CH 4-8 by Mr.Mv

jinkscabbageΔίκτυα και Επικοινωνίες

23 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

90 εμφανίσεις

CBCN4103 – Intro to Networking 
Chap4 
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) is a standard description or "reference model" for how messages 
should be transmitted between any two points in a telecommunication network. Its purpose is to guide 
product implementors so that their products will consistently work with other products 
OSI was originally intended to be a detailed specification of interfaces. It’s now an ISO standard. 
The main idea in OSI is that the process of communication between two end points in a 
telecommunication network can be divided into layers, with each layer adding its own set of special, 
related functions. 
More information is added at the beginning or end of the letter. This process is called encapsulation 
 
The frame header contains information (for example, physical addresses) required to complete the data 
link functions.  
Layers 1‐3 are the functional equivalents of the network nodes. 
The layers are in two groups. 
The upper four layers are used whenever a message passes from or to a user. 
The lower three layers (up to the network layer) are used when any message passes through the host 
computer. 
 
TCP and IP were developed by a Department of Defense (DOD) 
 
1. The network access layer, is responsible for communicating with the actual network hardware 
2. The internetworking layer, is responsible for figuring out how to get data to its destination. 
Making no guarantee about whether data will reach its destination, it just decides where the 
data should be sent based on routing information, among other things, the destination IP 
address, Subnet Mask and Network ID. 
3. The transport layer, provides data flows for the application layer. It is at the transport layer 
where guarantees of reliability may be made 
4. The application layer, is where users typically interact with the network. This is where telnet, 
ftp, email, IRC, etc. reside. 
 
SSL protocol runs above TCP/IP and below higher‐level protocols such as HTTP or IMAP. 
 
The Internet Society (ISOC) serves as the standardising body for the Internet community. It is 
organised and managed by the Internet Architecture Board (IAB). 
Network management covers a wide area, including: Security(protected from unauthorised 
users), Performance(eliminate Bottle necks in the network) & reliability(network is available to 
users and responding hardware n software) 
 
SNMP 
SNMP(Simple Network Management Protocol) has become the industry‐wide standard for 
reporting management data for an IP based network. 
SNMP‐compliant devices, called agents, store data about themselves in Management 
Information Bases (MIBs) a database of objects that can be monitored by a network 
management system. Both SNMP and RMON use standardised MIB formats that allows any 
SNMP and RMON tools to monitor any device defined by a MIB and return this data to the 
SNMP requesters 
 
RMON is short for remote monitoring, a network management protocol that allows network 
information to be gathered at a single workstation. RMON defines nine additional MIBs that 
provide a much richer set of data about network usage 
 
Common Management Information Services (CMIS). CMIS defines a system of network 
management information services. CMIP was proposed as a replacement for the less 
sophisticated SNMP but has not been widely adopted. CMIP provides improved security and 
better reporting of unusual network conditions. 
 
 
Topic 5 
 
127.x.x.x address range is reserved as a loopback address, used for testing and diagnostic 
purposes. 
 
IPv4 addresses are 32 bits in length, whereas IPv6 is a 128‐bit addressing scheme. 
 
The octets serve a purpose other than simply separating the numbers. They are used to create 
classes of IPv4 addresses that can be assigned to a particular business, government or other 
entity based on size and need. The octets are split into two sections: Net and Host. The Net 
section always contains the first octet. It is used to identify the network that a computer 
belongs to. Host (sometimes referred to as Node) identifies the actual computer on the 
network. The host section always contains the last octet. There are five IPv4 classes plus certain 
special addresses: 
Default Network ‐ The IPv4 address of 0.0.0.0 is used for the default network. 
Class A ‐ This class is for very large networks, such as a major international 
company might have. IPv4 addresses with a first octet from 1 to 126 are part of this class. 
The other three octets are used to identify each host. Valid Host IP addresses range from 
1.0.0.1‐126.255.255.254. Class A networks, the high order bit value (the very first binary 
number) in the first octet is always 0. 
Class B ‐ Class B is used for medium‐sized networks. A good example is a large college campus.  
IPv4 addresses with a first octet from 128 to 191 are part of this class. Class B addresses also 
includes the second octet as part of the Net identifier. Valid Host IP addresses range from 
128.1.0.1‐191.255.255.254. The other two octets are used to identify each host. It has 10 in the 
first octet. 
Class C ‐ Class C addresses are commonly used for small to mid‐size 
businesses. IPv4 addresses with a first octet from 192 to 223 are part of this class. 
Class C addresses also include the second and third octets as part of the Net identifier. 
The last octet is used to identify each host. Valid Host IP addresses range from 192.0.1.1‐
223.255.255.254. In the first octet 110 it has. 
Class D ‐ Used for multicasts, Class D is slightly different from the first three classes. It has (1110) 
a first bit value of 1, second bit value of 1, third bit value of 1 and fourth bit value of 0. The other 
28 bits are used to identify the group of computers the multicast message is intended for. 
Class E ‐ Class E is used for experimental purposes only. It has (1111) a first bit value of 1, second 
bit value of 1, third bit value of 1 and fourth bit value of 1. 
 
Users are assigned IP addresses by Internet service providers (ISPs). ISPs obtain allocations 
of IP addresses from a local Internet registry (LIR) or national Internet registry 
(NIR), or from their appropriate regional Internet registry (RIR) as follows: 
 Asia Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC) in Asia/Pacific Region; 
 American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) in North America and Sub‐Sahara Africa; 
 Regional Latin‐American and Caribbean IP Address Registry (LACNIC) in Latin America 
and some Caribbean Islands;  
 Réseaux IP Européens (RIPE‐NCC)in Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, and African 
countries located north of the equator. 
Internet Assigned Number Authority (IANA) carefully manages the remaining supply of IP 
addresses to ensure that duplication of publicly used addresses does not occur. Duplication 
would cause instability in the Internet and compromise its ability to deliver datagram to 
networks. 
 
Subnetting is the process of borrowing bits from the HOST bits, in order to divide the larger 
network into small subnets. Subnetting does NOT give you more hosts,
 but actually costs you 
hosts. 
Subnetting is one of the techniques used to overcome the shortage of Classful IPv4 addresses. 
Other schemes used are Private addressing with NAT/PAT, Supernetting and IPv6. 
 
2
3
 ‐ 2 = 6 , this network only requires 5 subnets hence there will be one extra subnet. 
Binary Notation 11111111.11111111.11111111.11100000 (bcoz 2
3
 ‐2 number of needed 
subnets) 
Dotted Notation 255.255.255.224 
Slash Notation 192.168.1.0/27 (count all ones the binary notation) 
2
5
 ‐ 2 = 30, Maximum of 30 hosts per subnet. 
 
 
 
 
Topic 6 
 
Internetworking is connecting two or more computer networks with some sort of routing device 
to exchange traffic back and forth, and guide traffic on the correct path across the complete 
network to their destination. 
 
Routers works at the Network layer of the OSI Model. 
Bridges works at the data link layer. Switches is a multi‐port bridge 
Repeaters works at the Physical layer. A hub is a repeater with multi‐port. 
 
Shielded Twisted‐pair This is a type of copper telephone wiring in which each of the two copper wires 
that are twisted together and are coated with an insulating coating that functions as a ground for the 
wires. 
Unshielded Twisted‐pair are not shielded and thus interfere with nearby cables. They are used in LANs 
to bit rates of 100Mbps and with maximum length of 100m. UTP cables are typically used to connect a 
computer to a network 
Coaxial Cable has a grounded metal sheath around the signal conductor. Interference among cables is 
reduced due to the sheath around signal conductor.  Allows higher data rate transfer. Typically they are 
used at bit rates of 100 Mbps for maximum lengths of 1 km 
 
Bridge can be defined as a device that is used to connect two local area network or two segments of the 
same LAN that uses the same protocol together such protocol includes Ethernet or token ring. Bridges 
examine the destination MAC address (or station address) of the transmitted data frames, and will not 
retransmit data frames which are not destined for another network segment. They maintain a table with 
connected MAC address, and do not forward any data frames if the MAC address is on the network that 
originated it, else it forwards to all connected segment. 
Switch is a very fast, low‐latency, multi‐port bridge that is used to segment LANs. All the nodes 
connected to a hub share the bandwidth among themselves, while a device connected to a switch port 
has the full bandwidth all to itself. 
Switches forward received data frames in two ways. 
Cutting through switching: The switch reads the destination address before receiving the entire 
frame. The data is then forwarded before the entire frame arrives 
Store & forward switching: The switch involves reading the entire Ethernet frame, before 
forwarding it, with the required protocol and at the correct speed, to the destination port. 
Routers do the following:Do not forward broadcast.Do not forward traffic to unknown addresses. 
Modify data packet header. Build tables of network addresses 
The Network Interface Card (NIC) is a circuit board that is physically installed within an active network 
node, such as a computer, server, or printer 
A repeater extends the length of a network cabling system by amplifying the signal and then re‐
transmitting it. Repeaters operate at Physical Layer 1 
 
Chapter 7 
Domain name servers translate domain names to IP addresses. 
The COM, EDU and UK portions of these domain names are called the top‐level domain or first‐level 
domain. There are several hundred top‐level domain names, including COM, EDU, GOV, MIL, NET, ORG 
and INT, as well as unique two‐letter combinations for every country. 
The domain name industry is regulated and overseen by ICANN, the organisation that is responsible for 
certifying companies as domain name registrars. 
Only a domain name registrar is permitted to access and modify the master database of domain names 
maintained by InterNIC. The master database contains the documentation on all of the domain names 
registered to date. 
World Wide Web is a system of Internet servers that support specially formatted documents. The 
documents are formatted in a markup language called HTML (HyperText Markup Language) that 
supports links to other documents, as well as graphics, audio, and video files. This means you can jump 
from one document to another simply by clicking on hot spots. Not all Internet servers are part of the 
World Wide Web. 
The Internet is a massive network of networks, a networking infrastructure. The World Wide Web, or 
simply Web, is a way of accessing information over the medium of the Internet. It is an information‐
sharing model that is built on top of the Internet. 
E‐mail is short for electronic mail, the transmission of messages over communications networks. 
All online services and Internet Service Providers (ISPs) offer e‐mail, and most also support gateways so 
that you can exchange mail with users of other systems. 
In the PC world, an important e‐mail standard is MAPI.  
The CCITT standards organisation has developed the X.400 standard, which attempts to provide a 
universal way of addressing messages. 
FTP is short for File Transfer Protocol, the protocol for exchanging files over the Internet 
Security refers to techniques for ensuring that data stored in a computer cannot be read or 
compromised by any individuals without authorisation. Most security measures involve data encryption 
and passwords. 
Data encryption is the translation of data into a form that is unintelligible without a deciphering 
mechanism 
Three basic security concepts important to information
 on the Internet are confidentiality, integrity, 
and availability. Concepts relating to the people
 who use that information are authentication, 
authorisation, and nonrepudiation. 
Security is strong when the means of authentication cannot later be refuted the user cannot later deny 
that he or she performed the activity. This is known as nonrepudiation 
Network security incident is any network‐related activity with negative security implications. 
An account compromise is the unauthorised use of a computer account by someone other than the 
account owner, without involving system‐level or root‐level privileges 
A root compromise is similar to an account compromise, except that the account that has been 
compromised has special privileges on the system. 
Several factors that make Internet vulnerable are as follows: 
 inherent openness of the Internet and the original design of the protocols make the Internet 
prone to attacks 
 intruders are constantly developing new tools and techniques 
 traffic on the Internet is not encrypted, and thus confidentiality and integrity are difficult to 
achieve 
 Rapid growth and use of the network, accompanied by rapid deployment of network services 
involving complex applications.  These services are not designed, configured, or maintained 
securely. 
 Operating system security is rarely a purchase criterion. off‐the‐shelf operating systems are 
shipped in an easy‐to‐use but insecure configuration that allows sites to use the system soon 
after installation. These hosts/sites are often not fully configured from a security perspective 
before connecting. 
 The need for network security experts far exceeds the supply 
 
Security Policy A policy is a documented high‐level plan for organisation‐wide computer and 
information security. 
Factors that contribute to the success of a security policy include management commitment, 
technological support for enforcing the policy, effective dissemination of the policy, and the security 
awareness of all users. 
Security‐related Procedures Procedures are specific steps to follow that are based on the computer 
security policy. 
Security PracticesSystem administration practices play a key role in network security. 
 
Chapter 8 
four major factors to consider before implementing a wireless network: 
 High availability; 
 Scalability; 
 Manageability; and 
 Open architecture. 
 
IEEE 802.11 committee and the Wi‐Fi Alliance have diligently worked to make wireless equipment 
standardised and interoperable. 
 
WLAN, just like a LAN, requires a physical medium through which transmission signals pass. Instead of 
using twisted‐pair or fiber‐optic cable, WLANs use infrared light (IR) or radio frequencies (RFs). 
The use 
of RF is far more popular for its longer range, higher bandwidth, and wider coverage. WLANs use the 
2.4‐gigahertz (GHz) and 5‐GHz frequency bands 
 
 
 
Although not addressed in the IEEE standards, a 20‐30% overlap is desirable. 
 
 
Three Authentication and Association types listed as follows: 
 Unauthenticated and Unassociated 
The node is disconnected from the network and not associated to an access 
point. 
 Authenticated and Unassociated 
The node has been authenticated on the network but has not yet associated 
with the access point. 
 Authenticated and Associated 
The node is connected to the network and able to transmit and receive data 
through the access point. 
 
Methods of authentication 
The first authentication process is the open system. This is an open connectivity 
standard in which only the SSID must match. This may be used in a secure or non‐secure 
environment even though the ability of low level networks ‘sniffers’ to discover the SSID 
of the WLAN is high. SSID shorts for Service Set Identifier, a 32‐character unique 
identifier attached to the header of packets sent over a WLAN that acts as a password 
when a mobile device tries to connect to the 
Wireless Access Point (WAP). 
The second process is the shared key. This process requires the use of Wireless 
Equivalency Protocol (WEP) encryption. WEP is a fairly simple algorithm using 64 and 
128 bit keys. The AP is configured with an encrypted key and nodes attempting to access 
the network through the AP must have a matching key. 
 
The Radio Wave and Microwave Spectrums 
Computers send data signals electronically. Radio transmitters convert these electrical signals to 
radio waves. Changing electric currents in the antenna of a transmitter generates the radio 
waves. These radio waves radiate out in straight lines from the antenna. 
In a WLAN, a radio signal measured at a distance of just 10 meters (30 feet) from the 
transmitting antenna would be only 1/100th of its original strength. The antennas type on AP 
and NIC is omnidirectional which is usually rubber dipole. 
 
The process of altering the carrier signal that will enter the antenna of the transmitter is called 
modulation. There are three basic ways in which a radio carrier signal can be modulated. 
Amplitude Modulated (AM) radio stations modulate the height (amplitude) of the carrier signal. 
Frequency Modulated (FM) radio stations modulate the frequency of the carrier signal as 
determined by the electrical signal from the microphone. 
In WLANs, a third type of modulation called phase modulation is used to superimpose the data 
signal onto the carrier signal that is broadcast by the transmitter. Streams of 0 and 1 are 
represented by waves in reverse phases to each other 
 
Signals and Noise on a WLANs 
All band interference affects the entire spectrum range. Bluetooth™ technologies hops across 
the entire 2.4 GHz many times per second and can cause significant interference on an 802.11b 
network. Leakage from a microwave of as little as one watt into the RF spectrum can cause 
major network disruption. Wireless phones operating in the 2.4GHZ spectrum can also cause 
network disorder. 
In a SOHO environment, most access points will utilise twin omni directional antennae that 
transmit the signal in all directions thereby reducing the range of communication. 
 
 
 
Wireless Security 
This is a Layer 3 connection as opposed to the Layer 2 connection between the AP and the 
sending node. 
o EAP‐MD5 Challenge: Extensible Authentication Protocol is the earliest authentication 
type, which is very similar to CHAP password protection on a wired network. 
o LEAP (Cisco) Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol is the type primarily used 
on Cisco WLAN access points. LEAP provides security during credential exchange, 
encrypts using dynamic WEP keys, and supports mutual authentication. 
o User authentication : Allows only authorised users to connect, send and receive data 
over the wireless network. 
o Encryption: Provides encryption services further protecting the data from intruders. 
o Data authentication: Ensures the integrity of the data, authenticating source and 
destination devices. 
 
__________________________