Consultation Paper on the Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) of the ...

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1

Consultation Paper on the Equality Impact
Assessment (EQIA) of the Rural Anti
-
Poverty and
Social Inclusion Framework.


If you consider your views on this consultation can be better obtained
through other means the Department of Agriculture and Rural
Develo
pment (DARD) will be
happy to

meet with representative groups
or discuss your views as required.

Copies of this document can be made available in other formats or
languages on request. Copies can be downloaded from the DARD
website or requested from:

Roy G
riffin

Rural Policy Division

DARD

Rm 404 Dundonald House

Stormont Estate

Upper Newtownards Road

Belfast

BT4 3SB


Telephone:

028 9052

4598

Textphone
: 028 9052

4420

E
-
mail:

Ruralpolicy.branch@dardni.go
v.uk


Website:

www.dardni.gov.uk/index/consultations

This consultation will open on the
8th April

for 8 weeks and close on the
5th June

2009
.




2

Contents

Page

Section 1:

................................
................................
................................
....................

4

Introduction

................................
................................
................................
.......

4


Section 2:

................................
................................
................................
....................

5

Executive Summary
................................
................................
.........................

5


Section 3:

................................
................................
................................
....................

9

Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Framework: aims
objectives and background.

................................
................................
..........

9

Aims and Objectives of the Framework.

................................
...........

9

Identification of the key priorities of the framework
.

..................

10

Background to the Framework

................................
................................
...

11


Section 4
:

................................
................................
................................
..................

15

EQIA Process

................................
................................
................................
..

15

EQIA Procedure

................................
................................
..............................

16


Section 5
:

................................
................................
................................
..................

18

Equality evidence used in the Framework.

................................
.............

18

Preliminary Evidence

................................
................................
...........

18

Preliminary issues identified from the Rural Development
Programme EQIA.

................................
................................
.................

20

Evidence from issue papers by contributor.

................................
.

29


Section 6
:

................................
................................
................................
..................

31

Evidence from Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Fr
amework
consultation.

................................
................................
................................
....

31

Workshop: Loughry Campus 4
th

March 2009.

...............................

31

Participation meetings.

................................
................................
........

35

Other evidence submitted as part of Consultation on Rural
Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Framework.

............................

36


Section 7:

................................
................................
................................
..................

38

Equality assessment of framework.

................................
..........................

38

Rural Fuel Poverty.

................................
................................
...............

41

Rural Transport and Access.

................................
.............................

42

Rural Childcare.

................................
................................
.....................

44

Rural Challenge Programme.

................................
.............................

45

Rural Community Developmen
t.

................................
.......................

47


3

Section 8:

................................
................................
................................
..................

50

Alternative Policies and Mitigation.

................................
..........................

50


Sec
tion 9:

................................
................................
................................
..................

51

Consultation.

................................
................................
................................
...

51

Questions.

................................
................................
...............................

52


Annex A

................................
................................
................................
.....................

54

DARD’s Commitments to Lifetime Opportunities.

................................

54


Annex B

................................
................................
................................
.....................

56

Table: Strate
gic Equality Impact Summary.

................................
...........

56


Annex C

................................
................................
................................
.....................

57

Distribution List.

................................
................................
.............................

57


Annex D

................................
................................
................................
.....................

72

Evidence from issue papers by contributor.

................................
..........

72



4


Section 1:

Introduction


1.1

The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, as
part of the
Programme for Government

commitment

is
developing a Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion
Framework. This Framework will deliver a series of
programmes worth £10 million over the three budget years
from 2008/09 to 2010/11.

1.2

This consultation paper is
an Equality Impact Assessment
(EQIA) for the Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion
Framework.



5

Section 2:

Executive Summary

2.1

This document is the public consultation of the
draft
equality
impact
assessment on the proposed
Rural Anti
-
Poverty and
Social I
nclusion
Framework and will be used to inform the
final Framework and its supported programmes
.

2.2

DARD have been allocated £10 million
through

the
Programme for Government to develop a

Rural Anti
-
Poverty
and Social Inclusion Framework
to address issues of po
verty
and social exclusion. The objectives of the framework are
supportive of

Government’s overarching Anti
-
Poverty and
Social Inclusion Strategy: Lifetime Opportunities.

2.3

While the Framework will contribute to the targets
set within
Lifetime Opportunities,

there

is also the opportunity to
develop a rational
e

and baseline for future action and to
support the Rural Development Programme 2007
-
2013.

2.4

The
aim

of th
is

Framework is to,



Contribute towards the elimination of poverty in rural
areas;



Contribute towards

the reduction of social exclusion in
rural areas; and



Create a foundation for sustainable actions that will
continue to address poverty and social exclusion in rural
areas.

2.5

The
o
bjectives
of the framework are:



6



Provide mechanisms and support to those livi
ng in rural
communities to identify and tackle poverty and social
exclusion in their areas; and



Provide access to the necessary tools and support to
address these concern
s
.

Lifetime
O
pportunities requires
D
epartments to ensure that
poverty and social exclu
sion
issues
are addressed by
targeting those most at need. This framework recognises the
need to target those most vulnerable,
and
also that actions
must be ongoing and address wider rural poverty

and
exclusion.


2.6

The f
ramework has identified five
prioritie
s

under which
specific programmes are to be developed
, these are,



Rural Fuel Poverty;



Rural Community Development;



Rural Transport;



Rural Childcare
Programme
; and



Rural Challenge Programme
.

2.7

These priorities have been generally accepted as identifying
conc
erns of many key rural stakeholders.
The proposed
actions

under each priority are to be developed to meet the
above aims and objectives.

2.8

T
he Equality Imp
act Screening completed on the p
roposed
f
ramework identified

the need for a full equality a
ssessment


7

as

without detailed specific programmes or actions it was
difficult to fully identify the potential equ
a
lity impact
.

2.9

The information used to develop

the
proposed

framework
is
reviewed in this EQIA to highlight possible equality
implications.

2.10

Evidence for t
h
e draft

framework was obtained from other
areas of the Departments work, namely the EQIA on the
Rural Development Programme 2007
-
2013. Additionally two
issues papers were commissioned from the Rural
Development Council a
nd the Rural Community Network

spec
ifically for the development of the framework.

2.11

Further evidence
was
obtained from the public consultation
including a
one
day workshop on the Rural Anti
-
Poverty and
Social Inclusion Framework, and from individual stakeholder
meetings.

2.12

In assessing the equa
lity impacts t
he proposed priorities are
considered from an equality perspective
, highlighting the aim
of each priority, possible
actions

and the anticipated effect on
sections of the rural community.

2.13

I
n considering the evidence used to develop the framewo
rk it
is recogni
s
ed
that there are several unknowns and that there
are gaps in the evidence

base
. These areas are
,



Migrant Workers;



Black and minority ethnic groups;



Issues around health, including mental health; and



Religious basis of poverty.


8

2.14

DARD have a

duty to promote equality of opportunity
and
good relations
in the

development and

delivery of this
EQIA,
the
framework
and its

subsequent
actions
.

2.15

There will be an economic appraisal of each pr
iority

to
ensure that the action targets an
appropriate

need
.

2.16

In
undertaking the EQIA, developing the framework and in
the
deliver
y of

each pr
iority

we
must

consider how potential
inequalities can be mitigated against and /or avoided
.

2.17

The purpose of the consultation paper is to
,



Obtain c
onsultees


views on the equ
ality aspects of the
priorities

and
actions

identified by the Rural

Anti
-
Poverty
and Social
I
nclusion Framework
.

Identify and obtain
f
urther information which should be considered in
assessing equality impacts.



Receive

a
ny suggestions or comments on how to

better
engage with rural groups during the consultation and
subsequent delivery of the Framework.

2.18

All information and responses will be considered in the
finali
s
ation of the Framework.

2.19

A series of questions are included for consideration in
forming any re
sponse

at

section 9.
7
.


9

Section 3:

Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Framework:
aims objectives and background.


Aims and Objectives of the Framework.


3.1

DARD have been allocated £10 million
through

the
Programme for Government to address rural po
verty and
social exclusion. To do so DARD have proposed a Rural
Anti
-
P
overty and Social Inclusion Framework.
The
f
ramework has three broad aims:



Contribute towards the elimination of poverty in rural
areas;



Contribute towards the reduction of social exclus
ion in
rural areas; and



Create a foundation for sustainable actions that will
continue to address poverty and social exclusion in rural
areas.


3.2

The framework has two objectives:



Provide mechanisms and support to those living in rural
communities to ide
ntify and tackle poverty and social
exclusion in their areas; and



Provide access to the necessary tools and support to
address these concern
s
.


10


Identification of
the
key priorities

of the framework
.


3.3

C
ommissioned reports, discussions

and input from
sta
keholders were

used to identify 4

priority

areas, on the
basis of need, the long term benefit and practicality

(i.e. can
these be
realistically

tackled within the financial
constraints
and
timeframe of the available funding)
. These 4 priorities
are:



Rural
Fuel Poverty;



Rural Transport;



Rural
Childcare
;
and



Rural
Community Development
.

3.4

A fifth priority, a Rural Challenge Programme, was also
proposed to enable local communities to identify
and target
issues of poverty and exclusion.

The
purpose

of these
priorities is to address issues identified by Section 75
groupings and representative organisations


3.5

The rationale and identification of these priorities is further
detailed in the
Rural

Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion
Framework Consultation document
.

This is available at
http://www.dardni.gov.uk/index/consultations/archived
-
consultations.htm






11

Background to the Framework


3.6

In undertaking the development of t
his framework DARD
recognise that
many of the contributory factors to poverty
and social exclusion
in rural areas fall within a cross
governance remit thus requiring a integrated, innovative
partnership led approach with other Departments.

In
developing t
he
f
ramework
DARD

have sought
to identify
potential gaps in the current delivery of supportive
services

to rural communities, perhaps arising from the distinctive
nature of the rural community
.
T
here are several cross
cutting strategies which can inform an
d assist DARD’s
aim
.

3.7

The Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Strategy ‘Lifetime
Opportunities’ is the overarching strategy for
the
Northern
Ireland
Executive
to address poverty and social exclusion.
This has identified several challenges to form the basi
s for
future policies and the

direction of actions
,
these are as
follows,



Eliminating poverty;



Eliminating social exclusion;



Tackling area based deprivation;



Eliminating poverty from rural areas;



Shared future
-

shared challenges;



Tackling inequality in th
e labour market;



Tackling health inequalities; and



Tackling cycles of deprivation.


12

3.
8

These challenges

are for all departments
to address and
DARD has

already made commitments to contribute to these
through the Rural Development Programme 2007
-
2013. This
draft

anti
-
poverty and social inclusion
framework will also
contribute to
addressing the chall
e
nges

of Lifetime
Opportunities.

DARD’s
current
commitments to
L
ifetime
O
pportunities are
outlined
in
Annex
A
.

3.
9

This
draft
framework has also been developed to

be both
complimentary and
to
contribute to DARD’s role in other
cross cutting strategies

namely,



A Shared Future;



Children and Young People;



Racial Equality Strategy;



Positive Steps; and



Sustainable Development Strategy.

3.
10

While being complimentary to
these overarching strategies
this
draft
Framework
seeks to identify and address what

potential gaps
exist
in
the current
strategic context
, due to
the nature of rural communities and the individual pressures
they face. In
considering
this framework

it was
recognised
that there needed to be consideration of the urgency,
effectiveness and long term benefit of any identified action.

3.
11

The framework will also support the

develop
ment of

base
line

information
for future
anti poverty and social inclusion
measure
s

to build upon.


13

3.
12

The
draft f
ramework was based
in part

on two pieces of work
commissioned from the Rural Community Network and the
Rural Development Council namely, ‘Defining Rural Poverty;
An Issues Based Approach’ and ‘Challenging the Rural Idyll:
Rural Poverty and Social Exclusion, Priorities for Action’,
respectively. These papers
allowed rural representative
groups

to identify

the key issues facing rural communities

and individuals
.

3.1
3

Input to the RCN report came from a range of stakeholders
including Help the Aged, Age Concern, NI Rural Women’s
Network (NIRWN), Disability Action, Ulster Farmers Union,
Carers NI and the Community Relations Council.

3.14

The RDC undertook a stakeholder consultation to identify
target areas, outcomes and priori
ties for any rural poverty
strategy. Four areas of Access Poverty, Financial Poverty,
Social Exclusion and Attitude were identified.

3.1
5

Further discussions with such sources as Ulster Farmer’s
Union, NI Agricultural Producers Association, Rural Support
N
etwork, Northern Ireland Housing Executive, the NI Anti
-
Poverty Network, Energy Savings Trust, Southern Investing
for Health and Homestart have also been incorporated

into
the
draft

framework
.

3.1
6

As mentioned th
e

final
framework
is

intended to
comple
m
ent

other government initiatives, ensuring an integrated
approach. As
potential
key priorities began to be identified
discussions were held with other government departments
to
ensure a joined up approach for

each priority, for example,
Department of Social D
evelopment

in regard to fuel poverty

14

and
C
ommunity
D
evelopment. Other Departments that have
been approached are
,



Department of Regional Development;



Department of Education;



Department of Health and Social Services

and Public
Safety
; and



Office of the Firs
t Minister and Deputy First Minister.

The
NI Assembly
Committee for Agriculture and Rural
Development have
been
included

throughout

the
development of this Framework.


3.1
7

The Framework was opened to public consultation on the
26
th

January until the 23
rd

March and in addition to the
consultation paper and questionnaire

it

contained key impact
assessments and screening reports.

While the need for a full
equality impact assessment was identified it was difficult to
progress without having a better indication

of the potential
priorities and programmes that
could

be developed. While
the framework was developed on robust information from
rural stakeholders there was the potential that some issues
had not been fully identified.
I
t was decided that the
responses t
o the proposed framework could better inform the
shape and direction of any EQIA.


15

Section 4




EQIA Process


4.1

As part of the initial assessment of the Framework an
Equality and Human Rights Impact Screening was
completed. This demonstrated that there
were unknowns in
both the differential impact on particular groups, as defined
under section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act (19
98) and the
level of potential

impacts.

It also highlighted the ambiguity
arising from not having
predefined

programmes and
prior
ities.

4.2

The Northern Ireland Act (1998), Section 75 requires DARD
to promote equality of opportunity
between the following nine
groups
,


persons of different religious belief;


persons of different political opinion;


persons of different racial grou
p;


persons of different age;


persons of different marital status;


persons of different sexual orientation;


men and women generally;


persons with a disability and persons without; and


persons with dependants and persons without.


16

Additionally DA
RD is also required to promote good
relations between persons of different religions, political
opinion or racial group.

4.3

Consequently a full
Equality
Impact

Assessment

was
initialised

and forms the basis of this consultation paper.

4.4

A workshop was
held on the 4
th

Ma
rch as part of the
framework’s
consultation process. This gave various
stakeholders the opportunity to raise some of the associated
equality issues. These
concerns
and any other information
obtained during the framework consultation proce
ss, for
example through the assistance of the
P
articipation
N
etwork,
have been included into the evidence presented in this
paper.


EQIA Procedure

4.5

This paper represents the first four stages of the EQIA
process, as outlined in the Equality Commission’s

Guide to
the Statutory Duties: Procedure for Conduct of Equality
Impact Assessments.

4.6

There are four initial stages.



Scoping
.

The aim and objectives of the framework are included in
Section 3.



The evidence available.

The evidence used in developing the

proposals is outlined in
Section 5 and Section 6


17



An assessment of this evidence.

An assessment of the evidence is undertaken in Section 7.



Possible mitigation and
alternative policies
.

This is discussed in Section 8.

4.7

On completion of the consultation
the responses and
evidence obtained will be used in forming a response to the
consultation and in the finalisation of the Framework.



18


Section 5

Equality evidence used in the Framework.


Preliminary Evidence


5.1

In this section we present an overview of
the initial evidence
available and the further information obtained specifically for
the development of the Framework.

5.2

Equality and the provision of opportunity must be a central
part of any policy or framework, and in undertaking the
consultation on
the framework we have invited comment on
the equality aspects

of the policy
.

The
draft f
ramework as it
stands, even with equality questions, we feel provides a
basis for discussions.

5.3

Part of the equality principle is to assess where consultation
has n
ot been particularly effective and to identify new ways
of engaging with groups to ensure their views are taken into
consideration to better shape policy and delivery.

This will be
considered throughout the process.


5.4

Some further information from Lifet
ime Opportunities: the
G
overnment’s Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Strategy for
Northern Ireland (OFMDFM) has been included in
Annex
B
,
giving a summary of those considered most at risk of
poverty.


19

5.
5

The preliminary evidence used


generated from the
EQIA
undertaken on the Rural Development Programme 2007
-
2013 provides a brief background for some of the issues
affecting each Section 75 Group. This is presented in the
order of the Section 75 groups within the Northern Ireland
Act. I
n using this informat
ion the currency

of the information
has been considered and more recent information would be
preferable.

5.6

The two key issue papers by the Rural Development Council

(RDC)

and Rural Community Network
(RCN)
are available
on
request
,

details

of which are at

Section 9
.8
.

Additionally
the Network News
-
December 2008, published by the RCN
also provides a useful synopsis of the evidence used in the
Framework
, available from the RCN
.

5.7

The further evidence obtained for the Framework has been
presented by the re
spective contributing organisation

attached at Annex D
. This
block of evidence
is not
presented by Section 75 grouping because
some
organisations
have
address
ed

the

issues
impacting
on a
range of
individuals.


20

Preliminary issues identified from the Rura
l Development
Programme EQIA
.


P
erson
s of different religious belief.

5.
8

Evidence considered within the RDP highlighted that farm
ownership by size reflected a religious split which meant that
any measures within the RDP which favoured a particular
farm s
ize or related indicator could have a resultant
inequality. Similarly farms within Severely Disadvantage
d

Areas were demonstrated to be predominantly Catholic
owned.


P
ersons of different political opinion
.

5.
9

Political opinion is often linked to religion

in Northern Ireland
and is characterised by a number of single identity rural
communities. The Rural Development
P
rogramme offered
some potential to help address this, creating opportunities for
building of cross community relations.


P
ersons of different

racial group
.

5.1
0

Rural areas are becoming increasingly diverse, with
significantly more migrant and seasonal workers no longer
concentrated into urban areas. Key issues identified during
the development of the Rural Development Programme for
minority an
d ethnic people were;



Loneliness and isolation



Lack of family and wider support mechanisms


21



Unsuitable childcare arrangements



Language barriers



Unfamiliarity with local systems including access to health
and social care.



Limited social opportunities



Transp
ort
-

in many cases women do not have a driver’s
licence.



Lack of rural transport arrangements.



Lack of English language classes and other capacity
building initiatives suitable to minority ethnic women in
rural areas



Limited opportunities for training in a
reas of employment



Lack of food stores to cater for particular dietary needs


P
ersons of different age
.

Older People.

5.1
1

Approximately one third of older people in Northern Ireland
live in rural areas with persons aged 75 and over slightly
more likely to

live in rural areas and to live alone. A disperse
older population has implications for delivery of support,
health and social services, housing and access (transport).

5.1
2

Key issues for older people in rural areas were identified,



The need to feel safe

and secure;



Being valued in their community;



Having an adequate income;


22



Having ready access to health and social infrastructures
that will enable them to lead active and healthy lives;



Equality of opportunity in work and learning; and



Recognition of the m
ajor economic and social contribution
they make to the community in their many roles such as
carers, entrepreneurs and volunteers.

5.1
3

It was further identified that there was a lower rate of uptake
in over 60’s due partially to many choosing to retire fr
om
work changing their focus to quality of life from business
orientated measures.

Young People

5.1
4

Young people were identified as being under represented in
the
r
ural
d
evelopment
p
rocess, even while being identified as
a key group for rural development.

A study of youth
unemployment in rural areas (undertak
en by Glasgow
University 2000)
was considered to contain many pertinent
issues, including



Rural labour markets are characterised by low skilled and
insecure employment



Limited opportunities to upgrade
skills or undertake
training.



Poor or costly transport frequently restricted young
people’s employment opportunities



Social networks facilitated access to job opportunities for
those young people with good local contacts.


23



Although there was often a high de
mand for female
workers in tourist related services, those with children
frequently lacked access to childcare facilities.



Specific issues apply to young people working in
agriculture, with over half of farmers aged over 55 and
were
low incomes are the nor
m. The challenge is to help
those who can and wish to farm to succeed and help
others find local
employment in rural areas.

Children and young people

5.1
5

Key issues identified for children and young people in rural
areas included,



The need to feel valued
within their communities



Full access to facilities and services;



The need for training and employment opportunities;



Help to overcome poverty and social exclusion;



Better access to and provision of information;



Better and appropriate transport services;



Af
fordable housing; and



The need to include children and young people in decision
making.

5.1
6

The need to have opportunities in rural areas to prevent de
-
population was also highlighted in the R
ural Development
Programme

EQIA.




24

Pers
ons of different marital

status.

5.1
7

Evidence from the Rural Development Programme suggests
that rural areas have a slightly higher proportion of married
people. There was no specific evidence to suggest that
single people were losing out [in respect of the programme].


Persons
of different sexual orientation
.

5.
18

Some key issues were identified for people who are lesbian,
gay or bi
-
sexual,



Negative attitudes;



Isolation;



Public transport infrastructure;



Peer/ social support;



Family support;



Access to information;



No direct links

to policy makers/ service providers;



Invisibility in relation to rural development policies;



Lack of understanding by policy makers/ service
providers of the needs and rights of lesbian, gay or bi
-
sexual
people; and



Concerns around confidentiality when ac
cessing locally
delivered services.

5.
19

For these reasons the Rural Development Programme
identified a lack of engagement (capacity , coming forward of
groups, targeted measures), lack of evidence to demonstrate

25

any specific benefits in terms of sexual or
ientation and a
general lack of programme uptake.


M
en and women generally
.

5.2
0

The rural development programme identified that gender
inequality existed in some key areas,



Farming;



Women in business;



Career choices and training/ education;



Pay;



Poverty;



Provision of childcare;



Care issues;



Domestic violence;



Access to services;



Transport and infrastructure; and



Women represented in public life.

5.2
1

It was identified that while there was some improvement,
women were under represented in rural community
d
evelopment processes. The barriers to participating in the
programme were identified to include provision of childcare,
representation in local government and the nature of the
application process.




26

Women

5.2
2

A
n

issues paper prepared for the Rural Commun
ity Network
highlighted
,



Childcare issues
-

including provision, cost and
transport.



Employment programmes
-

main barriers for women
are childcare, transport, but also issues around skills
and types of work available.



Farming
-


50% or more of women work off
the farm to
provide supplementary income to support the farm
business.



Food and Drink Sector
-

females are under represented
compared to the national UK average.



Persons
with a disability and persons without.


5.2
3

While the greatest issues identified in
the Rural Development
Programme related to the lack of power and influence
experienced by disabled people to effect change within their
local community, several other issues were also identified,



A strong sense of isolation and social exclusion;



Limited ac
cess and mobility
-

making everyday tasks
difficult



Services not being accessible;


27



Greater risk of financial poverty, less opportunity;



Lack of meaningful employment;



Lower attainment of education and employment skills;



Lower expectations and aspirations to

improve
opportunities;



Inadequate early childhood intervention and
development;



Poor opportunities for participating in political life;



Inadequate social and adapted housing; and



Difficulties of inconsistent public transport systems in
rural areas.

5.2
4

W
hile the DARD Social Survey identified a higher level of
disability among farmers (26%) than the economically active
population in Northern Ireland, there is no specific evidence
to
demonstrate

any barrier to participation in the RDP.


P
ersons with dependa
nts and persons without
.

5.2
5

The RDP identified that it was more likely that households
within the target area would have one or more dependant
children than in Northern Ireland generally. The overlap with
Section 75 groupings of age are noted.




28

5.2
6

The

Department are currently reviewing t
he information
obtained in the Rural Development Programme

EQIA and
are to publish a response in due course.



29

Evidence from issue papers by contributor.


5.
27

The information from the various contributors, RCN’s own
co
mments and RDC’s paper were all used to set the key
objectives for the framework as detailed within the
consultation paper on the framework
. These papers also
had relevance in respect of the equality and are attached at
Annex D.

5.
28

How the priorities an
d
proposed actions
address the
concerns of stakeholders is
provided

in Section 7
. Each
priority also identifies the target groups that DARD expect
the actions to address.

5
.29

Of note however is that many of the issues identified
indicated a need for job
opportunities, particularly to assist
women back to work. While this is in part addressed by the
RDP, there is a

need to remove the barriers to these
opportunities,
such as
transport and childcare.

In doing this
there is also an opportunity to assi
s
t those

who are also
impacted by these constraints.

Two issues which are
repeatedly identified throughout representative Section 75
Groupings comments

were that

Community development
must
be recognised as a mechanism for addressing poverty
and exclusion in a loca
l manner, allowing local people to help
others address individual circumstances of poverty and
exclusion. Fuel Poverty was a pressing concern for many
individuals due to
spiralling

costs.


30

5.
30

However these needs can be seen to be reflective of wider
com
munity concerns, and do not specifically target those
most vulnerable and isolated in rural communities.
The fifth
priority was established to
enable communities to
identify
issues
relating to poverty and exclusion
within their area and
to

take steps to in
clude

those
most isolated.


31

Section 6

Evidence from Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion
Framework consultation.


6.1

In this section we present the evidence obtained from the
consultation undertaken on the Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social
Inclusion Framew
ork. This comes from three main sources,



A workshop held as part of the consultation process;



Face to face meetings with individuals and
organisations to discuss the framework
,

including

ongoing

meetings supported via

the Participation
Network; and



Further

evidence from consultation responses
and

from
additional evidence held and submitted by rural
stakeholders.


Workshop: Loughry Campus 4
th

March

2009.


6.2

A workshop was held as part of the consultation process on
the framework. This was attended by many

key stakeholders
representing some Section 75 groupings and rural interests.
A full list of attendees is available, along with the group
feedback, on the DARD website
,


www.dardni.gov.uk/index/co
nsultations

6.3

The workshop centred around the development of the
framework, and asked attendees to consider the priorities

32

and
supportive
evidence used. While the evidence, issues
and equality are all linked, one question specifically
addressed equality
. The question and responses are
summarised below, divided into comments on the process
and on the target areas.



Question 6: We intend to undertake an equality
impact assessment of the framework and have been
gathering evidence of the impact the framewor
k
could have on people in rural areas. What equality
issues do you think we should consider?



Process




EQIA should have happened
.



If it is done properly
, it
targets needs properly

and
it will have a
positive impact.




If necessary can target resources and
could change strategy.



Equality groups should be proactively promoted.



Not enough to say
there is no

negative impact
-

need to maximise
the positive impacts
.



Need to look at poorest in S75 Groups.



May not necessarily be those on benefits.



Info
rmation

must b
e collated at community level


using local
groups
.



The consultation should include the people directly affected by
these issues e.g. service users/ luncheon club groups, young
people.



The consultation process could be undertaken by the Rural Support
Netwo
rks through schools, letters to parents etc.



Areas that need to be better considered




All Section 75 groups.



Age includes children and young people as well as older people.



Need to look at low pay culture.



Ethnic minority communities with regard to langu
age.



Disability.



Transport needs to also look at issues for young people.



Black and minority ethnic groups

need attention.



33

6.4

A full response to the workshop comments will be posted on
the DARD webpage
shortly
. However these comments have
been considered

in the development of this EQIA. In direct
response to the above points DARD would make the
following comments.



The draft framework was intended to provoke
discussion on the potential priorities. It was felt that
without having an initial discussion and s
ome collective
agreement on possible priorities,

equality
considerations would be too vague
-

with no action to
assess. By undertaking the EQIA after initial comment
on the Framework and with some support for the
proposed priorities, we have been better ab
le to
identify a series of possible programmes against which
to assess potential impacts.



Conversely in undertaking the EQIA the equality
implications

identified allow for better targeting of
programme actions, identifying specific needs and
assisting reso
urce allocation.



The framework will not be finalised until the EQIA has
been completed allowing for reallocation of resource
and priorities.



By undertaking this EQIA and consultation we are
asking equality groups to identify their concerns and
we will con
tinue to engage with these groups were
possible to consider their concerns, incorporate any
relevant information and promote their aims. This
includes the identification of those most at risk.


34



Consideration of the
impacts

of the proposed priorities
(Secti
on 7) highlights the
positive

impacts on each
Section 75 Group.



In drafting this EQIA we are asking for the input of all
stakeholders and from all community based
organisations. Additionally we have identified a role for
community groups in the delivery of

some aspects of
the draft framework.



We have already identified that there are gaps in the
evidence we have available for the development of this
framework, for example in respect to black and ethnic
minority groups and migrants. In asking for this
evide
nce we will also be looking to identify any barriers
to obtaining information, such as language. DARD
must as part of the Equality Principle, as mentioned in
Section 5.3 identify were consultation has not been
effective and take remedial action. In this in
stance we
intend to progress this concern (language barrier) with
the NI Council for Ethnic Minorities.



In considering the impact upon Section 75 groups we
will as evidence is obtained highlight any issues for
particular sections of these groups
i.e.
, chil
dren and
young people, and older people under the banner of
Age.



35

6.5

The purpose of this EQIA is to better consider all Section 75
groups and those for which limited information is held have
been highlighted.


Participation meetings.


6.
6

The

department
have, with the assistance of the Participation
Network
been

addressing how it engages

with children and
young people.
Initial meetings were held with
representitives
of
Armagh Travellers and Barnardos. Further meetings will
take place with representatives
of children and young people
during the consultation period of the EQIA.

This information
will be used in the better definition of priorities and
programmes and will be fully reported in the response to this
consultation.

6.
7

Through the assistance of the
Participation Network better
links to representative organisations have been made. As
this is the first attempt at engaging with children and young
people it was
recognised
that there needed to
be fuller
consideration

given
as to how engagement could be mo
st
effective.

This will be also relevant for future consultations.

6.8

The
benefit

to

the development of the framework and EQIA
will be reflected upon
in the department
’s

response to the
consultation.



36

O
ther evidence submitted as part of Consultation on R
ural
Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion Framework.


6.
9

At the time of writing there have been
39

responses to the
Framework consultation.

These responses and DARD’s
response will be placed on the
D
epartments website in due
course.
(
http://www.dardni.gov.uk/index/consultations/archived
-
consultations.htm
)

6.
10

In general there is support for the issues that have been
identified. However there have been concerns raised abo
ut
the,



Clarity of the objectives in the Framework;



Timing of EQIA;



Lack of identified programmes
;



Need to fully consider how each priority can target
particular Section 75 Groups; and



The limited amount of funding available.

6.
11

Many comments on specific

issues have been included into
the next section where we consider the impacts of the five
priorities on various groups. These comments will also be
dealt with in greater detail within the Departments response
to the Rural Anti
-
Poverty and Social Inclusion

Framework
consultation.

6.
12

DARD
will consider all the

comment
s

made and
where
applicable and practical,
will incorporate these into the

37

framework and provide a full response to all concerns in due
course. In undertaking this EQIA consultation it has bee
n an
aim to ensure the objectives of the framework are clear and
identifiable and that the timing of the EQIA has been
explained. In the next section all possible information about
potential and current programmes is provided and in
undertaking an assessme
nt of the proposed priorities
possible impacts are considered.






38

Section 7:

Equality assessment of framework
.


7.1

This paper has laid out the evidence and sources used to
date in the development of the Framework. As explained in
the
framework
consultation
document this information
provided several possible areas of intervention,
addressing
the needs of different Section 75 groupings
.
Additional
consideration of other government strategies and
programmes
and constraints
led to the selection of the
proposed
five priority areas.


7.2

In this section we will consider the proposed
programmes under each priority and who are likely to be
most affected.

7.3

Before further developing these priorities we have to address
two questions,



Have we fully identified the poverty and

social inclusion
concerns of all Section 75 groups in selecting priorities
-

is there sufficient evidence to warrant funding
programmes to address these needs
?
; and



Will the programmes developed effectively target those
most vulnerable? i.e. those most in
need.

7.4

Drawing from the responses to the consultation, most if not
all would agree that the needs identified and the resultant
priorities are real
and ongoing
concerns. Some respondents
have indicated that they would prefer alternative priorities,

39

such as a
ddressing income which they felt contributed more
to poverty.

Again the practicality and scope of the framework
needs to be
considered
.


7.5

However it is also evident that there are several areas for
which we
may

not have the body of evidence which would be
d
esirable in ensuring that
some
section 75 groupings specific

poverty and inclusion concerns are recognised.

7.6

These areas are
,



Migrant workers
;



Black and minority ethnic groups;



Issues around h
ealth, including mental health
; and



Religious basis of poverty.

7.7

U
ntil this information is obtained than we cannot conclusively
say that the priorities will allow for programmes to address
the
specific needs

of these Section 75 Groups
, or provide
any qualitative or quantitative measure of these needs.
During the EQIA con
sultation DARD will attempt to identify
and obtain information on these areas both by approaching
representative groups and asking for potential information
sources from other rural stakeholders.
As a result of the
workshop some representative groups have
identified
evidence
they currently hold and agreed to share this with
DARD.

T
his will be
considered for the final
Framework.

7.8

However given that the priorities
proposed
are areas in
which most equality groups
have identified

a need, and that
any revised pr
iorities must also reflect the current information
we still need to
consider
the second question, ensur
ing

40

actions

effectively
target
the needs of those most vulnerable
or at risk.

7.9

Before roll out of any
actions
, each will be subject to an
economic apprai
s
al which fully consider
s

need

and value for
money
.

The economic appraisal will also be used to identify
any appropriate monitoring required.

7.10

It must be stressed that while initial scoping and appraisal is
being undertaken

of the various proposed
actions
,
these
remain, unless identified otherwise, as proposals.

As the
funding period is relatively short (finishing in the 2010
-
2011
financial year) it was considered prudent to assess proposals
as the framework developed
.


7.11

This is the first time DARD has deliv
ered a socially targeted
scheme so effort has been directed towards providing for
baseline information and developing a robust evidence
source for future policies and programmes. It should also be
noted that non
-
monetary benefits
will be
clearly considere
d
within the economic appraisal process.










41

Rural
Fuel Poverty
.

7.12

Fuel Poverty is defined as where an individual household
has to spend more than 10% of income on fuel to heat a
home and has been identified as more pronounced in a rural
setting. Additio
nally more houses are without central heating
in a rural areas (4.6% urban: 6.18% rural) and there is a
higher proportion of owner occupied houses in rural areas,
with half the fuel poor households being owner occupied.
This information was detailed in the

Framework consultation.

7.13

Informatio
n from a Help the Aged survey (
Age Concern
response) indicates that older people are disprop
ortionally
represented in Fuel Poverty figures.

The same response also
highlights that older people are more

likely to live in ol
der
houses and/or

less well maintained
further compounding the
impact upon this group. DSD are currently changing the
scheme to address age and income bias concerns (Policy
Review of the Warm Homes Scheme


DSD, December
2008).The purpose of this priority
is to alleviate the impact of
fuel poverty in rural areas. Given the current fluctuations in
fuel costs it is considered more effective to support
measures which promote more efficient use of heating fuels
providing an ongoing benefit.

7.14

There are three opti
ons, one of which has been committed to
with two currently being progressed
. DARD are committed
to,



Warm Homes Scheme. £380,000 has been allocated
to the DSD Warm Home Scheme, in the form of a top
up grant to allow for some 600 rural homes to avail of

42

the
scheme. The Warm Homes Scheme is dependant
upon eligibility criteria of age and income
.

7.15

Two other proposals are currently under consideration,



Hard to
H
eat homes

the Department is considering
possible measures to deal with hard to heat homes.
These have be
en identified as more frequently
belonging to the elderly.



Renewables
, the
D
epartment is currently considering
how measures could be developed to benefit the rural
‘fuel poor’
.

7.16

These
actions
are not Section 75 group specific but reflect
the multiple identi
ties of many rural dwellers.


7.17

These
actions
will be delivered on need, but it is expected
that the greatest impact will be on the elderly and those with
dependants.


Rural Transport and Access
.

7.18

Access is identified as a concern for several section 75
group
s, notably on the basis of age, dependants and
disability effecting social inclusion, employment opportunities
and general access to services.

7.19

As access is a concern for many groups
which has resulted
in a sporadic and piece meal approach.
The consultation

responses have demonstrated that community transport
initiatives are not solely under the Rural Community
Transport Scheme, but have benefited from other sources of

43

funding such as Invest NI
-

Social Entrepreneurship
Programme.

7.20

In providing support to com
munity based transport initiatives
there is the potential of directly impacting upon all section 75
groups, but particularly, in light of initial responses there is an
identified need for programmes which will address the
access needs of Children and Young

People and Older
people or those with a disability
.

7.21

Currently there are several proposed programmes under this
priority, these are,



Possible introduction of
Rural
Assisted Travel
S
cheme
on Rural Community
Partnership
Transport services.
i.e. free travel f
or those over the age of 60 and half fare
travel for the disabled by using their SmartPass
.



Development of Social Auditing i.e. develop a
consistent approach to accounting for social
environmental and economic performance and impact
of the Rural Transport
Fund.



Develop an enhanced Management Information
system to allow the 18 Community Transport
Partnerships to gather more reliable monitoring
information



Possible enhancement of Social Car schemes
.

7.22

Under the introduction of the
Rural
Assisted
T
ravel
S
cheme
o
n Community
Partnership
transport services several groups
have been identified as potential beneficiaries,
notable the

44

over 60’s. There are additional benefits (half price fares) for
other groups based on age, disability and health grounds
.

7.23

On the request
of the Agriculture and
Rural Development

Committee the programme will also consider companion
assisted travel requirements to aid carers.


Rural Childcare
.


7.24

The consultation document on the Rural Anti
-
Poverty and
Social Inclusion Framework already identifi
es the importance
of affordable and accessible Rural Childcare. It also identifies
those most likely to be impacted by nature of the service
provided for example, all day nurseries or afterschool
provision. This priority has been well received in the
consu
ltation responses.

7.25

DARD has, prior to this funding opportunity, used a Rural
Childcare Group to identify rural childcare challenges and
possible solutions. This is being developed into a Rural
Childcare Programme with the objective of,



informing policy on
how to improve childcare provision
in rural Northern Ireland so parents/guardians can be
free to enter employment or participate in training.

7.26

It is likely that this priority will allow for some pilot/
demonstration projects to be delivered, based on the th
emes
of,



Access;


45



Early
Y
ears Integration;



Quality and Safety; and



Sustainability and Affordability

7.27

The selection criteria for these projects will require the
project to demonstrate that there is a need and to define
clear aims and objectives
, and to set up

clear monitoring and
evaluation arrangements
.

7.28

Under the E
arly
Y
ears Integration theme there
could for
example be an opportunity for those in the sector to avail of
funding
to allow them to better address the needs of children
who are disabled
or from ethn
ic and migrant
b
ackgrounds.

7.29

The selection criteria for these programmes will be set so
that
the projects

which target disadvantaged areas will be
given more weight
.

7.30

It would be antic
i
pated

that this priority will
in particular have
a

positive impact upon d
ependants, children and young
people, women, migrants and disabled children.


Rural Challenge

Programme
.


7.31

Th
e Rural Development Programme 2007
-
2013
Measure
3.4, Basic Services for the economy and rural
population
,
measure intends to improve living conditio
n
s

and welfare for those in rural areas and improve
attractiveness of such areas through the provision of more
and better services.



46

7.32

In developing any possible programmes it will be necessary
to ensure that
there is comp
a
t
i
bility without duplication of
eff
ort

and that the poverty and social inclusion needs of the
most vulnerable/ isolated are addressed.

7.33

Two programmes are currently proposed
,



Develop
ment of
a regional programme, specifically
targeted at the most vulnerable, to maximise benefit
and grant upt
ake
,

working in conjunction with
DHSSPS, DSD, DRD, NIHE and RSN’s.
This will allow
for those most vulnerable to be identified and
approached at community level and builds upon a
successful
initiative

piloted
by

the Western Health
Action
Zone
in Fermanagh

a
nd Tyrone

last year.



Develop a programme and open a call for applications
to address poverty and exclusion issues at a very local
level. The central theme of any project must be for the
applicants to engage with those identified target groups
who are expe
riencing poverty and social exclusion.
These target groups have been identified as,



Children and Young People;



Lone Parents;



Unemployed;



Disabled;



Carers;



Elderly; and


47



Black and ethnic minority groups

and low paid
workers

7.34

It would be considered that these
two programmes reflect a
good balance between targeting individual and group need.


Rural Community Development
.

7.35

It has already been specifically identified that there is a lack
of representation of some Section 75 Groups in the rural
sphere due to lack of

capacity.

7.36

In supporting Rural Community Development it is essential to
ensure that all aspects of society, i.e. all section 75
groupings are able to participate and develop capacity and
potential.

7.37

This can best be achieved if the supporting structure can
clearly demonstrate an inclusive and equitable approach and
recognises the challenges that rural community development
brings.

7.38

In developing this priority DARD are reaffirming their
commitment to ensuring there is a high level of support for
community grou
ps to allow them to take advantage of current
funding mechanisms including the above Rural Challenge
Programme
and measures under the Rural Development
Programme.

7.39

To do this we
propose

that ongoing support of community
development must ensure the following

objectives are
addressed.


48



Creating capacity and leadership, continue to
recognise changes in rural areas and provide support
to communities to manage these changes.




Ensure that community development in rural areas is
subject to a robust quality assuran
ce process.




Contribute to the community development elements of
the new RDP, ensuring that rural community needs are
addressed through the Axis 3 LAGs and that full
utilisation is made by groups of “Quality of Life”
measures.




Ensure that LAGs have suppor
t and information to
recognise the legitimacy of community development
process in the application process, evaluation and
impact of the “Quality of life” measures.




Examine current rural community development network
structure, and how networks complement
each other in
the new rural development environment.




Engage with emerging new council structures under
RPA to develop an effective rural community
development infrastructure.




Work with DSD and wider voluntary and community
sector to ensure the develo
pment of a support service
strategy that ensures an effective streamlined voluntary
and community sector structure post 2011 that also
recognises and supports the “rural community
development sector”.




Engage with DARD on the development and support of
key

rural policy initiatives such as Rural White Paper,
Rural Champion and Anti Poverty work to ensure that
future rural communities and the unique character of
“rural community development” is supported.




Continue to identify and develop measures to alleviat
e
poverty, social exclusion and inequality in rural areas
through community engagement.



49

7.40

This proposal will be subject to economic appraisal to ensure
that by doing this we create the best possible environment to
allow communities to identify and support t
hose most in
need.





50

Section 8:

Alternative Policies
and M
itigation
.


8.1

It has already been noted within the Rural Development
Programme that there are instances of low capacity within
some groups.

In developing the framework and programmes
consider
ation will have to be given to providing support to
improve the capacity of represent
a
tive groups.

8.2

The development of programmes
will
also allows for an
opportunity for DARD to both promote equality of opportunity
and ensure targeting of those most vul
nerable or isolated.

8.3

In preparation for possible outcomes an economic appraisal
has been started
on potential

priorities. Each programme /
project will be subject to an economic appraisal in order to
ensure that the project effectively targets
the iden
tified
need.
The use of programme specific selection criteria will ensure
those most vulnerable

and

isolated benefit most
.


8.4

DARD will study the responses to this EQIA consultation both
to
shape and finalise
the Framework but also to develop better
e
ngagement skills and take on any suggestions for monitoring
and implementation of equality issues during delivery.


51


Section 9:

Consultation
.


9.
1

This consultation follows on from the formal
Rural Anti
-
Poverty
and Social Inclusion F
ramework consultation
and will be used
to shape the final framework. This consultation however differs
in that it is targeted not
just
at rural
focused
groups but
towards Equality S
cheme consultees. This is to ensure that
those who may not consider themselves to
represent

a
rur
al
group, yet provide a service or are involved in some way with
rural dwellers
, or have an overlapping equality interest
are fully
included and alerted to possible opportunities.

9.
2

As this consultation links closely with the framework
consultation and t
here is a need to begin to deliver the
funding, it is proposed to open it for comment for
8 weeks
.

9.
3

This consultation will therefore close on the

5th June

2009
.

9.
4

The list of groups to whom this paper is distributed is attached
at
Annex
C
. Consultati
on papers are also available on the
DARD website

and on request (see below).

9.
5

Alternative formats

and languages

are available on request
and sufficient time will be given for comment.

9.
6

The purpose of the consultation paper is to
,




Set out how DARD ha
ve considered potential equality
implications arising from the proposed Rural Anti
-
Poverty
and Social Inclusion Framework;


52



Obtain c
onsultee’s views on the equality aspects of the
priorities identified by the Rural

Anti
-
Poverty and Social
inclusion Framewor
k and a
ny currently proposed
programme;



Identify and obtain f
urther information which should be
considere
d in assessing equality impacts; and



Rece
i
ve a
ny suggestions or comments on how to better
engage with rural groups during the consultation and
subseque
nt delivery of the Framework.

9.
7

We include below a series of questions which may be useful in
shaping any responses

Questions
:

1

Are the priorities
as
identified a suitable means of
addressing the
equality
issues

of rural poverty and
exclusion?

2

How ca
n DARD ensure this Framewor
k reaches those
most vulnerable?

3

Is there anything more you think we could do to
contribute to the
reduc
tion of

poverty in rural areas,
across the 5 main priority areas?

5

Have you any views on how we could better promote
equal
ity and good relations across each of the 5 main
priorities?

9.
8

We welcome your comments

in any format, writing, e
-
mail or
by telephone. If you wish to discuss any aspect of this

53

framework or to arrange any face to face meeting
p
lease
contact the departme
nt as below.

Roy Griffin

Rural Policy Division

Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

Room 407 Dundonald House

Stormont Estate

Upper Newtownards Road

Belfast

Telephone 028
9052 4598

Textphone

028
9052

4420

Email
ruralpolicy.branch@dardni.gov.uk

Website:
www.dardni.gov.uk/index/consultations



54


Annex
A

DARD’s Commitments to Lifetime Opportunities
.

While D
ARD

is committed to all the ta
rgets of Lifetime
opportunities, specific actions
have been identified below
.

Early Years



Provide opportunities for young children in rural areas to
benefit from projects and schemes such as accessible
rural transport, day care provision, creches and
initi
atives that also support their parents as well as
seeking to improve their overall quality of life
.

Children and Young People



Provide opportunities for children and young people of
all ages in rural areas to benefit from the NI Rural
Development Programme
thorough projects and
schemes such as improving access to ICT and
increasing accessibility through rural transport routes
and positively benefiting the lives of farm families as well
as seeking to improve their overall quality of life.

Working Age Adults



P
rovide opportunities for people of all ages in rural areas
to benefit from the Rural Development Programme
through projects and schemes that enhance their
working lives and also aim to encourage a return to the
workplace. These include providing childcare
facilities,
improving access to ICT, increasing accessibility to the

55

job market through rural transport routes and schemes
that benefit the lives of farmers and farm families.



By 2020, to equip farm businesses to adjust to greater
trade liberalisation and
help to realise the development
potential of the food production, processing, fishing,
forestry, horticulture, equine, amenity and leisure
sectors.



By 2015 to ensure that the needs of rural communities
are met by equitable access to public services and
pro
grammes, and through programmes which enhance
economic opportunities in rural areas and which
strengthen and enhance
their

social infrastructure;

Older People



Provide opportunities for older people in rural areas to
benefit from the NI Rural Development Pr
ogramme by
increasing accessibility through rural transport routes;



Projects that encourage social participation and inclusion
and aim to positively benefit the lives of olfer farmers
and their families



By 2020 support every local authority to identify and

address gaps in provision of services for each of the
above groups of people in rural areas.


56

Annex

B

Table: Strategic Equality Impact S
ummary.


Extract from Lifetime Opportunities: Governments Anti
-
Poverty and Social
Inclusion Strategy for Northe
r
n Irela
nd, OFMDFM


Section 75 Group

Poverty positive reduce
differentials for;

Rationale

Religious belief

Roman Catholics

Greater risk of poverty for
Roman Catholics than
Protestants

Political opinion

Nationalists and those
not stating a political
prefer
ence

The Poverty and Social
Exclusion Survey NI (PSENI)
indicated that the persons
with the referenced political
affiliations had the highest
rates of poverty

Racial group

Ethnic minorities / Irish
Travellers

Data from GB indicates that
ethnic minorit
ies are at high
risk of poverty. There is no
comparable NI data Irish
Travellers have high levels of
disadvantage in for example
employment, economic
activity, and accommodation
needs

Age

Younger people (with
children)

Have a high risk of poverty

Mar
ital status

Divorced/ single/
separated (with children)
Divorced/ single/
separated

Association with lone
parenthood and high risk of
poverty Family breakdown is
also an indicator of future
financial hardship

Sexual orientation

Unclear however equalit
y
impact is likely

Data for poverty by sexual
orientation not



57

Annex
C

Distribution List.


Organisation


Contact

Address

Advice NI

Arfawn Yasin

1 Rushfield
Avenue

Belfast


BT7 3FP

Age Concern (NI)

James Knox

3 Lower Crescent

Belfast

B
T7 1NR






Age Sector Reference
Group



c/o Help the Aged
NI

24
-
31 Shaftesbury
Square

Ascot House

Belfast

BT2 7DB

Agri
-
Food &
Biosciences Institute

George McIlroy

Faculty Building,

Newforge Lane

Belfast

BT9 5PX

Al Nisa Wom
en's
Group

Mrs. AS Khan

c/o 46 Mount Eden
Pk

Belfast

BT9 6RB

AN MUNIA TOBER



12 (Unit 2)

Blackstaff
Complex

77 Springfield
Road

Belfast

BT12 7AE

Association of NI
Colleges

Ms Kelly

Unit 3, The Sidings
Business Park,
Lisburn BT28 3
AJ


58

Association of Chief
Officers of Voluntary
Organisations



97 Malone Avenue

Belfast BT9 6EQ



Baha'i Council for
Northern Ireland



13 Limavady Road

Londonderry

BT47 6JV



Ballymena Community
Forum



Glendrum Drive

Ball
ymena BT43

Barnardos

Margaret Kelly

542
-

544 Upper
Newtownards Rd

Belfast BT4 3HE



Belfast Baha’i
Community

Ms Pipa Cookson

442 Springfield
Road

Belfast BT12 7DW

Belfast Islamic Centre

Mr Muhammad Al
Qaryooti

38 Wellington
Park,

Belfast B
T9 6DN







British Deaf
Association (NI)

Ms McAteer

Suite 3, Cranmore
Hse

611 Lisburn Road

Belfast BT9 7GT



BR Consultants

Billy Robinson

Equality and
Diversity Training

406 Antrim Road

Belfast BT36 5EJ



Cara
-
friend

Ms C
ollins

Cathedral
Buildings

64 Donegall Street

Belfast BT1 2GT

Causeway Chinese
Welfare Association

Mrs Michelle Lyons

11
-
13 Main Street

Castlerock

BT51 4RA



Carers Northern
Ireland



Helen Ferguson

58 Howard Street

Belfast BT1 6PJ




59

Child Poverty Action
Group (NI)



12 Queen Street

Derry /
Londonderry



Children's Law Centre

Paddy Kelly

3rd Floor, Philip
House

123
-
137 York
Street

Belfast BT15 1AB



Chinese Welfare
Association (CWA)

Eileen Chan
-
Hu

133
-
135 University
Street

Belfast BT7 1HP









Chinese Chamber of
Commerce

Mr Danny Wong

133
-
135 University
Street

Belfast BT7 1HQ

Citizens Advice
Bureau

C Bradley

11 Upper Crescent

Belfast BT7 1NT



Coalition on Sexual
Orientation (CoSO)

James
Knox

2
-
6 Union St

Belfast BT1 2JF



Committee on the
Admin of Justice
(CAJ)

Maggie Beirne

45
-
47 Donegall
Street

Tim Cunningham

Belfast BT1 2BR









Community
Development & Health
Network (NI)

Barbary Cook

30a Mill Street

Newry, BT34 1EY





Community
Foundation for NI

Ms Kilmurray

Community House,
Citylink Business
Pk, 6 Albert St

Belfast BT12 4HQ



Community Relations
Council (CRC)

Duncan Morrow

Glendinning House

6 Murray Street

Belfast BT1 6DN




60



Derry Well
Woman

Susan Gibson

17 Queen Street

Derry /
Londonderry

BT48 7EQ





Disability Action

Monica Wilson

Portside Business
Pk

189 Airport road

Belfast BT3 9ED





Down's Syndrome
Association

Mr Hanna

Graham House,

Knockbracken
Heal
thcare Park,
Saintfield Road

Belfast BT8 8BH



Drainage Council for
NI

Eddie Gaw

Hydebank,

4 Hospital Road,
Belfast BT8 8JP







Dungannon and South
Tyrone Borough
Council

Daniel Holder



Employers' Forum on
Disability

Gabrie
lle Fitzpatrick
-

McCrickard

Banbridge
Enterprise Centre

Mags Harkin

Scarva Road Ind
Estate



Banbridge BT32
3QD





Equality Coalition



45
-
47 Donegall
Street

Belfast BT1 2BR



Equality Commission
for NI

Ms Carleton

Equality House


61

Statutory
Duty Team

7
-
9 Shaftesbury
Sq



Belfast BT2 7DP









Equality Commission
for NI

Aubrey McCrory

Equality House

Statutory Duty Team

(manager)

7
-
9 Shaftesbury
Sq





Belfast BT2 7DP

Equality Forum NI

John Mason

SEELB,
Grahamsbridge
Road

Dundon
ald BT16
2HS



Falls Community
Council

Ms Mallon

275
-
277 Falls
Road

Belfast BT12 6FD



Fermanagh Women’s
Network



32 Paget Lane

Enniskillen, BT74
7HT









Foras na Gaelige

Ferdie Mac an Fhailigh

Teach an Gheata
Thiar

2
-
4
Queen St

Belfast BT1 6ET



Foyle, Carlingford &
Irish Lights Comm

Mr Anderson

22 Victoria Road

Derry /
Londonderry

BT47 2AB

Family Planning
Association



113 University
Street

Belfast BT7 1HP



Gay Lesbian Youth
Northern Ireland
(GLYN
I)



Cathedral
Buildings

64 Donegall Street


62

Belfast BT1 2GT



General Consumer
Council

Sinead Furey

116 Holywood
Road

Belfast BT4 1NY





Gingerbread Northern
Ireland

Ms Cavanagh

169 University
Street

Belfast BT7 1HR



GMB



3
-
4
Donegall Quay

Belfast



Guide Dogs for the
Blind Association

Mr Swan

Lanesborough
House

15 Sandown Park
South

Belfast BT5 6HE



Help the Aged,
Northern Ireland

Mr Lynch

Leslie House

Shaftesbury
Square

Belfast BT2 7DB



Indian Com
munity
Centre



86 Clifton Street

Belfast BT13 1AB

Leonard Cheshire

Nigel Treanor

4
-
6 Boucher Road

Boucher Plaza

Belfast BT12



Lesbian Advocacy
Services Initiative

Rita Wild

PO Box 3
Ballymena

BT42 9AA

Lesbian Line



Cathedral
Buildings

64 Donegall Street

Belfast BT1 2GT



Livestock & Meat
Commission for NI

Norah Whittaker

Lissue House

31 Ballinderry
Road

Lisburn, BT28 2SL




63

Local Government
Staff Commission

Diana Stewart

Commission
House

18
-
22 Gordon
Street

Be
lfast BT1 2LG



Lower North Belfast
Community Council

Mr Crozier

The Castleton
Centre

30
-
42 York Road

Belfast BT15 3HE



Magherafelt Women's
Group

Ms Lagan

The Learning
Lodge

27
-
29 Moneymore
Rd

Magherafelt

BT45 6AG



MENCAP

Ms Pr
ice

Segal House

5 Annadale
Avenue

Belfast BT7 3JH



Methodist Church in
Ireland



1 Fountainville
Avenue

Belfast BT9 6AN



Multi
-
Cultural
Resource Centre

Margaret Donaghy

9 Lower Crescent

Belfast BT7 1NR





Newry and Mourne
Wom
en Ltd



Ballybot House

28 Cornmarket

Newry BT35 8BG



Newtownabbey Senior
Citizens Forum



6a Ballyclare Road

Newtownabbey

BT36 5EX



NI African Cultural
Centre



12 Upper Crescent

Belfast BT7 1NT

NI Anti
-
Poverty
Network



Room 3,
58
Howard Street


64

Belfast BT1 6PJ





NI Commisssioner for
Children and Young
People

Patricia Lewesley

Millennium House

Great Victoria
Street

Belfast BT2 7BN



NI Council for Ethnic
Minorities (NICEM)

Patrick Yu

Ascot House, 3rd
Floor



24
-
31 Shaftesbury
Square

Terry Deehan

Belfast BT2 7DB

















NI Muslim Family
Association

Dr Mamoun Mobayed

7 Ruby Road

Belfast BT7 1PS

NI Council for
Voluntary Action

Seamus McAleavey

61 Duncairn
Gardens

Belfast BT15 2GB



NI Fishery Harbour
Authority

Mr Chris Warnock

3 St Patrick's
Avenue

Downpatrick, BT30
6DW



NI Human Rights
Commission (NIHRC)

Professor Monica
McWilliams

Temple Court

39 North Street

Belfast BT1 1NA



NI Islamic Centre



Wellington Par
k

Malone Road,
Belfast BT9



NI Rural Women’s
Network

Ms Doherty

15 Molesworth
Street

Cookstown

BT80 8NX



NI Women’s Aid
Federation



129 University
Street

Belfast BT7 1HP


65



NI Women's European
Platform (NIWEP)



58 Howard Street

Belfast BT1 6PJ



NIAPA

Mr Scullion

15 Molesworth
Street

Cookstown, BT80
8NX



NIPSA

David Stuart

Arches Centre,
Bloomfield Avenue

Belfast BT5 5AA



North West
Community Network



6
-
8 Pump Street

Derry /
Londonderry

BT48 6JG



North West Forum of
People with
Disabilities

Mr Kyle

58 Strand Road

Derry /
Londonderry

BT48 7AJ



Northern Ireland
Committee ICTU

Ms O’Hare

Carlin House

4
-
6 Donegall
Street Place

Belfast BT1 2FN







Northern Ireland
Office



11 Millbank

Human Rights and
Equality Unit

London



SW1P 4PN





NSPCC

Mr Reid

Jennymount Court

North Derby Street

Belfast, BT15 3HN



NUS USI

Ms Wilson

Northern Ireland
Student Centre

29 Bedford Street

Belfast BT2 7EJ


66



Oi Kwan
Chinese
Women’s Group

Mrs Selina Lee

c/o 17 Eblana
Street

Belfast BT7 1LD

Omagh Ethnic
Communities Support
Group

Ms Rose Kelly

The Community
House

2 Drumagh
Avenue

Omagh BT78 1DP

Omagh Traveller
Support Group

Conor Keys



Omagh Women's Area

Network



2
nd

Floor, Omagh
Community House

2 Drumragh
Avenue

Omagh BT81 1DP



Parents &
Professionals &
Autism

Mrs Cassidy

Knockbracken
Healthcare Park,
Saintfield Road

Belfast BT8 8BH







Pig Production
Development
Committee

Dr
Beattie

c/o Ulster Farmers'
Union

47 Antrim Road

Belfast BT15 3DA







Pobal

Ms Janet Muller

216 Bóthar na
bhFál

Cultúrlann McAdam Ó
Fiaich

Béal Feirste, BT12
6AH









Polish Association NI

Mr Maciej Baxtor

c/o 129 Ormeau
Road

Belfast

Press for Change



4 Glenside Road

Derry /
Londonderry

BT48 0BW


67



Queer Space



PO Box 160

Belfast BT1 2AU



Rainbow Project

James Knox

2
-
6 Union Street

Belfast BT1 2JF



Rare Breeds Survival
Trust



Stoneleigh Park

Nr