Professional Education Unit University of Kentucky Science Education, Grades 8-12 Biology Education Chemistry Education Earth Science Education Physics Education Initial Preparation Program

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1

Professional Education Unit

University of Kentucky


Science Education,
Grades
8
-
12


Biolog
y

Education

Chemistry Education

Earth Science Education

Physics Education

Initial Preparation Program

Submission Date: Fall 2006


UK PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

http://www.uky.edu/Education/EDC/mic/welcome.html

GOVERNING KENTUCKY REGULATION:

(16 KAR 2:010. Kentucky teaching certificates)

http:/
/www.lrc.state.ky.us/kar/016/002/010.htm


UNIT POLICY ON ADMISSION, RETENTION AND COMPLETION:

http://www.uky.edu/Education/NCATE/coeretention.pdf


Contents



Section 1:
Program Concept
ual Framework





A.

Conceptual Framework for
the Professional Education Unit at the
University of Kentucky


B.

Mission Statement for the Department of Curriculum and Instruction

C.

Mission of
the
Science Education Program

D.

Knowledge
Bases

for
the

Science Education Program

E.

Performance Standards in the Science Education Program

F
.

I
ntegration of the Curriculum and Assessment System


Section 2:
Program Continuous Assessment Plan


A.

Integration

of
Program
Continuous Assessment Plan

with the Unit A
ssessment System

B.

Integration of Program Continuous Assessment Plan with Program Conceptual Framework

C.

Program Continuous Assessment Plan Integration with Standards and

Program Activities

D.

Continuous Assessment Monitoring Checkpoints

E.

Multiple Assessments

F
.

Dispositions and Modes of Assessment

G
.

Plans for Collecting
8
-
12 Student Impact Data


H
.

Candidate and Program Feedback Chart

I
.

Use of Technology to Support the Assessment System

J
.

Process to Ensure Accuracy, Fairness, and Consistency of
Assessm
ents


Section 3:
Program Experiences


A.

Overview of Masters with Initial Certification
(MIC)
Program

in Secondary Education

B.

Overview of Alternative Route Option in Science Education

C.

Delivery of Science Education Program

D.

Course Descriptions


E
.

Integratio
n of Performance Standards into
Science Education
Program


F
.

Integration of Code of Ethics

into Science Education Program

G
.

Integration of KERA Initiatives

into Science Education Program


H
.

Integration of EPSP Themes

into Science Education Progra
m


Section 4:

Program Faculty

Section 5: Curriculum Contracts


2



Section 1: Program Conceptual Framework


The
S
cience
E
ducation
P
rogram operates under the umbrella of the Master of Arts in Education including initial
certification. Science education can
didates may pursue program completion in Biology Education, Chemistry Education,
Earth Science Education and Physics Education, depending on their subject matter background and personal interests.
Although all science education candidates complete similar

science education activities and complete the same subject
pedagogy courses, they focus on the national
and state
standards associated with their particular science discipline(s).


A.


Conceptual Framework for
the
Professional Education Unit

at the Universit
y of Kentucky


The conceptual framework for the professional education unit at the University of Kentucky (UK) is guided by the theme,
Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading.

This theme is aligned closely with both the institutional vision and
m
ission of UK and the vision and mission of the professional education unit. The theme reflects and guides how we
approach preparation of professional educators within the context of a research extensive, land grant university.


Research
is a valued activi
ty and tool within UK’s educator preparation programs. Faculty and candidates generate
scientific research using a wide range of research methodologies and contribute to the professional literature. Programs use

practitioner inquiry and data
-
based instru
ctional models in applied settings to enhance student learning and professional
development. Research findings from the entire field of education inform design of courses, selection of interventions, and
features of professional education programs.


Refle
ction

is a long
-
standing aspect of UK’s educator preparation programs and is, in our view, a hallmark of professional
practice. Reflective assessment of performance, outcomes, and approaches to problems is a dynamic process appropriate
for faculty, experi
enced educators, and candidates in initial stages of their careers. Candidates are expected to complete
numerous reflective activities as they work to meet standards; the goal
is
to prepare
educators who are capable of analysis
and problem
-
solving that wi
ll result in improving educational practices and outcomes.


Learning
is included as a component within our conceptual framework to underscore our commitment to the many facets of
learning and to highlight the ways in which our programs conceptualize, promo
te, and accomplish learning. As a unit, we
do not share a single theoretical view of learning. Faculty and candidates conceptualize learning using a wide range of
perspectives including behavioral, constructivist, and social. We believe that our diversi
ty of thought enriches and
strengthens our unit. The reference to learning in our conceptual framework encompasses learning among all those who
participate in our educator preparation programs and those who are affected by the educational efforts of our f
aculty and
candidates.


Leading

is an expectation that faculty hold for ourselves and an outcome that we promote among our candidates. As
members of the educational community at Kentucky’s flagship university, we believe it is our obligation and privilege

to
provide leadership in educational policies and practices across levels and dimensions of universities, schools, and agencies.

We believe that as leaders and followers work together to improve student learning among diverse student populations, we
can
obtain positive results that improve education in Kentucky and beyond.



The four elements of our conceptual framework are synergistic and mutually supportive of our work. Taken as a whole,
research, reflection, learning, and leading

provide a strong conc
eptual basis and functional framework for the preparation
of educators at the University of Kentucky.


B.
Mission Statement for the Department of Curriculum and Instruction


The mission of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is to 1)
d
esign, deve
lop, and implement programs that will
improve the quality of elementary, middle, and secondary education and provide educational leaders; 2)
p
repare teachers
and provide continuing professional development; 3)
c
onduct and disseminate research; and 4)
p
rovi
de services in a variety
of educational and professional settings.



3

C.
Mission of the
Science Education Program


The
Science Education P
rogram is designed to give
candidates

the theoretical background and practical skills needed to
become effective scien
ce teachers.
Candidates

are introduced to a wide range of instructi
onal materials and ideas that
provide

opportunities to make decisions relative to appropriate “hands on” and investigative activities for high school
students
. Candidates

are encouraged t
o be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating plans for
teaching secondary school science concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon teaching the processes of science
as w
ell as the content of science
. Candidates

are

expected to have high expectations of all students and provide effective
instruction for diverse groups of students
. Candidates

are
encouraged

to prepare themselves for leadership roles in the
schools in which they will serve.



D. Knowledge Bases

for
the
Science Education Program


The M
asters with Initial Certification (MIC) Program
and the Science Education Program draw heavily upon what is
known about effective teaching and schools. Readings and discussions include a wide range of resources includin
g, but not
limited to, philosophy and history of education, working with students from diverse backgrounds, effective teaching
strategies,

achievement gap,

ethics of teaching, intelligence and technology,
multicultural issues, asking and answering
action r
esearch questions, development, learning, motivation, and goals and strategies of teaching high school science.


Supporting research and literature for
candidates in the Science Education Program
include the following:



Cohort Classes:


Dewey, John. (1938
, 1998).
Experience and Education.

60
th

Anniversary Ed. West

Lafayette, Indiana: Kappa Delta Pi.


Gaines, Ernest


J. (1993).


A Lesson Before Dying.


New York:


Vintage.


Hersch, Patricia. (1999).
A Tribe Apart: A Journey into the Heart of American

A
dolescence.
NY: Ballantine.


Ornstein, Allan C., Lasley II, Thomas J. & Mindes, Gale. (2006).
Secondary and

Middle School Methods.

Boston:
Pearson, Allyn & Bacon.


Soder, Roger, Ed. (1996).


Democracy, Education, and the Schools.


San Francisco:
Jo
ssey
-
Bass.


Strike, Kenneth & Soltis, Jonas F. (2004).
The Ethics of Teaching.

4
th

Ed. New York:
Teachers College Press.


Technology Education:


Sternberg, Robert J. & Preiss, David D., Eds. (2005).
Intelligence and Technology.
The Impact of Tools o
n the Nature and
Development of Human Abilities.

Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.


Multicultural Education/Campbellsville Project:


Gollnick, Donna M. & Chinn, Philip C. (2006).
Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic

Society.
7
th

Ed
. Upper Saddle
River, New Jersey: Pearson, Merrill Prentice Hall.


Core

Seminar, Spring
:


Falk, Beverly & Blumenreich, Megan. (2005).
The Power of Questions. A Guide to Teacher and Student Research.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.


Social Foundations
:


P
BS Series,

School: The Story of American Public Education

(
2001
)
. The attendant reader of the same title by Sarah
Mondale (Beacon Press, 2001), is also recommended.



4

Special Education
:


Blackboard: Access via
https:/
/myuk.uky.edu

or
http://elearning.uky.edu


Rose, David H. and Meyer Anne (2002)
Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning
.
ASCD: ISBN: 0
-
87120
-
599
-
8.


Educational
Psychology
(De
velopment, Motivation, and Learning
):


Mayer, R.E. (2001). What good is educational psychology? The case of cognition and instruction.
Educational
Psychologist
, 36(2), 83
-
88.


Behavioral Learning Theory Web Quest

http://suedstudent.syr.edu/~ebarrett/ide621/behavior.htm


Cognitive Theory Web Quest

http://suedstudent.syr.edu/~ebarrett/ide621/cognitive.htm


So
cial Learning Theory Web Quest

http://suedstudent.syr.edu/~ebarrett/ide621/social.htm


Huitt, W. (1997). Motivation to learn: An overview.
Educational Psychology Interactive
. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State
University.
http://chiron.valdosta.edu/whuitt/col/


Maehr, M.L. & Midgley, C. Enhancing student motivation: A Schoolwide approach.
Educational Psychologist

26, 3 & 4
(1991): 399
-
427.


Furrer, C.
& Skinner, E. (2003). Sense of
relatedness as a factor
in children’s academic engagement and
performance.
Journal of Educational Psychology
, 95(1), 148
-
162.


Learner
-
Centered Psychological Principles

www.apa.org/ed/lcp2/lcp14.html


Brett, A., Smith, M.,

Price, E., & Huitt, W. (2003). The affective domain.
Educational Psychology Interactive
. Valdosta,
GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved from
http://chiron.valdosta.edu/whuitt/col/
affsys/affsys.html
.


Huitt, W. (1997). Socioemotional development.
Educational Psychology Interactive
. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State
University. Retrieved from
http://chiron.valdosta
.edu/whuitt/col/affsys/erikson.html


Secondary Science Methods
:


National Research Council (1996).
National science education standards
. Washington, DC:

National Academy Press.
(http://www.nap.ed
u/readingroom/books/nses/html/
)


Kentucky High School Co
re Science for Assessment

for both
Middle School and High School Science

http://www.education.ky.gov/users/jwyatt/CCA%204%201%20FINAL/CCA_41.doc



Kentucky Program o
f Studies

(http://www.education.ky.gov/users/jwyatt/POS/POS.pdf
)



Kentucky New Teacher Standards
http://www.kyepsb.net/teacherprep/newteacherstandards.asp#std.1

.


American
Association for the Advancement of Science. (1989).
Science for all Americans: A
project 2061 report on
literacy goals in science, mathematics, and technology
.

Washington, DC: American Association for the
Advancement of Science.


American Association
for the Advancement of Science. (1993).
Benchmarks for science literac
y.

New York: Oxford
University Press


Appel, Kenneth, John Gastineua, Clarence Bakken, David Vernier. (2003).
Physics with

Computers
. Beaverton, Oregon:
Vernier Software & Techno
logy.



5

Billmeyer, Rachel., Mary Lee Barton. (1998).
Teaching reading in the content areas: If not me
,
then who?
. 2
nd

Edition.
Mid
-
Continent Regional Educational Laboratory.


Driver, Rosalind., Ann Squires, Peter Rushworth, Valerie Wood
-
Robinson. (1994
).
Making

Sense of secondary science:
Research into children’s ideas
. : reprinted 2005.

New York: Routledge Falmer


Hazen, Robert M., James Trefil. (1991)
Science Matters: Achieving scientific literacy
.

N
ew York: Anchor Books.


Holmquist, Dan D. an
d Donald L. Volz. (2003).
Chemistry with computers
. 3
rd

Edition.

Beaverton, Oregon: Vernier
Software & Technology.


Johnson, Robyn L., Gretchen Stahmer DeMoss, Richard Sorensen. (2003)
Earth science with

computers
. Beaverton,
Oregon: Vernier Softw
are & Technology.


Jones, L.R., I. Mullis, S.A. Raizen, I.R. Weiss, and E.A. Weston. (1992).
The 1990 science

report card:
NAEP
’s
assessment of fourth, eight, and twelfth graders
. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.


Keeley, Page. (2005)
Scie
nce Curriculum Topic Study: Bridging the gap between standards and

practice
. Thousand Oaks,
California: Corwin Press


Kober, Nancy. (1992).
What we know about science teaching and learning
. Washington, DC:

Council for Educational
Development and Resear
ch.


Masterman, David and Scott Holman. (1997)
Biology with Computers Using Logger Pro
. Beaverton, Oregon: Vernier
Software


Morholt, E. and Paul Brandwein. (1989).
A sourcebook for the biological sciences

(third

edition). San Diego: Harcourt
Brace
Jovanovich, Inc.


National Academy of Sciences. (1990).
Fulfilling the promise: biology education in th
e
nation’s schools
. Washington,
DC: National Academy Press.


National Academy of Sciences. (1998).
Teaching about evolution and the nature of scien
ce
.

Washington, DC: National
Academy Press.


National Research Council (2005).
How students learn science in the classroom
.

Washington, DC: National Academy
Press.


National Research Council (1996).
National science education standards
. Washington
, DC:

National Academy Press.


National Science Teachers Association. (1996).
NSTA Pathways to the science standards:

Guidelines for moving the
vision into practice
. Arlington, Virginia: National Science

Teachers Association.


Volz, Donald L. and San
dy Sapatka (2003).
Physical science with computers
. 3
rd

Edition
.
Beaverton, Oregon: Vernier
Software.


E
. Performance Standards

in the Science Education Program


The Science Education Program a
ligns itself with and expects candidates to meet the follo
wing performance standards:
Kentucky New Teacher Standards, the Unit

Functional

Skills and Dispositions, the
Unit

Technology Standards, and the
National Science Teachers Association/National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education Secondary Science

Education Standards.



6

F. Integration of the Curriculum and Assessment System

The Science Education Program for initial preparation and certification enables candidates to meet required standards for
new teacher practice, leadership, research, and reflect
ive practice through a variety of design
ed

program experiences. The
program allows
candidate
s to integrate a number of ideas related to content and professional knowledge.
With the
exception of six hours of graduate content work, content preparation occu
rs prior to admission to the teacher preparation
program. The program provides a variety of course work leading to a functional knowledge of student learning,
development, and motivation relative to teaching the content area. A large block of field exper
iences coupled with
classroom work enables candidates to meet program goals and standards through performance.

Candidate

performance is evaluated through the continuous assessment system and numerous products produced during
their work. Assessments incl
ude interviews, project feedback, and an extensive use of the portfolio. Information gleaned
from
candidate

work is used to make adjustments in activities and experiences provided
for
candidates
.

In addition, there is
a close working relationship between

university faculty and colleagues in the field. Practicing teachers are encouraged to
provide feedback regarding strengths and weaknesses of the program and ways in which the preparation of teachers might
be improved.
Candidate
s being observed by univer
sity supervisors provide systematic feedback regarding needs for
modifying and improving the teacher preparation program
.



7

Section 2: Program Continuous Assessment Plan


A.
Integration of Pro
gram Continuous Assessment with the
Unit Assessment System


Th
e
Science

Education Program utilizes a continuous assessment system designed to assess candidate proficiency and
program effectiveness. Continuous assessment of candidates involves a developmental approach to educator preparation in
which candidates are e
xpected to progress toward mastery of standards as they practice and gain competence with
increasingly complex pedagogical and professional tasks.
Through continuous assessment, the program monitors
candidate
performance over the duration of the program.

Candidates are expected to progress over time as their involvement with
program activities increases
. Candidates
are expected to meet or exceed minimum program expectations upon entry into
the program. As involvement in classes and field experiences inc
rease, a higher level of performance is expected.


The
Science

Education Program Faculty uses candidate data to measure the progress of individual candidates throughout
the program and then uses aggregated candidate data in the process of determining the
effectiveness of the program.
Selected data items collected on candidate proficiency and program effectiveness in the
Science

Education Program is also
fed into the unit assessment system. For example, all programs collect candidate data using the Contin
uous Assessment
Re
view

(CAR). The CAR is used at program admission, retention, and exit transition points to record candidate
performance on the
appropriate Kentucky
-
adopted educator proficiency s
tandards, the Unit Functional Skills and
Dispositions, and
the
Unit
Technology Standards
. The analysis of candidates’ performance on the National
Science
Teachers Association

(NSTA
) standards also informs the unit assessment system.
In addition, data from the New Teacher
Survey administered by the Kentucky Educa
tion Professional Standards Board are reviewed by the program
faculty. These
data

are an essential element of the program evaluation component of the unit assessment system. Finally,
a wide range of
basic data items, i.e.,

grade point averages (GPAs), ad
missions test scores, student teaching evaluations, and PRAXIS II
examination pass rates,
is

reviewed by the
Science

Education Program Faculty
,

audited and monitored at the unit level,
and
fed into the unit’s comprehensive data system
. These data sets
con
stitute
important information for program development

and unit operations.



B. Integration of Program Continuou
s Assessment Plan with Program

Conceptual

Framework


Program and end
-
of program assessments are evaluated in the context of candidates ha
ving the theoretical background and
practical skills needed to become effective science teachers. Candidates are expected to make informed decisions in the
selection o
f developmentally appropriate, hands
-
on,

investigative, process oriented, activities for

high school students.
Candidates

are expected to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating plans for teaching
secondary school science concepts and skills. Candidate dispositions must demonstrate sensitivity to diverse stude
nt
populations, the need for multiple teaching and assessment strategies, a commitment to asking and answering teaching
questions using appropriate literature and inquiry strategies, a preference for reflective teaching activities, and a desire
to
serve a
s a change agent (leadership role) within the school and school system.


C. Program Continuous Assessment Plan Integration with Standards and Program Activities


A primary focus of the Science Education Program is to meet multiple standards proposed

by state and national agencies
(
s
ee Section 3)
.
Collective and collaborating data are used to recommend program changes/improvements.


D. Continuous Assessment Monitoring Checkpoints


Formal assessments are conducted at the following points:


Checkpoint

1: Admissions to the MIC Program (Prior to Fall Semester)

Checkpoint 2: Retention (End of Fall Semester)

Checkpoint 3: Exit (End of Spring Semester)

Follow
-
u
p: KTIP and Fol
l
ow
-
u
p Surveys



E.

Multiple Assessments


Multiple assessments are used to
determi
ne
candidate

progress throughout the program. These assessments inform the
program of candidate progress and provide input regarding program adjustments.



8

Early Assessments
:

Quality of References Presented For Admission to Program

Successful Completion

of Required Courses



128

Semester Hours and Undergraduate Degree

Course Content Grades


33
Semester Hours in the Science Major with a Minimum GPA of 2.50

Hours of Support Course Work


24 Hours+ in Support Area with Minimum GPA of 2.50

Overall Course

Grades


128 Semester Hours with GPA of 2.75 (Graduate School Requirement)

GRE Scores (Verbal, Quantitative, Writing)


400, 400, 4 (ACT 18, PRAXIS I, or Composition Course with a Minimum
Grade of B in Lieu of 4 Writing Score)

Advising Sessions


Monitor
Course Progress and Adherence to Program Requirements

Communication Skills (Oral and Written)


Writing Sample and Ability to Communicate with

Program Admission
Interviewers

Understanding of Requirements for Becoming a Teacher


Program Admission Interview

Dispositions Exhibited for Becoming a Successful Science Teacher


Program Admission Interview and Dispositions,
Technology, and New Teacher Standards


Program Assessments
:

University Classroom Work (Projects, Papers, Presentations)

Classroom Examination
s

Advising Sessions


Monitor Progress in Program and Problems Encountered by Candidate

Field Placements


Monitor Performances Exhibited in Field Experience

Mid
-
Program Assessments


Dispositions, Technology, and New Teacher Standards

Planning Skills


Evaluation of Lesson and Unit Plans Prepared in Classes

Observations in Student Teaching

Informed Selection and Implementation of Appropriate, Planning, Teaching Strategies,
Student Assessment, Ability to Analyze and Discuss

Teaching Effectiveness

Selecti
on and Development of Portfolio Artifacts (Mid
-
point Review)


End
-
of
-
Program Assessments
:

Written Masters Degree Examination

Portfolio (Portfolio Artifacts Are Uploaded to An Online, Electronic Portfolio System)

Portfolio/Exit Conference

Written Program Su
rveys


Student and Cooperating Teacher

Success in Finding Employment as Practicing Teacher

Continuous Assessment


Dispositions, Technology, and New Teacher Standards

PRAXIS II Scores in Content Area


Follow
-
up Assessments
:

Performance in KTIP Experience

Written Program Surveys


Intern Teacher and Resource Teacher

Continuation of First Year Teacher Contract


F. Dispositions and Modes of Assessment


The combined program faculties of the UK educator preparation unit have established five (5) skills and di
spositions that
underlie all UK educator preparation programs. These skills and dispositions have been adopted and endorsed by the
Science

Education Program Faculty. The required skills and dispositions are as follows:


Functional Skill and Disposition 1
:
Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively
.



Communicates successfully in formal presentations



Communicates successfully in small groups and/or informal settings



Uses nonverbal communications skills successfully



Communicates successfully in writ
ing (reports, essays, letters, memos, emails, etc.)


Functional Skill and Disposition 2:

Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes
.



Demonstrates knowledge and command of sociocultural variables in education



Demonstrates constructive attitudes toward ch
ildren, youth, parents, and the community



Demonstrates awareness and acceptance of diversity in educational settings.




9

Functional Skill and Disposition 3:

Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and
relationships
.



Accurate
ly states key subject matter ideas



Explains key subject matter ideas



Tailors key subject matter ideas to diverse populations



Addresses misconceptions among students about key subject matter ideas



Identifies real life examples to enhance student learning of

key subject matter ideas


Function Skill and Disposition 4:

Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues,
administrators, students, and parents in educational settings
.



Demonstrates acceptable educator behavior in d
iverse educational settings



Demonstrates adaptability in reflecting on self in relation to diverse groups


Functional Skill and Disposition
5:

Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior
.



Demonstrates understanding of the Kentu
cky School Personnel Code of Ethics



Complies with all legal requirements for educators in a knowledgeable and timely manner



Demonstrates understanding of ethical issues related to own professional certification area


The Science Education Program Faculty u
ses the unit Continuous Assessment Review form to rate each candidate at each
of the three assessment points on the unit dispositions. When candidates consider applying for a professional preparation
program, they are provided with the unit’s set of
F
unct
ional
S
kills and
D
ispositions and a self
-
assessment form so that they
can begin reflecting on their own capability with each of the skills/dispositions. Candidates use artifacts as evidence of
their capabilities with each of the skills/dispositions ite
ms.

Faculty accumulate evidence from coursework, student
portfolios, interviews, and supervisor ratin
gs to determine their ratings.
Candidates have an opportunity to reflect with the
faculty about the ratings and can use faculty feedback to accumulate new o
pportunities to develop their skills and
dispositions and to demonstrate them via artifacts.


G.

Plans for Collecting 8
-
12 Student Impact Data


The Science Education Program is keenly aware of the importance of the issues of P
-
12 teacher quality enhancement,
promotion of increased achievement for P
-
12 students, and closing the achievement gaps between P
-
12 student populations.
The program

is committed to developing future teachers who will help address these issues. The program develops
candidate research ca
pability and studies the extent to which pedagogical activities affect P
-
12 learning. Coursework
requires candidates to plan, implement, and assess lessons and units. Candidates analyze the results of their efforts, with
increasingly sophisticated tools
as their experience with research methods grows. Candidates also gain experience and
facility in utilizing the results of CATS
assessments
to understand student needs and to interpret student performance
behaviors. In addition, the program plans to work
with graduates of the program to collect aggregated summary
performance data from the
Commonwealth Accou
ntability Testing System (CATS)
, particularly subject
-
specific summary
data.

The Science Education Program
has plans to

collect student achievement dat
a from the CATS for teachers
successfully completing the MIC Program. This
would

occur during teachers’ first
-
year participation in KTIP. Given the
variety of science content areas, student variables, and teaching/learning environments, this could prove
to be an important,
but formidable
,

task.




10

H.

Candidate and Program Feedback Chart



Green

=

Candidate

Feedback


Red

=

Program

Feedback










Checkpoint 1


Admissions Data


Checkpoint 2


Mid
-
Point
Retention
Assessment Data




Checkpoint 3


Exit Assessment
Data

Admission
into program

Retention
portfolio
feedback

Exit portfolio feedback;
Exit interview
feedback; Student
Teaching Observation
Evaluations

Initial Student
Data; Unit pass
rates on PRAXIS
II

Successful completion of
Methods Course;
Effective Evaluations of
Retention Port
folios
;
Faculty teaching
performance

Successful completion of
the Program; Job
Placement Rates; Student
Evaluations; Mentor
Teacher Evaluations


11

I.


Use of Technology to Support the Assessment System


Candidates

admitted to the progr
am begin developing portfolio materials during each semester of the program under the
guidance of the Program Chair and other course instructors. Portfolio materials are uploaded to an online portfolio system.
Candidates post artifacts and demonstrate way
s in which they are meeting each New Teacher Standard. These materials are
reviewed online by the
s
cience education faculty person at the mid
-
point of the program and again at the end of the
program. In addition to portfolio materials uploaded by
candidate
s
, student teaching observation evaluations can be posted
to the candidates’ online portfolios.


At the unit level,
the results of
candidate

reviews

by the Science Program Faculty
, in the form of admission to program and
completion from program
,

are record
ed in the unit database and information system.


These data are readily retrievable and
used in studies of cohort characteristics.


Data relating to testing, GPA, and progress through programs
are
also recorded
and available
.
The
unit web portal system, w
hich is under development,
will permit the direct entry of
candidate
performance assessment data into the comprehensive database system.


One of the first of the portal
-
based data entry
modules will allow program faculties to directly enter continuous asse
ssment ratings (CAR) into candidate records.


While
the necessary portal modules have been under development,
the Science Education Program Chair has entered the
CAR
ratings into pre
-
formatted Excel Spreadsheets
for
submission and storage at the unit level
.


J.

Process to Ensure
Accuracy, Fairness, and Consistency of
Assessments


The Science Education Program, along with the Mathematics Education Program
,

is managed by the Math and Science
Program Faculty. This group consists of scienc
e educators, mathematic
s educat
ors, science faculty, mathematics faculty,
graduate mathematics and science education
candidates
, and practicing science and mathematics teachers. The group
represents a broad c
onstituency,

and

it

is intended that this structure provide admission
and retention processes that are
accurate, fair, and consistent. For example, candidates for program admission are reviewed by two
-

and three
-
member
interview committees representing membership of the
P
rogram
F
aculty. Following the interview, interviewer
s share
applicants’ admission portfolios, along with rating scales and notes,
with

the entire membership of the Program Faculty. It
is believed that this process provides a mechanism that is accurate, fair, and consistent for all
candidate
s

for admission
and
all other decisions involved in the management of the program.


12

S
ection 3:

Program Experiences



Initial teacher certification in science education is available through two routes in the Science Education Program at the
University of Kentucky. The fi
rst is through the Masters with Initial Certification (MIC) Program, in which candidates
enter the program with an undergraduate major in the sciences, or the equivalent, and complete a master’s degree that leads
to initial certification at the Rank II lev
el in Kentucky. The second is an alternative route option that is available to teachers
who are initially employed on a temporary certificate by partnering school districts. These two options are described in the

following sections.


A.
Overview of the

Masters with Initial Certification (MIC) Program in Secondary Education


The Master of Arts in Secondary Education with Initial Certification (MIC) at the University of Kentucky (UK) is a unique
and intensive program of 34 credit hours leading to both a m
aster’s degree and initial teacher certification in Kentucky.
The format of the program requires that candidates participate in challenging graduate coursework and extensive field
preparation that promotes an understanding and synthesis of theory and prac
tice. The MIC offers five content
-
area
programs, including business/marketing, English, mathematics, science, and social studies.


As a doctoral
-
granting university with the designation of RU/VH: Research University (very high research activity), as
desi
gnated by Carnegie Classifications, UK promotes an intense commitment to the generation of research by faculty and
candidates and also promotes the use of research
-
based practices. This commitment to research is reflected in the
institutional and unit mis
sion and vision statements.


The professional education unit at UK has adopted the model of preparing educational professionals for
Research and
Reflection for Learning and Leading
, befitting the university’s role as an RU/VH. The MIC, as a master’s lev
el program, is
committed to this model. Our candidates learn to appreciate, generate, and adapt research in a reflective manner to promote
student learning and to enhance their abilities as teacher leaders.


Each candidate in the MIC participates in two

cohort groups, the common core cohort and the content
-
area cohort. The
common core cohort is the primary organizing unit of the fall semester. The common core cohort is built around a high
degree of cooperation between the professional education unit and

local high schools. Each candidate is assigned to a
common core cohort made up of candidates from each of the content areas. These cohorts are lead by faculty in the
Department of Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) and meet in four area high schools in th
ree counties.


The common core cohort classes have two components. At the beginning of the semester, candidates meet with their cohort
leaders at their assigned high schools to lay the groundwork for their field placements. In the cohort classes, candid
ates are
introduced to general pedagogical issues, including the relationship of educational philosophy to practice, classroom
management techniques, theories of adolescent development and learning, instructional strategies, and ethical issues
associated w
ith being a high school teacher. To supplement this coursework, candidates also work with other C&I faculty
to increase their knowledge of multiculturalism and its relationship to teaching and learning and how to incorporate
technology in their classrooms
.


The second component of the common core cohort is a six
-
week field placement in one of four cohort schools. The
placement is four days per week, four hours per day. Candidates are placed in their content
-
area departments and observe
and work with a wi
de variety of teachers and administrators. They are required to become immersed in the school culture
through observations, meetings, teaching, and coursework. They complete major cohort projects on each of the following:
interdisciplinary instruction, s
ervice learning, classroom management, and tutoring/mentoring.


In addition to the common core cohort classes, candidates take classes in educational psychology, educational foundations,
and special education. These classes meet on campus before and aft
er the field experience. The premise is to allow
candidates an opportunity to become acquainted with educational theories, practices, and special issues in these areas
before interacting with students and then to reflect on these elements once the fall fi
eld experience is complete. Faculty
members from these classes also have candidates complete projects related to their field experience.


Finally, each candidate takes a content
-
area methods course. As with the common core classes, the methods courses me
et
weekly throughout the semester


before, during, and after the seven
-
week field placement. Content
-
area professors focus
on content
-
specific pedagogy and work closely with all other faculty to ensure candidates experience a well
-
integrated

13

curriculum t
hat ties all coursework, field activities, and assignments together to promote the synthesis of theory and
practice.


Fall Semester MIC Courses



Course

Hours

Title

EDC 730*

3

Foundations of Pedagogical Theory (Common Core Cohort)

EDC 777*

3

Practice i
n the Secondary School (Common Core Cohort)

EDS 558

1

Issues in Special Education

EDP 658

1

Problems in Educational Psychology

EPE 773

1

Seminar in Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation

EDC 63x

3

Special Methods in (content area)

*EDC 730 and EDC
777 are being replaced with new identifying course numbers


EDC 645 and EDC 646, respectively.
The content of the courses will remain the same.


The organizing element of the spring semester is the content
-
area cohort. During the spring semester, each c
andidate
completes 16 weeks of student teaching in an area high school. The focus in the spring is on honing their skills as teachers

of a specific content and applying the theoretical knowledge gained during the fall semester. Unlike the fall field
expe
rience, the spring student teaching assignment is with an individual teacher in one classroom. After an initiation period
of a week or two, candidates begin taking responsibility for planning and teaching the classes and eventually assume a full
teaching
load under the supervision of the cooperating teacher and a university supervisor. Content
-
area professors meet
regularly throughout the spring semester with student teachers to continue their instruction in content
-
specific pedagogy.


In addition to st
udent teaching, candidates participate in an evening seminar on campus. The primary focus of the spring
seminar is on learning classroom inquiry techniques. Classroom inquiry involves such strategies as action research, case
study, personal narrative, an
d ethnography for the purpose of improving teaching and learning. Each candidate develops a
classroom inquiry project based on their student teaching experience. At the end of the semester, they are required to give
oral and written presentations on thei
r inquiry projects as their culminating project for the spring seminar. Additionally,
during the spring seminar, candidates continue their work with faculty on incorporating multiculturalism and technology in
their classrooms.


Finally, during the spring
semester, each candidate takes a course in educational leadership. In this one
-
hour course,
candidates are introduced to many legal and ethical issues they encounter in their classrooms. Once again, the educational
leadership faculty work closely with C&
I faculty to integrate the content and instruction with that of the other courses the
candidates take.


Spring Semester MIC Courses


Course

Hours

Title

EDC 746

9

Subject Area Instruction in the Secondary School (Student Teaching)

EDC 777*

3

Teaching Acr
oss Curriculum in Secondary Schools

EDA 770

1

Topical Seminar in Educational Leadership: Teacher Leadership for the
MIC Program

*EDC 777 is being replaced with a new identifying course number


EDC 745. The content of the course will remain the
same.


Candidates take their elective courses during the summer sessions before and after the cohort experiences of the academic
year or in the evenings during the academic year. They must take six hours of electives in their content area and three
hours of elec
tives in curriculum and instruction. Advisors work closely with candidates to choose elective classes that fill
any gaps in the candidates’ content or pedagogical knowledge.


The entire program is dedicated to the development of professional educators w
ho understand theory and practice and how
the two elements work together to create positive learning experiences for high school students. To ensure that our
candidates are progressing toward that goal, mid
-
term assessments are made at the end of the fall

semester in both the
common core cohort and in the content
-
area cohort. The common core assessment involves writing an in
-
depth philosophy
of education, using the knowledge gained from all courses and field experience during the semester. The content
-
ar
ea
instructors use portfolio assessment. In the spring, each candidate is required to take a master’s comprehensive
examination and to present the results of their classroom inquiry projects as part of their culminating activities. The fina
l

14

assessment i
n each content area is based on candidates’ portfolios. They also are required to pass the Praxis II exams in
pedagogy and their content areas prior to receiving a recommendation for certification.


The MIC at the University of Kentucky is a unique teache
r preparation program. We seek candidates with proven ability in
various content areas and then provide them with the theoretical and practical knowledge, skills, and dispositions to become
effective classroom teachers. For admission into the program, ea
ch candidate must:


1.

have completed a bachelor’s degree in their content area or an equivalent,

2.

have an overall GPA of 2.50 and a content
-
area GPA of 2.75,

3.

have taken the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and

4.

have completed an interview with content
-
area

faculty.


Program faculties

in each content area are the official governing bodies for the respective programs. As such, they are
responsible for admission of candidates to their respective programs; for continuous assessment of candidates throughout
the
ir programs; for reviewing candidate data to inform program improvement efforts; and for initiating course and program
changes based upon feedback from candidates, graduates, and their supervising/mentor teachers in the schools.


B.
Overview of the Alter
native
Route

Option in
Science

Education


The
a
lternative
c
ertification
o
ption in
science

e
ducation at the University of Kentucky is designed for the preparation of
secondary
science

teachers and tailored to meet the needs of individual candidates who qual
ify for admission to the
program. This two
-
year program enables candidates with concurrent employment or sponsorship in a school district to
achieve Rank III certification and potentially rank II certification. The alternative certification option at UK re
quires
candidate
s to have a signed contract
with

a local school.


Successful teaching is a complex, multi
-
layered, developmental endeavor that involves a unique combination of knowledge
and skills on different dimensions; therefore
,

a special emphasis is
placed on the concept of
Teaching as Inquiry

in the
program. At its most basic level, though, it involves continuous inquiry around key questions related to how students learn.
This program focuses on helping candidates become adept at this process of inqu
iry about teaching and learning. As
candidates progress through this program of supervised field experiences, structured seminars, and problem
-
based
activities, they acquire the knowledge and skills needed to become the kind of reflective teacher
-
scholars

needed to help
students succeed.


The program is organized around several key dimensions of teaching that the
Science

Education Program Faculty view as
essential aspects of teacher expertise. The following dimensions of teacher knowledge guide the curricu
lum comprised of
field experiences and focused seminars:




Teaching as an Instructional Activity

involves the ability to apply knowledge, transform knowledge into
practice, and develop curriculum to support diverse learners in various environments utilizing

appropriate
classroom management and technology skills.



Teaching as a Disciplinary Activity

involves candidates acquiring knowledge in the disciplines that are the
foundation of the teaching profession and the focus of the subject area candidates will tea
ch. Candidates
continue to broaden and deepen their disciplinary expertise over the course of their careers.



Teaching as a Socio
-
Cultural Activity

examines the many social, cultural, economic, and political factors in our
society that affect what happens i
n schools and in the way we raise and provide for children. Candidates
understand how values, beliefs, language, and religion intersect with their students’ identity and motivation,
and how these affect equity and access to learning opportunities for stude
nts.



Teaching as a Reflective Activity

emphasizes that candidates think about what they do and why they do it as a
daily challenge in teaching. Candidates will become increasingly purposeful in what they do and be able to
consider the consequences of their

decisions. Candidates will ask if their choices and actions are good to
continue or need to change. This reflective knowledge is achieved through continuous informal and formal
inquiry among candidates, university faculty, and school personnel.



Teaching a
s a Developmental Activity

suggests candidates understand how children change as they grow.
Candidates will be able to guide students’ learning in ways appropriate to their cognitive, physical, and
emotional development.



Teaching as a Moral/Ethical Activit
y

indicates every action has a moral component. Candidates will recognize
the moral component of their work so they can create safe, supportive environments that welcome differences

15

of opinion and diversity of experiences and learning styles. Candidates mu
st model ethical decision
-
making as
it pertains to the classroom and link the classroom to the social and natural environments in which we live.



Teaching as a Collaborative Activity

emphasizes the value and importance of good working relationships
among ca
ndidates, faculty, colleagues, students, and family members. Candidates also need to work in
partnership with other school support staff, education administrators, community leaders, and social service
providers.


Admission

The alternative certification op
tion in
science

education
is designed for

teachers holding
temporary certification who
wish
to remain employed in the area

while

gaining certification at the same time. The program condenses educational
experiences from UK’s ongoing program (i.e., MIC), bu
t does not compromise the intellectual rigor expected of all
candidates who enroll in the
u
niversity. The two
-
year program culminates in full certification. Individual
s

who want to
teach and who hold at least a bachelor’s degree in
science

are provided thi
s option of an alternative route to teacher
certification.


Candidates

complete an application for admission to the alternative certification program and for admission to the Graduate
School as a post
-
baccalaureate student. Applicants are reviewed by the
Science Education

Program Faculty and must meet
program expectations of this faculty group.
Candidates

may choose to work toward certification only or have some course
work apply toward an eventual master’s degree.
T
ransfer work from post baccalaureate and

other institutions
is limited
to
nine (9) semester hours.
Candidates
desiring an eventual master’s degree must apply for, and be admitted to, full admission
to the Graduate School’s master’s degree program in secondary education. As a prerequisite to admi
ssion, all
candidates

must be employed

by a school district in the University of Kentucky service area.


This program seeks candidates with a diversity of exceptional life experiences. These individuals might be “career
changers” or persons with exceptiona
l experiences who can bring to the classroom strengths and abilities not typically
found in traditional
candidates
.


Eligibility

As mentioned above, to be eligible for the program, the candidate must be employed or sponsored by a participating school
dist
rict. The terms of employment or sponsorship must enable the candidate to complete all necessary school
-
based
experiences required in the program.


Course
work

The
a
lternative
c
ertification
p
rogram in
science

e
ducation is an intensive two
-
year, part
-
time pr
ogram. Candidates are
enrolled in the fall and spring semesters and in the summers. The following courses are required during the first and second
academic year:



Academic Year One (Evenings or Weekends)


Fall Semester


Secondary
Science

Method
s

Course (E
DC 63
4
)


3 hours


Field Experiences in Secondary Education (EDC 362)

3 hours



Spring Semester


Introduction to Education (EDC 501, Teaching Internship)

3 hours


Classroom Management/Discipline (EDC 610)


3 hours



Academic Year Two (Evenings or Weekends)


Fall Semester


Introduction to Education (EDC 501, Teaching Internship)

3 hours



Spring Semester


Introduction to Education (EDC 501, Teaching Internship)

3 hours


During the first and second summers (and/or the second year of the program), participants
are required to complete 6 hours
in the following areas: 1)
working with students with
special needs, and 2) learning, development, and motivation.
Participants are required to complete a minimum of three (3) semester hours in each of these two categories.

Technology,
Teaching, Humanistic, and Multicultural Studies will be integrated into the teaching internship courses.



16

Prior to admission to the
a
lternative
c
ertification
p
rogram in
science e
ducation,
candidates

submit a list of all content
-
related courses

taken. Advisors review all course work and identify any deficiencies in the major and/or support areas. All
deficiencies must be completed prior to being certified. Where appropriate, advisors may substitute graduate level courses
for existing subject are
a requirements. As they are available, content courses may be taken in the evenings of the fall and
the spring semesters. Some content courses may be available during summer school. Other content courses can be taken at
community colleges, private colleges
, or regional universities. The number of content courses required varies from
candidate
to
candidate
. The number is a function of an individual’s previous content courses and certification requirements
for the
Science E
ducation
Pr
ogram.


Clinical and Fiel
d Experiences

Clinical and
f
ield
e
xperiences are completed in the classrooms to which the candidates are assigned. These experiences are
correlated with coursework and seminars in which candidates are concurrently enrolled. The first
-
year experiences serve

to
meet practicum and student teaching requirements. Upon completion of the alternative certification program and issuance
of the Rank III certification, teachers participate in the KTIP Program.


KTIP Program

Following the second year of this program,
ca
ndidates

participate in the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program (KTIP) year
in which the intern teacher will be observed, assessed, and assisted by the three
-
member internship committee comprised of
the principal, resource teacher, and teacher educator.


A
ssessment

As candidates progress throughout the program, they are evaluated continuously through a series of performance
assessments that incorporate these dimensions
:

the Kentucky New Teacher Standards, the NCATE/N
STA Science

Education Standards,
the
Uni
t
Functional Skills and
Dispositions,
and
the
Unit

Technology Standards
.


Assessment begins with the admissions process and continues throughout the program. Formal assessments occur at the end
of each semester. A formal exit assessment is completed at the

end of the two
-
year period, conducted by the
Science

Education Program Faculty. These assessments include existing retention and exit assessment rules established for teacher
education candidates
in the professional education unit
. Items to be assessed in
clude portfolios, on
-
demand writing
samples, classroom performance, course materials, student learning outcomes, and candidate standardized test results,
including the
appropriate
PRAXIS II content examination and the
Principles of Learning and Teaching Te
st.


C
.

Delivery of Science Education
Program


Candidates in the Masters with Initial Certification Program are organized into two cohorts: an interdisciplinary cohort and

a disciplinary
methods
cohort.

In the fall semester,
candidates

in the interdisc
iplinary cohort
are organized into cohorts at
four

schools including Bryan Station High School, East Jessamine High School, Tates Creek High School,
and Woodford

County High School.
Candidates

are assigned to cohorts across disciplines.
I
nstructors meet
the cohort classes in the
respective schools. The science teaching methods course is currently being taught in a science classroom at Tates Creek
High School. Student teaching seminars, organized by content areas, are held in local schools.


D. Course
Descriptions


Masters with Initial Certification (Grades 8
-
12)

Coursework

in
Science

Education:


EDC 634 Science Pedagogy in the Secondary School (3 credits)

Through campus and school
-
based experiences, candidates will learn how to engage young people in l
earning mathematics
and how to make decisions about planning instruction and develop assessment based on a sound knowledge base for
applying content, materials, and methods (including educational technology) appropriate for high school students.


EDC 746
Student Teaching in
Science

(9 credits)

The purpose of student teaching and the student teaching seminar is to help student teachers continue to develop their
knowledge, strategies, and the skills necessary in order to become a successful and productive
sc
ience
teacher capable of
leading in the profession. With the support of cooperating teachers in area public schools, the course instructor, and
university field supervisors, student teachers apply theories, methods, and techniques they have learned in the
past in
addition to what they will learn during the concurrent student teaching experiences.



17

EDC 777 Practice in the Secondary School (MIC Cohort) (3 credits)

Classroom management, technology, and multicultural education are addressed. The purpose of th
is course is to give both
a sound theoretical foundation and in
-
depth experiences enabling one to become a professional educator who utilizes
research and reflection in order to learn and lead in the classroom.


EDC 730 Problems of the School Curriculum (3

credits)

Problems in the field of the school curriculum and in the preparation of instructional materials.
Classroom management,
technology, and multicultural education are addressed. The purpose of this course is to give both a sound theoretical
founda
tion and in
-
depth experiences enabling one to become a professional educator who utilizes research and reflection in
order to learn and lead in the classroom.


EDP 658 Problems in Educational Psychology (1 credit)

Special topics in psychological theories
and research applicable to educational practices. May be repeated to a maximum of
six credits. Prereq: Consent of instructor.


EDS 558 Issues in Special Education (1 credit)

In
-
depth study of a current and topical problem or issue in the education of exc
eptional children and youth. May be
repeated to a maximum of nine credits. A title is assigned each time the course is offered. (Same as RC 558).


EPE 773 Seminar in Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation (1 credit)

Examination of selected problems in

educational policy studies and evaluation.

The implicit objective of social foundations
courses (e.g., Philosophy of Education; History of Education, Politics of Education, etc.) is to assist candidates in
understanding the social nature of education in
our society; to think critically and reflectively about education; and to
recognize education as an area of inquiry in which systematic study can benefit practice.



EDL 770 Topical Seminar in Educational Leadership (1 credit)

Advanced graduate students
enroll in this topical seminar to enhance their portfolios for educational leadership through
concentrated study of innovations in the specialized functions of administration. These specializations include, but are not
limited to, the study of curriculum a
nd instructional leadership, educational law, personnel administration, school and
community relations, education for diverse populations, budgeting and financing of schools.


E
.
Integration of Performance Standards into
Science Education
Program

The Sci
ence Education Program is aligned with state, institutional, and national standards, which include the Kentucky
New Teacher Standards, the Unit Functional Skills and Dispositions, the Unit Technology Standards, and the Nation
al
Science Teachers Association

Standards. A description of the alignment of the science education curriculum and
experiences with these standards sets follows in this section.

Kentucky
New Teacher Standards for Preparation
and

Certification

The Kentucky
New Teacher Standards serve as

a primary focus throughout the program. Using the continuous assessment

process
,
candidate
s are evaluated at beginning, mid
-
way, and end points of the program relative to their attainment of skills
included in the
s
tandards. Components of the program ar
e designed to prepare future teachers to achieve a high level of
performance in each of the teaching skill areas. Skills are demonstrated through university classroom projects; fi
eld
placement; student teaching, including

cooperating teache
r observations
and conferences and
supervising teacher
observations and conferences
;

final projects; examinations; and por
tfolio development and review.


Following each

of the Kentucky New Teacher Standards identified below is a description of
selected examples

of
ways
the
program enhances and assesses c
andidate

performance
aligned with the
respective
standards. Course
s
that contain these
activities and assessments are noted at the end of
each

narrative.

Standard 1:

Designs/Plans Instruction

The teacher designs/plans i
nstruction and learning climates that develop student abilities to use communication skills, apply
core concepts, become self
-
sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and
integrate knowledge.


18

Candidates

are taught
to plan instruction focusing on academic standards as evidenced by inclusion of the standard(s) in the
written plan. Lesson plans prepared in university classes and in school classrooms include academic expectations for the
lesson. Lesson plans are evalu
ated based upon their potential for motivating and actively involving diverse learners and
emphasis upon higher level thinking skills. Lessons are evaluated based upon developmental level appropriateness,
creating an environment for learning to occur, and

the consistency of assessment/evaluation strategies used to assess the
types of learning included in the lesson. During student teaching, supervisors observe these ideas being put into practice
and discuss with the student teacher how improvements can be

made in their teaching.

(EDC 634, EDC 730, EDC 777)

Standard 2:

Creates/Maintains Learning Climates

The teacher creates a learning climate that supports the development of student abilities to use communication skills, apply
core concepts, become self
-
s
ufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and
integrate knowledge.

Candidates

demonstrate a commitment to challenging each student and providing a supportive environment for working
and learning. The core content of

the MIC Program includes major strands or themes in classroom management and
multicultural issues.
Candidate
s select and apply (or modify) one of a number of models for classroom management and
prepare a written approach to managing students and classroo
m in effective ways.
Candidate
s research and incorporate
learning activities that appeal to students from a variety of learning, socio
-
economic, cultural, ethnic, gender, and physical
ability backgrounds.
Candidates

are expected to demonstrate high level
s of sensitivity to differences among students and
maintain high expectations of all students. Lesson plans include strategies for addressing instruction for
students with
special needs in the classroom. Cooperating and supervising teachers observe
candi
date

performance in these areas.

(EDC
634, EDP 658, EDC 730, EDC 777)


Standard 3:

Implements/Manages Instruction

The teacher introduces/implements/manages instruction that develops student abilities to use communication skills, apply
core concepts, be
come self
-
sufficient individuals, become responsible team members, think and solve problems, and
integrate knowledge.

In the science methods course,
candidates

examine research and experience findings related to the use of effective
questioning strategies.

Candidate
s read and discuss a handout (Rowe and others) containing recommendations for effective
questioning in the classr
oom. During student teaching, candidate
s’ questions are analyzed by the supervising teacher.
Recommendations for improvement are m
ade, and a refocusing activity occurs using the methods
handout on
recommendations.

(EDC 634)



Candidate
s are expected to use a variety of modes of instruction in lesson planning and actual teaching. A variety of
teaching methods is used to build inter
est in the science concepts and skills as well as to accommodate a wide range of
diversity among learners. Multiple teaching methods are modeled for future teachers in program classes. The field of
science lends itself to a variety of modes of instruction
. Activities encouraging an understanding of the nature of the
scientific enterprise are encouraged and expected. In particular, scientific inquiry is a major theme in the science methods

course and in the student teaching experience.
Candidates

are obs
erved relative to their application of scientific principles
to everyday life experiences and are guided toward increased sensitive to the needs and feelings of students. Student
teachers provide feedback to students in an effort to guide their learning a
nd help correct misconceptions students may be
forming. A major emphasis in class is the discussion of observations and inferences made during exploration and
laboratory experiences.

(EDC 634, EDC 730, EDC 777, EDC 746)


Standard 4:

Assesses and Commu
nicates Learning Results

The teacher assesses learning and communicates results to students and others with respect to student abilities to use
communication skills, apply core concepts, become self
-
sufficient individuals, become responsible team members,
think
and solve problems, and integrate knowledge.

Candidates

e
mbed assessments of daily
instruction in lesson planning
and make judgments regarding the effectiveness of
the instructional strategies used in the classroom. Performance assessment receives c
onsiderable emphasis in special
(content specific) methods classes.
Candidates

practice developing innovate and effective assessments and incorporate
these elements in lesson and unit planning. Lesson plans and classroom tests are examine
d to e
nsure that

multiple forms of
assessment and evalua
tion are included in the lesson and
classroom.

(EDC 634, EDC 730, EDC 777, EDC 746)






19

Standard 5: Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning

The teacher reflects on and evaluates specific teaching/learning situations
and/or programs.

Following instruction,
candidates

are asked to analyze their teaching and reflect upon ways in which instruction might have
been more effective.
Candidates

are asked to reflect based upon their own feelings about the lesson and do so in a
n
informed manner using what they know about learning and instruction. Following classroom observations by supervisors,
candidates
are asked to identify strengths and limitations of the day’s instruction. After giving
candidates
an opportunity to
think a
bout the effectiveness of their lessons, the supervisor shares his/her written insights regarding the student teacher

s
work. Following the conference, student teachers prepare and submit a written response to comments and
recommendations offered by the s
upervisor.

(EDC 634, EDC 730, EDC 777, EDC 746)



Standard 6:

Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others

The teacher collaborates with colleagues, parents, and other agencies to design, implement, and support learning programs
that develop student abili
ties to use communication skills, apply core concepts, become self
-
sufficient individuals, become
responsible team members, think and solve problems, and integrate knowledge.

Cohort leaders often ask
candidates

to work with a student from another disciplin
e (or two) in planning and teaching a
mini
-
unit (or lesson) incorporating concepts and skills from each of the disciplines. For example, a history and
mathematics teachers taught a short unit incorporating selected history/culture of Egypt with some of th
e early and very
significant mathematics knowledge derived from that culture. Another group of
candidates

combined a study of radiation
with the massive destruction of Hiroshima and its effect upon that society. These activities have helped
candidates

di
scover
value in collaboration among teachers of different disciplines
,
i.e., interdisciplinary lesson project
.
(EDC 730, EDC 777,
EDC 746)


Standard 7:

Engages in Professional Development

The teacher evaluates his/her overall performance with respect to
modeling and teaching Kentucky's learning goals, refines
the skills and processes necessary, and implements a professional development plan.

Candidates

are expected to participate in a content
-
specific professional meeting at the regional or state level.
For example,
science
candidates

participate in the annual meeting of
the
Kentucky Science Teachers Association (KSTA) and
mathematics teachers participate in the annual meeting of
the
Kentucky Council of Teachers of Mathematics (KCTM).
Candidates

plan the
ir agenda from a pre
-
prepared program, project what they will learn from the experience, participate in
sessions, share conference gleanings with fellow
candidates
, and prepare a written evaluation of the experience and their
accomplishments. This fall, s
cience methods
candidates

are preparing a group presentation in November at KSTA.
Participation in the confer
ence supports candidates’ identity

with the teaching profession and
with
professionals

in the field
.
In addition, the activity supports the theme

of developing leaders within the profession.
In these settings, candidate
s have
an opportunity to meet, and talk with, some of the best teacher leaders in Kentucky.

(EDC 634, EDC 746)


Standard 8:

Knowledge of Content

The teacher demonstrates a curre
nt and sufficient academic knowledge of certified content areas to develop student
knowledge and performance in those areas.

Grades in the content major (and support areas) and Praxis examination scores serve as one type of evidence indicating
knowledge of

the content area.
Candidates

in mathematics and the sciences at UK tend to have good grades, pass the
content
-
area P
RAXIS

exam
inations,

and exhibit strong intellectual skills as indicated by GRE scores.

Candidates

are asked to respond to thought questi
ons/problems from the content area in the program admission interviews.
This
enables

program repre
sentatives to get a glimpse of candidate
s’ abilities and aptitudes toward the content area. Special
methods courses provide extended experiences in the spec
ial nature of mathematics and/or the sciences. What does it mean
to be a mathematician, physicist, biologist, chemist, or earth scientist? What are the “big ideas” of mathematics and/or
science? What are the modes of inquiry in the sciences or mathemati
cs? How does one go about the processes of doing
science or mathematics? What is really important about the disciplines that must be taught to young people? What content
(knowledge, skills, and attitudes) is developmentally appropriate and must be inclu
ded in the secondary school programs?
How can this content be arranged and structured to capture the interests and engagement of high school students?
Questions like these constitute a significant part of the special methods courses.
Candidates

are give
n many opportunities
to read, discuss, demonstrate, and write about these questions.
These experiences

tend to increase
candidate
s’

20

understanding of the disciplines and increase their level of excitement, and preparation, for teaching mathematics or
scien
ce.

(EDC 634, EDC 746)


Standard 9:

Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

The teacher uses technology to support instruction; access and manipulate data; enhance professional growth and
productivity; communicate and collaborate with colleagues, pa
rents, and the community; and conduct research.

Over the past few years, future teachers have entered the teaching profession with much higher levels of computer skills
even though there remains a range of abilities exhibited by these
candidates
. The use
of technology is another strand within
the MIC Program. Cohort leaders, technology instructors, and special methods instructors stress the importance of these
teaching skills. Both within the core program and special methods
,

candidates

are given opportu
nities to complete
technology projects. Projects include spreadsheets, power point presentations, applied use of the internet for data sources,

and gathering and interpreting data.
Candidates
demonstrate their abilities to use technology by preparing les
sons using
technology.
Candidate
work demonstrates the use of technology to address interests and abilities of diverse student needs
and learning styles. Mathematics and science teachers tend to use the full range of technology applications in teaching;
however, gathering and analyzing real data are recurring emphases in many of their applications.

(EDC 634, EDC 730,
EDC 777)


Unit Functional Skills and D
isposition
s

The Science Education Program endorsed the Unit Functional Skills and Dispositions for a
ssessment of professional
dispositions expected of its candidates.
Following each
disposition are

selected examples illustrating ways in which
the
disposition is enhanced and assessed throughout the program.


Functional Skill and Disposition 1
:

Candidates

communicate appropriately and effectively.

• Communicates orally in formal presentations

• Communicates with individuals in small groups in informal settings

• Uses nonverbal communication skills

• Communicates in writing (reports, essays, letters, memos,

emails)

Science certification seekers present data to other
candidate
s in methods classes and receive feedback from other members
of the class and instructor about the clarity of the presentation. At the end of the program,
candidates

must formally prese
nt
an exit portfolio to a group of evaluators. The presenter must clearly communicate their projects to the evaluators.

Pre
-
service science teachers submit several written reports, essays
,

and reflections to their various supervisors. Supervisors
comment

upon the content of these writing samples and suggest improvements to the writing. When a
candidate
’s writing
contains multiple serious problems, the science supervisor may schedule additional meetings with the
candidate
to improve
their writing or sugge
st additional writing resource
s available from the UK Writing Center
. Entry into the program requires
the submission
of

a writing sample.

Student teachers are observed in high school classroom
s

through student teaching and fall placements. Comments about

the student’s communication both in whole group and individualized instruction stem from these observations. During post
observation conferences, a discussion of the positive and improvement areas noted by the observer follows an observation.
The pr
e
-
se
rvice teachers write a response to the comments arising from the post
-
observation conference.

Functional Skill and
Disposition 2:

Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes.

• Demonstrates knowledge and command of socio
-
cultural variables in education



Demonstrates constructive attitudes toward children, youth, parents, and the community

• Demonstrates awareness and acceptance of diversity in educational settings

In the common core courses for the MIC program,
candidates

write several papers demonstrati
ng knowledge of socio
-
cultural variables in education

and diversity in educational settings. A written management plan includes detailed
descriptions of rules, policies
,

and practices for a science classro
om. The plan incorporates how

the pre
-
service tea
cher
intends to address specific problems presented by diversity (e.g.
,

ADD, racial characteristics, non
-
native English speakers,

21

gender bias). A multicultural assignment details
candidate
s


increasing aware
ness

of other cultures and knowledge of these
cu
ltures.

In methods courses,
candidate
s discuss various forms of interaction they experienced with students, parents
,

and the
community. Discussions of possible diplomatic solutions to problem interactions ensue.

Functional Skill and Disposition 3
:

Candi
dates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and
relationships.

• Correctly states key subject matter ideas

• Explains key subject matter ideas

• Tailors key subject matter ideas to diverse populations

• Addresses misconceptions in k
ey subject matter ideas

• Identifies real life examples to enhance student learning

Secondary science education majors develop science units including state and national standards. The units are reviewed
and commented upon for content both extraneous and
omitted information. The unit assessment includes evaluation of how
candidate
s plan for not only the typical student but the atypical student within the classroom. Appropriate lesson
modifications are evaluated.

Classroom observations include notes abou
t the
candidate
’s knowledge of the subject and their facilitation of instruction
with the entire classroom. As the pre
-
service teacher facilitates questioning in a classroom, observers note how well the
student teacher acknowledges misconceptions an
d the
method(s) student teacher
s use to address the misconception.
Student teachers are also encouraged to bring pertinent examples of the instructional objectives from everyday experiences.
These skills are evaluated by the supervisor and the cooperating teac
her on observation forms and these evaluations are
shared with the student teacher in post
-
observation conferences.

Functional Skill and Disposition 4
:

Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of
colleagues, administrators, stu
dents, and parents in educational settings.

• Demonstrates acceptable educator behavior in diverse educational settings

• Demonstrates adaptability in reflecting on self in relation to diverse groups

Student teacher observations by both the cooperating tea
chers and the
university
supervisor comment upon the student
teacher’s professional behavior in the school setting. In the fall semester, cohort groups engage in discussions surrounding

professional behavior.

All student teachers submit reflective pieces
via e
-
mail about their classroom performance after all formal observations.
These reflections comment upon the
candidate
’s op
inion about the post conference

and methods the individual could use to
address the problems in future lessons.

Functional Skill a
nd Disposition 5:

Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.

• Demonstrates understanding of the Kentucky School Personnel Code of Ethics

• Complies with all legal requirements required of educators in a knowledgeable and time