cat I proposal-101711x - Oregon State University

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20 Φεβ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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1


PROPOSAL TO CREATE A SCHOOL OF
INTEGRATED PLANT, SO
IL, AND INSECT SCIEN
CE

BY
MERGING

THE DE
PARTMENTS OF CROPS AND SOIL SCI
ENCE AND HORTICULTURE

Oregon State University

College of Agricultural Sciences

CPS Tracking #:
81957


April 2011

1.

Program Description

a.

Proposed Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP)
number
:
011199

CIP #
011199

Title:

Plant Sciences, Other

Definition:

Any instructional program in plant sciences not listed above.

(Source: US Department of Education, National Center for
Educational Statistics, CIP 2010 ed.)

b.

Program Overview
:
b
rief overview (1
-
2 paragraphs) of the proposed program, including its
disciplinary foundations and connections; program objectives; programmatic focus; degree,
certificate, minor, and concentrations

offered.

As part of the strategic reorganization of OSU, we propose to merge the Department of Crop and
Soil Science
(CSS)
and the Department of Horticulture

(HORT)

into a School of Integrated Plant, Soil,
and Insect Science

(
IPSI
)
.

MERGE



Department o
f Crop and Soil Science

(CIP # 011102) and the
Department of
Horticulture

(CIP # 011103)

NEW



Academic Unit: School of Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect Science

(CIP #011199)
in the College of Agricultural Sciences



Degree: BS in Integrated Plant, Soil
and Insect Science (CIP # 011199)



Options:

o

Agronomy

o

Ecological Landscapes and Urban Forestry

o

General Horticulture

(Ecampus)

o

Insect Biology and Management

o

Plant
Breeding
and Technology

o

Soil Science

o

Ecological and
Sustainable Horticulture Production

o

Therapeu
tic Horticulture

o

Turf Management

o

Viticulture and Enology



Minors:

o

Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect
Science

2




CONTINUE

(Unchanged)



Graduate Degree Programs

o

MS, MAgr, PhD in Crop Science

o

MS, MAgr, PhD in Horticulture

o

MS, MAgr, PhD in Soil Science

o

Graduate
minors

o

Crop Science

o

Horticulture

o

Soil Science

o

Entomology

TERMINATE



Departments

o

Department of Crop and Soil Science

(CIP # 011102)

o

Department of Horticulture

(CIP # 011103)



Course Designators

o

CSS

“Crop and Soil Science”

o

HORT

“Horticulture”



Options

o

Crop
Management

o

Soil Resource Management

o

Ecological and Sustainable Horticultural Production

o

Environmental Landscape

o

General Horticulture

o

Horticultural Communication

o

Horticultural Research

o

Therapeutic Horticulture

o

Turf Management

o

Viticulture and Enology



Undergraduate Minors

o

Crop Science

o

Soil Science

MOVE



All degree programs (undergraduate and graduate) and courses from the two
departments to the proposed new school; including majors, options, minors
(undergraduate and graduate), and areas of concentration

COURSE DESIGNATORS



IPSI

is proposed as the new course designator

PROPOSED EFFECTIVE DATE



Winter

Term 201
2

3


CSS

and HORT are two
of Oregon State University’s largest academic
units

(
A
ppendix 1

a and
b
)
.
The

CSS f
aculty
is

housed in four
on
-
campus buildings, at Eastern Oregon University
(EOU), in thirteen counties
,

and
at
f
ive

OSU E
xperiment
S
tations across Oregon
.
The
Horticulture faculty has programs in 28 of the 36 Oregon counties,
at
four branch stations,
and
on
the Corvallis campus
.
Professorial and professional faculty, classified staff, and
graduate students conduct research, teaching, extension and service a
ctivities within
Oregon, across the United States
,

and around the world
.
Through
statewide
research,
e
xtension
,

and teaching programs,
CSS
and HORT
faculty are directly involved
with nursery
and greenhouse, field,
forage,
fruit and nut, seed
,

and vegetabl
e

crops that account for
75%

of

Oregon’s $
4.1
billion agricultural industry
.
HORT
faculty
members also

work with
Oregon’s landscape and turf industries
,

and Master and community gardeners
.
Emphasis is
placed on designing, constructing
,

and managing
commu
nity and
private

landscapes
with
appropriate ornamental
,

native

and food

plants
that provide ecosystem services

for

homes,
cities, municipalities,
watersheds, parks, golf courses, gardens and arboreta, streamside
gardens, restoration sites,
green roofs and
bioswales
.
Soils faculty do extensive work with
the Natural Resource Conservation Service, US Forest Se
rv
ice and other federal agencies
.
Many
other
faculty members
work with soil and water conservation groups across the state
.
The two de
partments also house the
majority of the
small farms faculty who work with
comm
ercial small farm entrepreneurs,
as well as non
-
commercial small acreage landowners
in urban, peri
-
urban
,

and rural
communities
.
In addition to land

stewardship, the team
addre
sses alternative and specialty marketing through creation and enhancement of local
and regional food systems
,

and farm direct marketing channels.

Some may ask why two large departments should be merged. The answer is that while this
merger will create new

challenges in management and require exploration of new modes of
faculty interaction in order to maintain a desired level of faculty governance, the merger will
combine the strengths of two strong, nationally recognized OSU programs to create a new
entity

that can achieve national and international recognition. We will have unique
capability in cropping systems, plant breeding and genetics, ecological landscape design and
management, and high value horticultural crops research, extension and teaching. We

will
have a statewide footprint in county
-
based extension and research activities involving
commercial growers, small farmers and the urban public. We will have state of the art
educational programs that combine traditional students with practitioners to

give “hands
-
on” experiences in every class. More detail on the outcomes of this merger
is

given in the
following paragraphs.

The organization chart for IPSI can be found in
figure 1
.

OSU has
the following mission statement:

“As a Land Grant institution committed to
teaching, research, and outreach and engagement, Oregon State University promotes
economic, social,

cultural,

and environmental progress for the people of Oregon, the nation
4


and the world
.
This mission is achieve
d by producing graduates competitive in the global
economy, supporting a continuous search for new knowledge and solutions, and maintaining
a rigorous focus on academic excellence, particularly in the three Signature Areas: Advancing
the Science of Sustain
able Earth Ecosystems; Improving Human Health and Wellness; and
Promoting Economic Growth and Social Progress.

IPSI

will
support the missions of OSU and
the
C
ollege of
A
gricultural
S
ciences

through its commitment to acquire, synthesize
,

and
disseminate b
asic and applied knowledge,
will
serve as a

model
,

and
further enhance the
integration of research,
extension,
and teaching statewide in matters related to sustainable
field and
horticultural cropping systems
,

ecological landscapes
, crop and landscape
-
rela
ted
entomology, resilient farm and food systems, and soil resource management

at local,
national and international scales
.
Current and future integrated programs span

basic
to

applied research with stakeholder engagement
; span

molecular

to

landscape

level systems;
span

research, Extension
,

and teaching missions; and span

biological, ecological, social, and
economic disciplines
.
The
IPSI

brings together individuals from a broad set of
discipline
s in
the continuum of

basic and
integrative
sciences
.
I
n addition to traditional agricultural
support programs such as production and plant breeding, we have expertise in
integrated
pest management, biology and ecology;

systems biology
; reproductive biology;

and ecology
.
Multidisciplinary
working
groups are f
ocused around
cropping ecosystems

such as
field
crops,
fruits, vegetables, nursery crops,
and
wine
-
grapes
.
S
ystems research
i
s increasingly
critical to solving problems for Oregonians
.
IPSI

will
also serve as an
example

for
t
rans
-
disciplinary research
that
engages broad academic disciplines and works jointly w
ith
practitioners to solve
real
-
world problems
.
The creation of new knowledge i
n
IPSI

is

anchored directly to people’s lives and livelihoo
ds and connected to practice
.
IPSI

will

c
reate
a
premier
and nationally
ranked program that will draw on the strengths of
two very strong
nationally recognized
OSU programs.

All activities in
IPSI

will be fully integrated across the three
land grant
missions


teaching,
research
,

and extension
.
There will be tw
o full
-
time administrative School directors who will
have responsibility for overall School leadership and management

(
F
igure 1)
.
These
individuals will work on all issues cooperatively but each will take the lead for certain aspects
of
IPSI
.
A
n Executiv
e C
ouncil that represents all faculty and staff in
IPSI

will make major
policy and directional decisions
.
There will be a single curriculum, peer teaching,

graduate
admissions, scholarship, promotion and tenure, and other operational committees
.
IPSI

wil
l
consist of Program Areas that reflect areas

and possible Centers

of

D
istinction for which we
wish to be recognized nationally and internationally
.
These program areas will provide for
work synergies and manageable

governance units within
IPSI

but will also encourage
interdisciplinarity across the College and Division
.

5



IPSI

will offer
an
undergraduate degree of Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect
Scie
nce

with
options in Agronomy, General Horticulture (via Ecampus), Plant Breeding and Technology,
Ecological and
Sustainable Horticulture Production, Viticulture and Enology, Ecological
Landscapes and Urban Forestry, Turf Management, Therapeutic Horticultur
e, Soil Science,
and Insect Biology and Management
.
Undergraduates will be offered a minor in Integrated
Plant, Soil, and Insect Science. IPSI will continue to offer graduate majors in Crop Science,
Horticulture, and Soil Science. Graduate minors will c
onsist of Crop Science, Horticulture,
Soil Science, and
Entomology
.

Discussions are still underway about creating a larger Plant Science Program of some type.
Conversations to date have led to the conclusion that there are significant
pedagogic

difference
s between IPSI and Botany and Plant Pathology

(BPP)
. At this time, the majority of
IPSI undergraduates are going to non
-
academic career positions
.


Coursework and training of
these students is focused with these goals in mind. At this time, the majority
of BPP
undergraduates are moving into academic settings with undergraduates curriculum aligned
with that objective.

c.

Course of study
:
proposed curriculum, including course numbers, titles, and credit hours.

All CSS and Horticulture

undergraduate
degrees
and options will be terminated
.
The
following cladogram lists the
IPSI

degrees that will be offered:


Figure 1. New School of Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect Science organizational chart.

6



In accordance with OSU policy, students will be able to complete the degrees under which
they began at OSU. While the specifics of course offerings wi
ll change, the same types of
classes as are now being offered will be available and our School advisor will be able to make
meaningful class substitutions. We believe that many students will opt to work toward one
of the new options.

Discussions are under
way

to explore the possibility of broader
-
scale degree offerings in Plant
Sciences at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IPSI curriculum has been designed
so that it could be wrapped into such a degree.

Proposed Curriculum

Undergraduate

The
proposed Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect Science curriculum is outlined in Appendix 2.
We have designed the new major around the wide range of courses already offered by other
departments in developing the initial curricular requirements. We are explo
ring two options
for class designators. Either a new class designator will be used for all courses
-

IPSI has
been proposed
-

or we may use IPSI for classes that cut across the curriculum in all degree
options and use existing (ENT, HORT) or new (CROPS, S
OILS) designators for some classes to
give them easy name recognition for students and others doing quick scans of classes
available at OSU. Classes with new designation will be posted in the on
-
line catalog system
as soon as approval for transition is gr
anted.

Graduate

Three distinctive graduate degree majors will continue to be offered in IPSI: Crop Science,
Horticulture, and Soil Science. The existing Entomology graduate program will become a
7


stand
-
alone Entomology minor.
Examples of coursework taken
to attain each of the three
graduate
degrees can be found in Appendix 3.

d.

Manner

in which the program will be delivered
:
including program location (if offered
outside of the main campus), course
scheduling
, and the use of technology (for both on
-
campus
and off
-
campus delivery).

The proposed merger will largely
incorporate

the existing modes of delivery:



C
l
assroom lectures
.
This traditional approach is

often enhanced

through digital
proje
ction and audiovisual devices.



Laboratories and recitations
.
These

modes enable and facilitate hands
-
on and
experiential learning
.



Blended
audience
courses
.
U
ndergraduate
and/or graduate
students and practitioners
will

learn together in
the
same course
.



On
-
line courses and curricula
.
Currently over 25 courses are
available on
-
line
.
An
online option is General Horticulture is available.



Seminar
-

and team
-
based classes
.
Seminars featuring work by extension personnel,
research faculty, and graduate students from
IPSI

and invited guest speakers
take place
weekly thro
ughout the school year and are open to the public
.
Endowment funds are
available to sponsor outside speakers.



Extension related activities
.
These activities include the Master Gardener program,
the Small Farms program, the Oak Creek Center for Urban Hort
iculture,
the Agricultural
Composting Resources and Education Series,
and the Organic Agriculture program
.



Outreach related activities
.
These activities include interactions with commercial and
industrial agriculture
and the
public

by members of
IPSI

at l
ocal,
regional,

and national
levels
.
Also

include
d
are training

sessions, farm fairs, community fairs, etc
.
Outreach is
provided via internet web pages that provide information and tools for both urban and
rural clients.



IPSI

student clubs
.
IPSI

will ho
st
the BugZoo, Crop

Science Club
, Soils Graduate
Student
Club
,
Horticulture
Club
, Organic Growers’
Club
, Landscape
Club
, Turfgrass
Club
,
and Soil
Judging
Club
.



Workshops and field days
.
C
ounty extension and
branch
experiment
station faculty
throughout the

state hold many workshops and field days throughout the year
.
These
activities are open to the public
.
A number of workshop
s

are conducted in Spanish.



Internships
.
All s
tudents in
IPSI

are required to complete an internship
that allows
them to work
wit
h industry
, community or other governmental partners
.
Internships
are
completed under the 410 blanket and
can be from

six and twelve
credit
hours.



Service Learning
.
Experiential learning is merged with community service

in a number
of classes and in club

activities
.

8


The proposed curriculum will continue and enhance the long
-
standing focus
in Plant, Soil,
and Insect Science
-
related curricula for field
-
based, experiential learning where students
are exposed to materials and problems in a real
-
world context
.
This approach promotes
active learning and provides a key context for material learned from other sources
.
It
includes field trips as integral components of courses
at
all levels, as well as designated field
experience and field courses
.

e.

Ways in whic
h the program will seek to assure

quality, access, and diversity
.

IPSI

faculty
have
taken active steps to assure program quality including the following:



Learning outcomes
.
C
o
urse work
will
address the following learning outcomes:
1)
Identify
with career,
2)
Recognize role of profession in society,
3)
Embody concept of life
-
long
learning,
4)
Develop b
asic academic success skills,
5)
Communicate effectively,
6)
P
reparation

for career
,
7)
Develop d
iscipline
-
specific knowledge and skills,

8)
Develop
h
igher
-
order thinking skills,
9) Experience c
ommunity service
,

and
10)
D
evelop

personally
.

An example of

l
earning outcomes can be found in

Appendix
4
.



Providing peer assessment of a
ll
those teaching

(A
ppendix
5
)
.
Current CSS

assessments
are performed every three years for non
-
tenured faculty and every five years for tenured
faculty
.
The goals of the assessment are 1) to evaluate the teaching program of individual
instructors including course design (e.g., course content, obj
ectives, syllabus,
organization, methods and materials for delivering instruction), grading and examinations,
relationship to overall curriculum objectives (including themes and skills appropriate to
the courses), classroom presentation, and rapport with s
tudents, and 2) to provide insight
into
,

and context for
,

results from student evaluations
.
These processes will be adopted
by IPSI and adjusted accordingly.



Tracking student evaluations
.
C
lass student evaluations and the
S
tudent

and Citizen

Evaluation o
f Teaching (SET
/CET
) forms are reviewed each term by the
departmental

leadership
.
Feedback is provided to each instructor as to ways improvements might
be

achieved.



Industry alignment and relevancy
.
The ties that
IPSI

has to the agricultural industry in the
state allows for constant feedback on
the training of our students
.
All students are
required to have an internship
experience, which

also results in feedback on our students’
formal training
.
Most of the students

graduating from the two
units merging into
IPSI

find
well
-
paying

jobs

local
ly

or regional
ly
in their
specific
field
of study
.
The synergi
stic

relationship between
IPSI

faculty and industry
, NGOs and other governmental agencies

will
allow the
proposed S
ch
ool to align training of our students with the needs of
these
groups
.

9


Access to the program is both wide and deep
.
More than $
12
0,000

in scholarships will be
available to new and continuing students on an annual basis
.
These funds are derived from

endowm
ents
,
long
-
time annual
gifts,

and annual contributions.

Because

much of our work is hands
-
on activities in fields, greenhouses and laboratories
,
there

are many opportunities for employment within
IPSI

during both the school year and
summer
.
Over
50 students are employed during the school year and
more than
125
typically
work
on a full time basis
for faculty during the summer.

IPSI

has strong ties to community colleges offering programs in agriculture
.
Formal
matriculation agreements are in place
.

Students
can
attend
local
community college
s and
take
course work toward

an

OSU
Colleg
e of Agricultural

Sciences


major
.
The community
colleges that offer such courses includ
e Treasure Valley CC in Ontario
;

Blu
e Mountain CC in
Pendleton
;

Chemeketa CC in

Salem

and

Dallas
;

Yamhi
ll Valley, Woodburn
,

and Brooks
;

Klamath CC in K
lamath Falls
;

Lane CC in Eugene
;

Clackamas CC in Oregon City
;

Mt
.
Hood CC,
Gresham
;

Portland CC in
Portland
;

and

Linn
-
Benton CC in Corvallis and Albany.

Place bound students can take c
lasses via the internet through the Extended Campus
program (Ecampus). More than 25 classes are availab
le on an array of topics. An E
campus
general
B.S. in H
orticulture is also now available.

The diversity of people within our program is
consistent with
other programs at OSU

(Table
1).

Table 1. Distribution of students in IPSI, Fall 2010.


OSU
-
UG

OSU
-
Grad

IPSI
-
UG

IPSI
-
Grad

International

4%

20%

6%

23%

Students of color

18%

12%

9%

33%

Women

47%

48%

40%

54%

Oregon residents

78%

40%

81%

41%

Source:
http://oregonstate.edu/admin/aa/ir/sites/default/files/enroll
-
fall
-
2010.pdf

P
rograms
and opportunities
are available to students
for international

study
.
Programs in
which
IPSI

students have
been involved in

recent years
include the following:



The E.R
.
Ja
ckman Internship Support Program
(
provides financial assistance to
students in low
-
paying or volunteer internships
)
.



Summer and Fall 2010:

Nicaragua, Directed Study and Research




Guatemala, Long Way Home Organization Intern



Fall 2008:

Christchurch,
New Zealand, Crop Research Assistant



Summer 2008:

AGRA for West Africa, Ghana

10




The
N
AU
2 + 2
Pro
gram in cooperation with
Nanjing Agricultural University in
China
.
Chinese students study their first two years in China and then finish their
last two years
at OSU
.
OSU students
will be
sent to Nanjing Agricultural University
in their last two years
.
The first two Chinese students
started at OSU
in 2009
.

Many of our ‘students’
include adult
learners
who are
served by our extension and outreach
efforts
.
Exam
ples of a few programs specifically targeted to diverse and ethnic audiences
include: League of Women Farmers in southern Oregon; Immigrant and Refugee Farmer
Training in the Portland Metropolitan Area; Willamette Valley and Mid
-
Columbia
pesticide
applicat
or and/or tree fruit and nursery production and management

training for
Hispanics
;
Spanish speaking sessions at the H
erm
iston Farm Fairs and the Far West Show in Portland,
and a cooperative Spanish
-
language pesticide users program with the University of Id
aho in
the Treasure Valley.

IPSI will continue to pursue its’
diversity goals

that
include seeking

to increase the diversity
of graduate and undergraduate student populations

as well as
faculty, and staff
;

developing
collaborative approaches to complex issues
;

broaden our interests to better serve a
changing society
;

and building a strong sense of community within the School. Diversity
means the inclusion of a wide spectrum of people who bring value to the

School through
their variety of backgrounds, experiences, and views
.

This includes dimensions of race,
ethnicity, culture, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, physical abilities,
national origin, religious and political beliefs, scient
ific perspectives, and other
characteristics and ideologies. Diversity is about understanding and appreciating each
other, and moving beyond simple tolerance to embracing, respecting, and celebrating
diversity in each individual and the college as a whole
.

IPSI will support OSU’s goal of creating

an environment that mobilizes the community to
prepare our students, staff, faculty and the state of Oregon for leadership, service,
exploration, and excellence in the 21
st
century

(
http://oregonstate.edu/diversity/DAP/2007_OSU_CAMPUS_DIVERSITY_ACTION_PLAN.pdf
).

Diversity and education within IPSI

Diversity can enhance education by fostering multiple ways of understanding

the curricula
and by promoting understand in a global context the commonalities and divergences in
social, political, and cultural experiences. Diversity provides tools to be culturally respectful,
professionally competent, and civically responsible by e
xposing students to diverse
perspectives, lifestyles and experiences. IPSI will use emerging technologies to play a key
role in facilitating learning opportunities for all students including non
-
traditional learners.
Students will be



provided the opportu
nity
for
authentic
,
meaningful, life affirming, community
experiences;

11




empowered to acquire new ways of viewing themselves and the world in which they
live;



provided life transforming experiences that prepare them to think critically,
understand their li
ves in a global context, test and verify assumptions about the world,
and encounter realities different from their own;



have their creativity fostered by encouraging dynamic interaction among individuals
with different perspectives, skills and values.

Diversity of staff and faculty

IPSI
aspires to an environment in which all members of the community feel safe, respected,
and free at all times to participate in various undertakings of the college including learning,
teaching
, administration, and research
. We
value the strength in diversity of our faculty,
staff, students, administrators, and ideas
.
We nurture the community through
communication and mutual respect.

How will we further enhance diversity?

IPSI will provide a welcoming climate for all, inc
rease the diversity of our community, and
provide a proactive diversity curriculum and

training in the following ways:



Ensure that diverse perspectives are brought forward when Department plans and
decisions are made, by providing multiple means of communi
cations such as
suggestion boxes, group meetings, and facilitated meetings.



Ensure everyone recognizes harassment, knows what to do about it, and how to
prevent it by publicizing, and enforcing OSU harassment policy. This will include
subtle forms such as

exclusion, which often go unnoticed by the majority. We will
assure that training in recognizing all forms of harassment is available to students in
their first year through new
-
student orientation and/or introductory classes, and to all
employees in the
ir first year of employment.



Provide appropriate physical access to buildings, classrooms, and all activities
sponsored by or on behalf of the School.



Build community within and outside the School by holding open forums that include
interactive discussi
on on scientific issues or shared interests.

IPSI will pursue an increase in diversity through the following means:



Increase racial/ethnic diversity of the student body to reflect diversity present in the
region by seeking additional funds for minority sc
holarships and fellowships.



Retain and increase racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of faculty, staff, and
administration to reflect diversity present in the region by examining P&
T processes to
ensure that all people, including those from underrepresented groups are fairly
treated. IPSI will further develop a proactive approach for recruitment from
underrepresented groups.



Increase international opportunities and experiences for
students, RAs, staff, and
faculty.



Increase knowledge and understanding of diversity issues



Actively cultivate understanding and appreciation of diversity through diversity
training
.
Assure that diversity training is available to students in their first

year
12


through new
-
student orientation and/or introductory classes and to all current
employees and new employees in their first year of employment.



Improve mentoring ability of all supervisors in the School, especially mentoring of
diverse student and emp
loyee populations by providing mentorship training. The
School will assure that mentorship training is available to all current supervisors and
new supervisors in their first year of employment.

f.

Anticipated fall term headcount and FTE enrollment over eac
h of the next five years
.

This

proposal integrates the curricul
a

of
two

current B.S
.
degrees
; our

estimate of future
enrollment
is

based on recent history
(T
able
2
)
.
The
median
numbers for
undergraduates

and graduates

over the past six years

have been
1
66

and
5
5
, respectively
.

Table 2
.
Fall e
nrollment trends for CSS and Horticulture over
the
past six years.



Unde
rgraduate Student Headcount

Graduate Student

Headcount


CSS

HORT

Total Majors

Minors

Crops

Soils

Hort

Ent
*

Total

2010

35

125

160

51

18

13

25

1
1

67

2009

41

99

140

64

20

13

17

1

51

2008

31

100

131

35

16

10

23

1

50

2007

34

93

127

36

15

12

22

0

49

2006

40

99

139

26

13

19

26

1

59

2005

40

103

143

16

16

17

27

4

63

* Entomology

Source: Departments of CSS and HORT.

The enrollment of undergraduate students in the proposed IPSI
is expected to

follow a linear
trend

over the next five
years (
T
able 3).

Graduate enrollment is expected to increase slightly

over the present number of 57 students
.

Table
3.
Based on a
linear trend, e
xpected fall
-
term enrollment for
undergraduates and
graduates for each of the next five years.


AY
2006
-
10

2011
-
12

2012
-
13

2013
-
14

2014
-
15

2015
-
16

Undergraduates

171

215

226

237

248

259

Graduates

57

57

58

59

61

62

Total

228

273

284

296

309

321

While the university established metrics for five graduates per year in MS programs and two
in PhD make sense in units where such programs have
stand
-
alone

curriculum and training
paths, in all of our graduate program areas, classes are blended. W
e have a predominance
of 500 level classes with a few 600 level classes offered as student numbers mak
e sense to
13


offer such classes.
This structure exists as the primary difference between MS and PhD
programs is not the coursework, but the level of self
-
d
irection that is required of students in
their research work. We also have many more PhD students coming to us with degrees in
areas related to our programs but not specific training, i.e., physics degree to do soil physics
work, biology degree to weed ec
ology work, etc. These students have all the skills needed to
set off on a successful path of self
-
directed research but need the basic class work offered by
500 level classes. Our goal in all graduate program areas is to have a total of five graduating
students at the MAg, MS and/or PhD level each year.

g.

Expected degrees/certificates produced over the next five years
.

Over the next five years, it is expected that the number of undergraduates and gra
duates
completing a degree in IPSI will
grow linearly, increasing to
about
48

and
1
9
, respectively
(T
able
4
).

Table
4
.
Expected
degree completion for each of the next five years

by

undergraduates and graduates
, respectively
.


AY
2006
-
10

2011
-
12

2012
-
13

2013
-
14

2014
-
15

2015
-
16

Undergraduates

32

40

42

44

46

48

Graduates

17

17

18

18

19

19

Total

49

57

60

62

65

67

h.

Characteristics of students to be served
:
resi
dent/nonresident/international;
traditional/nontraditional; full
-
time/part
-
time; etc.

The B.S. in
IPSI

degree will serve students wishing to become
agricultural and
science
practitioners as well as educators, policy makers
,

and entrepreneurs
.
The degree program
will primarily serve resident students

with an interest in local food systems
, food security

an
d ecosystem service work. M
any
students
will be from California due to the increasing
limited access to their state schools
.
Maintaining a visible farming,

cropping, soil, and insect
systems program will enable
the new School

to attract more out
-
of
-
state

students
.
I
t is
anticipated that there will be significant numbers of nonresident students who
will access
coursework online
.
Many of the latter will be nontraditional students, including single
parents and students returning to school after an extended

absence
.
Due to the mix of
course types and the number of courses available online, th
ere is potential

for development
of a
hybrid curriculum
.
In such a program, students could access introductory coursework
through a dual enrollment program, or through

E
-
Campus
.
They would then access the
upper division courses and internship/research opportunities while in residence.



14


i.

Adequacy and quality of faculty delivering the program
.

A list of the proposed IPSI faculty, their highest
degree
, rank, focus area, and courses taught
can be found in Appendix
6

and
7
.

Student evaluation of teaching (SET)

SET scores for the two merging units are in general at or above College levels. Scores

are
available upon request.

Award
s

received by faculty

Fac
ulty within in the two existing units have received numerous national and international
awards and recognition.
A
synthesizes
of the
types of awards received by faculty in 2009
and 2010

is shown in T
able
5
.

Table
5
.


Awards and recognition of faculty in merging units in 2009 and 2010
.

Awarding Group


A
wards

Alberta B. Johnston Award


1

American Pomological Society


3

American Society for Horticultural Science


2

American Society of Agronomy


5

American Society
of Enology and Viticulture


1

Arnold and Gerry Appleby


1

City of Portland


1

College of Agricultural Sciences


9

CSREES


1

Entomological Society of America: Pacific Branch


2

Epsilon Sigma Phi


2

Extension Mid
-
Managers Conference


2

eXtension

Review Committee


1

Forest Service


1

International Society for Horticultural Science


3

L.L. Stewart


1

Multi
-
state research group “Water Management and Quality for Ornamental Crop
Production and Health”


1

National Association of County
Agricultural Agent
-

Sustainable Agriculture USDA
SARE/NACAA


8

National Golf Course Superintendents Association of America


1

Ontario Oregon Chamber of Commerce


1

Oregon Farm Bureau


1

Oregon Invasive Species Council for GardenSmart Oregon


1

Oregon

Organic Coalition


2

Oregon State University


6

OSU College of Agricultural Sciences


7

OSU Division of Outreach and Engagement


1

15


Awarding Group


A
wards

OSU Extension Association


4

OSU University Continuing Education Association (UCEA)


1

Potato Association of America


6

SCRI eXtension Proposal Panel


1

USDAAPHIS


3

USDA
-
ARS


1

Western Apicultural Society


1

Western Region Land Grants


1

Total


88

j.

Faculty resources
.

Faculty
head count
number

and FTE

in
IPSI

are shown in T
able
6
.
Vitas
are
available on
request
.
Our
s

will be a large unit
.
We have a diverse faculty with
ranks of many types,
which
adds strength to our unit
.

Table
6
.
Faculty h
ead count and FTE

within IPSI
for fall 2011
, both on and off campus
.

Category

Number
On
-
ca
mpus

Number
Off
-
campus

Total

number

FTE On
-
campus

FTE Off
-
campus

Full Professor

1
7

1
3

30

15.02

12.75

Assoc. Professor

13

20

33

12.24

19.55

Asst. Professor

18

12

3
0

14.65

11.75

Instructor

15

10

2
5

11.83

8.08

Sub total

63

55

118

53.74

52.13

Category

Number
On
-
campus

Number
Off
-
campus

Total

number

FTE
On
-
campus

FTE
Off
-
campus

Senior Faculty Research Asst.

12

5

1
7

10.55

4.5
0

Faculty Research Asst.

2
0

7

2
7

18.2
0

6
.00

Postdoc

10


10

10
.00


Research Assoc.

6


6

3.6
0


Professional Faculty

19


19

17.98


Classified

3
1


3
1

30.5
0


Sub total

98

1
2

110

90.83

10.5
0

Emeritus

4
3


4
3



Adjunct

5


5



Affiliated

28


28



Courtesy

2
3


2
3



Sub total

99


99



Total

2
60

67

3
27

144.57

62.63

Source: Department of Crop and Soil

Science and Department of Horticulture.

16


k.

Other staff

Support Staff

IPSI

has a

Head Undergraduate Advisor
who
coordinate
s

the advising in each of the options
.
The advisor also

track
s

and update
s

advising materials and student files; complete
s

graduation audits; interact
s

with off
-
campus partners in

internship program
s
; communicate
s

with community college advisors about
the
completion and transfer of lower division
courses, coordinate
s

advising and orientation activities in the summer; and coor
dinate
s

undergraduate activities (general advising meetings, awards ceremonies, coordination of
awards nominations,
etc.
)
.
An a
dditional half
-
time advisor
provides advising and related
act
ivities for the online B.S. in general H
orticulture and
back up

for

the head advisor
.
A
f
aculty
advisor is
often
assigned to each
undergraduate student
to help them
chart their
curricular course
, to provide contacts for jobs and internships
,

and to provide advice on
employment and graduate school opportunities.

One profe
ssional faculty member (office manager and executive assistant) and f
our other
classified
staff

will provide office
and human resource
support

for
I
PSI
.
We have six farm
staff (professional and classified positions) and a computing and web staff of six
(three on
partial appointments)
.
Finance

and accounting support is provided through the Ag
riculture

and Marine Science Business Center

with some centralized human resource support.

l.

Facilities, library, and other resources
.

Existing classrooms and laborato
ries
available to

the Department of
Horticul
ture and the
Department of Crop

and Soil Science

and other
CAS units on campus

generally
meet the
needs
for

course delivery
.
As the School offers more blended and distance learning
opportunities, additional tech
nological improvements will have to be made to meet these
needs
.
However, like many OSU facilities, deferred maintenance is sorely
needed
.
The

oldest of facilities in use is over 50 years old and the newest is over 20 years old
.

In addition to regular
classroom and laboratory facilities,
IPSI

has
faculty at
E
xtension offices
in 32 o
f

Oregon
’s 36

counties

and at
nine
E
xperiment
S
tations across the state
-

Central
Oregon Agriculture Research Center, Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center, Food
Innova
tion Center Experiment Station, Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension
Center, Klamath Basin Research and Extension Center, Malheur Experiment Station, Mid
-
Columbia Agricultural Research and Extension Center, North Willamette Research Extension
Cent
er,
and
Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center
.
Students are often employed
at these off
-
campus facilities
during the summer and graduates students can have
cooperative research projects with faculty on
-

and off
-

campus.

Four near
-
campus farms are part of
IPSI

-

Hyslop Field Research Farm,
East Farm Complex,
Lewis

Brown Farm,
and the
Woodhall
Vineyard
.
See

section
7b for information about the
Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture and the proposed Center for Virtual Agri
culture.

17


m.

Anticipated start date
.

Winter

Term
, 201
2

2.

Relationship to Mission and Goals

a.

Manner in which the proposed program supports the institution’s mission and goals
:
for
access; student learning; research; and/or scholarly work; and service.

IPSI

reflec
ts OSU’s mission
of

a
comprehensive
, fully integrated
program
.
IPSI

has very
strong collaborations with industry and state and federal agencies

and colleagues across the
region and nation
.
IPSI

promotes economic
, social, cultural
,

and environmental progress for
the people of Oregon, and outside the state, through its
commitment

to
a four ‘legged’
program: teaching, research,
extension, and

outreach and engagement
.

See other sections of this document for information on access (1e)
, student learning (1d),
research/ scholarship (5d) and service (vitas available on request).

b.

Manner in which the proposed program contributions to the Oregon University System
goals
:
for access, quality learning; knowledge creation and innovation; and ec
onomic and
cultural support of Oregon and its communities.

IPSI

will contribute to the OUS goals in the following ways:



We will model blended learning opportunities with practitioners and students.



Statewide faculty members will collaborate with our univer
sity, community and industry
partners to provide educational opportunities about the importance and roles of food
and essential plant production
and insect management
to the people of Oregon
.



We will model contemporary Web 2.0 technologies for authentic in
teractive outreach.



Faculty members in
IPSI

will work with OSU Ag
riculture

in the Classroom, Science and
Math Education, Master Gardener, 4H, SNAP and other OSU, state and federal programs
in a coordinated effort to facilitate learning about
food, fiber an
d ecosystem services
.



We will work with our more than 20

affiliated commodity commissions and associations
to help coordinate and contribute to their outreach efforts and research agenda.



We will partner and collaborate with SWCD’s, NRCS, Portland Metro, N
GO’s, and other
agencies to extend our reach into urban and rural communities
.



We will provide “Food 101” workshops for state and federal legislators and their aides.



We will
further expand our
partnership
s

with K
-
12 schools across the state to provide
a
gricultural science and garden
-
based curricula and tools
.
We will offer this delivery
system as a readily available outreach mechanism for those writing NSF, NIH, NIFA and
other grants that require outreach.



IPSI
’s research farms and CAS Branch Experiment

Stations will experiment with and
showcase effective sustainable living technologies


green roofs, living walls, ecological
18


landscapes, insect harbors, biomass converters, solar power, etc
.
especially near urban
com
munities.

c.

Manner in which the program
meets broad statewide needs
:
and enhances the state’s
capacity to respond effectively to social, economic, and environmental challenges and
opportunities.

IPSI

en
vision
s

that Oregonians and peers across the United States and internationally will
recognize

the
new
School as a premier source of sustainable agronomic and horticultural
farm and food systems and ecological landscapes research; experiential and online learning;
and innovative and compelling outreach and engagement activities for urban, peri
-
urba
n
and rural citizenry
.
Activities within
IPSI

will result in healthy food production, improved
human health and livelihoods, ecosystem services, and protection of our
environment
.
IPSI

has the “unfair” advantage over many of its peer institutions as our
farming, forestry and
landscape sectors are in our back yard or accessible via our branch experiment stations
.
This
enables and provides the continued opportunity for distinction, and high quality
trans
-

disciplinary

and in
-
field research, and experientia
l learning.

3.

Accredi
t
ation

a.

Accrediting body or professional
society that has established standards in the area in
which the program lies, if applicable.

Other than the Therapeutic Horticulture
Certification, which

is offered
through Portland
Community

Colle
ge

(
http://www.pcc.edu/programs/gerontology/horticulture
-
careers.html
)
,
no other certifications are awarded at this time in other program areas. Several of our core
classes are required for certification in Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service
National Association of Interpretation
certification programs

(
http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/Recreation/recreation_national/interpretation.html

)
.
We are in on
-
going contact with our OSU colleagues who manage these programs t
o be sure
that our course offering meet their needs.

b.

Ability of the program to meet professional accreditation standards.

N/A

c.

Undergraduate program accreditation
:
if the proposed program is a graduate program in
which the institution offers an undergradua
te program, proposal should identify whether
or not the undergraduate program is accredited and, if not,
what would be required to
qualif
y it for accreditation.

N/A

d.

Steps taken to achieve
accreditation
:
if

accreditation is a goal, the proposal should
iden
tify the steps being taken to achieve accreditation
.
If the program is not seeking
accreditation, the proposal should indicate why it is not.

19


N/A

4.

Need

a.

Evidence of market demand.

Nineteen percent of the civilian labor force of Oregon is farm employment
.
Roughly ten
percent of state’s revenue is agriculturally based
.
IPSI

teaching, research, extension, and
outreach takes place on campus, at four established farms, four Experiment Stations, and
five Research and Extension Centers throughout the state

to me
et the need of the industry
.

The College has stated that there shall be no daylight between research and Extension
.
IPSI
meets

this provision and extends the

principle
to

complete integration
of

undergraduate
education
.
The University has three Signature

Areas of Distinction: Advancing the Science of
Sustainable Earth Ecosystems; Improving Human Health and Wellness; and Promoting
Economic Growth and Social Progress
.
IPSI

clearly addresses all three areas with its
integrated teaching, research, extension,

and outreach programs.

b.

Shared location
:
if the program’s location is shared with another similar OUS program,
proposal should provide externally validated evidence of need (e.g., surveys, focus groups,
documented requests, occupational statistics and for
ecasts).

N
/A

c.

Improved educational attainment
:
manner in which the program would serve the need
for improved educational attainment in the region and state.

Students across the nation and around the world will recognize
IPSI

as a leader in sustainable
crop
ping, soil and insect systems education
.
This will be achieved in the following ways:



The courses and curricula will be delivered on
-
campus and across the region
via

electronic technologies.



IPSI will continue to work with employers to match graduating st
udent skills with
employer needs

so that we maintain our current, near 100% placement rate.



IPSI

will continue to
collaborate

with employers to create dynamic experiential learning
opportunities and internships that also give employers an opportunity to “test drive”
students
.



IPSI

will offer upper
-
level and graduate classes for students, practitioners and the
curious, for univ
ersity credit, continuing education credit and simple knowledge
enhancement.



Service learning will be a backbone of the program.



IPSI

will continue to provide scholarship monies to those in need.



Articulation between community colleges and
IPSI

will contin
ue.


20


d.

Manner in which the program would address the civic and cultural demands of
citizenship.



The Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture, which has programs and demonstrations
include the Green Roof, Green Tower, High Tunnels, Honey Bee Research, Living
Fence,
OSU Student Organic Garden, and Permaculture.



Organic farming programs and demonstrations.



The experiment and extension stations distributed throughout the state provide for a
direct link to Oregon citizenship and allows for open and fruitful commun
ications.



Service learning provides students with ‘hands
-
on’ education about the industry.

5.

Outcomes and Quality Assessment

a.

Expected learning outcomes of the program.

IPSI

follows the
University learning goals

that

consist

of six

categories identified as
Ac
ademic
values; Basic academic success skills; Career prep
aration;
Discipline
-
specific knowledge and
skills; Higher
-
order thinking skills;
and
Personal
development
.
T
hese learning goals are
general
ly

applied to class
room course work. T
hey can be extended
equally well to extension
and outreach programs.

b.

Methods by which the learning outcomes will be assessed and used to improve
curriculum and instruction.

IPSI

reviews its undergraduate curriculum
yearly

by inventorying the course learning
outcomes for each
course, identifying core competencies, and recommending changes to
the catalog of courses, including removing existing courses, redesigning or merging existing
courses, and design
ing

new courses.

c.

Program performance indicator
:
including prospects for
success of program graduates
(employment or graduate school) and consideration of licensure, if appropriate.

Nearly all undergraduate students who seek employment after graduation have multiple job
offers and are able to obtain a job in their area of study
.
We have more jobs available than
we have graduates
.
Graduate student enrollment is limited by the number of assistantships
that we are able to generate through grants and contracts
.
We consistently have more high
quality applicants than available posi
tions
.
Like our undergraduates, there are more jobs
available for graduate students in most program areas than available
students
.

d.

Nature

and level of research and/or scholarly work expected of program faculty
:
indicators of success in those areas.

Nea
rly all faculty in
IPSI

have appointments split among teaching, research and extension
.
All professorial faculty, as well as some instructors, have a minimum 15% scholarship
requirement
(30% maximum)
in their position descriptions and are expected to do s
cholarly
work as

appropriate for their position
.
For those with research appointments, the common
21


output is journal articles, book chapters
,

and other similar publications
.
For those with
predominant extension appointments, extension publications are the

most common output
.
Curricula, web sites, and electronic tools are other common outputs
.
As part of annual
review and promotion and tenure processes, faculty are expected to document the impact
of their activities
.
Tens of millions of dollars of on
-
the
-
ground impact are easily
documentable every year from faculty work
.
In recent National Research Council
assessment of PhD programs, our units ranked at or above national averages for criteria
related to scholarship.



Grant support
:
IPSI

brought in 17.4% o
f the $55,243,472 awards received by the
College of Agricultural Sciences in 2010
.
For FY 2010
-
2011, combined grants and
contracts for the two department
s
,
new awards make up

33% of the College of
Agricultural Sciences

awards to date.



P
lant p
atents:
Clear
field wheat varieties have been the number one royalty income
source for OSU for at least the last three years
.
Royalty income
is

and will

continue to
be
generated from
varieties of potatoes, strawberries, hazelnut
,
ornamentals,

and
other crops bred by
IPSI

faculty
.

6.

Program integration and collaboration

a.

Closely related programs in other OUS universities and Oregon private institutions.

A
s indicated in other document sections, we have direct ties with community college
programs across the state as well as

with Eastern Oregon University
.
Many s
tudent
s

who
come
from community colleges take initial coursework and then transfer into our programs
at OSU
.
We have direct teaching program ties with Portland Community College for the
Therapeutic Horticulture Prog
ram
.
Our extension faculty in Umatilla County and Wasco
Counties are co
-
located at community colleges and conduct some combined educational
efforts.

b.

Complements other
programs
:
ways

in which the program complements other similar
programs in other Oregon
institutions and other related programs at this institution
.
Proposal should identify the potential for collaboration.

No other OUS universities have programs related to horticulture, crop science, soil science or
applied entomology
.
As noted, we are act
ively engaged with community colleges
.
We are
developing active partnerships with WSU and UI to provide coursework in plant, soil and
insects sciences on a regional basis.

c.

No
collaboration
:
if

applicable, proposal should state why this program
might

not be
collaborating with existing similar program.

N/A

22


d.

Potential
impacts
:
on

other programs in the areas of budget, enrollment, faculty
workload, and facilities use.

If programs grow significantly, there will be increased need for timely offerings of
basic to
upper level math and science classes that serve as the foundation for all of our curricular
options
.
As noted, our facilities are

20

or more years old and updates are needed to allow
newer

educational and current research and extension technologi
es to be used.

7.

Financial Sustainability (attach the completed
Budget Outline
)

Both the CSS and HORT Department Heads approved the attached budget tables
.

a.

Business
plan
:
for

the program that anticipates and provides for its long
-
term financial
viability,
addressing anticipated sources of funds, the ability to recruit and retain faculty,
and the plans for assuring adequate library support over the long term.

As shown in
T
able
7
below, the two units that will become
IPSI

had a combined total
operational base of nearly $13 million on a three
-
year average basis in the period 2007
-
09
.
Base support (state provided funding) for the new School exceeds 7 million in FY11 and total
ARF, OSUF and grant and contract spending parall
els that amount
.
It is anticipated that
E
&G
funding will remain constant or increase in the F
Y
11
-
13 biennium
.
Extension and AES bases
may decrease as much as 20% depending on legislative outcomes
.
ARF contracts, OSUF
current use funds and grant and cont
ract spending is anticipated to increase in the coming
biennium.

Fiscal management in the two units has been sound and it is anticipated that such
management will continue.

Table
7
. CSS and HORT combined operational base for 2007 through 2009.


Tenured/tenure
-
track faculty positions in the College of Agricultural Sciences revert to the
College when a position is vacated for any reason other than tenure denial at the unit level.
A priority staffing process within the College has historically been

used to fill positions. Both
College and unit resources are used in recruiting well
-
qualified position candidates.
Retention is a combined effort of the unit, College and University based on faculty quality

U&G Base

Extension
Base

Experiment
Station Base

ARF
Contracts

ARF
Expenditures

OSU
Foundation
Current Use

Grant and
Contract
Awards

Grants and
Contracts
Expenditures

CSS

430,775

695,462

3,615,288

1,284,697

1,450,369

680,217

4,867,390

3,014,583

HORT

231,214

640,936

2,029,494

906,576

812,456

768,965

4,700,615

2,551,014

Total

661,989

1,336,398

5,644,782

2,191,273

2,262,825

1,449,182

9,568,005

5,565,597










Base fund total

7,643,169








Expenditures total

9,277,604








Total expenditures

16,920,773








23


and equity analyses. If AES and Extension fun
ding decline dramatically due to state budget
reductions, retention could become more of an issue especially if other states are in a better
position to hire faculty. OSU administration above the College level may need to become a
greater contributor in m
aintaining high
-
performing faculty.

b.

Unique resources
:
plans for development and maintenance of unique resources
(buildings, laboratories, technology) necessary to offer a quality program in this field.

It is essential that all of our existing facilities
in four buildings on campus and at four farms in
the area be upgraded to meet current health, access
,

and performance standards
.
Maintenance has been deferred in all facilities for decades
.
Emergency repairs have been
made as well as some energy
efficiency and computing connectivity upgrades, but facilities
in general show their 20
-
50 year age.

Center for Virtual Agriculture

Given the distribution of our faculty across the state, to fully integrate faculty into
a School
governance

and
to best util
ize faculty time and talents in teaching and outreach activities,
we will need to create and maintain state
-
of
-
the
-
art videoconferencing and other distance
communication technologies
.
We have submitted a Technology Resource Fee
(TRF)
proposal
to build a C
enter for Virtual Agriculture that could serve as a technology hub for the
northwest corner of campus
.
While a TRF grant will provide the needed infrastructure, if the
Center receives broader university use, we will need on
-
going university resources to

person” the facility
.
We also see this Center as the first step in creating a true technology
learning and educational outreach facility
.
We would like to create a room where seamless
Skype
, Adobe Connect
,

or other distance communications can be done to
facilitate the
participation of individuals from around the world on graduate student committees and in
educational activities
.
We would like to create a room from which seamless Webinars can
be
broadcast
.
We would like to create a facility where the lat
est multimedia technologies
can be tested and demonstrated for faculty and student use
.
All of these activities will
require University funding for infrastructure development and staffing
. The proposed

School
can guarantee that audiences for our educatio
n and outreach products will exist across the
state, region, nation
,

and world.

The estimated cost for this facility is $
30
0,000. The
technology cost
is

estimated at $
20
0,000, the remainder is associated costs of the remodel
and purchases of appropriate
furniture.

Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture

The Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture (OCCUH) is a student and public learning center
just to the east
of
35
th

Street, north of Western Boulevard, on the OSU campus
.
It is a
showcase for experimenta
tion and demonstration of sustainable living technologies in an
urban environment


green roofs, living walls, ecological landscapes, insect harbors, biomass
converters, solar power, etc
.
Efforts are underway to enhance this one
-
of
-
a
-
kind resource
.
24


Fundi
ng for building repair and maintenance will be needed
.
Work is underway to establish
an endowment fund to provide student internships and other student experience
opportunities
.
Some f
aculty
members
are already engaged with community and industrial
partn
ers to more fully develop this site as a first
-
choice sustainable living learning center for
our community.

c.

Targeted student/faculty ratio


assuming projected student enrollment and need for
additional teaching FTE

A number of classes that have had limite
d enrollment are being dropped while classes with
the potential to meet the needs of a larger student audience are being
added. I
n

most
cases,

course additions will be handled by teaching assignment shifts among existing faculty. That
said, as indicated e
lsewhere, in order to have key classes taught by long
-
term faculty
members, approximately two additional teaching FTE are needed in our School. A number
of classes are being taught through short
-
term hire of
well
-
qualified

instructors but
longer
-
term

solutions area needed to add curricular stability.

In addition, w
e anticipate growing the tenure
-
track faculty

teaching

FTE to at least six

from

the current level of

just over
four

FTE

(distributed over 40 plus individuals)
.
There will be
approximately 2
50 undergraduate students, so our targeted student FTE to faculty is 40:1

in
the year 2015 as per T
able
4

(graduation rate times 4.5 years)
.


Our combined current student credit hours
in FY
0
9
-
10
was

7825
, so our targeted student
credit hours to faculty FT
E
should exceed

1200:1.

d.

Resources to be devoted to student recruitment.

As noted elsewhere, a significant number of scholarships will be available to students
studying in
IPSI
.
These funds will be used and School faculty will continue to pursue
university

and College level scholarship and fellowship funds to recruit a diverse group of
students to
IPSI
.
The nearly 100% job placement of our students is an attraction and will
further developed as a recruitment tool.

8.

External review (if the proposed program i
s a graduate level program, follow the
guidelines provided in
External Review of new
Graduate Level

Academic Programs

in
addition to completing all of the above information).

Three distinctive graduate degree majors will continue to be offered in IPSI: Cro
p Science,
Horticulture, and Soil Science. The existing Entomology graduate program will become a
stand
-
alone Entomology minor.

Unlike some graduate programs on campus, there is no set curriculum for degrees in any of
the IPSI program areas.
The student
and their graduate committee establish student
programs
.
Students studying in a particular area


plant breeding and genetics, agronomy,
applied entomology, horticulture, etc.


often take a typical set of classes

but there are no
25


specific requirements ot
her than participation in graduate student orientation courses,
presenting a School seminar as part of a seminar class, and serving in a teaching assistant
capacity for one term.

a.

Support from departments and program liaisons
.

As

the merger of CSS and HORT
was proposed administratively within the College of
Agricultural Sciences and OSU, we have not asked for input on the merger from the clientele
groups with which our units interact. These groups have been told that the merger is taking
place and what the
likely benefits to them

will be.
Given the genesis of the merger proposal,
we have not sought outside letters for inclusion in this CAT I proposal.

b.

Liaisons letter

of support
.

Liaison letters were sent to the following people:

Ciuffetti, Lynda

Department

Head, Botany and Plant Pathology

Edge, W. Daniel

Department Head, Fisheries and Wildlife

Males, James

Department Head, Animal Sciences

Borman, Mike

Department Head, Rangeland Ecology and Management

Thompson, Greg

Department Head, Agricultural
Education and General Agriculture

Maness, Thomas

Department Head, Forest
Engi
n
eering
,
Resources
, and Management

Doescher, Paul

Department Head, Forest Ecosystems and Society

McGorrin, Robert

Department Head, Food Science and Technology

Capalbo, Susan

Department Head, Agricultural & Resource Economics

Herring, Peg

Leader
-
Education Outreach, Extension and Experiment Station Communications


The liaison letter and responses to these lette
rs can be found in A
ppendix
8

and
9
,
respectively.
26


Appendix 1
.
O
rg
anizational charts for

existing

a) Crop and Soil Science
,

and
b) Hort
iculture

Departments
.

a)


b)




27


Appendix
2
. Proposed Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect Science curriculum.

New tag

Credits

New title

Dual
-
List / Cross listed

Comments

IPSI

100

1

Freshman Seminar (first
-
year only)



IPSI 111

2

Introduction to Horticultural Systems, Practices and Careers



IPSI 112

2

Introduction to Soils and Agronomic Systems, Practices and Careers


Online

also

IPSI 113

1

Introduction to Entomology,
Practices and Careers


New course

IPSI 199

1

Issues in Sustainable Agriculture



IPSI 200

3

Crop Ecology and Morphology



IPSI 211

3

Horticulture
-

Food, Farms and Landscape Ecosystems


O
nline

only

IPSI 212

4

Sustainable Soil Ecosystems


Online
also

IPSI 213

4

Insect Science and Pest Management



IPSI 226

4

Landscape Plants: Deciduous Trees and Conifers


Online
also

IPSI 227

3

Landscape Plants: Herbaceous Ornamentals and Natives


Online
also

IPSI 228

4

Landscape Plants: Spring Flowering Trees and
Shrubs


Online
also

IPSI 251

2

Edible Plants: Tree Fruits, Berries, and Nuts



IPSI 260

3

Organic Gardening and Farming


Online
also

IPSI 270

2

Introduction to Therapeutic Horticulture



IPSI 271

2

Techniques and Adaptation Strategies in Therapeutic
Horticulture



IPSI 272

2

Basic Therapeutic Skills I


PCC only

IPSI 273

2

Basic Therapeutic Skills II


PCC only

IPSI 274

2

Therapeutic Horticultural Programs for Older Adults/Children


PCC only

IPSI 275

2

Therapeutic Garden Design, Maintenance, and
Programming


PCC only

IPSI 280

3

Introduction to Sustainable Landscape Design



IPSI 285

3

Permaculture Design and Theory


Online
also

IPSI 286

1

Permaculture Certification


Online
also

IPSI 299

1
-
16

Special Topics



IPSI 299H

1
-
16

Special Topics



IPSI 300

4

Introduction to Agroecosystems



IPSI 301

3

The Biology of Horticulture


Online
also

IPSI 305

4

Principles of Soil Science


EOU only

IPSI 310

4

Forage Production


Online
also

IPSI 311

4

Plant Propagation



IPSI 314

4

Turfgrass Science


Online
also

28


New tag

Credits

New title

Dual
-
List / Cross listed

Comments

IPSI 315

4

Nutrient Management and Cycling



IPSI 316

3

Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems


Online
also

IPSI 317

4

Plant Nutrition



IPSI 318 (WIC)

3

Ecology of Managed Ecosystems


Online
also

IPSI 319 (WIC)

3

Agricultural and Environmental Predicaments



IPSI 320

3

Principles of Crop Production


New course

IPSI 327

3

World Weeds


Online
also

IPSI 328

3

World Food


Online
only

IPSI 329

3

World Soils



IPSI 330

3

Pests,
Plagues and Politics


New course

IPSI 332

3

Identification of Economically Important Insects



IPSI 335

3

Introduction to Water Science and Policy

GEO/IPSI 335

Online
only

IPSI 340

3

Pens and Plows: Writings of Working the Land



IPSI 345

4

Sustainable

Landscape Maintenance: Principles and Practices


Online
only

IPSI 350

3

Urban Forestry



IPSI 351

4

Floriculture and Greenhouse Systems



IPSI 358

4

Sustainable Landscape Construction: Techniques



IPSI 360

4

Irrigation and Drainage for Horticultural
Systems



IPSI 361

4

Plant Nursery Systems



IPSI 366

3

Soil Ecosystems of Wildlands


New course

IPSI 368

3

Practicum in Analytical Soil Chemistry



IPSI 380

3

Advanced Landscape Design Studio



IPSI 381

3

Ag, Power, Discrimination, & Survival



IPSI

385

3

Landscape Operation



IPSI 399

1
-
16

Special Topics



IPSI 401

1
-
16

Research



IPSI 403

1
-
16

Thesis



IPSI 405

1
-
16

Reading & Conference



IPSI 405t

3

Turfgrass Pest Management



IPSI 406

1

Projects: Data Presentations



IPSI 406

2

Horticultural Projects



IPSI 407

1

Senior Seminar



29


New tag

Credits

New title

Dual
-
List / Cross listed

Comments

IPSI 408

1
-
16

Workshop



IPSI 409

1
-
16

Practicum



IPSI 410

1
-
16

Internship



IPSI 411

1

Book Club



IPSI 412

1

Career Exploration


Online
only

IPSI 415

3

Soil Fertility Management



IPSI 418

1

Toxic Plants in PNW Pastures



IPSI 430

3

Plant Genetics

IPSI 430/530


IPSI 431

1

Plant Genetics Recitation


New course

IPSI 433

4

Systematics and Adaptation of Vegetable Crops

IPSI 433/533


IPSI 435

4

Environmental Soil Physics



IPSI 438

2

Exploring World Agriculture



IPSI 440

4

Weed Management

IPSI 440/540


IPSI 441

4

Plant Tissue Culture

IPSI 441/541


IPSI 442

4

Principles of Integrated Pest Management: Systems Design

IPSI 442/542


IPSI 443

3

Honey Bee Biology and Bee Keeping


Online
also

IPSI 445

3

Fruit Quality



IPSI 447

4

Arboriculture and Tree Care in Managed Landscapes



IPSI 450

4

Plant Breeding

IPSI 450/550


IPSI 451

4

Sustainable Tree Fruit and Nut Production



IPSI
452

4

Berry and Grape Physiology and Production Systems

IPSI 452/552


IPSI 453

3

Grape Growth Physiology



IPSI 454

3

Principles and Practices of Vineyard Production


Online
also

IPSI 455

4

Biology of Soil Ecosystems

IPSI 455/555


IPSI 456

4

Urban
Forest Planning, Policy, and Management



IPSI 460

3

Seed Production

IPSI 460/560


IPSI 463

3

Seed Biology

IPSI 463/563


IPSI 466

4

Soil Morphology and Classification

IPSI 466/566


IPSI 468

3

Digital Mapping of Soilscapes



IPSI 475

3

Soil Resource
Potentials



IPSI 478

4

Advanced Turfgrass Science



IPSI 480

4

Case Studies in Cropping Systems

IPSI 480/580

Online
also

30


New tag

Credits

New title

Dual
-
List / Cross listed

Comments

IPSI 495

3

Horticultural Management Plans



IPSI 499

1
-
16

Special
Topics



IPSI 501

1
-
16

Research



IPSI 503

1
-
16

Thesis



IPSI 505

1
-
16

Reading & Conference



IPSI 506

1
-
16

Projects



IPSI 507

1
-
16

Seminar



IPSI 508

1
-
16

Workshop



IPSI 509

1
-
16

Practicum in Teaching



IPSI 511

2

Research and Educational
Perspectives in Horticulture



IPSI 512

1

Discussions in Plant Science



IPSI 513

3

Plant Genetic Engineering



IPSI 514

3

Properties, Processes and Functions of Soils



IPSI 515

3

Soil Fertility Management



IPSI 516

4

Advance Plant Nutrition



IPSI

517

1

Diagnosis of Nutritional Disorders



IPSI 523

3

Principles of Stable Isotopes



IPSI 525

3

Mineral
-
Organic Matter Interactions



IPSI 530

3

Plant Genetics

IPSI 430/530


IPSI 531

1

Plant Genetics Recitation



IPSI 533

4

Systematics and
Adaptation of Vegetable Crops



IPSI 540

4

Weed Management

IPSI 440/540


IPSI 541

4

Plant Tissue Culture

IPSI 441/541


IPSI 542

4

Principles of IPM: Systems Design

IPSI 442/542

New name

IPSI 543

3

Honey Bee Biology and Bee Keeping

IPSI 443/543


IPSI
545

4

Soil Chemistry



IPSI 547

3

Nutrient Cycling in Soil Ecosystems

IPSI/BPP/FS 547


IPSI 550

4

Plant Breeding

IPSI 450/550


IPSI 552

4

Berry & Grape Physiology/Culture

IPSI 452/552


IPSI 555

4

Biology of Soil Ecosystems

IPSI 455/555


IPSI 560

3

Seed Production

IPSI 460/560


IPSI 563

3

Seed Biology

IPSI 463/563


31


New tag

Credits

New title

Dual
-
List / Cross listed

Comments

IPSI 566

4

Soil Morphology and Classification

IPSI 466/566


IPSI 568

3

Soil Genesis and Geomorphology



IPSI 573

4

Cytogenetics



IPSI 580

4

Case Studies in Cropping Systems

IPSI 480/580

Online
also

IPSI 590

4

Experimental Design in Agriculture



IPSI 599

1
-
16

Special Topics



IPSI 601

1
-
16

Research



IPSI 603

1
-
16

Thesis



IPSI 605

1
-
16

Reading & Conference



IPSI 606

1
-
16

Projects



IPSI 607

1

Seminar



IPSI 608

1
-
16

Workshop



IPSI 620

1

DNA Fingerprinting



IPSI 621

1

Genetic Mapping


New course

IPSI 622

1

Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci



IPSI 635

4

Advanced Soil Physics



IPSI 645

3

Soil Microbial
Ecology



IPSI 650

3

Advanced Plant Breeding & Quantitative Genetics



IPSI 655

3

Global Biogeochemical Cycles

GEO/IPSI 655


IPSI 660

4

Herbicide Science



IPSI 670

3

Physiology of Crop Yield



IPSI 699

1
-
16

Special Topics







32


Appendix 3. Graduate coursework examples
.

Masters of Science
-

Crop Science



Major Coursework Title

Course
Number

Credits

Thesis

CSS503

12

Seminar

CSS507

1

Practicum in Teaching

CSS509

3

Methods of Data Analysis

CSS511

4

Methods of Data Analysis

CSS512

4

Properties, Processes and Function of Soil

CSS513

4

Advanced Plant Nutrition

CSS516

4

Weed Management

CSS540

4

Ecological Restoration

CSS545

4

Biology of Invasive Plants

CSS548

3

Biology of Soil Ecosystems

CSS555

4

Environmental Physiology
Plants

CSS588

3

Experimental Design in Ag

CSS590

4

Rangeland Management Planning

CSS590

4

Professional Development

CSS599

1

Ecological Invasive Plant Management

CSS670

2

Total


61


Masters of Science
-

Soils



Major Coursework Title

Course
Number

Credits

Properties, Processes, and Functions of Soils

CSS513

4

Professional Development
-
writing

CSS599

1

Nutrient Cycling

FS547

3

Methods of Data Analysis

ST511

4

Practicum in Teaching

CSS509

3

Biology of Soil Ecosystems

CSS555

4

Methods of Data
Analysis

ST512

4

Soil Morphology and Classification

CSS566

4

Soil Landscape Analysis

CSS568

4

Soil Physics

CSS535

3

Thesis

CSS503

11

Total


45





33


Masters of Science
-

Horticulture (Plant Breeding and Genetics)





Major Course Title

Course
Number

Credits


Minor Course Title

Course
Number

Credits

Research & Educational Perspectives in Horticulture

HORT511

2


Anthropology of Food

ANTH586

4

Discussions in Plant Science

HORT512

2


Ethnographic Methods

ANTH591

4

Plant Genetics

HORT530

3


Advanced
Plant Nutrition

HORT516

4

Plant Breeding

HORT550

4


Professional Development

CSS699

1

Advanced Plant Breeding

CSS650

3


Total


13

Methods of Data Analysis

ST511

4





Experimental Design in Agriculture

CSS590

4





General Biochemistry

BB550

4





General Biochemistry

BB551

3





Systematics and Adaptation of Vegetable Crops

HORT533

4





Genes and Chemicals in Agriculture: Value and Risks

BI535

3





Seminar

HORT507

1





Thesis

HORT503

12





Current Topics in Plant Breeding

HORT630

3





Research

HORT501

1





Total


53








34


Appendix
4
. Learning outcomes
.

Oregon State University

Department of Horticulture

Undergraduate Student Learning Outcomes


The Department of Horticulture’s Curriculum Committee has identified the following as core

learning objectives for undergraduate students completing any of the department’s six options.


1.

learn, comprehend and apply the language of Horticulture and Horticulture Science

2.

understand and be able to manipulate plant growth and development through
Hor
ticulture practices

3.

observe Horticulture systems, identify assets and liabilities of the systems, form
hypotheses and make appropriate recommendations

4.

communicate effectively verbally, orally and in writing

5.

recognize, understand and be able to use the lat
est tools and technology relevant to
Horticulture

6.

identify plants, make appropriate plant recommendations and suggest novel plant uses
in specific Horticulture systems

7.

identify and explain the role of Horticulture in contemporary social, economic, politica
l
and environmental contexts

8.

demonstrate proficiency in the basic sciences through applications in Horticulture

9.

participate and contribute to society as a Horticulture professional

10.

find, analyze and use relevant Horticulture information and resources

11.

synt
hesize knowledge and experience from class, work experience and internships to
solve Horticulture problems across many scales

12.

analyze Horticulture entities as managed ecosystems


We recognize and expect that individual options will likely emphasize additio
nal learning objectives
that are relevant to the option’s specific goals.


These objectives constitute a “living” document that should be visited often and revised if
necessary. They serve as a guide in the development of individual courses, programs, opt
ions and a
cohesive curriculum and are a valuable reference as the department faces critical
retirement/replacement of core teaching faculty. In addition, they are the foundation of the
department’s current learning assessment initiative (in compliance wi
th OSU’s Office of Academic
Programs).



35


Appendix
5
.
IPSI peer assessment.

DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND SOIL SCIENCE

FACULTY PEER TEACHING REVIEW PROGRAM

DRAFT RECOMMENDATION 11
-
12
-
01

The faculty of the Department view excellence in teaching as an integral
component in our Department’s success.
Accordingly, we believe that all of our faculty can benefit from periodic review and assessment of their teaching effort. The

primary focus of the peer
-
review of teaching is to ensure that our courses compel higher
-
le
vel learning for our students.

Goals and Intent



Peer teaching evaluation is intended to be a positive, constructive experience for the instructor
and should be conducted fairly and with a spirit of collegiality.



Peer teaching evaluation has a role in both

formative and summative teaching evaluation (Keig
and Waggoner 1994).



Formative evaluation:

evaluation intended to improve teaching.



Summative evaluation:

evaluation that functions in decision making relative to P&
T and
compensation (required in OSU guidelines for P&T).



Goals of peer teaching evaluation:

1.

To evaluate the teaching program of individual instructors including course design (e.g.,
course content, objectives, syllabus, organization, methods and material
s for delivering
instruction), grading and examinations, relationship to overall curriculum objectives
(including themes and skills appropriate to the courses), classroom presentation, and
rapport with students.

2.

To provide insight into and context for res
ults from other forms of evaluation (e.g.,
student evaluations).

3.

To foster interaction among faculty:

4.

To recognize the efforts and dedication of departmental teaching faculty work
collaboratively to assess teaching and assist in improvement of teaching. faculty.


Serving as peer evaluators may require a significant time commitment. Those who serve on
peer
evaluation committees should provide time for doing so and be rewarded for their efforts by
the department head.

Frequency of Evaluation



All faculty teaching regularly scheduled courses should experience
peer
-
teaching

evaluation.
This includes courtesy fac
ulty.



The entire teaching program (all courses that are taught by an instructor) should be evaluated.



The teaching program of non
-
tenured faculty should undergo peer evaluation every three years.
Most non
-
tenured faculty would experience evaluation twice

prior to P&T. A principal purpose
of the first evaluation is to identify, well in advance of evaluation for P&T, areas of teaching that
need improvement.



The teaching program of tenured faculty should undergo evaluation at least every 5 years.



The Depar
tment Head will maintain and distribute an annual schedule to ensure that faculty can
adequately prepare for review.

Peer Evaluation Committee



A Peer Evaluation Committee will be appointed by the Department Head. This standing
committee will consist of t
hree to five faculty members, each of whom will serve staggered,
three
-
year terms.

36




Ad hoc peer review committees will be formed for each faculty member being evaluated. Each
ad hoc committee will consist of two members of the Peer Evaluation Committee and

one or
two additional members as needed to ensure subject matter expertise. The additional members
may come from other departments.

Procedure for Conducting Peer Teaching Evaluations



The peer evaluation consists of two parts: examination of instructional materials and classroom
visitations.



Examination of instructional materials:

1.

The instructor provides to the committee a summary of the teaching program that
includes: (i) an instruct
or's narrative consisting of the instructor's personal teaching
philosophy, course descriptions, course objectives, relationship with other courses in the
department (prerequisites, subsequent courses, etc.), description of methods and
approach for deliver
ing instructional materials, expected outcomes, recent changes in
content and methods and recent efforts in teaching development, and comments and
concerns relevant to evaluation, (ii) syllabi, (iii) reading list/text(s), (iv) examples of
course handouts a
nd/or website information, (v) a sample of exams and problem sets,
and (vi) grade distributions. The Department provides a compilation of student
evaluations for all courses taught in the last 5 years. Peer evaluation can provide insight
into and context f
or results of student evaluations and suggest whether students and the
instructor are "connecting." (Adapted from Seldin, 1985; University of Missouri, 1992).

2.

Members of the committee review the teaching summary and meet as a group to discuss
the instruct
or's teaching program. A list of possible questions for consideration by the
committee is attached (Attachment I). The committee should identify the strengths of
the program, areas for improvement, and formulate questions on aspects of the
program that are

unclear.

3.

The committee meets with the instructor to discuss, clarify, and expand the materials
summarizing the teaching program. Every effort should be made to keep the tone of the
meeting positive and constructive. An oral summary of the committee's rea
ction to the
teaching program should be presented to the instructor. Strengths of the program
should be discussed and areas for improvement should be suggested. Suggestions for
improvement are recommendations for the instructor's consideration. Questions t
hat
arose at the previous meeting of the review committee should be discussed with the
instructor.



Classroom visitations:

o

Done properly, visitation by peers demands a good deal of time and can be very useful to
help improve teaching. In
-
class components
must be part of peer evaluation within the
OSU guidelines for Tenure and Promotion. Therefore, peer evaluation of untenured
professors and those seeking promotion is essential. Classroom visitation can be helpful
in resolving discrepancies between student
evaluations and the perception of the peer
evaluation.

o


1.

The committee will meet with the instructor prior to coordinate classroom visits.
One or more of the instructor’s classes will be visited. Each class that is visited
will be visited at least twice. All committee members will do at least one
37


classroom evalu
ation. Guidelines for evaluation of classroom visitation are
attached (Attachment II).

2.

After the
visitations,

the committee and instructor meet to discuss
strengths/weaknesses, etc. Videotapes of selected lectures may be made for use
by the instructor and
/or committee.

The Review Document



The ad hoc committee will develop a written evaluation for consideration by the Peer Evaluation
Committee. Based on this draft the Peer Evaluation Committee will prepare a consensus review
letter to be submitted to the D
epartment Head.



A copy of the evaluation(s) will be provided to the instructor who may respond to it in writing.
Both the peer evaluation and the instructor's responses must be considered in summative
evaluation.



References

Keig, L., and M.D. Waggoner.
1994. Collaborative Peer Review: The Role of Faculty in Improving College Teaching. ASHE
-
ERIC Higher Education Reports. The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

The University of Missouri. 1992. Teaching Evaluation

Seldin, P. 1985. Changing Practi
ces in Faculty Evaluation. Jossey
-
Bass Publishers, San Francisco.




Attachment I

Guidelines For Reviewing The Teaching Summary (Adapted from Seldin, 1985 & University Missouri, 1992)

Course Content

Is it up
-
to
-
date?

Is the treatment balanced and fair?

If

appropriate, are conflicting views presented?

Are the breadth and depth of coverage appropriate?

Has the instructor mastered the subject matter?

Is the coverage responsive to the needs of students?

Is it relevant to the discipline?

Course Objectives

Ar
e the objectives clearly communicated to the students?

Are they consistent with overall curricular objectives?

Does the course incorporate the appropriate themes and skills?

Are in
-
class and out
-
of
-
class work appropriately balanced?

Does the instructor enc
ourage students to think for themselves?

Course Organization

Is the syllabus current and relevant to the course objectives?

Is the course outline logical?

Are the lecture, laboratory, or other assignments integrated?

Should they be?

Is the time devoted
to each topic appropriate?

Assignments

Do assignments supplement lectures discussions, labs, and
fieldwork
?

Do assignments reflect and support course objectives?

Are they appropriate for the level of student?

Is adequate time given to complete the assignme
nts?

Is it consistent with expected quality?

38


Are the assignments challenging to the students?

Grading and Examinations

Are exams suitable to content and course objectives?

Are exams representative of course content?

Are exams clearly written?

Are exams fai
rly graded?

Are grading standards made clear to the students?

Interest in Teaching

Does the instructor discuss teaching with colleagues?

Does the instructor seek advice from others and participate in teaching
-
related workshops and committees?

Is the instru
ctor sought out by others on teaching
-
related matters?

Is the instructor knowledgeable about current developments in teaching?

Instructor Concerns

Are the instructors concerns about evaluation
well founded
?

Are the instructor's needs for course improvement

well founded
?






Attachment II

Faculty/Instructor Name ______________________________________

Class course and number ______________________________________

Class Topic ______________________________________

Date __________________








39


Crop and Soil Science Dept., Oregon State University

Teaching Evaluation Feedback Form

Please answer the following questions regarding instructor performance.
No ability
=
O
;
Outstanding ability

= 4
.
NA

if the
statement does not apply.


Relating the
subject





Ability



1.

The teacher provided a learning objective for today’s
class.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

2.

The teacher taught the material which he/she
promised to teach.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

3.

The teacher used language appropriate for the
student’s level.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

4.

The teacher presented information that is current and
relevant

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

Comments:








Delivering the
information








5.

The teacher presented information in a logical
manner.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

6.

Teaching aids
-

videos, overheads,
the internet
-

were
useful and relevant.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

7.

The teacher encouraged students to think of solutions
to problems.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

8.

The teacher used appropriate pacing for different
portions of the presentations

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

Comments:








Relating to the students






9.

The teacher listened to class members.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

10.

The teacher answered questions from class members

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

11.

The teacher checked for student understanding
throughout the class.

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

12.

The teacher provides opportunities for more
extensive discussion of course material (either in
and/or out of class).

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

Comments:









Overall teaching ability








13.

Overall rating of teacher’s performance?

N/A

0

1

2

3

4

Comments:











40


Appendix
6
.


List of on
-
campus faculty; name, highest degree, rank, focus area, and courses taught.

Name

Highest Degree

Rank

Focus Area

Courses

Azarenko, Anita

PhD

Professor

Administration

and tree fruit physiology

HORT 511

Bottomley, Peter

PhD

Professor

S
oil microbiology

CSS413/513, MB 302

Chen, Tony

PhD

Professor

Plant biotechnology

and

stress physiology

HORT 513

Fisher, Glenn

PhD

Professor

F
ield crops entomology


Hannaway, David

PhD

Professor

F
orages

CSS310

Hart, John

PhD

Professor

S
oils
fertility

management


Hayes, Patrick

PhD

Professor

P
lant breeding and genetics
-

barley

CSS430/530

Karow, Russell

PhD

Professor

A
dministration

CSS100

Kling, Jennifer

PhD

Professor

P
lant breeding and genetics
-

meadowfoam

CSS590, 650

Mallory
-
Smith, Carol

PhD

Professor

W
eed science

CSS440, 660

Mehlenbacher, Shawn

PhD

Professor

Hazelnut breeding and genetics

HORT 433/533;

Myers, Jim

PhD

Professor

Vegetable breeding and genetics

HORT 450/550

Myrold, David

PhD

Professor

S
oil
microbiology

CSS455, 523,645

Rao, Sujaya

PhD

Professor

E
ntomology

CSS310, 599

Stephenson, Garry

PhD

Professor

S
mall farms extension


Strik, Bernadine

PhD

Professor

Berry cropping systems

HORT 251, 452/552

Young, William

PhD

Professor

S
eed crops
production


Baham, John

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
oil chemistry

CSS205E, 305E, 395E

Braunworth, Bill

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Admin


Chastain, Tom

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

C
rop/seed plant physiology

CSS200, 460, 670

Dragila, Maria

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
oil physics

CSS335,535

Elias, Sabry

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
eed science

CSS420/520

Noller, Jay

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

soil pedology and morphology

CSS466,468

Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Seed biology

HORT 463/563

Parke, Jennifer

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

P
lant pathology and soil
interactions

CSS325

Regan, Rich

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Nursery and greenhouse cropping systems

HORT 311, 351,361

Ross, Andrew

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

C
ereal crops quality and food science

FST 425/525,480,641

Schrumpf, Barry

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
eed certification


Stone, Alex

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Vegetable cropping systems


Sullivan, Dan

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
oils fertility and soil
amendments

CSS515

41


Albert, Dennis

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Landscape ecology


Contreras, Ryan

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Ornamental plant breeding

HORT 226 &

228, 301

Deluc, Laurent

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Wine grape metabolomics


Flowers, Mike

PhD

Assist. Prof.

C
ereal crops management

CSS321

Golembiewski, Rob

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Turf grass management

HORT 112, 314, 360, 418

Hulting, Andrew

PhD

Assist. Prof.

E
xtension weed science

CSS418, 407

Kleber, Markus

PhD

Assist. Prof.

S
oil
biogeochemistry

CSS375,525

Lambrinos, John

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Landscape ecology

HORT 318, 411

Langellotto
-
Rhodaback, Gail

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Community and urban horticulture


Motazedian, Iraj

PhD

Assist. Prof.

S
eed certification


Naithani, Sushma

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Plant genetics and genomics


Peachey, Ed

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Weed ecology and management in horticultural crops


Pett
-
Ridge, Julie

PhD

Assist. Prof.

E
nvironmental
soil science

CSS305

Sagili, Ramesh

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Apiculture


Skinkis, Patty

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Viticulture

HORT 453, 454

Townsend, M. Shaun

PhD

Assist. Prof.

P
lant breeding and genetics
-

hops


Walton, Vaughn

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Integrated Pest
Management

HORT 442/542, 330

White, Linda

MS

Assist. Prof.

Berry cropping systems


Burr, Terry

MS

Instructor

S
eed certification


Cassidy, James

MS

Instructor

primary introductory soil class teacher

CSS205,305,499

Donegan, Kelly

MS

Instructor

Advisor

HORT 112, 412

Hankins, Rachel

MS

Instructor

S
eed certification


Hannaway, Kimberly

MS

Instructor

L
ead CSS ecampus class instructor/coordinator

CSS 499/599E SERIES

Knight, Randy

MS

Instructor

S
eed certification


McDonald, Sarah

PhD

Instructor

Nutrition
and general horticulture
-
online

HORT 111, 316

McMorran, Jeffrey

PhD

Instructor

S
eed certification


Millison, Andrew

MS

Instructor

Permaculture

HORT 285, 286

Ries, Paul

MS

Instructor

Urban forestry

HORT 350, 447, 455

Seiter, Stefan

PhD

Instructor

Ecological and sustainable agriculture

HORT 260

Shafabakhsh, Farhad

MS

Instructor

S
eed certification


Shay, Al

MAg

Instructor

Environmental landscape management

HORT 315, 358

Smith, Sandy

MBA

Instructor

S
eed certification


Zielinski, John

BS

Instructor

S
eed certification


42


Appendix
7
. List of off
-
campus faculty; name, highest degree, rank, focus area, and courses taught.

Name

Highest Degree

Rank

Focus area

Couse taught

Ball, Daniel

PhD

Professor

W
eed science


Butler, Marvin

MS

Professor

COARC Super
.,

Ext
.

Staff Chair, field crops ext


Landgren, Chal

MS

Professor

Christmas tree extension specialist


Long, Lynn

MS

Professor

Tree fruit cropping systems


Macnab, Sandy

MS

Professor

Sherman Co field crops extension


McGrath, Dan

PhD

Professor

Vegetable
IPM and cropping systems


Olsen, Jeff

MS

Professor

Tree fruit cropping systems


Petrie, Steven

PhD

Professor

CBARC superintendent and soil
fertility


Shearer, Peter

PhD

Professor

Tree fruit entomology


Shock, Clinton

PhD

Professor

MES superintendent
and crop physiology


Sugar, David

PhD

Professor

Tree fruit pathology


Tuck, Brian

MS

Professor

MCREC superintendent and field crops


VanBuskirk, Phil

MS

Professor

Admin, tree fruit entomology


Bohle, Mylen

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Central Oregon field crops
extension


Bubl, Chip

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Commercial and community horticulture, admin


Castagnoli, Steve

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Tree fruit cropping systems


Clough, George

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Vegetable cropping systems


Corp, Mary

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Umatilla Co field
crops extension


Detweiler, Amy Jo

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Community horticulture


Horneck, Donald

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Columbia Basin irrigated crops extension and soils


Huber, Andrew

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

P
lant science teaching

CSS all UG plant

Kaufman, Diane

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Berry cropping systems


Kiemnec, Gary

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
oil science teaching

CSS all UG soils

Lutcher, Larry

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Morrow Co field crops extension


Machado, Stephen

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

C
rop management and soil quality


McMahan,
Linda

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Community horticulture, admin


Penhallegon, Ross

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Community horticulture


Renquist, Steve

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Commercial and community horticulture


Roseberg, Richard

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

C
rop management and soil fertility


Rosetta, Robin

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Nursery and greenhouse IPM


43


Name

Highest Degree

Rank

Focus area

Couse taught

Walenta, Darrin

MS

Assoc. Prof.

Union/Wallowa/Baker Co field crops extension


Wysocki, Don

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

S
oil management and alternate crops


Yang, Wei

PhD

Assoc. Prof.

Berry cropping systems


Anderson, Nicole

MS

Assist. Prof.

North Willamette Valley field crops extension


Angima, Sam

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Lincoln Co Staff Chair, small farms, master gardeners


Charlton, Brian

MS

Assist. Prof.

P
otatoes and specialty crops


Defrancesco, Joe

MS

Assist. Prof.

Integrated Pest Management


Einhorn, Todd

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Tree fruit cropping systems


Felix, Joel

PhD

Assist. Prof.

W
eed science


Kaiser, Clive

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Tree fruit cropping
systems


Miller, Weston

MS

Assist. Prof.

Community and urban horticulture

HORT 260

Norberg, Steven

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Malheur Co field crops extension


Owen, Jim

PhD

Assist. Prof.

Nursery and greenhouse production and management


Rondon, Silvia

PhD

Assist. Prof.

F
ield crops entomology


Silberstein, Tom

MS

Assist. Prof.

Mid
-
Willamette Valley

-


field crops extension


Affeldt, Richard


Instructor

has resigned
-

being replaced


Andrews, Nick

MS

Instructor

Small farms and vegetable cropping systems


Bell, Neil

MS

Instructor

Community and urban horticulture


Buchanan, Marcus

PhD

Instructor

Viticulture


Fery, Melissa

MS

Instructor

Central Willamette Valley small farms
-

forages and
water quality


Fick, Barbara

MS

Instructor

Community and urban
horticulture


Garrett, Amy

MS

Instructor



Maley, Jordan

BS

Instructor

Gilliam Co field crops extension


Matthewson, Melissa

MS

Instructor

Small farms


Powell, Maud

MS

Instructor

Small farms


Reynolds, Robert

MS

Instructor

Community and urban
horticulture




44


Appendix
8
. Liaisons

letter of support
.


Dear Colleagues:


The attached Category I proposal (current draft) describes the creation of the School of Integrated
Plant, Soil, and Insect Science. It is the merger of two
departments in the College of Agricultural
Sciences
-

the Departments of Crop and Soil Science, and Horticulture. Additionally, we have
proposed a new undergraduate major
-

Integrated Plant, Soil and Insect Science (IPSI) with a number
of options.


Our new c
ourse compliment is provided in the attached Excel file.


In accordance with the liaison criteria in the Curricular Procedures Handbook, this memo serves as
notification to your department of our intent to create a new School within the College of
Agricult
ural Sciences and a new undergraduate major.

Please review the attached materials and send your comments, concerns, or statement of support
to Anita
by 16

May, if at all possible.


We apologize for the short turn around but are scrambling to
try to have ou
r completed CAT I before the Faculty Senate by their June meeting.


We sincerely
appreciate your assistance.


Per custom these days, we will interpret lack of response as support.

We thank you for your time and input.

Sincerely,



Anita and Russ





45


Appendix
9
. Responses to liaisons letter of support
.

From:

Thompson, Greg [Greg.Thompson@oregonstate.edu]

Sent:

Monday, May 09, 2011 8:20 AM

To:

Anita Azarenko (azarenka@hort.oregonstate.edu)

Subject:

FW: CAT I liaison

The Agricultural Education and Gener
al Agriculture Department supports the merger of the CSS and
HORT Departments into the School of Integrated Plant, Soil, and Insect Science.


I commend you all
on your efforts to make the merger a success. The proposal is well written and very detailed.


I
t is
evident that the writers and collaborators have put a lot of effort and detail into this merger and
School.




Best Wishes,


Greg


Greg Thompson, PhD


Professor & Department Head


Agricultural Education and General Agriculture


112 Strand Hall


Oregon State University


Corvallis, OR


97331


(541) 737
-
1337


greg.thompson@oregonstate.edu




From:

Borman, Mike

Sent:

Monday, May 09, 2011 11:01 AM

To:

Karow, Russell; Azarenko, Anita Nina

Subject:

RE
: CAT I liaison

Russ and Anita,


For what it is worth from a “lame Ranger”, you have my support.


Good luck!


Mike Borman



Department Head and Extension Specialist

Dept. of Rangeland Ecology & Management



Tel: 541
-
737
-
1614

Fax: 541
-
737
-
0504

michael.borman@oregonstate.edu





46