Symmetrical Partitioning

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Symmetrical Partitioning
of the Row
.
In
Schoenberg's Wind Quintet,
Ope
26
JOHN
MAXWELL
Schoenberg
completed his Wind Quintet,
Ope
26, in August
1924,
after
having worked on the manuscript since April
1923. It is one of his earliest twelve-tone compositions.
Felix Greissle stated that it was
"the first large
work in
which
Schoenberg
has substantiated the laws of compositions
with twelve tones."l The first performance was on
September
16,
1924.
The Wind Quintet is in four movements: an opening sonata
form,
a scherzo and
trio,
a slow movement, and a concluding
rondo. The
third
movement is a
broad ternary form
with a
substantial coda section. The
entire
quintet is based on
the following tone
row:
A
6
B
8
c*
C
10
9
Bb D E
7
11 1
F* G#
F
352
As can be noted quickly from the pitch class numbers, the
two hexachords of the row each contain five notes of a whole
tone scale plus one note not in the scale. From the matrix
formed by this
row
(see Example 1), it is evident that
every
row form is divided into hexachords of primarily odd
or
even
lArnold Schoenberg, Quintett fuer Floete,
Oboe,
Klari­
nette,
Horn
und Fagott,
Ops
26,
introductory
notes by Felix
Greissle (Vienna: Universal-Edition, 1925), p.
ii.
2 INDIANA
THEORY
REVIEW
Example 1. Matrix of Row for Quintet,
Ope
26.
0
4
6
8
10
9
7
11 1 3 5
2
A B
8
0
2 4
6 5 3
7
9 11 1
10
6
10
D
0
2 4
3
1 5
7
9 11 8
C
4
8
10 0
2
1 11 3 5
7
9 6
2
6 8
10
0
11 9 1 3 5
7
4
3
7
9 11
1
0 10
2 4
6 8 5
5 9 11 1
3
2
0
4
6 8
10
7
A
1 5
7
9
11
10
8
0
2 4
6
3
11 3 5
c
7
9 8 6
10 0
2 4
1
D
9 1 3 5
7
6
4
8
10 0
2
11
7
11 1 3 5
4 2
6 8
10 0
9
B
10
2 4
6
8
7
5 9 11 1 3
0
pitch class numbers, corresponding to the whole tone
structure of the hexachords. Although Schoenberg does not
make use of its semi-combinatorial properties, the row is
hexachordally combinatorial at
Po
and Ill'
PI
and
IO'
etc.
The row is not prime combinatorial (that is, no transposi­
tion of the first hexachord of
Po
will produce its second
hexachord)

There are other invariant aspects of the row,
however, that result from the fact that the first five notes
of each hexachord (the five whole-tone scale notes) are
transpositionally equivalent. Notes of order numbers
0-4
of
Po
can be found as order numbers
6-10
of
P
6
, 6-10
of
Po
can
be found as
0-4
of
P
7
,
etc. Example 2 shows the number of
invariants to be expected under transposed inversion. The
semi-combinatoriality of the row is evidenced by the lack of
invariants at
Ill"
Five invariants are found at I4 and
I
6

Because of the transpositional equivalence of the first five
notes of each of the two hexachords of the row, five-note
segments of corresponding prime forms and five-note segments
of corresponding I forms retain the same order. Examples of
these invariant orderings have been marked with brackets in
SCHOENBERG, OPe
26
3
Example 2. Inversional Invariants.
Transpositional Level
of Inversion
(Set
Type
0
234
6
8)
10 11
12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19
1
10
III
4 2
4 2 5
2 5 2 4
2 4
0
Number of
Invariants
the matrix of Example 1.
Schoenberg
exploits this invariant ordering in mm.
48-50
in the oboe line (see Example 3). In m. 48 the oboe takes
Example 3. Quintet, III, mm.
48-50.
Copy
tight
1925 by
Universal
Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude
Schoenberg.
Used
by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
up a linear presentation of
16
begun previously by the
clarinet in m. 46.
Upon
completing the five-note segment
D-Bb-Ab-Gb-E (11 7 5 3 1) that
16
holds in common with
III
(see Example 1), the oboe continues with notes from Ill: F-
G-Eb-C*-B-A-C
(2 4
0 10
8 6 9), thus using the invariant
segment to shift smoothly from one row form to another.
The whole tone differentiation or "odd-even" dichotomy of
the hexachords is not used often by
Schoenberg
in this move­
ment to produce explicit statements of the whole tone scale.
However, such linear statements do appear in other movements
of the Quintet, such as in the horn and flute lines from the
scherzo shown in Example 4.
4 INDIANA
THEORY
REVIEW
T
0
Example 4. Quintet, II, mm.
400-405.
(p.)
~r
0
I ___________
( P3)
'L
'I..
al!.
It,.,
~",J
...
qt_t.~t.
t'
~t
.
,
.
~,,~
~o~
0
if
.,
.IM.I --------
"
t.
.b 
0
Ill
...
....
~---
.ILl
,
""",~C-
,.I.
~----------
-
~.f'
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude Schoenberg.
Used by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
The final chord of the third movement is a whole tone
structure containing the last five notes of
RO
(The final
three measures are, in fact, constructed to form an inter­
esting alternation of "even" and "odd" whole tone collec­
tions. This can be seen in Example 5, in which the voice
Example 5.
PO-R
O
Voice-leading, Final Chord.
flute
0
)
oboe
8--11
8

clarinet
10--1--@-1--10
)
horn
4--7-3
7--4
)
bassoon
6--9-5
9--6
,.
leading of the final cadence is graphed. The central neigh­
bor note 2 is the pivotal note ending
Po
and beginning
RO.
SCHOENBERG, OPe
26
5
Although each hexachord of the row contains only five
members of a whole tone scale, the "extra" note in each
hexachord is positioned in the row so that repeated state­
ments of any given row form will produce an overlapping se­
quence of hexachords having all six notes of each whole tone
scale in succession. For example, beginning with pitch
class number 9 in Po (see the matrix in Example 1), by
repeating the row, we obtain the succession
9 7 11 1 3 5 2
0
4 6 8
10
and so on. This property allows
for an even stronger dichotomy of pitch content based on the
complementary whole tone scales, an example of which can be
observed in the canonic passage for oboe and clarinet, mm.
40-41
(see Example 6). Note how the transpositional
Example 6.
Mm. 40-41.
Etwas
flieJ3ender
'n
40
41
Fl
:R!
H"~~ I~~
..
~1 ';~
if
~.~
:ii:
4(':
Ob
I"
p-==
==-
-==
~
-=
~=--
~ ~
H".---..
h
Kl
IV
-::II:
RIll
ioo~:t
I~~n;~
}
'_1
~J;:ei:
1\
Hr
v
~--==~
bY'
b~
~
~
""
p~
l
r
Fg
---=
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude Schoenberg.
Used
by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
equivalence of the two hexachords of the row allows for
strict canon between segments of the same row form
(RIO).
Another example of whole tone division occurs at the begin­
ning of the canon between oboe and horn at mm. 61-62. The
two canonic voices divide a statement of R6 (see Example 7).
The row forms employed in the movement have been graphed
in Example 8. There are some strong relationships
Between
the row forms used and the form of the movement. The A or
main theme section (mm. 1-33) consists entirely of the four
basic row forms
PO' IO' R
O
'
and
RIO'
with the addition of I5
in mm. 8-15. There are' two short sections of freer con­
struction in which the pitch material is not clearly derived
from any row form
(mm. 20-21
and mm. 32-33). These areas
6 INDIANA
THEORY
REVIEW
Example 7.
Oboe
and Horn Canon.
~.A
,....
L:..
II 4

-
!a
iii
lL ...
:..

-
~ ~

e.
li.
........
...
fL
-
{
iII'':' l""
~
:p''''
...
..
j(
II
q
.,
CI
I
I
I
3
3
'I
';I
lot ...
\
Of
-
III~".
IIi> ...
f
.,
,,!""
Dill

f1II111
III
~
sfP
.,.
".
r
':a
JIo
~
...
!I
III
-
,
,
lIoo.
.oi!I.
..
11:
loI'
1:1.
I ....
i
..,
-
\~i
;''
bT ...
"'~
1
'i
:t
,
II
()
10
II
,
.;;,
,_ ;II
,
fill,.'
...!:LIB
.
loI'-
.... Dill .....
7
4~~

.....,;/
.,. g.-7
ifp .........
/"~
...
-"-
bn

,
alii
..,

...
,

'...,  trJI
\I
_
,..
""
,. .4
iii"
..,
MIlA' .
..L
IL
"
...
"'
,-
t
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude Schoenberg.
Used
by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
act as dividing or cadential sections. The B section (mm.
34-81) utilizes mainly Ill' RIll' P
6
, R
6
, and
I
6
"
These row
forms are used in a less straightforward manner than those
used in the A section. In the B section, Schoenberg does
not hesitate to begin in the middle of a row form. Where
this occurs it has been indicated in the chart of Example 8
by placing the order number of the first pitch in
parenthesis (see for example the oboe in m.
40,
where RIll
begins with order number 9). Schoenberg also divides the
row forms into trichords and presents the trichords in a
similar way: beginning in the middle of the row, as with R6
in mm.
53-60.
The second A section beginning at m. 82 and
the coda at m. 114 return to the row forms used at the
beginning. The second A section also contains an extended
"free" area in m.
103
that serves, like the corresponding
SCHOENBERG, OPe
26
7
measures in the first
A
section (mm.
20-21),
as a sort of
half cadence between statements of the principal theme. The
gradual exclusion of all other row forms besides Po and
RO
in the coda seems to indicate that Schoenberg regarded the
original form of the row, and indeed the opening five-note
segment of
PO'
as a reference point that ought to be reached
at the conclusion in order to attain a sense of closure.
And finally it is interesting that although Schoenberg did
not use Po and
III
combinatorially,
III
dominates the B sec­
tion. Perhaps he was aware of the relationship, even though
he did not use it to control vertical content.
Inspection of the graph in Example 8 reveals that row
forms often appear three times in succession. This
threefold repetition of rows is characteristic of the
principal theme of the movement and also in the B section
where the principal theme is absent (for example, see mm.
40-46, 53-60,
and 61-68). The intitial presentation of the
principal theme is stated by the horn in mm. 1-8 accompanied
by the bassoon (see Example 9). There are three statements
of Po divided between the two instruments in these measures.
Schoenberg has used a systematic process to partition the
horn theme out of the three statements, thereby producing a
new twelve-note series that is not related to the original
row by transposition or inversion. Example
lOa
shows Po and
this horn theme in pitch class notation, with brackets sup­
plied in Po to show the partitioning procedure that produces
the horn theme. Four notes are partitioned out of each
statement of
PO'
and each four-note group consists of two
parts of symmetrically arranged notes of the two hexachords.
The numbering of the brackets in Example 9 indicates the
order in which the pairs appear.
When the main theme is restated in the course of the
movement, a similar symmetrical partitioning procedure is
employed. The themes and the row forms out of which they
have been partitioned are shown in Example
10.
There are
some interesting relationships between statements of the
theme partitioned from different row forms. The recapitula­
tion at m. 82 and the flute line at m. 22 (Example
lOc
and
10e)
form the same series of pitch classes and are both
partitioned from the
RO
form of the row. Instead of being
the actual retrograde of the horn melody in mm. 1-8,
however, they present retrograde ordering only within each
tetrachord (in the first tetrachord, for example, compare
o
9 7 2 in the horn, Example
lOa,
with 2 7 9
0
in the flute,
Example
10c).
This is because the same symmetrical pairs of
notes have been extracted from corresponding repetitions of
the respective row forms. The same relationship exists
between th RIO-derived flute theme in m.
90
(Example
10f)
and the IO-derived theme in m.
104
(Example
10h). A
true
retrograde relationship can be seen between the flute line
in mm. 22-26 (Example
10c)
and its continuation (partitioned
(mm. )
(mm. )
Example 8.
Graph of Row Forms,
Op.
26~
[E]
11
8 15 19
20
22 27 28 .30 .32
.. ,4
3
x
Po
3
x
IS
3
x
P
Po
f.I,ob ob,Pg
principal
3
x
I
3
x
I
theme
c1Jn c1Jn
~
,34
,40
.46
(canonic)
free?
3
x
R
quartal sYl1uuetrical
flJg
3
x
RIO
chords---->partit
ioning
ob
3
x
I
c1Jn
principal
theme
I
48 51
.53
2
x
I ------------­
fl
6
3
x
P
f1,Pg
10
ob
3
x
RIO
c1,hn
III
trichords
3
x
HIll (9)
ob
I
(9)------)1
=
2
x
I (4)-------
6
C1
6
0b
11
H6
trichords
3-4-1-2-3
2
x
III
fg
3 x RIll
(3)
c1
3
x
R
hn,¥g
61
3
x
R
6
(6)
f.I,c1,fg
3
x
R
obJn
P
6
(9)---------P6(3)
16
c.I
1
c.I,hn
2
x
I (9)-----------------
hn
11
I
(9)-----RI --------------
11
fg
11
f9
68 78
1
81
1
82
3
x
RIb1
Po
or
RIll
I
RO
trichorcls
f1,o
(imitative)
3
x
RIll (6)
Ha-b-a
ob,hn
(canonic)
symmetrical
P
°c1,Ob
partitioning
H
~,fg
.57
R
6
(9)
3 x
R6
.59
R6
trichorcls
3-1-2
.61
00
H
:z:
t1
H
::t>'
:z:
::t>'
0-3
::c:
tx.l
o
::0
t<
::0
tx.l
<:
H
tx.l
:E:
[KJ
(mm.)
,82
.89
principal
theme
90
97
101
principal
3
x
1
0
(9)
1,/9(6)
theme
fl,cl
I
1,ob
3
x
R
I
10
ob,9g
3
x
RIO
3
X
P9(9~1
f1,hn hn, gl
3
x
10
cl
3 x
III
ob,cl,fg
[CoJ~
I
(mm. )
1114
118
122
125
10
f1,ob
R91
10
Po
Po
RO
c1,fg ob,hn,fg
(imi
ta
ti ve)
UIn'1tative)
.102 104
free?
3
x
10
quartal--}symmetrical
f1,c1
chords partitioning
3 x P
hn}g
principal
theme
127
1
131
'133 135
r
10
I
3
x
Po
HO
Po
fl,cl,fg
RIO
ob,hn
110
111 112
H
2
x
ItO
91,Ob f1,ob
III
11
2
x
P
tri-
c1,~n,fg
chords
1
138
ItO
1
139
PO--RO
.114
Ul
()
;:I:
o
tx:l
Z
O:J
tx:l
Xl
Q
o
'"0
N
0'1
w
10
INDIANA
THEORY
REVIEW
Example 9.
Mm.
1-7.
FI
Ob
Kl
Hr
Fg
FI
Ob
Kl
Hr
Fg
Etwas langsam
(Poco Adagio)d.::.32
1 2 3
~
-t!-
t
.v_~
--
 "-::i::
tf
..,
-.I
",.
1---,,£
.:J IV
Po
,,--
~o
D-.:t:.
-I
'yo
.:::
~~~~
~
;::::::
-~
N"b£
----
--
--C
0
1<>'
p-=
==--.
-==
=-
/
p
--==::=- -==::=-
immer
zart und
gesrrflgvoll
5 6
7
~
l£:l.
J'
;J
110
-.:r
_~
I
.3
-:a::
~
-
1'( 
'-":;:=-
~~~
=<I:
-~.
~---Y
~
-----
rilD
Ii-
I~
Pf;
-
t--,
>...::::::::::::
~
<>
:;:;:~ ~
'''--
....... -=
'e.
l!U~o
-=:-==--=-
o
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude Schoenberg.
Used
by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
from
PO)
in mm.
27-30
(Example
10d).
In this case the order
in which the symmetrically arranged pairs are extracted is
reversed, in addition to the retrograde relationship of the
parent rows from which the two themes are derived.
At m.
104
the same partitioning process is activated to
produce
bpth
the main theme in the horn at its original
level (from
PO)
and the flute counter subject from
10
(Exam­
ple
lOa
and
10h).
Consequently, a strict inversional rela­
tionship exists between the two instrumental lines. It is
the consistency of the derivational process that creates
this relationship. The simple use of P and I forms does not
assure such an inversional correspondence.
The partitioning pattern of the clarinet theme in mm.
8-14 (Example
lOb)
is somewhat different than that found in
other statements of the principal theme. Had the usual pat­
tern been followed, the clarinet would have sounded the
pitch classes
0
3 5
10
8 2 instead of 8 3 5
10 0
2. The
clarinet is forced into a slightly different partitioning of
SCHOENBERG,
OPe
26 11
Example
10.
Partitioning of Statements of Main Theme
from Row Forms.
A. Horn, mm.
1-8:
0
9 7
2/4
10
11
5
/6
8
1
3
1«,
~I
I
Ihl
2b,
3.ar---r
.3Ior---t
Derivation,
PO:
0 4
6
8
10
9
7
11
1 3 5 2
B. Clarinet, m.
8 : 8
3
5
10/0
2
1
7
/ 6
4
11
9
lClI
10.1
1\)1
:1~1
3or---1
n,--,
Derivation,
IO:
0
8
6
4
2
3 5 1
11
9 7
10
C. Flute, m.
22 :
2 7 9
o /
5
11
10
4
/
3 1
8
6
10.1
l-
Ib
l
lb,
I
~
3IIr-----t
Derivation,
RO:
2
5 3 1
11
7 9
10
8
6
4 0
D. Flute, m.
27 :
6
8
1
3/4 10
11
5
/
0
9 7
2
lo.
3,
I
9.0-
I
)0,
,
Icr.,...--,
Ib~
Derivation,
PO:
0 4
6
8
10
9 7
11
1
3 5
2
E.
Oboe,
m.
82.
Same line and derivation from
RO
as
Flute,
m.
22.
F. Flute, m.
90
:
10
5
3
0
7 1
2 8
9
11
4
6
I~
I
:1G1
1
3",.----.
1"1
?-b,
3br-'l
Derivation,
RIO:
10
7 9
11
1 5 3
2
4
6
8
0
G.
Horn, m.
104,
same line and derivation from
Po
as
mm.
I.
H.
Flute, m.
104:
0
3 5
10
8 2
1 7
6
4
11
9
''''I
'lo.,
~
Ibl
lb
I
310 ..----,
Derivation,
IO:
0
8
6
4
2
3
5
1
11
9 7
10
I.
Bassoon, m.
15:
8
1
3 6
10
11
5
4
9 7 2
0
CNebenstimme)
"\
I
"I
1\
'I
I
31
5,---,
Derivation,
PO:
0
4
6
8
10
9 7
11
1
3
5
2
12 INDIANA
THEORY
REVIEW
IO
in this case because the Eb (pitch class
0)
is already
sounding in m. 8 in the bassoon.
A
rather distinctive derivational pattern is in evidence
in the bassoon, mm. 15-19 (Example
10i).
This line is not
the principal theme, but a Nebenstimme. It is, however,
partitioned from three statements of
PO'
taking four notes
from each statement. The symmetry shown in Example
10i
is
striking.
The process of creating thematic lines
from
symmetrically
arranged note pairings can shed some light on the free
cadential areas found in the A and
AI
sections. Example 11
illustrates one of these sections, mm. 31-34. When the
notes are taken in the order of their appearance, they form
pairs that show a symmetrical structure when mapped onto the
original row
(PO).
The notes encircled in Example 12 and
marked
"A"
are part of a similar free passage, mm.
20-21.
The flute line obviously contains adjacencies not possible
in any row form. When mapped onto
IO
in a manner similar to
Example 11, however, another symmetrical pattern emerges.
Example 13 shows the same procedure applied to the passage
at m.
103.
The same pairings of notes from Po are used in
all three of the encircled sections, but in each the order
and registral deployment of the pairs is unique.
Admittedly, symmetrical partitioning does not explain
every note of these free sections. The quartal chords in m.
20
and mm.
102-3
defy analysis except that any four-note
chord consisting of three adjacent perfect fourths can be
mapped symmetrically onto one row form as the beginning and
ending notes fo the two hexachords of the row. In
m. 20
(see Example 12) the chord
0
9 2 7 can be mapped in this
manner onto Po or
RO'
the chord 3 6 8 1 onto I3 or RI
3
, and
the
chord
3
0 10
5 onto P
3
or
R
3

From the foregoing analysis, it is clear that symmetrical
partitioning of the row plays an important role in this
movement. Every statement of the principal theme emerges by
this process, and the structure of several free, seemingly
non-serial sections becomes evident through its application.
Symmetrical partitioning is clear evidence that Schoenberg
was investigating symmetry as a technique for
em~loying
the
twelve-tone row in his early serial compositions.
2For an example of a different sort of symmetry in early
serial works by Schoenberg, see Robert Schallenberg,
"Aspects of Pitch Emphasis in
Some
Twelve-Tone Works of
Arnold Schoenberg," (D.M.A. dissertation, University of Il­
linois at Urbana-Champaign, 1963), pp. 35-39. Schallenberg
demonstrates rather striking temporal and registral sym­
metries in cadential areas of the
Suite, Ope
25.
SCHOENBERG, OPe
26 13
Example 11. "Free"
Section,
mm. 32-34, and Derivation
from
PO.
~
..
Ij ..
'
'+
~"',
I
--u-
~
an
...
I: .. I:
~
::;;;;iii
.,
TIC}
.., --"I'
7
~+
~~
~
10
\
---
.,
9
1~
....
,..
-g
-
II
-:;or
It
-
-.;;;::
-..r 
-.;:
...
....
~
"-7
....
'"
10'
....
...
--

..
~
.
I:
"
,--
1
\
--
~
L.
"'"...I;
3
r
3
I
'I
s,
I
6
i
0
L
t
6
8
10
9
7
11 1
3
I
I
I
2.
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude Schoenberg.
Used by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA 90049.
,
""""1\11{"
If
-
--
I\~
"-
q ..
-,
A
rIO
I
5
2
I
;ii:.,
14 INDIANA THEORY REVIEW
Example 12. "Free"
Section,
mm.
20-21,
and Derivation
from
IO.
.c4_
2O
p
;-:;-~
?
I~
1:.-
./
frei,
.., ,
,
....
...
' I
.-'
Ifb ....
~. /~
1'=
F=
./. -lljo'
l-:'\~f'2
t1
~
---'it.L3.
~t";",
Ob
,oJ
.,=
==-'\.:
l:f
:"'-.
.
l'
J.
t::;,-!.
-~
1":\
Kl
.~
~
1'-
~
IJp::,..
p~':;.
I~
~
_0
;;1":\
H-r
~
tt
I~
I~'
Po
r-
--,
1-:'\
1":\
"\
p~
1=
jp:=-
l'
--
-----
Fg
5
I
l/
I
2.-
3
I
I
0
8
,..
L~
2
0
3
5
1
11
9 7
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude Schoenberg.
Used
by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
10
SCHOENBERG, OPe
26
Example 13 "Free"
Section,
m.
103,
and Derivations
from
PO.
I:
II:
103
'M--
Fl
I"
1\
Ob
I"
1\"
Kl
1\
Hr
"
Fg
~I
o
. colla parte
It..,,,
~
{rei
1':\
~~
1':\
~~~~
y'!?
L
1':\
pl...;:j~
~
r-I---'
6
8
~I
I
I
Li
'-1 --.
o
4
6 8
I
\
"II
I
~
"]l
I
accel
t::'
....
I':\~
'~~I!-.I~
..
I':\q
0:.
"/1
0
=
1':\
-
~7 .:!"~
-~ ~.
,;::::---
,..
1110
If
II
'S
';f,:J'
~1
r:)..-......
,~#a.
D
--..
;t
3
;t
-
I
10
9
7
I
f
10
9 7
111:0
4
6
8
10
9
7
11
3
1
J
I
r!h~nO
1
~il.
..
~
..
~
I
3'-::-'"
-~'
1':\-=>
I~'v
1':\
~"1
"""
1':\
~5
111
4r-\
1 3
5,,..---.
1 3
51
,;.,
,-
.~
-4
~>
I
!
I
I
5
5
1
3
5
Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition;
copyright renewed 1952 by Gertrude
Schoenberg.
Used by permission of Belmont Music Publishers,
Los Angeles, CA
90049.
15
2
2
2