Enhancing building security systems with autonomous robots

jadesoreΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

13 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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Abstract


During the last years,
investments in security have

been raised due to a different set of
factors
like terrorism. Particularly, the surveillance system of buildings is an important
issue to human daily life. This paper describes the development of a
m
ultirobot
system
for building surveillance applications over
I
nternet
. Each robot can handle some daily

surveillance routine tasks. Sensor information such as real
-
time images captured by a
camera on the robot with pan/tilt/zoom functions can be transmitted back to the central
management office via a local area network. Teleoperation of the robots via the I
nternet
or
I
ntranet
is also possible. The complete system can be installed and reprogrammed in
a very short time thanks to a high level task application programming environment
named RoboGraph. Using this tool the application can be programmed using Petri
nets
with commands and events already defined.


System description



The
global

architecture used is shown in figure 1.
The classic surveillance
system
of the building is connected to the Home Server that will register all the events
produced by the diff
erent sensors.
In addition, a set of autonomous mobile robots are
also connected to the
Home Server
via wifi, GPRS or 3G. On the other side, users can
monitor the system using a GUI that allows seeing monitor cameras and any other
sensors

on the robots.
Al
so, special events detected by the robots are shown on the GUI
in pop
-
up windows.
On the
other side, it is also possible
to remotely control some
actuators such as pan
-
tilts,
camera settings, etc.


Robots are able to
patrol programmed or
randomly generated

paths at
any time. Patrol tasks can
be
scheduled to start at fixed
times during the week, to be
executed during different
intervals of time.



Robots can also tackle
false alarms.
False alarms
are
quite expensive for security
companies and robots can
help

to detect them. For



1

This work was sup
ported in part by the Spanish
Comisión Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnología
,
CICYT, project DPI2005
-
06210.

The. Authors are with the Dep.
Ingeniería de Sistemas y automática, University of Vigo, 36200 Vigo,
Spain (phon
e: +34 986 81222
2; fax:
+34 98681
4014
; e
-
mail:
joaquin@uvigo.es
,
rsanz@uvigo.es
,
amador@uvigo.es
, dplosada@uvigo.es
).

Enhancing building security systems with autonomous robots

Joaquín L. Fernández,
Member, IEEE
, Rafael Sanz, Amador R. Dieguez and Diego P. Losada
1

Figure 1. System overview

example, every time that an alarm is activated,
a person

at the central can send a robot
to check if the alarm is false or real.




Each mobile robot uses
a modular control architecture that i
s organized as
shown in figure 2
. Even thou
gh the different modules are organized in four sets, they
can be mapped in the three layer architecture popularized by Bonasso de al. [5]. The
hardware servers and control set implement the functional layer while RoboGraph
implements the executive and plan
ning layer. Finally
,

the architecture

includes a set of
processes to interact with the users and connect to other process for Multirobot
applications.


Our current research addresses architectures
that extend the architecture described in figure
2

to
cont
rol several mobile robots (figure
3
).

We use IPC
[
1
]
to communicate modules on
the computer on board of the robots and a lightly
modified IPC
,

called JIPC
,

to communicate robots
to the home server computer and users. On each
robot a process (Robot Interfa
ce) serves to exchange
information between the robot control and the home
server.






Bibliography


[1]

R. Simmons, “The
interprocess communications system
(IPC).
http://www.ri.cmu.edu/
p
rojects/
project_394.html


Accessed:
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0
2
-
2
7
.







Figure 2. Robot Control Architecture

Figure3.

Multir
obot Control Architecture


Principal presenting author biography


Joaquín López Fernández

Born in Lugo, Spain, 1968. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University
of Vigo in 1992 and 2000, respectively, in the fiel
d of
Telecommunications
and
Automatic Control Engineering
. He spent one year as a visitor researcher in the
Department of Computer Science and another year as a Special Faculty in the Robotics
Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.
Cur
rently
,

he is
Assi
stant P
rofessor at the
Systems Engineering and Control

Department
at the University of Vigo

(Spain)
. His
currently research interests include supervision, fault diagnosis, mobile robot navigation
and mobile robot control architectures.