Dirrawarra community plan sets course in Wangaratta

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Voice of Indigenous
Community Engagement
VOICE

Issue
4
-
June

2012

Stories from

Victoria’s Local Indigenous
Networks











2

CONTENTS



Foreword










3


Achievements, challenges and the way ahead





4


Victoria honour
s

Indigenous leaders

past and p
resent




6


AFL stars share the journey

with Hamilton men’s group



9


Koorie culture takes the prize a
t Ballarat Begonia Festival



11


Deadly conference gets Gippsland buzzing





1
3


IT training a hit

in Dandenong, Frankston and Mornington



1
5


Fran
kston’s gathering place by the bay







1
6


Dirrawarra community plan sets course in Wangaratta



1
8


Workshop builds LIN participation in Geelong






20


Mildura sports carnival a real team effort






2
2


Culture stays strong in Melbourne’s west






23


SkyFest

celebrates Indigenous culture in Lakes Entrance



2
5


We walk one path in Whittlesea








27


From Geelong
to Mozambique


a sporting journey






2
8


LIN partnership boosts ed
ucation in Lakes Entrance




30


Kerang LIN takes to the water








31


Elders provide a gu
iding hand in Urban South





32


Broker Profile


Tammy Hunter








33


Contacting Your

Brokers









35




3

Foreword


With e
very

new issue

of VOICE

I look forward to seeing

the

inspiring stories

coming
from
LINs
across th
e state



stories that highlight the

energy, drive
and leadership
to be found
in Victoria’s Indigenous communities
.


T
he LINs
’ success

is
based on
their ability to engage with their
local
community and also work in partnership with all levels of gover
nmen
t and the
broader community to achieve positive results.


A great
example of this is
the
story
in this issue
about
the

Deadly in
Gippsland


Indigenous
conference
.



The idea for a
conference

to showcase

Indigenous achievement
s

and
success stories in Gipps
land
came
directly
from the

four Indigeno
us women in
the local community


Leonie Solomon
-
Green, Karen Mobourne, Esme
Thompson and Katie Yeomans.



They
soon

found willing partners and supporters at
all levels of government
and
through
hard work and

the
c
reative talents of its organisers
, partners

an
d
participants
,

Deadly in Gippsland
has
capture
d

the imagination of

the whole
Gippsland community and beyond.



I
t’s great

to see that community support for
LINs
continues to grow

strongly
.
O
ver

1,6
00

Indige
no
us Victorians

are
now

invol
ved with

LINs. This represents
more than
eight per cent

of Victoria’s ad
ult Indigenous population and has

increase
d by

15
% over the past year.



I hope you enjoy this issue of VOICE and congratulate

all LIN participants for

their

ongoing efforts to
develop community plans

and projects

to
m
ake their
communities stronger and achieve their goals.



Ian Hamm

Executive Director

Aboriginal Affairs Victori
a














4

Achievements, challenges and the way ahead


A recurring
highlight
for me as Minister for Aboriginal Affairs has been the
many opportunities I have had to listen to
,

and learn f
rom
,

my meetings
with
Elders, leaders and community members from across Victoria’s Indigenous
communities.


Many people
have told me that they wa
nt quality education for their children
and young people, good jobs for school leavers and strong safe families and
communities. These aspirations are shared by the
Victorian

Government.


In March 201
1, as an important demonstration of Victoria’
s

bi
-
parti
san
approach to improving the lives of Aboriginal Victorians
,

the Premier
, the
Deputy Premier and I co
-
signed
with the Leader of the Opposition and the
Opposition Spokesperson on Aboriginal Affairs
a Statement of Intent to close
the gap in outcomes for Ind
igenous people.


In April this year, I tabled
in Parliament
the
Indigenous Affairs Annual Report
,
and
I am pleased to
report
that in 2010
-
2011 there have been improvements
in kindergarten enrolments,
Y
ear 10 retention rates and university enrolments
for I
ndigenous Year 12 leavers.
However,

we need to
work together to reduce
very high

smoking rates, improve school retention rates to Year 10 and
reduce the over representation of Indigenous children in the child protection
system.


The Victorian Government’s

initial response to
the
Protecting Victoria’s
Vulnerable Children Inquiry

included an investment of more than $336 million

over four years.

Victoria’s Vulnerable Children: Our Shared Responsibility

Directions Paper 2012

identifies policy principles and ac
tion areas, which will
include specific issues relating to Aboriginal children and their families.



The Government has also committed to
establish
ing

a
new
Commission for
Vulnerable
Children and Young People
and appointing

a Commissioner with
special res
ponsibility for
vulnerable
Aboriginal c
hildren

and young people
.


In February 2012 I was delighted to join the Premier to launch the
inaugural
Victorian Indigenous Honour Roll
, the first of its kind in Australia.

It was a truly
memorable
experience to ind
uct the first group of 20
worthy
Indigenous
Victorians and celebrate their achievements with their families and friends
,
and I look forward to the second round of inductions later this year.


In
2012,
the Government will release a strengthened
Victorian In
digenous
Affairs Framework

(VIAF)
which has been informed by our consultations with
Aboriginal communities, organisations and Government agencies. The
Framework will focus on delivering effective services which are linked to
measurable outcomes and strengt
hening our engagement with
Aboriginal
Victorians.



5

The Government will also release an
Indigenous Economic Participation and
Development Strategy.

This strategy will build upon
Moonda Wurrin Gree
, the
2010 report of the Victorian Aboriginal Economic Develo
pment Group.


It is important that we
foster a joined up approach to Aboriginal Affairs by
promoting and building better partnerships between Government
,

community,
business and philanthropic sectors
.



The inspiring stories in this issue of VOICE show th
at Victoria’s LINs are
already playing an important part in this approach.


I believe we can all look forward to a productive year ahead which will set
future directions and lay down the foundations of lasting change and
improvements for all
Aboriginal

Victorians.



Jeanette Powell

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs


6

Victoria honours Indigenous leaders

past and present



At a

moving ceremony in Melbourne this past

February Victorian Premier Ted
Baillieu and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Jeanette Powell
inducted 20
outstanding Indigenous Victorians on the state’s inaugural Indigenous Honour
Roll.


The Premier said the Indigenous Honour Roll is the first of its kind in Australia
and Victoria is proud to lead the nation in recognising the many achievements
of Australia’s Indigenous people.


Victoria’s Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Jeanette Powell said the first group of
inductees have come from all walks of life and from all over the state.


“This exceptional group of people will inspire future leaders a
nd achievers to
make lasting contributions to the Indigenous community here

in Victoria and
further afield
,


Mrs
Powell said
.


The list of those honoured spans nearly two centuries of Victorian history.
They were selected by an all Indigenous Advisory Pane
l which received 44
nominations.


The Honour Roll will be now be permanently housed in the Victorian
Parliament in a purpose designed volume and display case.
Nominations for
induction to the 2012
Victorian Indigenous Honour Roll are now open and will
be
accepted until 5pm on 20 July 2012. Please visit the DPCD website (see
below) for further information about how to make a nomination.


For more information about the Victorian Indigenous Honour Roll please visit
ww
w.dpcd.vic.gov.au
/indigenoushonourroll


Honour Roll Profiles

William Barak (1824
-
1903)

Acclaimed artist and community leader William Barak was an important figure
i
n Victoria’s early history who engaged

with government on many issues
affecting his people
.


Johnny Mullagh or Unaarrimin (1841
-
1891)

One of Australia’s first international cricket stars, Johnny Mullagh was part of
Australia’s first (all Aboriginal) te
am to tour England in 1868
.


William Cooper (1861
-
1941)

Yorta Yorta Elder, William Coo
per was
a visionary
political lobbyist and civil
rights campaigner who established the Australian Aborigines League, a
national

day of remembrance and advocated

for national pol
itical reform
.


Sir Douglas Nicholls KVCO OBE JP (1906
-
1988)

A trailblazer with many o
utstanding achievements in the fields of sport, politics
and social justice, Sir Douglas was one of Australia’s most influential figures
in th
e
20th

century
.


7


Geraldine Briggs AO (1910
-
2005)

Geral
dine was

a leading act
ivist for Aboriginal rights who

helpe
d establish
Victoria’s Aborigin
es

Advancement League, and community health and legal
services in Victoria.


Lester Marks Harradine (1920
-
2010)

A Wotjobaluk Elder from Victoria’s Wimmera, Lester was a champion
footballer, returned servicemen and community

leader who was dedicated to
his local community in Dimboola.


John Stewart Murray OAM JP (1926
-
1929)

Wamba Wamba Elder and decorated Australian serviceman, Stewart Murray
was a tireless advocate for Aboriginal rights and founding member of the
Aborigines

Advancement League, Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service and
Aboriginal Funeral Fund.


Nessie Skuta OAM (1926
-
1995)

Nessie’s passionate campaigning
helped to establish
Gippsland and East
Gippsland Aboriginal Co
-
operative and made her a leading figure in t
he
Aboriginal rights movement
.



Elizabeth Pike (1927
-

)

W
riter in residence at the Aboriginal Catholic Ministry
Betty Pike’s
work offers
inspiration and insight on themes of Abo
riginal culture and identity.



Merle Jackomos (1929
-
)

Merle
and husband Ali
ck Jackomos played an important role in the Aboriginal
rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s

with

the Aborigines Advancement
League and many Victorian Aboriginal community organisations.


Dorothy (Dot) Peters (1930
-
)

A much loved Yarra Yarra Elder
Aunty
Dot
has made an enormous
contribution to reconciliation in Victor
ia through her teaching and
establish
ment of

the Remembrance Service for Victorian Indigenous Men and
W
omen
held at the Shrine of Remembrance since 2006.


Albert (Alby) Clarke (1934
-
)

Gunditj
mara Elder Alby Clarke has used his remarkable athletic abilities to
overcome his
T
ype 2 diabetes and raise community awareness about
Indigenous health issu
es
.


Melva Johnson (1934
-
)

A

beloved Yorta Yorta and W
e
mba

We
mba

Elder
Melva is

a champion for
Abo
riginal health, housing and education

who

has played an important role in
setting up community services in the Echuca area.


Alma Thorpe (1935
-

)

Gunditjmara Elder Alma Thorpe helped establish the Victorian Aboriginal
Health Service in Fitzroy in 1973 an
d
other
community organisations
.




8


Joan Robinson (1939
-
2009)

A Muthi Muthi Elder from Balranald in NSW Joan Robinson helped to
establish the Aboriginal Catholic Ministry in Melbourne and worked tirelessly
to teach the wider community about Indigenous cult
ure and history.


Lorraine ‘Bunta’ Patten (1941
-
)

Gunditjmara Elder Aunt
y Bunta was instrumental in establishing
Weroona
Aboriginal Cemetery at Greenvale in Melbourne’s north. An
acclaimed artist

Aunty Bunta is
involved in the Whittlesea Reconcili
ation Cou
ncil and the
Aborigines

Advancement League.


Joan Vickery (1941
-
)

A
Gunditjmara elder
Joan

helped to

establish
the Ngwala

Willumbong Co
-
operative,
to provide
providing

alco
hol and drug rehabilitation
services
and
also
the Koori Diabetes Service
.




Alf
r
ed

Bamblett (1944
-
)

Alf

Bamblett
is a respected leader who has helped to shape many key
Aboriginal organisations in Victoria. He has engaged with the highest levels of
government to influence
policy
in
education,

justice and human services.


Lionel Rose MB
E (1948


2011)

O
ne of the greats of Australian sport
Lionel

Rose

became the first Aboriginal
person to
win a
world boxing
title. A

talented musician and community worker,
Lionel was the first Indigenous person to be named Australian of the Year.


Archie

Roach (1955
-

)

Archie’s song ‘
Took
t
he Children Away’

about removal of Aboriginal c
hildren
from their families
resonated deeply across Australia and the world.

W
ith soul
mate Ruby Hunter, Archie embarked on a journey of healing through music.
After

los
in
g

his beloved Ruby in 2010
he now
runs Ruby’s Foundation to
improve opportunities for young Indigenous people
.



For more information
about the Victorian Indigenous Honour Roll please
visit the DPCD website.


9


AFL
stars share the journey

with Hamilton men
’s group


“When the invitation came from Geelong Football Club we were pretty
excited” says David Lovett from the Hamilton LIN men’s group.


“After meeting some of Geelong’s Indigenous players last year I thought it
would be great if they could come and t
alk with our men’s group. So I asked
Shane
Bell [the local DPCD Broker]

to arrange a visit” said David.


One afternoon in February, David and his group found themselves in a
Portland cafe sharing a coffee with Geelong stars Matthew Stokes, Travis
Varcoe,
Allan Christense
n
,

Steven Motlop
, Joel Hamling and Josh Walker
.
Also joining in were

other LIN members from Hamilton, Portland and
Heywood.


“We all had a great time
.
We asked them lots of questions about how they got
to be AFL footballers and what they h
ave to do to succeed at AFL level” said
David.


“When it was our turn to tell our story the players all li
stened respectfully as
we told them

about how our men’s group has built pride in our identity and
placed great importance on taking responsibility f
or ourselves, and our role in
our family and our community.




“We all
came away from our meeting feeling really positive about what we are
doing. We were really impressed with the respect and understanding we
received from the AFL stars” said David.


The
Hamilton LIN men’s group has come a long way since
a group of three

came together in 2009.
T
hey now have 12 regular members
,

ranging from
teenagers to men in their fifti
es and their numbers are growing
.


The
group meets weekly and has

been involved in

cul
tural heritage field trips

to the Glenelg River and Lake Condah
,
family fishing days and regular
healt
h
and well being workshops with local health staff.


They recently formed

their own country and western band
Black Opal Revived

with musical equipment pu
rchased with
$8,500

from the Department of
Justice Community Grants Program
.
The band plans
to perform at local
venues to raise funds for future men’s group activities.


Local DPCD Broker Shane Bell says the group is growing in self confidence
and
is
plan
ning its own activities program.


“All these men are now much more involved in community life and haven’t
looked back. Two have found jobs at the local Winda Mara Aboriginal
Cooperative and are developing an Indigenous men’s program for Hamilton,
Heywood,

Portland and Warrnambool.





10



For more information
about this story
and Hamilton

LIN please contact
DPCD Indigenous Communi
ty
Development

Broker Shane Bell

on (03) 5560
5714 or 0458 345 515
. See back page for full contact details.


11


Koorie culture takes
the prize

in Ballarat’s Begonia F
estival

With a 60

year history, the Ballarat Begonia Festival is one of Victoria’s best
known regional community events, attracting up to 15,000 locals and visitors
.



This year a

float developed by the loca
l Aborig
inal co
mmunity was

judged
the
best community entry

in the

Festival parade.


The theme of the
award winning float was
From Creation


a

Cultural
Evolution
. It
was the culmination of hard work by many in the community,
coordinated by Ballarat’s Koorie Engagement Ac
tion Group

(KEAG)
.


The float featured a

truck (prov
ided by
Ballarat Aboriginal Cooperative)

decorated wi
th shrubs and trees to reflect

the local environment
. It
was
followed by a group of 30 young traditional singers and
dancers who
recreated the story
of

Bunjil, the creator being who made the landscape, the
birds, the animals and the people.

The dancers were

lead by

Peter Lovett and Jamie Lowe, along with Tobi
Sam
-
Morris who also taught the group

a Torres Strait song
which they sang
between dance performa
nces.

“It

was a great way to catch up with other Indigenous young people, ma
ke
some great friends and

have a connection with so many in our community”
said Tobi.

T
he
diverse
backgrounds of the young performers reflect

the
composition

of
Ballarat’s Koorie
community which has

ties to communities all around Victoria,
Australia and the Torres Strait.


“I
t’s great that our kids in the community have the opportunity to stand up and
be proud of their culture. This experience will stay wi
th them for a long time t
o
come

said KEAG Co
-
Chair, Jamie Lowe.

The musical soundtrack

for the

float was created

by Ballarat Koorie musician
Tony Lovett with lyric
s written by young Koorie
community members
.


Inspired by its Begonia Festival success
,
KEAG

is keen
to

increase
opp
ortunities for Koorie residents to

participate

in the Ballarat community.

The
group was formed in 2010 to advise Ballarat City Council on issues for
the Indigenous people of the region, apart from matters concerning culture
and heritage.
It also oversees

the implementation of the Council’s
Reconciliation Action Plan 2100
-
2013.

Group m
embers
include Narelle Casey from the Ballarat and District
Aboriginal Cooperative, DPCD Indigenous Community Development Broker
Larry Kanoa and Tony Lovett from the Victori
an Aboriginal C
ommunity

12

Services Association. Several group members are also Ballarat LIN
participants.

For more information
about this story and Ballarat (Central Highlands) LIN
please contact DPCD Indigenous Community
Development

Broker Larry
Kanoa on (0
3) 5327 2819 or 0400 168 668. See back page for full contact
details.


13


Deadly conference g
ets Gippsland buzzing


The second Deadly in Gippsland
conference was an unforgettable experience
fo
r over 250 participants and
looks like becoming a regular event o
n the
Gippsland calendar.


Hosted by the Sale Local Indigenous Network (LIN) and Wellington Shire
Council the conference follows the success of the first
Deadly
event

in 2009.


The idea to create a conference showcasing success stories from Indigenous
comm
unities under the banner of Deadly in Gippsland was the shared vision
of four local Indigenous women


Leonie
Solomon
-
Green, Karen Mobourne,
Esme Thompson and Katie Yeomans.


Over two days in Nov
ember, at the
Wellington Entertainment Centre in Sale,
confe
rence goers were treated to a rich program of inspiring speakers,
musicians, artists, facilitators and community members who came to share
their stories, successes, talents and passions.


Gu
naik
urnai Elder Uncle Albert Mu
llett provided the traditional W
el
come

to
Country

and also
led

the Cultural Journey to Knob Reserve overlooking
Dooyedang (Avon River), a site of g
reat significance to the Gunaik
urnai
people.


Conference

MC Daphne Yarram performed a key leadership role and

introduced key
presentations fro
m Jody Broun, Co Chair of the National
Congress of Australia’s First Peoples (keynote address), Uncle Albert Mullett,
Barry Kenny, Jason King, Jodie Douthat and Dr Ali Khan.


They were ably supported by expert presenters at break out sessions on

themes of

health and well being, sustainable futures, arts and culture and
walking together.


A spectacular line up of musicians provided the entertainment
-

including
Kutcha Edwards, Shellie Morris, Uncle Herb Patten and the Deep Listening
Band (Steve Sedergreen,

Monica Weightman, Michael Jordan and Ron
Murray).


The conference enjoyed strong support from all levels of government. The
Hon David Morris MP, representing the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, spoke
about t
he relevance of
the eve
nt

to the
Government’s
Local Government
Aboriginal Partnerships Project and congratulated Mayor Jeff Amos and the
Wellington Shire on their support
.



These congratulations were well placed as Wellington Shire

recently won the
2012 National Local Government Award for Promoting R
econciliation
for its
partnership role

with the Sale LIN

in hosting the conference.



14


The
success

of the event

owes much to the hard work and tireless dedication
of many
staff and

volunteers. Although too n
umerous to name
special
acknowledgement should be

given to

Daphne Yarram and

Jod
ie

Douthat from
Sale LIN along with
conference coordinator Dionne Olsen, Laura Brearley
from the Deep Listening Project and
Frances Ford and Dean Hardisty from
Wellington Shire.


The conference Steering Committee also
playe
d a vital role with

representatives from Sale LIN, Wellington Shire, Ramahyuck Aboriginal
Corporation, Gippsland Regional Management Forum, Department of
Planning and Community Development, Department of Human Services and
Uniting Care Gippsland.



A
gener
ous list of patrons, sponsors and supporters

collectively
contributed
over $12
0,000

as well as

in kind support to stage

the event
.


These include
d

Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Corporation, six Victorian
Government Departments, Aboriginal Affairs Victoria,
all
six

Gippsland
Councils, Uniting Care Gippsland, Ramahyuck Aboriginal Corporation,
Bendigo Bank, Mission Australia, Small Business Victoria, Department of
Education Employment and Workplace Relations, Regional Development
Australia and Wellington Primar
y Care Partnership.



Per
ha
ps
the
greatest achievement is that
Deadly in Gippsland is
now

becoming a regular event on the Gippsland calendar
. W
ith a Message Stick
be
ing passed
to

East Gippsland Shire and the East Gippsland LINs to host
th
e next conference

in 2013
,

t
he ‘Deadly’ journey continues.


For more information
about this story and
Gippsland
LIN
s
please contact
DPCD Indigenous Community
Development

Brokers Leonie Solomon
-

Green

on (03) 5174 7308 or 0408 054 152 or Paul McDonald on (03) 5152 0631 or

0437 985 840. See back page for full contact details.
For more
about the
conference visit
http://www.wellington.vic.gov.au



15



IT training

a hit

in Dandenong, Frankston and Mornington


A computer training
program

involving

three
LINs in Melbourn
e’s south
ern
region has been welcomed by

Indigenous families in Dandenong, Frankston
and
M
ornington.


LINs across

the region have told DPCD Indigenous Com
munity Development
Broker Barry
Firebrace that
compu
ter skills and internet access
are

a high
priority

for Abor
iginal families.


“This training is needed not only
to
provide parents with computer
skills

but
also to assist them to support their children’s education” said Barry.


After
di
scussing the specific needs of

ea
ch LIN group the DPCD Broker

worked with the S
mit
h Family, local TAFEs and universities

to develop a
suitable training program.


Discussions were also
held with Koori
e

Education Support Officers from the
Department of Employment, Education and Childhood Development to help
identif
y local Indigenous fa
milies
wish
ing

to join the program.


The Smith Family (support
ed by
the
Victorian Government) came to the party
by offering
40 Indigenous families
free IT package
s at a total value of
$22,000. Each package consists of

a fully refurbished computer, 12 mon
th
internet c
onnection, computer training and a 12 month warranty with
free
telephone helpdesk support.

DPCD also contributed $4,000 to help get the
program started


As a result
the first
group of
40

participants have
now
received their IT
packages and com
pleted their

training at Frankston Chisholm TAFE,
Dandenong Chisholm TAFE and Swinburne University, Prahran.


In response to strong commu
nity interest, another
40 participants will receive
IT packages

and commence
training
in June this year
.
DPCD will al
so
contribute another $2,000 to assist with program delivery.


“The beauty of this project is that it

provid
es

a computer
,
internet access
,
training and support
all

in
the
one program
. This is
making a real difference
for Indigenous families in
our region”

said Barry
.


For more information
about this story and the Dandenong, Frankston and
Mornington Peninsula
LIN
s

please contact DPCD Indigenous Communi
ty
Development

Broker Bar
ry Firebrace on (03) 9937 0566
or 0417 330 281.
See back page for full contact de
tails.




16


Frankston’s gathering place by the bay


The Frankston Aboriginal community is set to achieve a long held dream to
have its own meeting place.


LIN participant Karan Kent belie
ves the gathering place


known as Nairm
Mar Djambana
-

will be a gre
at step forward for the community.


“This will be a place

where community can gather, information can be shared
and services can tap into and supp
ort the needs of our community.”


“It

will suppor
t our wellbeing by reducing
feelin
gs of social isolation, bu
ilding
our pride and embracing

our identity,
to
cr
eate

a deadly
, healthy community”
said Karan.


Nairm Marr Djambana Association
has been

incorporated to operate the
gathering place in
partnership with the Baluk Arts
Committee and Frankston
City Council w
hich owns the land and the buildings.



Nairm Mar Djambana means ‘gathering by the bay’ in the Boon Wurrung
language.


The idea for an Aboriginal gathering place in Frankston began with a group of
Elders yarning around a kitchen table.


After years of slo
w progress the momentum increased in 2008 when the
Frankston LIN joined the other three LINs in Melb
ourne’s southern region on
the Advisory C
ommittee to develop the region’s Closing the Health Gap Plan.


The five year plan commenced in 2009 and recognis
e
s

that community
gathering places c
an

play a vital role in improving health outcomes by
delivering community health promotion programs.


After considering several possible locations, Frankston Council, in
consultation with the LIN, decided
the
Jubilee

Park site was the most suitable
for the gathering place.
Close

to transport

and set in

bushland
the site has
the
potent
ial to use the nearby lake and surrounds for cultural activities
,
growing

bush tucker and using
local
bush
reeds for basket weaving and

crafts
.



Two buildings were placed on site in September 2011 and work is now
proceeding on refurbishment, connecting services and landscaping. The
facility is

expected to open in July 2012 during NAIDOC Week
.





P
roject
funding
has come from

Frank
ston City Council

($110,000)

and
Department of Health ($30,000)
.
Nairm Marr
Djambana has

also applied for
fund
s

from the Federal

Department of
Health and Ag
e
ing.



17

A

number of lo
cal companies have also provided support in the form

of
building materials, la
bour, furniture and equipm
ent.


For more information
about this story and the Frankston LIN please contact
DPCD Indigenous Community
Development

Broker Barry Firebrace on (03)
9937 0566 or 0417 330 281. See back page for full contact details.




18



Dirrawar
ra community plan sets course in Wangaratta



For the past twelve months the Dirrawarra Indigenous Network in Wangaratta
has been busy developing their community plan.


After starting with a blank canvas, the plan is now nearing completion and
shows the
emergence of a strong and confiden
t community
keen to celebrate
and share its culture. Dirrawarra is a word in the Pangerang language which
means “united” or “together”.


DPCD Indigenous Community Development Broker
Chris Bonacci
says the
community pl
anning process has
been evolutionary for a place like
Wangaratta recognising the rich history and current diversity. The plan
has
brought the community together and provided a positive focus for the future.


“We’re really
enthusiastic
about the

way commu
nity members have come
forward with their ideas, especially the many young people who took part.

This demonstrates how proud they are of their community.



“It’s provided an opportunity for the Indigenous community to celebrate its
diversity and for the w
ider community to better understand the challenges
and
complexities
faced by the Aboriginal community in Wangaratta.”


The Dir
rawarra plan sets out four main

goals for the future. They are to
establish a community meeting place, raise the profile of the In
digenous
community, improve coordination of local services and educate the broader
community about Aboriginal heritage and culture.



Rather than just creating a ‘wish list’
,

th
e
LIN has taken great care

to identify
the practical steps needed for each of
their goals to become a reality.


To achieve th
eir primary goal of having their own
meeting place,
for example,
the plan sets out a detailed,
one step at a time
process. This starts with

forming a LIN working party, finding an auspice agency, developing

community governance skills, and then securing funding for a feasibility study.
When

all

these steps have been taken, the community
will then

move on to
seek funding partners and, if successful, create an incorporated body to
operate their facility.


Si
milarly
,

the community understand that their goal of raising the
ir profile
can
onl
y be achieved in

partnership with the Rural City of Wangaratta and other
groups in the community. The plan identifies a number of specific projects to
make this happen.


The
se include developing
a local heritage path, display
ing
the Aboriginal flag,
setting up a local Indigenous honour roll, having a traditional Welcome to
Country at all major Council events and installing welcome signs on the main
roads entering the town.


19


The views and aspirations

of young Indigenous people are
a
significant force

behind the

plan. The plan states
“We want our young people to live in the
world of today, without forgetting the pride and traditions of yesterday. To walk
between two worlds and
feel at home in both.”


N
ow in it
s final stages of development,
the Dirrawarra plan

is currently
seeking furt
her input from community Elders

and Traditional Owners
.



For more information
about this story and Dirrawarr
a

(Wangaratta
) LIN
please contact DPC
D Indigenous Communi
ty

Development

Broker Darren
Moffitt
on (03)

5722 7110 or 0428 648 764.

See back page for full contact
details.




20


Workshop builds

LIN participation in Geelong


A community planning workshop in Geelong has brought local Indigenous
comm
unity members together to discuss their common issues and develop a
vision for the future.


The February workshop was facilitated by
DPCD Indigenous Community
Development Brokers Debby Walker and Shane Bell

with support from
Aboriginal Affairs Victoria.


The aim
was to introduce
Wathaurong

(Geelong)

LIN participants to the key
issues, ideas and methods us
ed in

community planning and help them get
them started

in
develop
ing a successful plan for

their own community.


Wathaurong is one of five LINS
in
Victor
ia’s
B
arwon
S
outh
W
est

Region.
With LINs

at Portland, Heywoo
d, Warrnambool and Hamilton already
developing their

plans
,
Wathaurong

is the latest community in the region to
begin this exciting process.


The work
shop was attended by 15

LIN participants and

interested community
members. P
articipants used creative and innovative ideas to build knowled
ge,
confidence and motivation.
They were part
icularly inspired by the


T
alkin


up
our st
rengths cards


designed to stimulate

discussion about
a

comm
unity’s

streng
ths and vision for the future.


DPCD Broker Shane Bell who has facilitated community plans in other LINs

in
the region

was pleased with the workshop.



“I
t was great to see the level of community participation in this

work
shop. It’s
always interesting

t
o see how communities decide

what’s important to them.
Although many

Victorian Aboriginal communities
may
have
a similar outlook

r
egarding a sustainable future,
their priorities are
often quite different at the
local level” he said.


The worksho
p was well

received and conducted in a relaxed and friendly
atmosphere
with
plenty of laughter
throughout the day. Participants left
feeling enthused and ready to share their experience with others in the
ir

community.


LIN participant

Mark Edwards

w
as mindful of
the
work needed to turn plans
into reality.

The day proved to be of value, having a unit
ed vision.
However,
it’s only as good as the resources provided to act and those actions taken”

he
said.


DPCD Broker Debby Walker summed up the day by saying

“It was
a great
day, full of
positive interaction and vision with

lots of exciting times ahead”.



21

For more information

about this story and the Wathaurong

(Geelong)

LIN
please contact DPCD Indigenous Community Development Broker, Debby
Walker on (03) 5215 6050 or
0400 568 178.


22

Mildura sports carnival a real team effort


With a history spanning nearly 30 years, Victoria’s annual Indigenous Football
and Netball Carnival is an annual highlight for Indigenous communities.


Last October over 3000 participants and spe
ctators flocked to Mildura to
display their sporting talents and take part in this popular event.


Hosted by the Mildura Indigenous Family Violence Regional Action Group
(IFVRAG) the three day event brought together 24 netball teams and 14 AFL
football

teams from Mildura, Shepparton, Echuca, Bendigo and metropolitan
Melbourne.


IFVRAG Chairperson and Mildura LIN participant Janine Wilson said the main
aim of the annual carnival is to bring Indigenous community members
together.



“Sport is the biggest
activity that brings us together, and it’s one of the
reasons why this carnival has been such a major success for many years
.

It’s
also an opportunity to showcase our culture and focus on community pride”

she said.


To stage the event IFVRAG worked in part
nership with the Robinvale and
Mildura LINs, Mildura Aboriginal Corporation, Mildura Rural City Council,
Department of Justice, Mallee Sports Assembly and Vic
toria
Pol
ice
.


Nearly twelve months in the planning, the carnival was the result of a lot of
hard
work behind the scenes.


“We spent a lot of time getting out into the community to raise money for the
event. The Mildura Rural City Council provided a generous grant of $15,000
and we raised another $18,000 by simply asking people in the community to
ma
ke a donation” said Janine.


A carnival highlight was the exciting debut of the Jaara Indigenous women’s
netball team from Bendigo which reached the C grade grand final
against
Robinvale
and came close to victory after training together for only two
month
s.


Jaara team member Narlinga Fitzpatrick said she was proud of how far the
team had come in such a short time and is keen to see it build on its early
success.


“Making the grand final in Mildura was an obvious highlight but seeing
everyone come toge
ther as a team and support each other was probab
ly the
biggest highlight for me,


said Narlinga.



For more information
about this story and the Mildura and Robinvale LINs
please contact DPCD Indigenous Community
Development

Broker Thelma
Chilly on (03)
5026 3798 or 0437 684 763. See back page for full details
.


23

Culture stays strong in Melbourne’s west


An exciting project in Melbourne’s west is building community strength
through cultural activity.


Readers of
VOICE August 2011

will remember our story abo
ut the Respect
for Your Mob project created by the Wyndham/Hobson’s Bay (Werribee) and
Maribyrnong LINs to strengthen local Indigenous families and prevent family
violence.


Since then five successful cultural workshops have been held in Braybrook,
Trugan
ina (2), Melton and Footscray. Their aim is to bring the community
together to reconnect people with culture and traditional family values.


At the Melton workshop in January, 45 community members came to learn
about traditional story telling, making clap
sticks and digging sticks, traditional
painting and design, didgeridoo lessons and traditional dance.


Led by Bill Nico
lson and other representatives from the Wurundjeri
Tribe Land
and Compensation Cultural Heritage Council and assisted by DPCD Broker
Deb
orah
Murray the

workshops have struck a chord in the local community.


“We’ve had a really enthusiastic response from the local Indigenous
community. These workshops have really brought people together and helped
to create a strong sense of community ou
t here in the west” says Deborah
Murray.


“One of the women taking part told me she was really pleased her grand
daughter had the opportunity to learn about her culture alongside her family
members.”


The Respect Your Mob and Family project is funded by a
$20,000 grant for
2011
-
2012 from the Department of Human Services Family Violence
Community Initiatives program.


The project is being delivered through a partnership between the Maribyrnong
and Werribee LINs, Macedon Ranges and North Western Melbourne
Me
dicare Local, Wurundjeri Tribe Land and Compensation Cultural Heritage
Council, Melton Shire, City of Brimbank, City of Maribyrnong, City of
Wyndham and PivotWest (a local GP group). These groups are represented
on the project reference group along with lo
cal community members.


With additional funding of $10,000 recently provided by DHS, the workshops
will now continue for the remainder of the year. At the end of the year a
community art exhibition is planned to showcase the art and craft produced by
comm
unity participants
.


For more information
about this story and the Wyndham/Hobson’s bay
(Werribee) and Maribyrnong LINs please contact DPCD Indigenous

24

Community
Development

Broker Deborah Murray on (03) 9937 0576 or 0409
185 831. See back page for full co
ntact details.


25


SkyFest celebrates Indigenous culture in Lakes Entrance


For over 60

years, East Gippsland families and visiting holiday makers have
gathered in Lakes Entrance to welcome the New Year at the local SkyFest
celebrations.


This year more tha
n 20,000 revellers had even more rea
son to celebrate as
they were
treated to a

Welcome to Country,
a captivating
Aboriginal dance

performance and displays of Indigenous
arts and crafts

from talented local
artists.


Meanwhile, working quietly behind the

sc
enes, a group of Aboriginal
m
arshalls provided additional security for the event and ensured a safe
environment for everyone to enjoy themselves.


Wayne Thorpe’s Welcome to C
ountry really got the crowd

involved as he
had
them

speaking in Aboriginal languag
e, then cheering and clapping as he
welcomed them to
Gunaikurnai
country
.


T
he Djeetung Megay Dancers had their first performance in front of a large
audience but were not overawed. Alice Patten, co
-
founder of the group said,
“It was fantastic and we’re s
till feeling the vibe a couple of months later”.


“Learning and understanding what the dances are about gave significance to
the dance and took away any fear of performance
,
” said Alice.


Another important Aboriginal participant at Sky
F
est was accomplishe
d local
artist and artefact maker Manfred Ratzmann. His display included some of his
own work and artefacts from the Krowathunkooloong Keeping Place.



“There was a lot of interest from non
-
Aboriginal people as well as young
Aboriginal people. It made me p
roud to be able to explain what the different
artefacts, tools and weapons were used for
,


said Manfred.


The Aboriginal m
arshals were also
a great

success, with 20 local men and
women being trained and employed to provide additional security. They won
pra
ise from police, organisers and the public for the cheerful and professional
way they went about their duties. The Aboriginal Marshalls program has been
operating since 2005 with the support of the Department of Justice.


The success of Sky
F
est 2011 owes
much to the Lakes Entrance LIN working
in partnership with
East Gippsland Aboriginal Arts Corporation, Lakes
Entrance Aboriginal Health Association, Lake Tyers Aboriginal Trust and the
Koorie Youth Justice Program
. They

were all represented on the SkyFest
Working Party.


The whole process
was assisted by a grant

of $10,000

from the Department
of Planning and Community Development, submitted on behalf of the Lakes
Entrance LIN.


26




For more information

about this story and Lakes Entrance LIN please
contact DP
CD Indigenous Community
Development

Br
oker Paul McDonald
on (03) 5152 0631 or 0437 985 840.

See back page for full contact details.



27


We walk one path in Whittlesea



In Me
lbourne’s outer north

the Whittlesea LIN is working hard to bring its local
Indige
nous community together to develop their community plan.




DPCD Indigenous Community Development Broker Tammy Hunter
says the
LIN has come a long way since it started in 2007
.


More tha
n 50 community members gathered for
the LIN’s community planning
fam
ily day at N
ioka Bush Camp
.


Although the focus was on community planning, the LIN
wanted the

event
to
be family

friendly. The natural setting of

Nioka Bush Camp in the Plenty River
Gorge, just 20 kilometres from Melbourne proved an ideal location.


H
osted by local Elder Uncle Reg Blow, the family day program blended group
discussions about community planning with performances by the Whittlesea
Indigenous Youth Choir (organised by Donna Wright) and the Strong Spirit
Dancers. Other activities included f
ace painting, mural artwork, didgeridoo
workshops, football, rugby and traditional games.



A highlight of the day was the launch of the winning design in the LIN logo
competition created by local artist and LIN participant Tracey Borg.



My design

represe
nts a path that
passes through and around our
municipality, conn
ecting all the people who live
here. The footsteps represent
people walking the path, coming together to share ideas and create ac
tivities
for the benefit of all our mob
,
” said

Tracey.


DPCD

Broker Tammy Hunter said the family day was a great success and an
important step

forward

in the community planning process.


“By

the e
nd of the day the community had
developed a vision for the future
and id
entified some key priorities to strengthen

comm
unity and culture,
improve

outcomes in health and education and
provide
support for Elders

said Tammy.


The Whittlesea planning event was staged in partnership between the LIN
and City of Whittlesea
, which provided in kind support

while
AAV

contributed

$1
,500 and DPCD $600

towards the costs of the event
.


For more information
about this story

and Whittlesea

LIN please contact
DPCD Indigenous Communi
ty Development Broker Tammy Hunter on (03)
9937 0577 or 0439 144 209
.
See back page for full contact detail
s.



28

F
rom Geelong

to Mozambique



a sporting journey



Three Indigenous sportsmen from western Victoria


Lowell Hunter, Stephen

Lovett and Ricky Kildea have played a part in a ground breaking sporting and
cultural visit to the All Africa Games in Mozambiq
ue.


Last September the three LIN participants joined a squad of Indigenous
footballers from across Australia to play an exhibition Aussie Rules match
against a local African team.


The exhibition match, played in Mozambique’s capital city Maputo,
showcase
d Australian rules for the first time as an official demonstration sport
at the African Games.


As well as playing the exhibition match the Indigenous footballers conducted
junio
r coaching clinics with over 300

young Africans.


For 22
year old Stephen
Edwards the trip was a great opportunity to meet
African people and enjoy the sharing of cultures.


“Some of my highlights were visiting
Kruger
National Park, seeing Nelson
Mandela’s house and visiting local villages to meet people in the community.
I a
lso enjoyed the dance performance during our visit to Swaziland”.


“The local kids we met at the three coaching clinics weren’t shy. They asked
for our clothes, sunglasses and even our shoes and we were happy to give
them away.”


“In Mozambique I was shock
ed by the number of people (especially children)
begging on the streets. The condition of the local childcare centre with 40 kids
to one carer brought tears to my eyes
,
” he said.


For Lowell Hunter, a LIN
participant from

Geelong and War
r
nambool, this was

more than a football trip
-

it was the experience of a lifetime.


“My highlight was the cultural exchange we had
with
African people when we
performed our traditional dance for them and they performed their dance for
us”.


All Indigenous players taking p
art had to find sponsors to raise $5,000 to meet
the
trip costs
.


Sponsors included Aboriginal Affairs Victoria, Aboriginal Community Justice
Panel, Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative, Belmont Football Club, VAEAI,
Brambuk Cultural Centre, TAC Geelong, Gee
long Rotary Club, Deakin
University, EMS Consulting and local businesses.






29

For more information
about this story and
Wathaurong

(Geelong
) LIN
please contact DPCD Indigenous Communi
ty
Development
Broker Debby
Walker on (03) 5215 6050 or 0400 568 178
. Se
e back page for full contact
details.


























30


LIN partnership boosts education in Lakes Entrance



In Lakes Entrance, a partnership between the LIN and the Local Aboriginal
Education Consultative Group (LAECG) has energised the community’
s
efforts to improve education outcomes for their children.


“We have been very frustrated, too many of our children are not doing well at
school, we couldn’t get
the

LAECG committee
going over the last few years
and our relationship with the local
second
ary college wasn’t good” said Lidia
Thorpe,
Chairperson of the
Lakes Entrance LAECG.



“For years Aunty Phyliss Andy was the LAECG Chairperson and we have a
lot to thank her for, however in the end she was left to do it all on her own.”


The LIN welcomed
the idea of working more closely with the education group
(LAECG)
and there was a feeling
that both groups could benefit by combining
their

meetings.


It was decided that these meetings should be jointly chaired by Lidia, from the
LAECG, and Paula Morgan f
rom the LIN.


So far t
his arrangement
is working well and has given the community new
enthusiasm to improve education outcomes for their children.


They have made
a fresh start
in their relationship
with
the local secondary
college and more community memb
ers are now coming along to meetings to
have their say
.


The latest

joint meeting was well attended and the mood was upbeat.

Connie
Harrison, who attended the
meeting,

said

‘It’s a new beginning
.

T
his brings
our
community together and we encourage others t
o come along to find
solutions as a g
roup
.



One of the first joint initiatives by the LIN and LAECG has been to
support a

Walking Club to promote healthy recreation. Fittingly t
he
ir first walk
was
a visit
to the
local
se
condary school to

introdu
ce themsel
ves to the principal to show
their commitment to education.
They then

walked to the local kindergarten
where they were enthusiastically
received
by the children and staff.


Alice Patten added, “This is very exciting, to have such an enthusiastic group
and

to have our LAECG up and running again with everyone so positive is
fantastic”.



For more information
about this story

and Lakes Entrance

LIN please
contact DPCD Indigenous Communi
ty
Development

Broker Paul McDonald
on (03) 5152 0631 or 0437 985 840
. S
ee back page for full contact details.



31


Kerang LIN takes to the water


The Kerang LIN is keen to get its local community together through healthy
fun activities.


DPCD
Indigenous Community Development
Broker Deborah Webster says
“The Kerang LIN is still

very much in the development stage. We are working
to get more people involved and raise our profile in the local community.”


“So we decided to organise a fun day during the school holidays for local
families to come down to the Reedy River and do some c
anoeing” said
Deborah.


“Why canoeing? Well, not everyone is interested in coming to a community
meeting. So we’re looking for fun healthy activities which people can enjoy
and also get to know each other
,
” she said.


So on Reedy Lake, just north of Keran
g, last September a group of families
met with instructors from Canoeing Victoria

(CV)

to learn about basic safety
and canoe handling.


Under the watchful eye of their instructors and wrapped in their yellow life
jackets they soon took to the water and put

it all into practice.


CV

is the state body for the management and promotion of canoeing in
Victoria.


Although the Kerang Family Day was all about water safety and learning the
basic skills, CV also offers a six step program for anyone interested in
pur
suing canoeing at a more serious level.


For the Kerang Family Day
,

CV provided a grant of $3,500 which covered the
costs of canoe hire, equipment and instructors. Kerang LIN provided a picnic
lunch for all participants.



“Everyon
e really enjoyed the da
y and people are

really
keen for the LIN to
organise more activities like this. The Canoeing Victoria instructors were great
and made sure everyo
ne was safe and had a good time,


said
Deborah
.


“We’ll continue to organise community events in Kerang to buil
d a stronger
sense of community. As community participation increases the LIN will be
able to move towards developing
their
community plan.”



For more information
about this story
and Kerang

LIN please contact DPCD
Indigenous Communi
ty
Development
Broker
Deborah Webster

o
n 03 4433
8032 or 0417 639 058.

See back page for full contact details.



32


Elders provide
a guiding hand in Urban South


Since it started in 2008 the Urban South (St Kilda) LIN has valued and
enjoyed the regular participation of its Elde
rs in community activities.


Until his recent passing, the late Uncle Graham (Bunja) Geebung was a highly
respected and prominent LIN Elder who was involved in many community
issues.

Although his advice and experience will be sadly missed, the

community st
ill
enjoy
s

the guidance and leadership of Elders such as Aunty
Judy Jackson (Aunty Jacko), Aunty Carolyn Briggs and Uncle Dennis Fisher.


They are
all
part of the newly formed Yallukit Willam Elders group from
Melbourne’s southern suburbs which has ten m
embers and meets monthly as
part of the Urban South LIN.


According to Boon Wurrung Elder
Aunty Carolyn Briggs
, “T
he Yallukit Willam
Elders G
roup is
all
about Elders coming together in
ngargee

embraced by
Bunjil
.”


Yallukit Willam
is one of six clans in t
he Boon Wurrung Nation and means
river camp or place.
Ngargee

is a Boon Wu
rrung word for

gathering or coming
together for yarning, celebration and planning.

Bunjil

is the
creator spirit in the
form of a Wedge
-
Tailed Eagle.


An early challenge
for the Elde
rs g
roup
has been
to strike

a balance be
tween
working on their own agenda and also being available

to other groups in the
community who wish to consul
t with them
.



They are in popular demand.
T
he LIN
is

seeking
their
guidance

on a range of
issues includ
ing

the establishment of

a local gathering place
.


G
roups such as the Southern Regio
n Aboriginal Planning

Group also want
their advice to

develop

a regional plan to improve Aboriginal outcomes acros
s
the three tiers of Government
.


There is also the

exc
iting possibility
emerging for the Elders

group
to

work
with young Aborigi
nal and Torres Strait Islander
people in the community to
facilitate inter
-
generational exchange
. This initiative is currently being
discussed with the Department of Health as part o
f the Southern metro
regional
Closing the
Health
Gap

Plan
.


For more information
about this story and
Urban South

(
St Kilda
) LIN please
contact DPCD Indigenous Community
Development
Broker
Alana
Marsh
on

(03)
9296

4614

or 04
48 526 088.
See back page for f
ull contact details.



33



Broker Profile



Meet Tammy Hunter


Tammy Hunter is a DPCD Indigenous Community Development Broker who
works
with three LINs in Melbourne’s north western r
egion


Hume
(Broadmeadows), Whittlesea and Northern Metro.


For
our first

VOICE Broker Profil
e, Gary Kenny asked Tammy a few
questions.


Tell us a bit about yourself and your family.

I am a Wurundjeri woman. My father, who has passed on to the Spirit
dream
ing
, was Elder Norm Hunter and my grandmother was Jessie Hun
ter,
who w
as born at

Coranderrk (near Healesville).

I live in Reservoir now but

I grew up in Broadmeadows


so
I’m still a
Br
oady
chick deep down. I have a

deadly daughter, Georgia Mae who is 12 years old.
My partner Chicka Turner

is a
Torres Strait

Islander
.
My mo
ther still lives in
Broadmeadows and
I have four sisters and a brother.


What are some of the jobs you’ve had in your working life?

I went to school at Worawa Aboriginal Colle
ge in Healesville and
then
came
back to Broadmeadows Tech to complete my year 12
. My first job was a work
for the dole program at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne which went
for 6 months.

After that I joined the Koori Gardening Team at the Living Museum of the
West in Maribyrnong.
Then

l went to work for Parks Victoria as a Ran
ger at
Organ Pipes National Park

just out of Melbourne
.

From there l became the Cultural Heritage Team Leader with Parks Victoria
for the Port Phillip region.

My next job was with the Commonwealth Department of Heritage and
Environment as the
state
Indige
nous Land Management Facilitator.

When my daughter was old enough for school I took up a job with D
epartment
of
S
ustainability and
E
nvironment

as an Indigenous Facilitator. That was what
I was doing before I
started my current job
.


What is the best and

also
the hardest thing

about your job?

The best thing

about my job

is working with people in the community to build
on what they already have and find out about their priorities for
the future.
The
hardest thing is trying to find funding to help the commu
nity implement their
projects.


What advice would you give to someone taking on your job?

Be open and inclusive. L
isten to community and always be respectful. Make
sure you’re out there mixing it up with the community face to face. Finally
,

always follo
w thorough with what you said you would do.


Who has given you inspiration?


34

My daughter Georgia and my partner Chicka Turner

-

they are full of positive
information and comments and kee
p me going and on the move.


How do you chill out?

Going to the gym an
d pumping iron
until

l feel like super woman
.


Tell
us something about yourself that others wouldn’t know.

In 2007 I was awarded the Churchill fellowship and
also
won a State Gold
medal and
an
Australian Gold medal in Taekwondo Sparring.

I also have to m
ake sure all the door
s

are closed in the bed room
each night
before l go to sleep
,

so no monsters can get me. True.




35


Contact
ing

Your Brokers


Hume

Darren Moffitt

Wangaratta Government Centre,

1st Floor, 62 Ovens Street,

Wangaratta 3677

(03) 5722 7110
0428 648 764

d
arren.moffitt
@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Clinton Edwards

79a Wyndham Street

Shepparton, 3677

(03) 5895 4113 0418 970 611

clinton.edwards@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Gippsland

Paul McDonald

574 Main Street, Bairnsdale, 3875

(03) 5152 0631 0437 985 840

paul.mcd
onald@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Leonie Solomon
-
Green

33 Breed Street, Traralgon, 3844

(03) 5174 7308 0408 054 152

leonie.green@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Barwon South
-
West

Shane Bell

Level 1, 126 Timor Street, Warrnambool 3280

(03) 5560 5714

0458 345 515

shane.bell@dpcd.
vic.gov.au


Sandra Bell

21 Scott Street

Heywood, 3304

(03) 5527 2008 0427 480 190

sandra.bell@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Debby Walker

6
-
8 Moorabool Stree
t
, Geelong,
3220

(03) 5215 6050 0400 568 178

debby.wal
ker@dpcd.vic.gov.au








36

Grampians

Larry Kanoa

111 Arm
strong Street North,

Ballarat, 3350

(03) 5327 2819 0400 168 668

larry.kanoa@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Eastern Metro

and St Kilda

Alana Marsh

30 Prospect Street, Box Hill, 3128

(03) 9296 4614 0448 526 088

alana.marsh@dpcd.vic.gov.au


North
-
West Metro

Tammy Hunte
r

Level 9, 8
Nicholson Street
,

Melbourne, 3000

(03) 9937 0577 0439 144 209

tammy.hunter@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Deborah

Murray

Level 9, 8 Nicholson Street

Melbourne, 3000

(03) 9937 0576 0409 185 831

deborah.murray@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Southern Metro

Barry Firebra
ce

Level 9, 8 Nicholson Street

Melbourne, 3000

(03)

9937

0566

0417 330 281

barry.firebrace@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Loddon Mallee

Thelma Chilly

Haven, 52

Herbert Street

Robinvale 3549

(03) 5026 3798 0437 684 763

thelma.chilly@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Bill Sheldon

56
-
6
0 King Street, Bendigo, 3550

(03) 4433 8033

0448 519 024

bill.sheldon@dpcd.vic.gov.au


Deborah

Webster

56
-
60 King Street, Bendigo, 3550

(03) 4433 8032 0417 639 058

deborah
.webster@dpcd.vic.gov.au




37



Authorised and p
ublished by Aboriginal Affairs Vict
oria

Department of Planning and Community Development

1 Spring Street Melbourne Victoria 3000

Telephone (03) 9208 3799


June 2012


© Copyright State Government of Victoria

June 20
12

This publication is copyright. No part may be reproduced by any process
ex
cept in accordance with provisions of the Copyright Act 1968.


Authorised and published by Jeanette Powell

8 Nicholson Street, Melbourne 3000


Print managed by Finsbury Green


Designed
by
Reanna Bono

Concept by Leonie Solomon
-
Green


Printed on 50% recycled

paper


ISBN 978
-
1
-
921940
-
44
-
6



Accessibility

If you would like to receive this publication in an accessible format, such as
large print or audio, please telephone Anatoly Sawenko on 03 9208 3257, or
email Anatoly.Sawenko@dpcd.vic.gov.au


This publication

is also published in PDF and Word formats on
www.dpcd.vic.gov.au