SWK 485 - Texas A&M University-Central Texas

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T
EXAS
A&M

U
NIVERSITY


C
ENTRAL
T
EXAS

S
OCIAL
W
ORK
P
ROGRAM


Course Number:

SWK
485
:
School Social Work

Section Number:

130

Semester
:

Fall 2011

Meeting Time/Place:

Tuesday and Thursday
,
7:30
-
9:00

PM

Classroom:


B112 Nursing Center

Instructor’s Name:

Becky Shumake, LMSW

Cell

Number:

(254)855
-
9942



E
-
Mail:

blshumake@
yahoo.com


Office Hours:



Professor will be available

30 minutes prior to class each day
, by appointment
.



I.

Course Description


Catalog Description:
Intensive studies of current trends and issues related to profession
al social work practice,
social service delivery, and populations at risk
.




II.

Nature of Course


This cours
e will introduce students to the practice of social work in a school
-
based setting
.
The course will
cover topics related to school social work
, interventions, resources and best practices.

Issues of problem
-
solving
and development of intervention and prevention models for school
-
based topics will be explored. The
course will focus on identification of at
-
risk populations in the school system

and development of assessment
and interventions on the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.


Teaching Method:
The
primary teaching approach in this course will be collaborative and active learning.
Material in the course will be prese
nted through class disc
ussions, reading assignments, guest speakers,
case
studies

and evaluation/development of assessments.


III.

Program Mission


The Social Work Program at T
exas A&M

University


Central Texas
prepares its graduates for leadership and
professional generalist pract
ice by integrating social work values, skills and knowledge through an emphasis on
excellence. Responsive to the needs of Central Texas and to the State of Texas, the Social Work Program
delivers a broad
-
based liberal arts education that is sensitive to vu
lnerable, oppressed and at
-
risk populations.
T
he Baccalaureate of Social Work
degree
enables students to achieve successful careers and become
responsible citizens.


IV.

Course Objectives


Consistent with the
CSWE Core Competencies for Effec
tive Social Wor
k Practice (see
below), there are nine
primary objectives in this course:



2

A.

Students will be able to identify the roles and functions of a school social worker.
Students will become
familiar with
t
heoretical framework
s
for understanding the impact of issues

related to
school social work
and how these frameworks have changed over time in the United States
. They will learn how to apply
th
ese

framework
s

when
engaging,
assessing and
carrying out interventions with
a wide variety of types
and ages
of clients
, fa
milies, and groups

who represent a

variety of
cultural
backgrounds
.

They will
understand how
professional social workers utilize a different approach than do other professionals who
interact with people impacted by
school related issues
. They will learn
to apply critical thinking when
making professional judgments about these practice approaches. They will learn how ongoing research
findings continue to add to our understanding of these issues within an ever
-
changing professional
practice context. They
will learn how th
ese

framework
s

for understanding clients and families can be
applied to developing policies
and services
that meet their needs more effectively.
Achievement of this
objective will be measured through the class discussions and through the
students’ written assignments.


B.

Students will learn a variety of interventions that can help improve client
and system functioning
when
dealing with issues related to
school social work
, including behavior, academics and attendance
.

They
will learn how to

apply these interventions within a professional social work approach, including
focusing on how human behavior is impacted by the social
and cultural
environment
s
. They will learn
how professional ethics and cultural competency guide these intervention e
fforts.
They will understand
that policy development and advocacy for policy changes can also be an important focus point of their
interventions.
Achievement of this objective will be measured through the class discussions and through
the students’ writt
en assignments.


C.

Students will explore how these issues impact populations at risk, including
students with disabilities,
mental health diagnosis, truancy, poverty, substance abuse, and other issues.
Critical thinking will be
utilized in order to understa
nd these issues from a social work perspective. The importance of
maintaining an understanding of recent research findings that expand on this understanding will be
stressed.
Policy issues will be considered along with issues of human functioning and beh
avior within
the social environment.
Achievement of this objective will be measured through the class discussions
and through the students’ written assignments.


D.

Students will become familiar with a wide variety of ways in which a person’s culture, values
, and
beliefs impact their
lives
. The focus will be on learning to respect and understand beliefs
,
values
, and
practices

that differ from those of the social worker
, using a professional social work perspective to
understand how to intervene effectively w
ithin those issues
.

Achievement of this objective will be
measured through the class discussions and through the students’ written assignments.


E.

Students will learn about
a variety of legal and ethical issues that relate to
school social work, including
N
o Child Left Behind, immigration, suicide prevention, LGBT issues, bullying and confidentiality.

They will learn how these legal and ethical issues impact
school
social work practice and how
professional social work interventions address these issues. Th
ey will learn to apply critical thinking
when making professional judgments about these issues. Achievement of this objective will be
measured through the class discussions and through the students’ written assignments.


F.

Throughout the course, students wi
ll focus on social work values and ethics as they apply to working
with diverse client and family systems impacted by issues
present in the school setting
. This includes
developing awareness of prejudices and biases within culturally diverse populations,
an awareness of the
impact of oppression,
understanding families in poverty,
understanding diverse needs of vulnerable
populati
ons, and understanding issues of assessment and intervention on the micro, mezzo, macro levels
.

Achievement of this objective wi
ll be measured through the class discussions and through the students’
written assignments.



3

G.

Students will learn the importance of developing a high degree of insight into their own beliefs,
attitudes, fears and insecurities, to increase their ability to d
eal effectively with
the diversity of
issues
that occur in a school
-
based setting.
They will understand the need to engage in life
-
long learning about
these issues to maintain their effectiveness and diminish any remaining areas of anxiety or uncertainty.

Achievement of this objective will be measured through the class discussions and through the students’
written assignments.


H.

Students will learn how issues
prevalent in the school social work setting

apply to different social work
practice contexts, inclu
ding
public and private school settings, post
-
secondary settings, alternative
learning environments, and the larger implications of school social work on development of policies,
funding and school
-
wide planning.
They will learn how each of these fields of

practice m
ight
require
developing policies and programs that meet the needs of clients and their families more effectively.
Achievement of this objective will be measured through the class discussions and through the students’
written assignments.


I.

Stude
nts will learn how assessment and intervention methods need to change when dealing with some of
the more complicated areas of
school social work, including suicide intervention, death and trauma,
parent absence, substance abuse and mental health.

They wil
l learn to apply social work ethical
principles to such complex situations and how to apply critical thinking to inform their professional
judgments. They will understand the need to focus on human rights and social justice as these apply to
these complex

areas, and will understand the need to stay informed of the latest research findings that
can inform our assessment and intervention approaches with these complex issues. Achievement of this
objective will be measured through the class discussions and th
rough the students’ written assignments.



V.

CSWE CORE COMPETENCIES FOR EFFECTIVE SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE


Each course in the social work program is designed to help students master the ten core competencies
established by the Council on Social Work Educati
on (CSWE) as measures of effective social work practice.
The following table relates these ten core competencies to the specific learning objectives for this course.


CSWE CORE COMPETENCIES

Course Objectives (see
previous section)

Identify as a profess
ional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.

A, B, C, D, E, F
, G, H, I

Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.

A, B, C, D,
E, F
, G, H, I

Engage diversity and difference in practice.

A, B, C, D, E, F
, G, H, I

Apply cr
itical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.

A, B, C, D, E, F
, G, H, I

Advance human rights and social justice

A, B, C, D,
E, F
, G, H, I

Engage in research
-
informed practice and practice
-
informed research.

A, B, C, D, E, F
, G, H, I

Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment

A, B, C, D. E
,

F
, G, H, I

Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well
-
being and to deliver
effective social work services.

A, B, C, D,
E, F
, G, H, I


Respond to and shape an e
ver
-
changing professional context

A, B, C, D, E, F
, G, H, I

Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups,
organizations, and communities

A, B, C, D, E, F
, G, H, I


VI. Course Requirements


A.

Required Text:

Openshaw, Linda (20
08).
Social Work in Schools: Principles and Practice
. New York,
NY: Guilford Press. ISBN
978
-
1
-
59385
-
578
-
9.




4

B.

Final Grades



A total of 10,000 points may be earned from the course assignments, as follows:


Course Assignment

Percentage of final grade

Tot
al possible points

Case Studies (15)

15%

1,
5
00

Assessment of School Experience Paper

15%

1,
5
00

Micro/Mezzo/Macro Paper

15%

1,
5
00

In
-
Class Presentation and Handout


20%

2,000

Final

Evaluation

5%

500

Attendance

5%

500

Interview with Student/Parent
/Teacher

15%

1,500


Participation in Class Discussions

10%

1,000

Totals

100%

10
,0
00

(Total ÷ 10
0

= final
grade)


Points and Corresponding Grades for individual assignments are based on the following:



A+: 100 points A: 95 points

A
-
: 90 points



B+: 88 points B: 85 points B
-
: 80 points



C+: 78 points C: 75 points C
-
: 70 points



D+: 68 points D: 65 points D
-
: 60 points



F: 59 points or less


Example
: A paper worth
15
% of the grade, on which a student earned a B+, would give 1,320 points toward
the final grade (88 x 15 = 1,320).


Final Class Grades are based on the following:




A
: 90 to 100 (9,000 to 10,000 points)


B: 89 t
o 80 (8,900 to 8,000 points)


C: 79 to 70 (7,900 to 7,000 points)


D: 69 to 60 (6,900 to 6,000 points)


F: 59 or less (5,900 points or less)


C.

Course Assignments


The following activities will be completed during the s
emester.


1.

Case Studies:


Students will be given case studies related to school social work scenarios. These case studies are designed
to help students reflect on the material being studied, classroom speakers, class discussions
and
assessments/interventi
on strategies. These case studies will be given in class and will be completed as
homework assignments. These case studies will be due at the beginning of the next scheduled class period.
Case study assignments can be hand
-
written (if the student has le
gible handwriting) or typed. Students will use
their responses to these assignments to demonstrate that they are grasping materials presented in class and
applying this knowledge to assessment and intervention strategies. The papers will be graded accord
ing to the
quality and depth of the answers, creativity in responses, application of knowledge and critical thinking. If a
student misses a class on a given day, the only way he/she can make up the case study assignment will be to

5

email the professor in t
ime to be able to submit their answers at the same time that all the other students submit
theirs. Students will not receive additional time to complete these assignments, unless permission for this is
given in advance because of the circumstances of the a
bsence. Although more than 15 case study assignments
will be given over the course of the semester, only 15 of these case studies will count toward the student’s grade
for the course. At the end of the semester, the grades on all of the case study assign
ments will be averaged and
that average will represent
15
% of the student’s final grade
f
or the class.



2.

Paper on
Reflection of School Experience
:

Students will complete a 3
-
5 page reflection paper on their own assessment of their school experiences.
Und
erstanding our own journey, beliefs and biases is essential to being a well
-
rounded, ethical practitioner.
This paper will be a personal exploration of the student’s experience as a student in grades K
-
12. Students may
choos
e to reflect on their school e
xperience in its entirety or on specific timeframes and experiences that were
memorable and significant. The paper should include, at a minimum:



Overview of school experience


Demographics, important events and relevant information



Influences


Think of p
eers, teachers, school personnel, etc. who influenced your educational
journey either positively or negatively.
This would also include activities like clubs, organizations,
etc. that you were involved in as a student.



Personal biases and beliefs


How di
d your school experience influence
d

your beliefs then (as a
student) and now (as an adult going into the social work profession)? This should also include a
discussion of how your school experience would inform your practice as a school social worker.



The paper will be graded on thoroughness, clarity, and your ability to accurately and sensitively convey
your

thoughts and feelings. Papers must be TYPED and DOUBLE
-
SPACED.

This assignment will represent 15%
of the students’ final grade.


3.

In
-
Class

Presentation and Handout
:


Students will select a topic relevant to social work in the school system. Students will research this topic and
will be required to present a 15
-
20 minute presentation to the class. This presentation must include a
Powerpo
int presentation developed by the student and a handout for the class that includes a minimum of
8

resources related to the student’s chosen topic.


The presentation will be graded by a combination of peer and teacher review and will be based on the
rele
vance of materials presented, the student’s ability to engage the class and offer new information, and the
quality of delivery of the information.


The handout should serve as an “at
-
a
-
glance” resource for other students in the class and will be graded on

the relevance of information given, overall appearance and quality and diversity of the resources provided.
Note: A maximum of 3 of the 8 resources can be internet or web
-
based.


A more detailed guide and rubric for this assignment will be given when to
pics are chosen.
This assignment
will represent 20% of the students’ final grade.


4.

Micro/Mezzo/Macro Project:

School social workers influence educational systems on three levels


micro, mezzo, macro. For this
assignment, students will
be given

a topi
c related to school social work
. Students will be responsible for
communicating

how that topic influences the education system on the micro, mezzo and macro levels. Students
should creatively identify ways in which a school social worker might identify in
terventions on these three
levels. A minimum of 3 interventions should be discussed for each level.

Again, grading will be based on thoroughness, clarity, and
creativity of responses.

Papers must be TYPED
and DOUBLE
-
SPACED.

This will represent 15% of t
he students’ final grade.


5
.

Interview with a Student/Parent/Educator:



Each student will complete an interview with a student, parent, educator or school personnel. For a student
or parent, the interview should be an assessment of the individual’s needs

and identified barriers to success and

6

would be more micro focused. For an educator or school personnel, the interview should be an assessment of
identified school
-
wide issues/needs and would be more mezzo/macro focused.


Following the interview, the st
udent will complete a written assignment related to the interview. The
student can choose to include all or a portion of the interview in the written assignment.
The interview text
should be divided into 2 columns: the first column should be the word
-
for
-
word text of the interview and the
second column should include identification of skills and self
-
analysis of how well the student thinks she/he

did
during the interview and things they feel might have been more effective
.
The second portion of the paper
should include an assessment of the needs and barriers of

the person interviewed and the development of a
mock service plan for prevention/intervention services for this individual.
This assignment will represent 15%
of the students’ final grade.


6.
Clas
s Attendance (5% of final grade
):



Students are expected to be present for every scheduled class session. If you are unable to avoid missing a class, you
must contact the professor
before
the class period (preferably by email) to explain the absence if y
ou want it to be
considered as an excused absence. Any unexcused (or unexplained) absence will affect this portion of your grade. For
example, an illness, doctor appointment, or funeral of a family member is an excused absence. The professor will review

other types of absences to determine how unavoidable they were; not being able to leave work is NOT an excused
absence. If your work schedule will not permit you to attend this class on a predictable basis, you should not be enrolled
in the class.
Stude
nts must be present when class begins and are expected to remain until class is dismissed; coming
in late and leaving early, or leaving to get something to eat or drink, are very disruptive to the rest of the class

and
should not be done
.



If you hav
e a class schedule that makes it impossible for you to get to this class on time (i.e., another class
that ends only a few minutes before this one begins but is in a location a considerable distance from this
classroom), you need to discuss this with the p
rofessor at the beginning of the semester, indicating what time
you think you will be able to arrive at the class each session, to see if an accommodation to this schedule can be
made.


The following shows the degree to which unexcused absences will impa
ct your attendance grade:


Number of Unexcused Absences

Attendance Grade

1


A
-

2

B

3


B
-

4

C

5

D

6 or more

F

NOTE: Arriving late twice counts as 1 absence


7.
Class Participation

(10% of final grade):


You will learn more from this class if you t
alk and participate.
Each of you has something important to contribute to
the course and to all of us learning together.
Ask questions, remembering that there is no such thing as a stupid question.
Share your reactions to what is being discussed. Refle
ct on implications of what we are studying. If you are a student
who has never before chosen to talk in classes, this will be a good opportunity for you to start developing a new life skill
that will serve you well in the profession of social work. (Stud
ents are encouraged not to divulge any personal
information they will not be comfortable having their fellow students know about them.) Being an active participant
increases understanding of the material for your fellow students as well.



Your clas
s participation grade will be determined by how much you talked during class sessions and by whether your
contributions added to the quality of the class sessions.
The professor
also reserves the right to call on students in class if
they are not particip
ating regularly in the discussions.



While it is important for students to be willing to discuss the course material, be careful when
thinking about bringing in stories from your personal life or work. At times, this can get the class off
subject and
use up valuable time. Think about whether the story you want to relate is important for the
entire class to hear. If not, you may want to talk to
the professor
individually about it, away from class. If

7

the professor
is concerned about the class getting si
detracked, she will suggest that you talk to her
individually so the class can get back on the subject. Class time is limited and valuable
.



8.
Final Evaluation:


A final evaluation of the course will
be
given. The format of this exam will be discuss
ed later in the
semester.
The final will represent 5% of the overall final grade for the class.


VII. Class Policies


1.

TAMU
-
CT expects all students to maintain high standards of personal and scholarly conduct. Students guilty of
academic dishonesty are sub
ject to disciplinary action. Academic dishonesty is a serious offense because it threatens
the quality of scholarship and defrauds those who depend on knowledge and integrity. Plagiarism is one form of
academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty includes,
but is not limited to, copying another person's work, turning in
someone else's work as your own, downloading material from the internet and inserting it into a paper as if it was your
own work, taking ideas from classes or readings and putting them in a p
aper without citations/references, cheating on
an examination or other academic work, collusion, and the abuse of resource materials. Any idea, even paraphrased
ideas, used or borrowed must be given credit by showing the source with an appropriate citatio
n or reference. Any
student who violates the university’s policies regarding Academic Honesty as outlined in the "Social Work Student
Handbook" will receive a failing grade in this course and will be reported to the Director of Student Affairs for
additi
onal university sanctions. More information can be found at www.ct.tamus.edu/student conduct.


2.

Social work practitioners respect others. This is particularly important in a class like this one, where we focus
specifically on issues of cultural identific
ation and differences. Therefore, differences in values, opinions,
and feelings of all class members will be respected. Students are encouraged to “speak their minds” in a
respectful and courteous manner in class. Everyone’s ideas are important to the c
lass, so it is imperative that
only one person speak at a time and that no side conversations occur (which are distracting and make it hard
for other students to hear what the person who “has the floor” is saying). If you find it hard to keep from
having
side conversations with a friend, make the decision not to sit next to that person. If you cannot make
that decision on your own and you disrupt the class by having side conversations with a friend, Dr. Rappaport
reserves the right to ask you to stop sitt
ing together in the classroom.


3.

Class discussions, oral presentations, and written materials must adhere to professional standards of
expression and conform to the style described by the American Psychological Association (APA, 1994). This
includes avoid
ance of the use of language that degrades women, people of color, gays, lesbians, bisexuals,
transgenders, and other diverse and at
-
risk populations.


4.

Reading assignments: Students are expected to read the assigned materials prior to the class for which t
hey
are assigned. Students are responsible for the information in the assigned readings (whether or not the
material has been discussed in class) and for the materials and videotapes presented in class. While in class,
students are expected to raise any
questions they have about material in the reading assignments they did not
understand.


5.

The professor will be giving handouts as the textbook. Because of the expense of copying, each student will
be given only one copy of them. If you lose yours, you w
ill need to borrow them from another student and
copy them at your own expense.


6.

Drop policy:


If you discover that you need to drop this class, you must go to the Records Office and get the necessary
paperwork.


When you receive the form, they will pu
t on it the deadline by which it must be returned to their office
with the necessary signatures.


It is your responsibility to get the necessary signatures and return the form to the
Records Office by the deadline.


Do not give the form to someone else and

ask them to do this for you, because if it
does not get done correctly, it will still be your responsibility for not having followed proper procedure.


After you
return the signed drop slip to the Records Office, the next day you need to go into the Duck
Trax computer system
and make sure that you are no longer enrolled in that class.


If you are still enrolled, follow up with the Records Office
until you are off the class enrollment.


Professors cannot drop a student from a class; this is always the stude
nt’s
responsibility.


If you do not follow the correct procedure or you miss a deadline, then you will receive an F in the

8

class for not having completed the work; incompletes will not be given to students because they did not complete the
drop process cor
rectly.


7.

Cellular phones are not permitted in class. If you carry one, it must be turned off for the duration of the class
period. If you fail to do this and you choose to take a phone call during class, you will need to leave class to
take the call and
you should not return to class afterwards. If you have an emergency situation requiring you
to leave your cellular phone on during a particular class period, this
must

be discussed with the professor
before class begins to see if the phone can be left on
for that one class only. Only severe emergencies will be
considered, and this kind of exception cannot be made for the entire semester’s classes.


8.

It is understood that many students who are in this class will need or want to eat or drink something during

the class
period. I do not have a problem with this occurring, as long as it is done respectfully. Try to have everything you
want with you at the start of class rather than deciding to get up and leave class to go buy something. If you have to
open wr
appers that may be noisy, do it before class begins to minimize disruption. Be thoughtful of fellow students in
terms of deciding whether to bring something to eat that has a strong odor that will make all the other students hungry.
Finally, if you shoul
d spill anything or leave crumbs or trash, it is expected that you will clean this up yourself at the
end of the class period so no mess is left for the next class that will be coming to the room.


9.

Students should not bring their children with them to clas
s. Mature subject matter is dealt with in social work
classes, and much of it is inappropriate for young children to hear. Under no circumstances should you
consider bringing a child to class without first checking with the professor to see if it would b
e a problem, and
in most circumstances you will be told that it should not be done.


10.

Library Services
.
INFORMATION LITERACY focuses on research skills that prepare individuals to live and work
in an information
-
centered society. T
AMU
-
CT
librarians (locat
ed in the library at Central Texas College) will work
with students in the development of critical reasoning, ethical use of information, and the appropriate use of
secondary research techniques, including exploring information resources
,

such as library
collections and services
;

i
dentify
ing

sources
,

such as subject databases and scholarly journals
;
executing effective search strategies
;
retrieving,
recording, and citing relevant results correctly
;
and interpreting search results and deciding whether to
expand the
search. Library Resources are outlined

and can be
accessed through the
TAMU
-
CT
web page
.


11.


UNILERT is the emergency warning system for TAMUCT. Messages about any health, weather, or safety
emergency will be delivered to students via email or
text messages if they have enrolled in the system. This includes
messages that the university has cancelled classes. Please enroll at TAMUCT.org/unilert.


12.

TAMUCT offers its students tutoring, both on
-
campus and online. Subjects tutored include: Accountin
g,
Finance, Statistics, Mathematics, and Writing (MLA and APA).


For hours, or if you're interested in
becoming a tutor, contact Academic Support Programs at 254
-
519
-
5496 or by emailing
gnichols@ct.tamus.edu.


13.

The professor reserves the right to amend this

syllabus at any time, as needed.


POLICY REGARDING TURNING IN LATE PAPERS:

Students must turn in papers at the beginning of the
class period in which they are due. No papers will be accepted after they are due, resulting in the student receiving
a 0 for

that paper. If a student has a serious emergency that prevents him/her from turning the paper in on time,
the student must talk with the professor
before

class to discuss this and to see if the professor will agree to grant an
extension of the due date.

There is no guarantee that the professor will grant an extension, but if one is granted,
the paper will not be accepted after that alternative due date. If you do not discuss your problem with the
professor before the paper is due, do not expect the pape
r to be accepted when you try to turn it in later; this is not
fair to the rest of the students who turned the assignment in by the due date.


Americans with Disabilities Act:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti
-
discrimination
st
atute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this
legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for
reasonable accommodation of th
eir disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an

9

accommodation, please contact Ryan Thompson, Academic Support Programs Coordinator, at (254) 519
-
5796
or by email at
rthomp8@ct.tamus
.edu
.



VIII.


Course Schedule

Date

Topics/Activities

Text/Reading


Tuesday
8/29


Review course syllabus

Introductions

Learning Styles

Bloom’s Taxonomy


** Note other readings will be assigned
throughout the course of the semester.**

Thursday
9/1

Overvie
w of School Social Work

Roles and Skills

The concept of Case Management

Prevention vs. Intervention

Textbook Chapter 1

Case Management Article

Tuesday
9/6

Overview of School Social Work cont’d

Micro/Mezzo/Macro

Treatment Plans and Assessment

Tex
tbook Chapter 2
-
3

Thursday
9/8

School Social Work Ethics

Ethical Decision Making

Assessment of School Experience Due

Tuesday
9/13

School Social Work with Elementary School Students

Textbook Chapters 4
-
5

Thursday
9/15

School Social Work with High S
chool Students

Textbook Chapters 7
-
8

Tuesday
9/20

School Social Work with High School Students cont’d

Dropout Prevention Strategies

Evidence
-
Based Practice

Post
-
Secondary and Employment Programs


Thursday
9/22

School Social Work with Middle Schoo
l Students

Textbook Chapter 6

Tuesday
9/27



Working with Families in Poverty


Thursday
9/29


Working with Families in Poverty Cont’d



10

Tuesday
10/4


Skills of a School Social Worker Cont’d

Home Visits

Coordination and Collaboration

Linking Inter
ventions to Outcomes (Evidence
-
Based
Practice)

Planning Group Work

Student Responses to Violence and Trauma

Textbook Chapters 9
-
10

Thursday
10/6

Discussion of Micro/Mezzo/Macro Papers

Micro/Mezzo/Macro Assignment Due

Tuesday
10/11

Substance Abuse P
revention and Intervention in the
School System

Textbook Chapter 12

Thursday
10/13


School Social Work Skills Cont’d

Confidentiality

FERPA

Mandated Reporting

Safety



Tuesday
10/18

Mental Health in the Schools

Self
-
Injury


“The Secret Cut”

Text
book Chapter 15

Thursday
10/20

Mental Health in the Schools cont’d


Tuesday
10/25

Special Education Services in the Schools

No Child Left Behind

ARDs

Student and Family Rights

Advocacy


Thursday
10/27

Library Day

Students should use this time to

work on their class
presentations



Tuesday
11/1

Death and Loss

Violence and Trauma


Textbook Chapters 10 and 13

Thursday
11/3

Suicide Prevention
and Intervention


Tuesday
11/8

Anger Management

Micro Assessment and Intervention

Group Work

Mode
ls for Intervention



11

Thursday
11/10

Parent Involvement and Absence

Textbook Chapter 11

Tuesday
11/15

Parent Involvement (cont)

Interview Assignment Due

Thursday
11/17

Discussion of Interview Assignments


Tuesday
11/22

School Social Work Policy an
d Funding in Texas


Thursday
11/24

No Class


Happy Thanksgiving


Tuesday
11/29

In
-
Class Presentations


Thursday
12/1

In
-
Class Presentations


Tuesday
12/6

In
-
Class Presentations


Thursday
12/8

In
-
Class Presentations


Tuesday
12/13

Education Pol
icy and the Future of School Social Work

“Waiting for Superman”


Textbook Chapter 16

Thursday
12/15

Last Day of Class

Final Evaluation



X.
Bibliography


Our textbook has an extremely comprehensive bibliography; I include here only resources that
can

be used by
students to provide further information on the topics covered by the course

that are not included in the
textbook’s bibliography
:


Allen
-
Meares, Paula (2004).
Social Work Services in Schools
. New York: Pearson.


Bartlett, Larry D.; Etscheidt
, Susan; and Weisenstein, Greg R.
(2006).
Special Education Law and Practice in
Public Schools

(2nd Edition).
New York: Prentice Hall.


Bench, Marcia (2003).
Career Coaching: An Insider’s Guide
. Palo
-
Alto, CA: Davies
-
Black.


Berg, Insoo K. (2004).
Classr
oom Solutions: WOWW Approach
. Milwaukee: BFTC Press.


Clark, James P.; and Alvarez, Michelle E. (2010).
Response to Intervention: A Guide for School Social
Workers
. New York: Oxford University Press.


Constable, Robert; Massat, Carol R.; McDonald, Shirle
y; and Flynn, John P. (2006).
School Social Work:
Practice, Policy and Research
. Chicago, Illinois: Lyceum.



12

Franklin, Cynthia; Harris, Mary Beth; and Allen
-
Meares, Paula (2008).
School Practitioner’s Concise
Companion to Preventing Dropout and Attendanc
e Problems.

New York: Oxford.


Franklin, Cynthia; Harris, Mary Beth; and Allen
-
Meares, Paula (2006).
The School Services Sourcebook: A
Guide for School
-
Based Professionals.

New York: Oxford University Press.


Garner, Abigail (2004).
Families Like Mine:

Children of Gay Parents Tell it Like it is.

New York: Harper
Collins.


Greenberg, Kenneth R. (2002).
Group Counseling for K
-
12 Schools: A Handbook for School Counselors
.
Boston: Allyn and Bacon.


Heegaard, Marge E. (2003).
Drawing Together to Build Char
acter
. Minneapolis: Freeview.


Heegaard, Marge E. (2003).
Drawing Together to Learn About Feelings
. Minneapolis: Freeview.


Heegaard, Marge E. (2003).
Drawing Together to Manage Anger.

Minneapolis: Freeview.


Henderson, Anne T.; Mapp, Karen L.; Johnson,

Vivian R. and Davies, Don (2007).
Beyond the Bake Sale: The
Essential Guide to Family
-
School Partnerships
.
New York: New Press.


Hess, Frederick M. (2007).
No Child Left Behind Primer
. Switzerland: Peter Lang Publishing.


Karr
-
Morse, Robin and Wiley, Me
redith S. (1997).
Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence.
New York: Atlantic Monthly Press.


Knapp, Sarah and Jongsma, Arthur E. (2002).
School Counseling and School Social Work Treatment Planner
.
San Francisco: Wiley.


Kotlowitz, Alex (1
991).
There Are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing up in the Other
America.

New York: Doubleday.


Miliken, Bill (2007).
The Last Dropout
.
Carlsbad, CA: Hay House.


Payne, Ruby (2005).
A Framework for Understanding Poverty
. Texas: aha! Proces
s.


Payne, Ruby (2006).
Working with Students: Discipline Strategies for the Classroom
. Texas: aha! Process.


Payne, Ruby; DeVol, Philip; and Smith, Terie D. (2006).
Bridges Out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals
and Communities
. Texas: aha! Proce
ss.


Perrotti, Jeff and Westheimer, Kim (2001).
When the Drama Club is not Enough: Lessons from the Safe Schools
Program for Gay and Lesbian Students.

Boston: Beacon Press.


Pipher, Mary (1994).
Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Souls of Adolescent Girls
. New

York: Ballentine.


Reese, William (2011).
America’s Public Schools: From the Common School to No Child Left Behind
.
Maryland: John Hopkins University Press.


Seleman, Matthew D. (2005).
Pathways to Change: Brief Therapy with Difficult Adolescents
. New
York:
Guilford.


13


Simmons, Rachel (
2002).
Odd Girl Out: The Hidden Culture of Aggression in Girls
. Orlando: Harcourt.


Smink, Jay and Schargel, Franklin (2004).
Helping Students Graduate: A Strategic Approach to Dropout
Prevention
. New York: Eye on Educat
ion.


Taffel, Ron (2005).
Breaking Through to Teens: A New Psychotherapy for the New Adolescence
. New York:
Guilford.