontology‐based 
Classification of Email, In Proc. Intl. Conference on Information Technology: Computers and 
Communications,194‐200 2003 
•[Wu, 03] Wu, S.H., Tsai, T.H., Hsu, W.L.: Text Categorization Using Automatically Acquired Domain 
Ontology, In Proc. 6th international workshop on Information retrieval with Asian languages, 138‐
145 Japan 2003
•[Yahoo, 07] Yahoo!, Inc. (2007). Yahoo! http://www.yahoo.com/.
54
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
55
55
A Semantic Approach for Classification 
of Web Ontologies
M. Fahad, N. Moalla, A. Bouras
Thankyou
 
for
 
your
 
attention!
liesp.insa‐lyon.fr
56
56
A Semantic Approach for Classification 
of Web Ontologies
M. Fahad, N. Moalla, A. Bouras
Thankyou
for
 
your
 
attention!
?