Technical Physics I PHY-230-CRF01

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Technical Physics I

PHY
-
230
-
CRF01

Fall 2013


Instructor:


Jim Trepka

Other Instructor
Information:

Contact Information

140 Jones Hall

(319)398
-
7146

e
-
mail
jim.trepka@kirkwood.edu

Section Number:


0201611

Monday & Wednesday 8 am


10 am

Credit hours:

3

Course description:

Studies the technical applications of motion, force, momentum, statics,
work, rotation and simple machines. Emphasizes concepts through
laboratory and lecture.

Prerequisites:

MT100U and MT101U

Course Materials
Needed:


1.

Applied Physics
,
10
/e

Ewen, Schurter & Gundersen
, ©2012

| Prentice
Hall | Cloth; 768 pp |

ISBN
-
10:
0136116337

| ISBN
-
13:
9780136116332

2.

PRS RF Clicker

Books and course materials for this course are available at the Kirkwood
Bookstore.

Learning Outcomes,
Objectives, and Course
Competencies:

Course Competencies:

1.

Analyze applied physics problems

using appropriate equations
and techniques

2.

Build and assemble applied physics labs

3.

Perform measurements of applied physics labs


Learning

Objectives
:

1.

Differentiate between a scalar and a vector quantity. Calculate the
components of a vector. Illustrate

graphically and mathematically
the resultant of two or more vectors.

2.

Give a definition and measure velocity and acceleration, using
proper units. Solve problems that involve velocity and uniform
acceleration.

3.

Using proper units, give a definition and meas
ure mechanical
force. State Newton’s Three Laws. Describe and predict what
happens in a system when forces are balanced or unbalanced.
Solve problems that involve Newton’s Three Laws.

4.

Give a definition and measure friction in mechanical systems. Solve
pr
oblems that involve static and kinetic friction including incline
problems.

5.

Give a definition and measure work, energy, and power in linear
mechanical and electrical systems. Explain the relationship
between energy and work. Explain the relationship betwee
n
potential and kinetic energy. Explain the conservation of energy
law. Solve electrical and mechanical problems that involve work,
energy, and power.

6.

Calculate the mechanical advantages of force transformers in
mechanical and fluid systems. Solve prob
lems that involve
mechanical advantage in simple machines such as a lever, an
inclined plane, a wedge, gears, pulley systems, wheel and axle,
screw jack, and belt drive. Construct simple machines and analyze
their behavior. Differentiate between ideal me
chanical advantage
and actual mechanical advantage. Calculate efficiency of a simple
machine based on mechanical advantage (actual/ideal) and based
on work (output/input).

7.

State the equation for an impulse and momentum and explain the
terms. Express the
law of the conservation of linear momentum
mathematically and give examples. Describe a perfectly elastic
collision algebraically and conceptually. Solve problems with
impulse and momentum. Measure impulse and momentum
experimentally.

8.

Describe static eq
uilibrium. State mathematically and
conceptually the first condition of equilibrium. Create a free body
diagram and use the diagram to solve for unknown forces or force
components. Illustrate by example and definition your
understanding of the term torq
ue. Solve complex problems
involving torque. Balance different masses in a system by
establishing equal torques.

9.

Define mathematically and conceptually angular displacements,
angular velocity, and angular acceleration
. Apply these concepts to
the solu
tion of complex problems. Measure the angular velocity
and acceleration of a system.

10.

Give a definition and measure work and energy involving
rotational inertia. Define angular momentum. Contrast and
compare linear system to rotational systems. Solve in
ertial
problems.

11.

Actively participate in class laboratories. Assume responsibility
for laboratory equipment. Assist other students and contribute to
group activities. Conform to all stated safety standards. Use
appropriate language in and out of the c
lassroom.

Lab Competencies by Experiment



Experiment 1F1 Measuring Specific Gravity Objectives

1.

Measure the specific gravity of a liquid using a hydrometer and a
pocket hydrometer.

2.


Determine the density of a liquid given the specific gravity of
that liquid.


Experiment 1F2 Measuring Pressure Objectives

1.

Measure pressure above atmospheric pressure with a
manometer and a mechanical pressure gauge.

2.

Measure pressure below atmospheric pre
ssure with a
manometer and a mechanical pressure gauge.

3.

Calculate absolute pressure, given atmospheric pressure and
measured pressure


Experiment 5MF1 Measuring The Potential Energy Of A Spring
Objectives

1.

Find the spring constant for a spring.

2.

Predict the
stretch caused by a known force applied to a spring.



Figure the Experiment 5MF3 Using Energy In Compressed Air To
Operate Air Motors Objectives

1.

Use energy stored in a compressed air system to operate an air
motor.

2.

Measure the rotational speed of the air
motor.

3.

Find the pressure drop across the air motor as it does work.


Experiment 5T2 Thermal Energy And The Specific Heat Of A Metal
Objectives

1.

Set up a device to find the specific heat of a metal.

2.

Find the specific heat of a given metal, and state its
units.


E
xperiment 6F2 Power From Air Motors Objectives

1.

Set up and use and air motor mechanism to lift a load.

2.

Measure pressure drop across an air motor.

3.

Measure flow rate through an air motor.

4.

Find the efficiency of the air motor being used.


Experiment 9
*1 Natural Frequency Of A Vibrating Body Objectives

1.

Assemble a system to measure the natural frequency of a simple
pendulum.

2.

Measure the natural frequency of a simple pendulum.

3.

Assemble a system to measure the natural frequency of a
vibrating system.

4.

Calcu
late the natural frequency of a vibrating system.


Experiment 11F1 Calibrating A Pressure Gauge Objectives

1.

Use a U
-
tube manometer to measure air pressure.

2.

Compare pressure measurement made with a differential
pressure gauge to that of the U
-
tube manometer.

3.

Calculate the percent accuracy of the differential gauge readings
compare to the manometer.


Assessment of Student Learning:



Student learning will be assessed via exams, homework, class
room participation, and lab reports.


Assessment of Student
Learn
ing:

Student learning will be assessed via exams, homework, class room
participation, and lab reports.

Late Work/
Make
-
up
Test Policy:

No late work will be accepted!

Class Attendance
Policy and College
Sponsored Activities:

As stated in the S
tudent
handbook
:
In compliance with Public Law 105
-
244, Kirkwood Community College makes a wide variety of general
institutional information available to students.


For additional information, go to


http://www.kirkwood.edu/pdf/uploaded/630/student_handbook.pdf

Productive Classroom
Learning
Environment:

Students will treat each other with respect and avoid using profane or
inflammatory speech that denigrates another’s race, ethnicity, gender,
or sexual orientation. Students who are disruptive will be
required
to
leave.

See student handbook

http://www.kirkwood.edu/pdf/uploaded/630/student_handbook.pdf

Plagiarism Policy:

See student handbook
http://www.kirkwood.edu/pdf/uploaded/630/student_handbook.pdf

Campus Closings:

See student handbook

http://www.kirkwood.edu/pdf/uploaded/630/student_handbook.pdf

Learning Envir
onment
Expectations:

The classroom and laboratory conditions will be conducive to teaching
and student learning. To promote and maintain that environment, all
pagers, cellular phones, and other autonomous means of communication
shall be deactivated during

instructional periods. RINGING OF CELL
PHONES DURING CLASS WILL RESULT IN POINTS DEDUCTED FROM
YOUR CLASS ROOM PARTICPATION AND PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT
GRADE. Participants are expected to come to class prepared to actively
participate in class.

American
s with
Disabilities Act:

Students with disabilities who need accommodations to achieve course
objectives should file an accommodation application with Learning
Services, Cedar Hall 2063 and provide a written plan of accommodation
to your instructor prior
to the accommodation being provided.

Student Evaluation:

Final Exam


A comprehensive final exam totaling 20% of your final
grade will be administered during finals week.

Unit Exams
-

Exams will be given after every 3 or 4 chapters totaling
40% of your
final grade. Missed exams must be made up on or before
the next class period. In a rare situation where the exam can not be
made up in that time period, the student will need to make up the exam
during the final exam week and this exam will be different
than that
taken by the rest of the class. All exams will be cumulative.

Labs
-

Labs will be worth 30% of your final grade. Labs will be done in
groups of up to four people. You will lose a point per minute late if you
are late to a lab. THERE WILL BE
NO MAKE UP LABS!!!


Class Room Participation and Professional Conduct
-

10% of your
final grade
. Half of this grade or 5% of your final grade will be
determined based on the
“Assessment_of_Contributions_of_Group_Members
“ sheet.

Points will be added to
classroom participation and professional
conduct grade based on the following:

1. Arrival at class by 8 am (50 % of class participation grade)



2. Performing in class problems

3. Helping lab partner or other lab groups.

4. Helping other classmates.

Points will be deducted from the classroom participation and
professional conduct grade for the following:

1. Inappropriate language or jokes.

2. Ringing of cell phones in class.

3. Disrupting the class.

4. Leaving class early or not arriving back to c
lass by 9:00, after the 8:00
break.

5. Not cleaning up workspace at the end of the class.

How final grades are
determined:

see above

Grading Scale:



B+

87

C+

77

D+

67

F

Below

60

A

94

B

83

C

73

D

63

A
-

90

B
-

80

C
-

70

D
-

60


Drop Date:


Students

dropping a class during the first two weeks of a term may
receive a full or partial tuition refund for 16 week terms, for shorter
courses check with Enrollment Services for total withdraw information.
Details of the refund schedule are available from Enro
llment Services in
216 Kirkwood Hall. For detailed discussion of drop dates and policies,
please read the student handbook.

The last date to dr
op this cl
ass for this term is November
29
.

Final Exam
Information:

Final exams are scheduled during the last week
of the term from
December 6 to December 12
. The final exam for this class is

scheduled
on Monday December 9

at 8:00.

Emergency
Information:

See student handbook
http://www.kirkwood.edu/pdf/uploaded/630/student_handbook.pdf

Other Information:

See website for class

http://faculty.kirkwood.edu/site/index.php?p=17078