Dowsing Geometry and the Structure of the Universe Version 2

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Dowsing Geometry v28



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1

of
50

Dowsing Geometry and the

Structure of the
Universe



Version 2

by

Jeffrey S. Keen

BSc Hons ARCS MInstP CPhys CEng

www.jeffreykeen.org





Abstract

Comprehension
of the structure of the universe currently concentra
tes on attempting
to link quantum physics with general relativity. Many researchers, including the
author, believes that the solution lies not just in physics, but involves consciousness
and cognitive neuroscience together with understanding the nature an
d perception of
information. This paper combines these latter factors in a non
-
orthodox approach
linked by geometry.


Developing an analogy to X
-
ray crystallography and diffraction gratings may prove
useful. We are not using electro
-
magnetic waves, but
consciousness. Confidence in
this approach is justified for several reasons. Some of the patterns observed when
dowsing seem similar to those produced by diffraction gratings or x
-
ray
crystallography. But in particular, as a result of numerous experimental

observations,
we know that waves are involved in dowsing.


In the
following data base of different

geometries
,

r
esearchers are invited to find
if
mathematical transformation
s
exist that would explain relationships between the mind
generated geometric patt
erns observed by dowsing, and the physical source geometry
that creates those patterns.
This should help demonstrate how dowsing, the universe,
and consciousness are connected
,

and the mechanisms involved. An analogy is to
Crick and Watson discovering th
e structure of DNA by using Rosalind Franklin’s
diffraction images.

This paper is version 2 of a paper originally published in September 2009,
and
contains major updates to the following four geometries
:
-

a straight line,
3 dots in a
triangle, 1
-
circle, 2
-
circles, and “Bob’s Geometry”.

Exciting discoveries are that equations for the mathematical transformation between
physical objects

and their perceived geometrical pattern are simple functions
involving Phi (
φ
), with no arbitrary constants


i.e.

true universal constants.
Perceived patterns are affected by
several
local and astronomical forces
that include

electro
magnetic field
s
, spin, and gravity
. The findings
formally
confirm the
connection between the st
ructure of space
-
time,
phi,
the mind, and observations.



Dowsing Geometry v28



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The Problem

For over eighty years

quantum mec
hanics has defied comprehension. E
ven Einstein
referred to it as “spooky”, leading some authorities to suggest

more recently

that the
solution lies not

in physics, but in consciousness and cognitive neuroscience

(e.g.
reference
s

58
,
59
,
60
,

61
,

67
,

7
1
)
,

together with understanding the nature and
perception of information
(e.g. reference
s

16
,
3
9
,
49
)
. As no
comprehensive
answers
have been forthcoming

to
these problems
,
or in unifying quantum physics with
general relativity,
the author believes it is necessary to think “outside the box” and
examine non
-
mainstream topics for inspiration.

Who should read this paper?

This paper is aimed at researchers in quan
tum physics, general relativity, cosmology
,
and others interested in the structure of the universe,

who not only have the same
philosophy

as the author

in the possible relevance of consciousness and information
,
but are able to visualise and demonstrate ma
thematically, multi
-
dimensional
geometric transformations.

Why Geometry

From ancient times

there is much scientific literature linking geometry to the structure
of the universe.
For example, t
he ancient Greeks knew about polyhedra and their
angles, and
the same common angles have been found in many

diverse

branches of
science such as molecular biology, astronomy, magnetism, chemistry, and
fluid
dynamics.

These commonalities cannot be coincidental. It would suggest that they
reflect the structure of the

universe.

The Philosophy of the Information Field

The Information Field may currently be the best working model that helps to explain

numerous observations and phenomena.

The h
andling of information is a key.

It is

postulate
d

that the Information Field

comprises inter alia structured information, with
long
-
term stability, self organised holographically

(e.g. reference
s

39
,
54
,
66
)
. This
model possibly involves standing waves and nodes as the mechanism for conveying
information

including such concepts

a
s

gravity.

Traditional quantum physics, on the other hand, considers the Zero Point Field as
comprising randomly generated virtual elementary particles being spontaneously
created and annihilated


too fast for us to detect them. The “vacuum energy” or
nega
tive pressure associated with this process could be the explanation for dark
energy and the gravitational repulsion. Based on the current “orthodox” understanding
of physics, the main problem with this theoretical approach is that it gives results that
are

120 orders of magnitude too great compared to the observed cosmic acceleration!

(e.g. reference 12)
.

Yet another reason for some lateral thinking.
F
urther details on
the
c
oncepts associated with the Information Field

can be found in
references 15 and
1
9
.


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Contents

and Hyperlinks
/Bookmarks

The Problem

................................
................................
................................
...................

1

Who should read this paper?

................................
................................
..........................

2

Why Geometry

................................
................................
................................
...............

2

The Philosophy of the Information Field

................................
................................
.......

2

Why Dowsing

................................
................................
................................
................

4

The Objective

................................
................................
................................
.................

4

Protocol and Methodology

................................
................................
.............................

4

Confidence in the Technique

................................
................................
.........................

4

Purpose of this Database and Expected Outcome
................................
..........................

5

Non Dowsers

................................
................................
................................
..................

5

Summary of Findings

................................
................................
................................
.....

6

Definitions
................................
................................
................................
......................

6

Contents of Database and Bookmarks

................................
................................
...........

7

0
-

Dimension

................................
................................
................................
............

8

1 Dot
................................
................................
................................
.......................

8

1


Dimension

................................
................................
................................
...........

9

A Row of Dots in a Straight Line

................................
................................
..........

9

A Straight Line

................................
................................
................................
.....

12

2


Dimensions

................................
................................
................................
........

12

3 Dots in a Triangle
................................
................................
..............................

12

4 Dots in a Square

................................
................................
................................

12

A Triangle

................................
................................
................................
............

15

A Square
................................
................................
................................
...............

16

1 Circle

................................
................................
................................
.................

16

2 Circles

................................
................................
................................
...............

17

Vesica Pisces

................................
................................
................................
........

21

3 Circles

................................
................................
................................
...............

23

Half Sine Wave

................................
................................
................................
....

25

Two Parallel Lines

................................
................................
...............................

27

Angle
d Cross

................................
................................
................................
........

31

Vertical Cross
................................
................................
................................
.......

31

Alpha Symbol

................................
................................
................................
......

32

Bob’s Geometry

................................
................................
................................
...

33

3


Dimensions

................................
................................
................................
........

36

Banks and Ditches
................................
................................
................................

36

A Sphere
................................
................................
................................
...............

36

A Cube

................................
................................
................................
.................

36

A Pyramid

................................
................................
................................
............

37

Generalisations, Conclusions, and Basic Theory

................................
.........................

38

Common Factors

................................
................................
................................
......

38

Conclusions based on 2 and 3
-
body interactions

................................
.....................

39

M
agnetism
................................
................................
................................
................

40

Waves and Phase
................................
................................
................................
......

41

Interactions, Resonance and Waves

................................
................................
.........

41

Wave Velocities & Frequencies
................................
................................
...............

44

The Way Forward

................................
................................
................................
........

45

Acknowledgements

................................
................................
................................
......

47

References

................................
................................
................................
....................

48

Further Reading

................................
................................
................................
...........

49

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Why Dowsing

Not only does d
owsing strongly combine

consciousness and information,
but
it has

been know
n

for many y
ears
that

in dowsing, geometry is fundamental.
As a result of
using dowsing as a scientific tool
,

n
umerous published papers have found the same

polyhedra and other

universal angles
,
(s
uch as

references
10, 11, 13, 14
)
.
Experimental results
, using sound s
cientific techniques for measurements and their
protocols,

are starting to provide a significant input to the fundamental und
erstanding
of how dowsing works, and provide confidence in using this technique

to explore the
structure of the universe.

(see ref
erences 6, 7, 8, 17, 18).


Dowsing therefore seems an ideal technique to adopt in our quest to explore the
structure of the universe, as it is unique in combining some of the key components


consciousness, information, and
geometry
.

The Objective

The

ambi
tious objective
of this paper
is to investigate the structure of the Information
Field
, (and by implication the
Universe
)
, by dowsing pure geometry.
This is unique
and different from the usual applications associated with dowsing.
Over the last few
years
, t
his technique has proved to be a very effective research tool.

Ascertaining t
he
mathematics of transformations between physical source geometry and the neural
(sub) conscious patterns perceived

when dowsing
, could lead to clues as to how
nature’s infor
mation is stored and accessed
:

In other words “the structure of the
universe”.

Protocol and Methodology

Th
e technique
adopted

is dowsing simple 0, 1, 2, and 3
-
dimensional geometric shapes
(e.g. dots, lines, circles, cubes, etc.) and measuring in 3
-
dimen
sions the different
dowsable
patterns

detected. Dowsing this pure geometry eliminates any effects
or
perturbations of mass or

matter. We are therefore only researching individual
consciousness, astronomical factors, and the Information Field.



F
urther
ge
neral information

on the protocol and methodology adopted
,

including
details of
a specialised
yardstick

that has proved effective in dowsing measurements

can be found in
reference 27
.

Confidence in the Technique

Initial experimental results
are very promis
ing
suggest
ing that a plethora of factors are
involved in producing certain types of dowsable lines and patterns. These include:
-

1.

photons, magnetism and gravity

2.

the earth’s spin and several astronomical factors strongly influence dowsable
fields;

3.

the a
ct of observing two objects causes them to interact;

and


4.

dowsing a "n
-
dimensional" geometrical source produces, in some cases, the
same dowsable pattern as a "n+1 dimensional" geometric source.


In other words, there a
re

strong element
s

of
comprehensive
ness and
universality

in this adopted technique
.


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Developing an analogy to X
-
ray crystallography and diffraction gratings may
also
prove useful in
the

quest to probe the structure of the Information Field.

In this case

electro
-
magnetic fields

are not bein
g used
, but consciousness. Confidence in this
approach is justified for several reasons. Some of the patterns observed when
dowsing
, such as
Figure
33
,

seem similar to those produced by diffraction gratings or
x
-
ray crystallography. But in particular,
as a

result of numerous experimental
observations,
resonance, interference, null points, and 2:1 ratios have been observed.
These examples suggest waves are involved in dowsing
, and hence possible
diffraction patterns
.

Purpose of this Database and Expected Out
come

In the
following data base of different

geometries
,

r
esearchers are invited to find
if
mathematical transformation
s
exist that would explain
relationships between the
mind
generated
geometric patterns
observed
by dowsing, and the

physical

source geome
try
that creates those patterns.

This should help demonstrate how dowsing, the universe,
and consciousness are connected
,

and the mechanisms involved. An analogy is to
Crick and Watson discovering the structure of DNA by using Rosalind Franklin’s
diffrac
tion images.


This approach could also have the benefit of adding support
, or otherwise,

to the
theory of the Information Field
,

including an understanding of how macro geometry is
mirrored in it, and support or disprove the theory that the
Information Fie
ld
, and our
universe, is a 5
-
dimensional hologram.

Non Dowsers

For newcomers to dowsing
a brief explanation for the non dowser

can

be found
in
references 1, 2, 15, 36
.


As this database involves the measurements of auras, it is appropriate to explain that
an aura is a multi
-
layered subtle energy field surrounding any physical or abstract
object, and contains information about that object. Being perceived by the mind,
auras are created as a result of the object’s interaction with local space
-
time, and
usual
ly form a geometric pattern.
See

references 25 and 31.







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Summary of Findings

In

an attempt to assist in deciphering the following database of patterns,
Table 1
summarise
s

some interesting findings and ratios.


Source

Comments on
Dowsed Pattern
s

1 do
t

Quantitative

daily, lunar month, and annual
variations in
measurements
.
Example
s

of
the power of

f湴e湴


a湤n
“N
潤os
”.

A straight
line

Identical

observations

to a dot; 1
-
dimension
source
gives

the

same
pattern as 0
-
dim
ens
ions
.

A triangle

Scaling

of so
urce geometry; 2:1 ratios
.

A square

Scaling

of source geometry; 2:1 ratios
.

1 circle

2:1 ratio; vortex

creation
;
beam
divergence angle = arctan 1/131.

2 circles

Resonance
; optimum separation; 2:1 ratio

of maximum and minimum
beam length
;

bifurcation

of
the beam vortex and 2:1 bifurcation
factor
;

possible 5
-
dimensions
.

3 circles

S
imulation of new and full moon;
beam
divergence angle = arctan


0.000137

Half sine
wave

Observation

possibly produces a null waveform caused by the mirro
r
image of the source
geometry?

interaction between

the observer and
the source geometry?
Possible
5
-
dimensions
.

2 parallel
lines

R
esonance; optimum separation; 2:1 ratio; magnetic effect;

wave
length/velocity
; wavelength

= distance between observer node and
intent node; i
nteraction between observer and geometry is different to
the interacti
o
n

between the 2 lines
.

Vertical
cross

Gravity involvement
; connection between sight and dowsing;
beam
divergence

angle = arctan 1/131.

Banks

and Ditches

Same

pattern

as a full sine wa
ve
or

2 parallel lines; 3
-
dimension
source
geometry

same as 2
-
dimension
geometry.


Table 1

Definitions

Before progressing further, it is necessary to define axes. This enables a more precise
mathematical representation of the 3
-
dimensional patterns being

dowsed, and enables
meaningful communication between researchers. If we define that

a)

Both
the x
-
axis,
and the

y
-
axis
are in the

horizontal

plane

b)

The z
-
axis is vertical
i
.e.

the x
-
y plane is horizontal

the x
-
z plane is vertical

c)

For 0, 1, and 2
-
dimensions

the source geometry is drawn on a sheet of paper in
the x
-
z plane where y=0
. However,
for practical experimental reasons, there
are a few instances where the source geometry has been placed on the ground,
i.e. on the x
-
y plane.

d)

The centre of the source g
eometry is at the origin of the axes.


In
general, different p
eople perceive similar patterns,

a
lthough the
ir

dimensions

may

vary
.
References

17,

20
-
24 and 34

give

further information on
variations when
measuring dowsable fields
. We know from preliminar
y work that this
is not relevant
Dowsing Geometry v28



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to
our

objective

to create a data base of patterns, as key angles remain constant, and
the perceived patterns only differ in scale, with possible minor perturbations that do
not affect the overall observed geometry.

Only

t
he

multiplying coefficients change

in
the mathematical description; the overall relationships are similar
.

Contents

of Database

and Bookmarks

0
-

Dimension

Source Geometry

Description of Source

.

1 Dot

1


Dimension


Source Ge
ometry

Description of Source


. . . . . . .

A row of dots in a straight line


1 straight line

2


Dimensions

Source Geometry

Description of Source

.

. .

3 dots in a triangle

. .

. .

4 dots in a square


Triangle


Square


Circle


2 Circles


Vesica Pices


3 Circles


½ sine wave


2 Lines



Angled Cross


Vertical Cross


Alp
ha symbol


Bob’s Geometry

3


Dimensions

Source Geometry

Description of Source



Banks and Ditches


Sphere


Cube


Pyramid







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0
-

Dimension


1 Dot

T
he simplest geometry
is

a dot
, which

produces a
dowsable horizontal beam, w
ith an
outward flow
, e
nd
ing

in a c
lockwise spiral
.

The

horizontal profile of the

dowsed
beam is shown
as the

graph

in Figure 1
.

The typical length of this beam is in the
range 3
-
6 metres.

1 Dot x
-
y Plane

(Horizontal Beam Profile)



Figure 1

Taking a vertical cross section through th
is

horizontal beam

by
dowsing its

extremities
, produces a rectangle
, as depicted in Figure 2
.

This is surprising as
instinct would have suggested a circle or oval cross
-
section
.


The properties of dowsing a dot make it suitable for a standard
yardstick

that has
proved effectiv
e in dowsing measurements
.


See reference 27.


1 Dot x
-
z Plane

(Vertical Cross Section)











Figure 2

Profile of the Beam created by Dowsing 1 Dot
Figure 2
-0.25
-0.20
-0.15
-0.10
-0.05
0.00
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
Length of Beam
metres
Width of beam
metres

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1


Dimension



A Row of Dots in a Straight Line


Dots in a straight line are analogous to a diffraction grating. As the number of dots
increases,

the width and length of the horizontal dowsable field, emanating from the
dots, changes.


The measurements

in Table 1

quantify these changes in length
in the horizontal x
-
y
plane
, as the number of dots increases from 2
-
7
.

As the number of linear dots
in
the
source geometry

increases
,
the

length

of the dowsed

field
decreases
.
As is apparent
from Table 1, t
he decrease in th
is

beam length is
more

strongly geometric
than
arithmetic
.

Beam Lengths of 1
-
7 Linear Dots


Number
of Dots

Length of
Beam(s)

n
-
(n+1)

n/
(n+1)

n

metres

metres











1

4.113

0.353

1.094

2

3.760

0.332

1.097

3

3.428

0.233

1.073

4

3.195

0.195

1.065

5

3.000

0.605

1.253

6

2.395

0.615

1.346

7

1.780





Average

0.389

1.154

Variation

0.147

0.096





37.92%

8.35%


Table 1


Beam Width
s of 1
-
7 Linear Dots


Number
of Dots

Width of
each
Beam

(n+1)
-
n

n/(n+1)

n

cms

cms











1

0.700

1.800

0.280

2

2.500

1.500

0.625

3

4.000

0.500

0.889

4

4.500

0.500

0.900

5

5.000

2.000

0.714

6

7.000

2.500

0.737

7

9.500





Average

1.467

0.691

V
ariation

0.644

0.159





43.9
4
%

23.00%


Table 2

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The measurements

in Table 2

are
also
in the horizontal x
-
y plane
, but quantify the
change in width of the dowsed field as the number of dots increases from 2 to 7
.

At
the same
distance from the source, a
s
the number of linear dots
increases
,
the beam
width
also
increases
.
Th
is

increase
in width
is neither str
ongly arithmetic nor
geometric. There may be an analogy to diffraction gratings as more slits produce a
wider area of interference fringes.


Drilling

down to the next level of detail

is shown in figure 3, which is a plan view of
the dowsable pattern
.

This is an example for 7 dots.

Each dot produces 1 associated
beam.

It is the same pro
-
rata pattern for any number of dots.


7 Dots


x
-
y Plane (Horizo
ntal)


Figure 3


The measurements

in Table 3

are in the horizontal x
-
y plane

for each of the 7 beams.
The widths of the beams are measured at their
ends
.
As is apparent, t
he beam widths
and gaps remain approximately constant
.

All 7
beams are

Type 1

only
. All end in
Type 3

spirals. A
ll 7 beams end in
the same

straight line; ie they

each

have different
lengths
.
The sides of the beams are
also
straight lines
; ie the
ir envelope

form
s

a
triangular horizontal profile.

Each beam has a s
quare cross
-
section

as in Figure 2 for
a single dot.
The divergence of the beam is arctan 1/42.7,
and the angle of the
external beam in Figure 3 is 76°. T
h
e
s
e angles

are

not uni
versal, but depend on the
number of dots.



The above analysis related to searching for horizontal patterns.
If the

dowser’s

intent
is
in the vertical plane

adjacent to the source sheet of paper
,

a different pattern
is
observed
as in Figure 4.
As before
, there
are 7

lines a
nd 7

dots.
However, t
he end
dots each have 3 associated lines
, t
he middle dot has 1 line emanating from it
, but t
he
remaining 4 dots do not have any direct lines.

All t
he
se

lines seem to go to infinity

Dowsing Geometry v28



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and
comprise a series of spiral
s

which

alternate between
clockwise

and
anti
-
clockwise
. The angles depend on the number of dots
, but for 7 dots they are 90°, 35°,
63°, 45°
.


Beam Widths of 7 Linear Dots




Table 3



7 Dots


x
-
z Plane (Vertical)


Figure 4


Beam
Number
Width of
Beam(s)
Width of
Beam
Width of
Gap
n
metres
metres
metres
1
0.000
0.300
0.300
0.080
2
0.380
0.265
0.645
0.095
3
0.740
0.246
0.986
0.094
4
1.080
0.240
1.320
0.075
5
1.395
0.278
1.673
0.071
6
1.744
0.288
2.032
0.142
7
2.174
0.386
2.560
Average
0.286
0.093
Deviation
0.033
0.018
11.540%
18.851%
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Most inanimate objects as well as living animals or plants have 7 linear chakras.
Seven linear dots were chosen to see if there was any geometric connection to the 7
chakras, and to the aura and tree of life patterns generated by
these chakras. With this
objective in mind, the above experiments were repeated with the 7 dots positioned
vertically as well as 7 vertical circles. The same patterns as above were found,
suggesting rotational symmetry. Unfortunately, Figures 3 and 4 do

not suggest any
obvious connection to auras,
Type 2

lines, or the
tree of life patterns

(
see reference
14)



as usually associated with dowsing

life forms
. Consequently, it may be deduced
that matter as well as pure ge
ometry may be involved in producing chakra patterns.


A Straight Line

A straight line drawn on a horizontal sheet of paper dowses as 9 “reflections” on both
sides of the source line, and in the horizontal plane through the source line. However,
a physical

line, such as a pencil, only has 7 similar “reflections”. For both abstract
and physical lines of about 15 cms length, the separation distances between adjacent
reflections is about 1
-
2 cms.


The centre point of a

straight
abstract or physical
line

also

emits a perpendicular
dowsable

vortex

beam
.

Interestingly
,
it is found that the same results are obtained
irrespective of
the

length

of the source line
. Taken to the limit

the
beam
pattern
observed is identical to

dowsing

1

dot

as discussed earlier.

Ig
noring the above
reflections, t
here would seem no difference between dowsing a dot or a line!


2


Dimensions


3
Objects

in a Triangle

Three objects, such as three stones, three coins or three dots on a sheet of paper,
forming the corners of an equilateral

triangle, produce 3 straight energy lines in the
plane of the triangle, as shown in Figure 5a. One line emanates from each apex. Each
line has an outward flow, and forms a perpendicular to the opposite side of the
triangle.


Figure 5a


The lengths of these 3 lines are variable and depend on the separation distances
between the 3 objects. For example, if the 3 objects are 16 cms apart the lines are
.

.

.













Dowsing Geometry v28



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13

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50

about 500 metres long, but if the 3 objects are barely touching, the lines ex
tend only
about one metre. These three lines dowsed white on a Mager disc, and can be
classified as Type 1 subtle energy.


The usual Type 3 double spiral

terminates these
lines, and gives a green indication on a Mager disc. As explained in the section
co
vering 2
-
body interaction, these spirals bifurcate.


Perpendicular to the paper is a central upward clockwise conical helix, the base of
which is approximately circular and passes through the 3 objects. As usual, this
central structure comprises 7 pairs o
f inverted cones and is about 3 metres high. It
can be classified as Type 3 subtle energy, and dowses green on a Mager disk. It does
not bifurcate.


If the corners of the triangle were replaced with 3 very strong magnets, the 3 lines
have a
much shortene
d

length. For comparison, if the 3 magnets were 16 cms apart
each line is reduced to about 9 metres. The energy lines are no longer straight, but
resemble a sine wave with 7 turning points (4 peaks and 3 troughs). They also
dowsed white on a Mager disc.

As depicted in Figure 5b, these sine waves also ended
in a spiral, but with an anti
-
clockwise flow. B
ifurcation

is also still present. The
polarity of the magnets seems to make no difference.


Figure 5b


T
he central spiral

remains present but the magnetism seems to change the clockwise
conical combination of helices into an anticlockwise long vertical cylindrical helix.
This spiral does not bifurcate.


The interesting philosophical question
, which is discussed elsewhere,

i
s h
ow do the
three objects know where each other is
;

and hence form th
e

pattern
s in Figures 5
,

with
the correct dimensions

which

are a function of

the separation distances between the
three bodies and the
angles comprising

their triangle
?


Only cursory mea
surements in 3
-
dimensions were taken. The more detailed inner
structure of the lines and spirals needs further research.


4
D
ots in a
S
quare

The
source

4
d
ots

in the following example

are

2.5 cms apart a
nd form the

corners of
a square
, with the origin of

the axes

at
the
centre of the
square
.

On

dows
ing
,

6

beams

.






Dowsing Geometry v28



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14

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50

are observed in the h
orizontal x
-
y plane
s
, comprising
2 sets of 3
.

Figure
6
, a plan
view,

is l
ooking down

on this dowsed pattern,

and the top two dots

of the source
square

are shown
.

The l
ength
of
the beams
wa
s about
3.95 metres

on the day of the
measurements
.

4 Dots in a Square

(
Horizontal
)

Plan


Figure
6



4 Dots in a Square

Vertical Cross Section


Figure
7


Figure
7

is a vertical cross se
ction through the 6 beams. The upper diagram is the
cross
-
section at the origin: ie y

=

0. The 4 source dots are at centre of
the
2 middle
Dowsing Geometry v28



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15

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50

beams. The bottom cross section was taken 2.6 metres from origin: ie y

=

2.6. As is
apparent,
on moving away from

the origin, the top 3 beams diverge from the lower 3
beams. At y = 2.6m
the separation between the top

and bottom

3 beams increases by
2.25


7.7 times, and

t
he right hand side beams

seem to

curve towards the centre

beam by 28%
.


In
Figure 6
, intent was

dowsing lines in a horizontal plane.

T
he intent

in

Figure 7
is

recording

lines in

the

x
-
z vertical plane at the origin: ie in the plane of the paper, or
y=0
. There are
4 lines
-

2 vertical

and
2 horizontal.

All lines have a perceived
outwards flow
, an
d the l
ines
are
about 1 cm thick.

On the date and time of
measurement, the l
ength of each of the 4 lines
wa
s about 60 metres.


4 Dots in a Square

Vertical Lines



Figure
8

A Triangle

A solid equilateral triangle

(having sides o
f about 11.5 cms)

produces a very different
pattern to 3 dots in a triangular formation that has been described earlier. In the plane
of the paper there are no dowsable patterns, which is the opposite of the 3 dots!
Coming perpendicularly out of the pape
r (i.e. horizontally) are 6 lines comprising two
pairs of three lines. A
s illustrated in Figure 9, a

vertical cross
-
section through these 6
lines shows that they form the corners of two triangles which are
about
4

and
8

times
scaled up versions of the ori
ginal source triangle

(i.e. sides of about 44 cms and 80
cms)
.


Figure 9

Dowsing Geometry v28



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A Square

As with a

triangle

described

above
,
there are no dowsable patterns in the plane of the
paper on which is drawn a squ
a
re

(having 5 inch sides)
.

C
oming perpendicularly out
of the paper (i.e. horizontally) are 8 lines comprising two pairs of four lines. A
s
depicted in Figure 10, a

vertical cross
-
section through these 8 lines suggests that they
form the corners of two squares which are

about
4

and

8

times
scaled up versions of
the original source square

(i.e.

sides of

20 inches and 40 inches)
.

As with a triangle
above, these seem to be further examples of a 2:1 ratio.



Figure 10

1 Circle

Perception in 2
-
Dimensions

Dowsing

an abstract 2
-
dimensional circle, such as one drawn on paper has a perceived
aura, in the plane of the paper, having a radius greater than the source circle. Figure
11a represents

this.


For different sized source circles, the dowsed aura radius is a

linear relationship in the
form
aura radius = constant * circle radius
, with the constant > 1
.


However, in finer
detail, the dowsed findings are more complex.


1 Circle and its Aura


Figure
11a



Scaling

Figure
11b

is a grap
h showing how the radius of a circle’s aura increases with the
increasing radius of the circle creating the aura. The top line is measuring the aura
from the centre of the source circle, whilst the bottom line is measuring the same aura
from the circumfer
ence of the circle. The latter is useful for 2
-
body experiments.


The formulae for the core aura size,
a
, are

Dowsing Geometry v28



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17

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50

a = 2.7568 r

when measured from the centre of the source circle, or


(i)

a =
1
.7568 r

when measured from the circumference of the circle.


(ii)


Simple mathematics of the geometry between the circle’s radius and its aura explains
why the difference between the two coefficients is exactly 1.


The measurements for Figure
11b

were taken on Wed 19
th

Jan 2011.

This was new
moon.


It is well known

that new moon shortens measurements, whilst full moon
expands measurements.

(See Reference

2
1
). The above constant
1.7568

is therefore
not unique, but depends on the time and date of the measurement. For comparison at
a last quarter moon equation (ii
) becomes

a =
5.78

r
, whilst at full moon the formula
becomes
a =
9.
89

r.


Core Aura Sizes for Different Diameter Circles
a = 1.7568r
R
2
= 0.9995
a = 2.7568r
R
2
= 0.9998
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
Radius of Circle r
cms
Radius of Aura a
cms
Aura from Cicumference
Aura from Centre
Linear (Aura from
Cicumference)
Linear (Aura from Centre)


Figure
11b

9 Rings

Figure 1 only represents the core aura. Abstract circles produce 9 aura rings
extending
outwards from the core aura, but solid discs only produce 7 rings.


(
See
Reference
23
).


Perception in 3
-
Dimensions

Dowsing a circle also
produces a 3
-
dimensional subtle energy beam coming
perpendicularly out of the paper.

The beam is a clockwise spiral having a
length

greater than
12m

when measured

at full moon.

The d
i
ameter of
the
spiral at its source

(i.e. at the sheet of paper with the circle)

equals the diameter of the core aura
, which
suggests that the perceived aura is the envelope of the spiral. This beam also has 9
layers emanating from the 9 rings.


This secti
on is only a summary.
Full details
are contained
in
R
eference 31.


2 Circles

An interaction between
2
-
circles or
any two objects occurs if they are in close
proximity
.

The observed dowsable pattern is a function of the size of the source
Dowsing Geometry v28



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18

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50

objects and thei
r separation distance.
The dowsed pattern for 2 equal circles is shown
in Figure 12
a
, and bears little resemblance to the pattern from 1 circle.

It comprises
many straight
subtle energy
lines
,

conical helix vortices,
and curlicues, which have
dynamics as

described below.


Straight Lines

2 circle interaction produces six straight

dowsable

subtle energy
lines
:


The Dowsable Pattern Produced by 2
-
Body Interaction



Figure 1
2a


Two lines, or more accurately 2 subtle energy beams,

a

&
b

are on the axis

through
the centre
s of the 2 circles, as shown in Figure 12a. They have a perceived outward
flow. The length of these lines is variable and is a function of the separation distance
between the 2
-
circles. In general, for any separatio
n, the lengths of lines
a

&
b

are

equal.


The two

lines
c

&
d

are

at right angles

to the line
s

a

& b,
and
are equidistant between
the centres of the 2 circles, if the circles are of equal size. If not, the point where
a

&
b

crosses
c

&
d

is

closer to the larger circle
.

Lines
c

&
d

also

have a perceived
outward flow, but
unlike line
s

a
&
b

are almost fixed in length as the circles separate.
In general, the lengths of lines
c

&
d

are

equal.


The two lines
e

&
f

have a flow

toward the geometrical centre point between the 2
circles








a

e

f

c

d

b



























g

h

k

n

l

m

i

j

o

p









Dowsing Geometry v28



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19

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Curved Lines

Also depicted in Figure 1
2a
,

are 3 types of curved lines.



12 of these curved lines marked
g
,
h
,

i
&

j

comprise 4
sets of curlicues

emanating
outwards from the 2 circles. Each se
t comprises 3 curved lines flowing away from

the 2
circles, o
n either side of the straight central
axis.
T
he lengths
of these curved
lines
are less than

the straight

lines
ab

and
cd
.


(However,
due to lack of space,
the
diagram is incorrect here as it sho
ws only 4

of the 12

lines emanat
ing

from the 2
circles).


Between the 2
circles,

6 curved lines, marked
o

&
p
, emanate inwards and join the 2
circles.

T
he
se look similar to a magnetic

lines of force pattern
. They consist of

2 pairs
each comprising

3 curve
d lines either side

of the central axis
.



These curlicues are

analogous to Cornu Spirals which are well known in optics and
occur when studying interference patterns and diffraction
.


Lines
ab

and
cd

seem to
act as
mirrors

so t
he

observed

patterns are sy
mmetrical about these lines.



Spirals

There are 17 spirals, or more accurately, conical helices. When looking downwards,
4 clockwise spirals, indicated in Figure 12a with green and red circles, terminate the
straight lines. The 12 spirals which termin
ate the curlicues positioned above the
central axis of the 2 circles (illustrated in Figure 12a) are also clockwise, but
anticlockwise below the central axis.

Cornu Spirals



Figure
1
2
b


Between the 2 circles, where lines e f and c d meet, a clockwise spiral is formed
(looking down).

If the 2 circles have equal sized auras this spiral, also marked with
green and red circles, is midway, but if they are unequal it is closer to the largest
circle. When the source paper is horizontal, this spiral has a perpendicular vertical
vortex.


Phys
ical or Abstract

Usually, the observed dowsed pattern is the same for abstract source geometry, such
as drawn on paper, as it is for any identical solid source geometry. If the 2 circles
drawn on paper are replaced by
any

2 solid objects, the observed pat
terns and effects
are identical save for an interesting difference which manifests itself in different null
points.




Dowsing Geometry v28



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20

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Null Points

Whilst separating

2 circles

or any 2 objects, a series of null points are created.


As the
null points are approached the cur
ved lines become flatter, as illustrated in Figure
1
2
b
. Eventually, a
t these null points all
16

terminating spirals,
the central spiral
, the
Cornu spirals

as well as all 1
8

curlicues

disappear. The straight line

ab

through the
central axis and the perpendi
cular line
s

cd

are not affected
. The dowsed pattern at
these null points is depicted in Figure
12c
.


Dowsed Pattern for 2
-
Circles at Null Points









Figure

12
c


However, there are also quantitative differenc
es between abstract and physical source
geometry as the two objects are separated.





Paper drawn circles

6 null points

are produced
, which are

spaced

in a

near

geometric

series.




Also for paper circles the 4 sets of
Cornu spirals marked as
k

&
l

and
m
&
n

each
comprise
9

separate Cornu spirals (i.e. 36 in total),
which are

spaced

nearly
equally
in
an
arithmetic

series
.


The Changing Subtle Energy Beam Length when
Separating 2 Circles


Dowsing the Interaction between 2 - Circles
Two Circles each of 3.85 mms drawn on paper
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
Separation Distance s
cm
Length of Generated Dowsable Line
metres


Figure
13

a

b

d

c

e

f

Dowsing Geometry v28



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21

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50



Solid discs or objects

Whilst separating

2
solid,
4

null points

are produced
,
the distances between
which are
nearly in a
geometric

series.

However, for solid objects the 4 sets of
Cornu spirals marked as
k

&
l

and
m
&
n

each comprise
7

separate Cornu spirals (i.e. 28 in total),
which are

spaced

nearly
equ
ally
in an
arithmetic

series
.


Resonance

As the circles are separated, a resonance effect changes the length of the central axis
lines
ab
. This is shown graphically in
Figure
13 where the

maximum length
,
L
max

of
each line
a

&
b

wa
s
2
.068

metres
,

when
th
e 2 circles (of radii 3.85 mms) were

at an
optimum critical separation

distance,
S
o
, of

3

c
ms

apart.


The lines
a

&
b

disappeared when the separation

of the 2 circles,
S
max

,
was equal
to
or greater than
6

c
m
s.

This is a
nother example

of
a
2:1 ratio
.


Bifurcation

All 16

termination

spirals bifurcate
, but not the centre spiral
.

Th
e spirals or more
accurately conical

heli
ces at the ends of the lines,

bifurcate

into a symmetrical pair of
“parabola

like
” shaped lines which end in another
helix which also bifurcates. This
is
shown in Figure 14, and the
process continues with ever decreasing parabola lengths.
About 6 bifurcations is the practical end of this
“infinite”
harmonic series.



An Illustration of Bifurcation



Figure
14


This section is only a summary.
Full details
including an analysis, theory, and
postulations
are contained

in
Reference 32.


Vesica Pisces

The
previous section

covered two separated circles. What happens when they
overlap? As illustrated in Figure 1
5
, a true vesica pices is a pair of overlapping
circles passing through each others centre. The experiments described here are based
on 2 circles
,

each of 1

inch diameter, drawn on separate sheets of paper placed on the
floor, and gradually separated.

Dowsing Geometry v28



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22

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50



Figure 1
5


Figure 16 illustrates the generalised aura and dowsable lines generated by this
geometrical pattern. The two
equal circles each have a radius =
r
, a diameter =
d
, and
s

= the separation distance between the centres of the two circles. The aura is shaped
liked a pair of lobes, similar to dipole radiation or the aura of a
rotating fan

as in
Reference 35
.


Figur
e
16

The aura comprises 9 bands, with the outer boundary drawn in red.


The maximum
size of the aura equals the diameter, d, of the circles, and is along the line
perpendicular to the axis through the two centres of the circles.


In addition, there are
two

variable length lines,
L
, (maximum length 6.8 metres on the date of
measurement), which are either side and also along the line perpendicular to the axis
through the two centres of the circles.


This line is marked in green, and is the one
used for measur
ement.


There is also a beam coming perpendicularly out of the paper
from the centre of the vesica pices, with an outward flow and possibly extending to
infinity, but this has not been measured.


Figure
17

is the graph obtained as the two circles are separ
ated. The y
-
axis is the
length of the line,
L
, and the x
-
axis is the ratio
s/r
. A resonance peak is obtained
when the separation distance,
s
,

between the 2 centres of the circles equals
r
, their
radius, i.e. a true vesica pices, when
s/r =1
.



Dowsing Geometry v28



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23

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Vesica Pices
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Separation/Radius s/r
Length of Line L metres


Figure
17


From a theoretical view a single circle produces a spiral with a base diameter 2 x the
diameter of the circle.


Two separate circles produce a variable line through the 2
centres.


The vesica pices seems to be a combination of both.



3 Circles

When 3
circles are aligned so that

1.

their centres are in a straight line, and

2.

adjacent circles are separated at a distance greater than the sum of their auras,

so

3.

there is no 2
-
circle interaction
(
as described
e
lsewhere)
,

then a subtle energy beam is formed as i
n Figure
18
.


Figure
18


Th
is

subtle energy beam always seems to flow out from the largest circle.

The
formation of this resonance beam on alignment is not limited by how far the circles
are separated.
It

extends over vast
di
stances, with
a mauve

dowsable Mager colour.
Although measuring absolute frequency is contentious and frequencies are relative to
individual dowsers, this 3
-
body beam is perceived
by the author
to have a frequency
in the order of 300mHz.

This beam also

s
eems to have

unknown and inexplicable

5
-
dimensional properties which
,

for convenience
,

can be classified as Type 5 lines.
(
This property is also found

in relation to
a half sine wave

and bifurcation
, which are
discussed elsewhere in this paper
)
.


Type 5
mauve

Dowsing Geometry v28



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24

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50

When m
easuring the length of a yardstick placed in this beam, the yardstick
’s

length
can be

significantly
increased or decreased (depending if the yardstick is placed
between 2

of the 3 circles
,

or in the beam

exiting from the 3 circles
)
, but its length is
the s
ame if the measurement is
made
with or against the

perceived

flow. i.e. the
length is invariant to
the
direction

of measurement
.


I
t is instructive to contrast the

above

3
-
body effect
s

to the 2
-
body case

discussed
earlier
.
These differences are summ
arise
d in Table 4, and as is apparent
,

the
subtle

energy beam
s are

very
different
.


Observation

3
-
circles

2
-
circles

Auras must overlap

x



Beam length dependent on the separation

x


=
s
潲瑥x⁰牯=畣e
d
=
=
x
=

=
B
楦畲cat
楯i
=
x
=

=
Ty灥‴=湥s
=
x
=

=
ieng瑨猠tea獵牥搠a牥=琠t湶n物r湴⁴漠摩牥c瑩潮
=
x
=

=
䵡来爠r潬潵爠睨w渠a汩gned
=
浡當m
=
睨楴w
=
c牥煵e湣y映=e牣e楶敤⁢ea洠癩扲b瑩潮o
=
浈m
=
歈k
=
=
呡扬攠b
=
=
T
桩猠獩s灬攠ge潭整oy=潦o㌠c楲i汥猠灲潤pce猠獩s楬a爠e晦ec瑳t瑯
=
a獴牯湯浩ca氠a汩g湭敮瑳=
獵s栠h猠湥眠w爠r畬u潯=
Ⱐ潲⁥c汩灳p献†䵯se⁤=瑡楬猠sa渠扥⁦潵=搠at
=
Reference 23.


The above analysis only relates to the situation when
no pair

of the 3 circles is in a
2
-
body interaction, i.e. the

circles

are sufficiently separated, and their auras do not
overlap. There are two other possibilities
. If all 3 circles are

in alignment, but

sufficiently close so they form

2
-
body interaction
s
, then Figure 19 illustrates
the

result. T
he beam emanating from
the 3 circles

divides in two
,

with a half
-
angle of
about 16°. These are very long lines having an outwards flow
, with
a mauve

Mager
colour, and seem to have
300mHz

frequencies,
and
5
-
dimensional properties,
as
discussed
above
.


Figure 20 illustrates that when the 3 circles are
not

in alignment, the end beam also
divides, but with a half
-
angle of about 31°, which is about double that in Figure 19.
The properties of this pair of beams are different to
those in Figure 19.
They have a
white Mager colour, and they seem to be similar to the
Type 4

lines found, for
example, when dowsing source geometry of 2 parallel lines. At about 300kHz, they
indicate a frequency 3 orders of magnitude less
than when the 3 objects are aligned.
It is not immediately apparent why only Figures 19 and 20, when all 3 circles are
close enough for 2
-
body interaction, the exit beam is split in 2.


Figure 19


Type 5
mauve


2
-
body
interacti
on

2
-
body
interaction


16°

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
25

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50


Figure 20


If 1

of the 3 circles

(A)

is
too far separated to be

in a 2
-
body interaction,
but B and C
are,
Figure 21 illustrates the geometry

when all 3 circles are in alignment. The 2
-
body interaction between B and C is different to when they are isolated
.

The beam
emitted from C
does not divide into 2,
is very long, has an outwards flow, and
as in
Figure 19,
has 5
-
dimensional properties
,
a mHz frequency,
and can be classified as
mauve Type 5
.



Figure 21


If, however, the 3
circles
in Figure
2
1
are
not

in alignment, as
depicted
in Figure 22,
the
single
very long emitted beam does not seem to have 5
-
dimensional properties,
but can be classified as
white
Type 4
, with a frequency of about 300kHz
.




Figure 22

Half Sine Wave

Th
e half sine wave
, Figure
23
,

is

possibly

the 2nd most interesting dowsable shape.

Irrespective of size, th
e

half sine wave shape
appears

inert

to dowsing
.

There are n
o
dowsable lines either horizontally or vertically.

Of all
the geometrical shapes so far
studied, the half sine wave is unique in this respect.
This may indicate another
example of waves
, with interference producing a null effect. The consequential
theoretical considerations are discussed later
.


A

B

C

Type 4
white


A

B

C

Type 5
mauve


31°


Type 4
white


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Half Sine Wave


Figure
23


The other unique, unexpected, inexplicable, and “weird” phenomenon, as discovered
by Bob Sephton, is that dowsing a half sine wave in the 5
th

dimension gives a strong
pattern. When re
-
dowsing the half sine wave geom
etry and specifying the intent in
the normal 3 and 4
-
dimensional space, there is a void as described above. However,
if the dowsing intent is asking for a pattern in 5
-
dimensional space one obtains 4
lines.



This pattern is illustrated in Figure
2
4
, an
d indicates the dimensions.


These
lines are in the plane of the paper, which can be fixed either horizontally or vertically


the effect and pattern seems identical.


There are no lines perpendicularly out of the
paper.


Although only measured over a dist
ance of 2.1 metres, these 4 lines appear to be
parallel within experimental error, have an outward flow, and seem to go to infinity.
Even though the source half sine wave only extended 110mm, the separation distance
between the outer lines was 1.35
-
1.40 me
tres. As they have different properties to the
4 types of lines generated by, say, banks and ditches, they are being referred to as
Type 5 lines.


All 4 of these Type 5 lines seem to have the same properties.


Unlike
Types 1


4 lines, they do
not

show a
colour on a mager disc.


These experiments have been repeated with

the following geometric shapes

that
produce strong patterns in 3 and 4 dimensional space (presumably the latter indicates
stability in time).


A dot, angled cross, vertical cross, circle, B
ob’s geometry, vesica
pisces, and a full sine wave.


All of these produce a void when dowsing in 5
-
dimensional space.


This void is in the plane of the paper as well as perpendicular to
the paper.


It makes no difference if the paper on which is drawn the

geometrical
shape, is fixed either horizontally or vertically.


Further research is obviously required to explain why a 5
-
dimensional result is only
obtained with a half sine wave, and
few

other geometri
es.

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Figure
2
4

Two Parallel Lines

Although 1 line
dowses the same as 1 dot, 2 lines dowse completely differently to 2
dots. Dowsing two lines

such as those drawn on a sheet of paper, as depicted in
Figure
2
5
,
is
probably
the most interesting

of the

dowsable geometry

described here.


Dowsing 2 Lines







Figure 2
5


In general, the very complex dowsable pattern produced by a source of 2 parallel lines
comprises 17 different lines, concentric cylinders, plus numerous spirals, which fall
into 4 different categories
. The pattern is illustrated

in

Figure
2
6
, with the 2

source
lines depicted

at the centre.

S
0
=
20mm

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The Dowsable Fields Produced By 2 Lines


9
Type 4


Figure
2
6


The Dowsable Fields Produced by 2 Lines

Each of the four types of fields that are found when dowsing 2 parallel lines ar
e
discussed below.

Type 1 Fields

As can be seen in Figure
2
6
, there are two groups of seven lines, making 14 in total.
These 14 lines are parallel to the two source lines. One group of seven lines is to the
right of the source whilst the other group of 7

lines is to the left. Each of these 14
lines has a perceived outward flow, but it is debateable what this “flow” actually
represents, although it could be a potential difference rather than a flow. As often in
earth energies, each line ends in a clock
-
w
ise spiral.



Separating 2 Lines


Figure
2
7

The length of the

14 outer

lines is variable, and mainly depends on the separation
distance between the 2 source lines, (with perturbations caused by astronomical
influences), as shown

graphically in Figure
27.


Dowsing 2 - Lines Interaction
Two Parallel Lines on Paper
0.000
0.500
1.000
1.500
2.000
2.500
3.000
3.500
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
Separation Distance
mm
Length of Generated Dowsable Field
metres
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T
his experiment
has been r
epeated several times over the last few years.
Although
t
he shape of the curve may differ

slightly
,

the maximum sized dowsable length of 3m
occurs when the 2 lines are 20mm apart. This is the optimum
separation distance,
when a resonance peak seems to occur. At separation distances equal to or greater
than 40mm, the dowsable field disappears suddenly. This is a
nother example of
a 2:1
ratio, which is found elsewhere in dowsing.


Seven Concentric Cylin
ders




Figure
2
8


The two groups of seven lines, as measured on the ground, are, in fact, seven
concentric cylinders. The dowser, walking along the ground, initially only detects
dowsable points where the cylinders meet the ground. This he then perceiv
es as two
sets of seven lines. Subsequent realisation of the three dimensional geometry follows
from further research, and leads to Figure 28, which illustrates this effect.


Type
1

Fields

A more advanced feature of these lines is that they give a w
hite
r
eading
on a Mager
disc
, as do the associated terminal spirals. However, it is not clear what this perceived
colour represents.
Some of the characteristics of
these

Type 1 lines
are summarised in
Table
4
.

Type 2 Fields

Type 2 lines have very different prop
erties to the Type 1 lines. A Type 2 line runs
along the top of the eastern most line, and extends outwards from both ends of the
bank. Measured from either end of the source lines, its length is greater than 100
metres in both directions. However, it
i
s difficult to measure distances

greater

than
hundreds of metres whilst keeping focused on the dowsable object
.

P
ossibly
, this line
is

perceived to extend to infinity,
but it is obviously impossible to prove this
statement. The Type 2 line also has an ou
tward perceived flow in both directions.


These Type 2 lines produce a g
reen

reading
on a Mager disc
, and have a r
ectangular
cross
-
section
.
In general, the size of the
Type 2
dowsable field increase
s

as the
source
lines

separat
e
.
Table
5

shows some of t
he

characteristics of the
se

Type 2 fields
.

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The Colours, Shapes, and Locations of the Lines



Field
Type




Location


Colour


Cross
-
Section


Shape of
Cross
-
Section

Approximate

Dimensions

metres

Approx.

Length

met
re
s


Type
1


Either side
of source
lines


White


Concentric
cylinders


Radii 0.1, with
axis along
centre of
source


5


Type
2

Along
easterly
line

Green

Rectangular



Height above
ground

0.5


Width


0.04



100+

Type
3


Along the
centre of
the source
lines

Red

Inverted conical
helix



Top of spiral
above ground

0.3


Diameter of
inverted base


1


100+


Separation
between
spirals

1

Type
4


Along
westerly
line

Blue

Diamond



Height above
ground

1.6


Width

0.40



100+


Table
5


Type 3 Fields

Unlike the previously described Ty
pe 1 and Type 2 lines, the Type 3 field is not a line
but a

series of spirals running
between the source 2 lines,

with a void between each
spiral. These spirals extend outwards from both sides of the source in an apparent
straight line.
The length of th
i
s

Type 3 line is

also

greater than 100 metres in both
directions

and the same qualification applies as for the Type 2 lines above.


Viewed downwards, these Archimedean (equally spaced)
spirals

turn
clockwise
, and

form an arithmetic progression, with a sepa
ration distance between adjacent spirals of
about 1 metre
, depending on the separation of the 2 source lines
.



These Type 3 lines produce an indication

on a Mager disc
of the colour red.
The
geometry of each spiral may be described as a pair of inverted

conical helices,
reflected at their apex. A further level of complexity is that each of the “spirals”
comprises 7 pairs of inverted conical helices stacked vertically.

Some of the
characteristics of the Type 3 fields are summarised in
Table
5
.


Type 4 F
ields

The fourth distinctive type of dowsable field runs along the most western of the 2
source lines. It extends outwards from both sides of this line, and as for the Types 2
and 3 lines above, has a length greater than 100 metres measured in both direct
ions
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from the ends of the source lines. This Type 4 line has a perceived outward flow, and
gives an
indicat
ion
on a Mager disc

of

the colour b
lue
. It has a d
iamond

shaped cross
-
section. Intriguingly, members of the Dowsing Research Group have reported b
asic
t
elepathy

when standing on these blue Type 4 fields.

Some of the characteristics of
the Type
4

fields
can be seen in Table
5
.


Orientation

The Type 2 line always runs along the most easterly source line, whilst the Type 4
line always runs along the m
ost westerly of the 2 source lines. When the 2 source
lines are orientated exactly
magnetic

east


west, there is a null point when the Type
2, 3, and 4 lines suddenly disappear. The Type 1 lines do not seem to be affected.
The implications of this are
discussed in the conclusions.


Angled Cross

Unlike two parallel lines, an a
ngled
c
ross

drawn

in
a
vertical plane
, as shown in
Figure
2
9
, does not produce

complex patterns.
There are n
o Type 2, 3, nor 4 fields.

What are produced are
4
horizontal

(Type1) li
nes emanating from the ends of the
source lines
. These have an o
utward flow
, with a l
ength

of

about 6 to 8 metres,
depending on time, the day, and the month.

These lines end in a
clockwise

spiral.


Angled Cross



Figure
2
9

Ver
tical Cross

A c
ross in

a

vertical plane
, as depicted in Figure
30

produces one
Type1
horizontal

line emanating from the centre

of the cross. It has an o
utward flow
and is perceived
to go to infinity with n
o spirals.

This b
eam diverges from a 7mm square c
ross section
to 19 cms square over a distance of 11.95 m from source.
This is a

very small angle
of divergence

whose a
rc tan
is
1/130.6
, which is very similar to the divergence of the
beam emanating from a circle, and is tantalising close to the F
ine Str
ucture Constant
=1/137)


In the
vertical

plane through the source
, four

Type 1 lines

are dowsed

which are
extensions of the source lines.

They have an o
utward flow
that is p
erceived to go to
infinity

without any

spirals.

Interestingly, turning this cross

so it is not vertical looses
the above horizontal beam, and produces the same properties as an angled cross in
Figure 29. This suggests that either gravity or the vertical stance of the dowser affects
results of dowsing geometry. However, if the dowser’
s intent is to perceive the
sloping cross as vertical, or the dowser leans so that the cross seems vertical, or is
parallel to the dowser’s body, the horizontal line re
-
appears. This suggests that the
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mind, and the brain’s mechanism that produces sight, m
ay be more relevant than
gravity.

Vertical Cross


Figure
30

Alpha Symbol

When dowsing an a
lpha symbol
(an e
arly Christian symbol
) as depicted in Figure
31
,
several people have reported seeing

much energy, and many vivid colours
including

blue and gold.

The pattern comprises three components.


In the
vertical

plane through the source,
(
i.e. on the sheet of paper
), there is a m
ain
beam
(a)
along the central horizontal axis (Type 1)
. It has an o
utward flow
, is
p
erceived to go to i
nfinity
, has no spirals, and the beam diverges with an angle whose
tan
gent

=
1/74.6
, which is about twice the previous value for the circle and cross.
There is a dowsing v
oid inside

the

oval
.


In addition, there are
2 x Type 1 lines
(b and c)
which are ext
ensions of the 2 source
lines.

They have an o
utward flow
with a l
ength of lines about 6 to 9 metres,
depending on time, the day, and the month.

These lines end in a
clockwise

spiral.


C
oming
perpendicularly out of the paper
,

a single

(Type1) line emanat
e
s

from the
cross
-
over centre point; i.e. horizontally, towards the observer.

It has an o
utward flow
with a length of
about 6 to 9 metres, depending on time, the day, and the month.

This
line end
s

in a
clockwise

spiral.

Alpha Symbol






Figure
31

b

a

c

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Bob’s Geometry

The geometry in Figure
32

contains some of the key angles found in many branches
of science.
For example
, the

Ampere and Dipole Force Law

is associated with
35.264°

(
arc

cos(sqrt(2/3))
; the Kelvin wedge involves 1
9.471°

(arc sin 1/3)
; and the
Carbon molecular bond involves 109.471°

(
cos
−1
(−1/3)
)
. Acknowledgements are due
to Bob Sephton who brought attention to the complex
dowsing patterns and fields
found when dowsing this geometry. This pattern in Figure 1 is therefore referred to as
“Bob’s Geometry”
. These patterns have been observe
d and measured by over 15
experienced dowsers who were members of the Dowsing Research Group (DRG).


Subsequent observations by the author show that results are affected by magnetic
fields, the orientation of the source geometry, and whether the latter i
s made from
solid wire or an abstract shape drawn on paper. These facts are used to research why
and how these dowsed patterns are produced. Figure 2 illustrates the findings, and
suggests
an analogy to patterns from a diffraction grating, or X
-
ray cryst
allography
that, for example, produced the structure of DNA.


Bob’s Geometry


Figure
32

Abstract Source

W
hen the major axis of

an abstract version of

Bob’s Geometry

that has been drawn on
paper

is aligned
north
-
south
,

Figure

33a

gives the complex dowsed p
attern
when the
source geometry is laid horizontally on the ground. It
comprises 8 energy lines

(which have a perceived outwards flow)
, 16 arithmetic
ally spaced

vortices, 16
geometric
ally spaced

vortices,

and

4 isolated vortices
.
There is also a central
vertical

conical

vortex with a height of about 14 metres comprising the usual 7 sub
-
vortices.





A
subtle energy cone

emanates from the westerly apex with an outward flow
.

Bob’s
Geometry is

possibly

the only source geometry pattern that creates/emits thes
e subtle
energy cones. There is a subtle energy

giving the impression of being “sucked”
into
the source geometry

and being converted into
a

different subtle energy coming out.
The reason for this is not known, nor if the optimum alignment is to magnetic
or true
north.


Physical Source

A s
olid
version of Bob’s Geometry produces

an identical dowsed pattern
as

a pure
geometry source
, except that the subtle
energy
is
emitted

from the eastern apex and

flows towards the east
,

as illustrated in Figure 33b
.

This

finding is significant as
u
sually pure abstract geometry gives identical dowsing to solid objects.



Dowsing Geometry v28



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Dowsed Pattern on the Ground with Abstract

Source Geometry




Figure
33a


Dowsed Pattern on the Ground with
Solid Source Ge
ometry






Figure
33b



N

W




N
m

Geometric Vortex


Arithmetic Vortex


Subtle Energy
Cone


Subtle Energy Line

E

Geometric Vortex


Arithmetic Vortex


Subtle/Orgone Energy Cone


Subtle Energy Line

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Orientation

For both abstract and solid versions of Bob’s Geometry,

w
hen the major axis

is
aligned
east
-
west

all the vortices and
subtle

energy disappear, leaving only the 8
energy lines and the centra
l vertical vortex
.

Figure
33c

is the dowsed pattern in the
horizontal plane. It

is
desirable
to determine if the earth’s spin (indicated by true
north) or magnetism (indicated by magnetic north) creates and destroys the 36
vortices and
the subtle

energy

c
ones
?



Dowsed Pattern on the Ground with East
-
West Orientation




Figure
33c


Philosophically, turning a sheet of paper through 90° destroys

these

36 vortices and
the subtle

energy

cones
. Or if turned another 90°, 36 vortic
es and
the subtle

energy

cones

are created. What does this tell us about the mind, consciousness, and how
Bob’s Geometry interacts with the
I
nformation Field? For example, a horizontal
rotation does not change

the vertical force of

gravity, but the angle
s to the direction of
the earth’s spin and magnetic field do change.


Orgone Energy

There is much unscientific hype on Orgone Energy that has been published.
The
subtle energy cones

as described in Figures
33a

and
3
3
b

possess some of the claimed
propertie
s of Orgone Energy that have scientific evidence. (See References 8, 9, 10).
Orgone Energy, Ormus, and Organite are usually associated with organic matter or
material from the Dead Sea. One relevant property of Orgone Energy is that it
significantly enh
ances auras such as those for glasses of water or the aura of humans.
For example

the radii of auras
can
increas
e

over 4 times, and this property is used in
this research to confirm the presence of Orgone Energy. As the source geometry is
rotated away fro
m north, the apparent strength of the Orgone energy is reduced, the
angle of the cone increases, and eventually there is a cut
-
off angle at about
22.5°
.


This section is only a summary. Full details
, including analysis, theory, and
postulations are contai
ned

in
Reference 33.




E

Subtle Energy Lines

N


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3


Dimensions


Banks and Ditches

The remarkable findings

are that massive 3
-
dimensional earth
-
works, known as banks
and ditches, produce exactly the same dowsable pattern as cm. sized 2 parallel lines,
which are 2
-
dimensional. The
latter was discussed earlier.
This Hyperlink gives
further information on
Banks and Ditches
.


A Sphere

The sphere used as the sour
ce object had a 16 cms diameter. Figure 34 is an elevation
showing the two dowsable lines generated. These are
Type 4

lines passing vertically
through the centre of the sphere. One has a vertical upward flow, whilst t
he other has
a vertical downward flow. The length of these two lines was greater than the height
of the room in which the measurements were taken.


As a sphere is, by definition, symmetrical, the fact that the only dowsable lines are
vertical suggests tha
t gravity is involved in their production. This is consistent with
the findings for other geometrical shapes.


.

Figure
3
4

A Cube

The edges of the source cube measured 6” x 6” x 6”, with the base placed
horizontally. Figure 35

is a plan view. 14 lines are generated as follows:


a.

4 x Type 1 lines extending horizontally, about 2.1 metres, from the centre of
each vertical face, with an outward flow.

b.

2 x Type 1 lines extending vertically, about 2.1 metres, from the centre of each
horizontal face, with an outward flow.

Type 4

Line

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c.

8 x Type 4 lines originating from each corner of the cube, in a diagonal
direction, extending horizontally, with a perceived outward flow, and giving
the impression of an infinite length, but this was only measured up

to a length
of 50 metres.


Figure
3
5

A Pyramid

The pyramid used as the source object has a square base 8 cms x 8 cms, with a height
of 10 cms. Its base was placed on a horizontal plane. Figure
3
6

is a plan view, that
illustra
tes the ten dowsable lines generated. The latter comprise:
-

a.

4 x Type 1 lines originating from the centres of each triangular face, extending
horizontally, with a perceived outward flow, and length of approximate 1.53
metres.

b.

1 x Type 1 line from the centr
e of the base square, extending vertically
downward, also with a perceived outward flow, and a length of 1.53 metres.

c.

4 x Type 4 lines originating from the corners of the base of the pyramid,
extending horizontally, with a perceived outward flow, and a len
gth that gives
the impression of an infinite length, but only measured up to a length of 50
metres.

d.

1 x Type 4 line originating from the apex of the pyramid, extending vertically
upwards, with a perceived outward flow, and a length that gives the
impressio
n of an infinite length, but only measured up to a length of 50
metres.

Type 1

Line

Type 4

Line

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Figure
3
6


Generalisations, Conclusions, and Basic Theory

Exciting discoveries are that equations for the mathematical transformation between
physical obje
cts and their perceived geometrical pattern are simple functions
involving Phi (φ), with no arbitrary constants


i.e. true universal constants.
Perceived patterns are affected by several local and astronomical forces that include
electromagnetic fields,

spin, and gravity. The findings confirm the connection
between the structure of space
-
time, the mind, and observations.

See Reference 37.


Although

full

mathematical transformations and an explanation

of the physics
involved

are still required
to explai
n

the patterns observed when dowsing geometry,
the following interim results and interpretations are based on the current state of work
in progress. Table 6 provides a cross
-
reference of the findings for each source
geometry. It must be stressed that a
blank in the table could mean that the factor has
not been measured or observed by the author. It does not necessarily mean that the
factor is absent. Similarly, to keep the data manageable, several other factors in the
text have not been included in Tab
le 6. These include arithmetic or geometric series;
direction of flow; clockwise or anti
-
clockwise vortices; Mager colours; Type 1
-
5
characteristics, etc.

Common Factors

It is apparent from Table 7 that short measureable lines are the most common
observat
ion, closely followed by very long lines that are too long to measure but give
the impression of extending to infinity. Vortices and divergent beams are equally
Type 1

Line

Type 4

Line

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common. The occurrence of 2:1 ratios and resonance is also frequent. Intriguingly,
the fact
that a 1
-
dimensional source geometry gives identical observations as a 0
-
dimensional source, and some 2
-
dimensional source geometries give identical
observations as 3
-
dimensional objects, reinforces the importance of geometry in the
structure of the univer
se.


Measureable lines
Very long lines
Vortices
Diverging beam(s)
2:1 ratio
Resonance
n-1 = n dimension
Scaling
137, 131
Gravity
Magnetic influence
5-dimension
Bifurcation
1 Dot




4
A Row of Dots in a Straight Line


2
A Straight Line




4
3 Dots in a Triangle

1
4 Dots in a Square

1
A Triangle



3
A Square



3
1 Circle




4
2 Circles







6
Vesica Pisces



3
3 Circles








8
Half Sine Wave

1
Two Parallel Lines







7
Angled Cross


2
Vertical Cross




4
Alpha Symbol




4
Bob’s Geometry



3
Banks and Ditches







7
A Sphere


2
A Cube


2
A Pyramid


2
Totals
13
10
10
9
6
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
1

Table
7

Conclusions based on 2 and 3
-
body interactions

Based on the findings from 2 and 3
-
circles source
geometry
, it is appropriate to stress
possible generalisations, conclusions and deductions that seem relevant to achiev
ing
the objectives of this paper.

1.

As a result of experimentation, the same observations as described apply to
any

3 objects


be they pure geometrical shapes drawn on paper, or solid
objects, or of any size.

2.

From astronomical and other scientific observati
ons, it seems that the laws of
physics and mathematics are the same throughout the observable universe.
Extrapolating point 1, it is a reasonable assumption that everything in the
universe can interact, so there are potentially an infinite number of 2
-
bod
y and
3
-
body alignments.

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3.

In theory, the 2 or 3 objects being studied can be paired or aligned and interact
with all other objects in the universe, and therefore significant affect
experimental results.

4.

To avoid the paradox in points 2 and 3, the dowser’s

conscious intent as to
which 2 or 3 objects are being studied is fundamental to the patterns in this
database.

5.

This tuning out of the rest of the universe by the observer’s mind, prevents an
overload of information.

6.

As a demonstration of points 4 and 5, i
f the dowser’s intent is only on circles
B and C

in Figure 21
, the conventional 2
-
body interaction is
obtained, as
detailed earlier in
Figure 12

and Table 4
.

In other words, the simple act of
changing
intent

dramatically a
lters the observations from the middle to the end
column in Table 4.


7.

If, as in point 6, consciousness and intent can change observed geometrical
patterns, how far can this be generalised to explain, for example, quantum
mechanics where it has long been k
nown that observations affect results?

8.

The evidence supports the postulate that the mind’s conscious intent creates a
node with each object being studied. So if 3 objects are being considered, 3
nodes are created, with a 4
th

being the dowser’s mind
: information being
transferred by waves, the nature of which is one of the objectives of this paper.

9.

This postulate can be generalised to explain why the observations in scientific
experiments can influence the results.

10.

This leads to the interesting ques
tions of how any 2 or 3 bodies are aware of
each others presence, and how they should interact. Are the nodal points only
created by conscious intent, or can they exist without observation?

11.

Similarly, how do 3 inert circles (or solid objects) know they ar
e aligned?

12.

The circles are giving the appearance of a form of consciousness, but more
probably they are just reflecting the structure of the universe.

13.

In a possible answer to points 10, 11, and 12, it would seem from Figures 18,
19 and 21 that alignment
of the 3 bodies produces a 5
-
dimensional effect.

14.

Does this Type 5 mechanism allow 3 bodies to be “aware” that they are in
alignment? This must be part of the structure of the universe. i.e. perceived
consciousness

15.

Does this effect support the hypothesis
that the universe is a 5
-
dimensional
hologram?

Magnetism

From the experimental results regarding

the importance of

magnetic east
-
west
orientation of the geometry

comprising

2
parallel
line
s,

it would seem that
magnetism
is a factor

in producing Type 2, 3,
and 4 lines. There are no observations indicating
that Type 1 lines are affected by magnetism.


Th
e
s
e conclusions

ha
ve

been confirmed by repeating the experiments

with

two

parallel
source lines after
placing them
in a Faraday cage
to
screen out any magne
tic
effects.
For all orientations, t
he Type 2, 3, and 4 lines are not present

a)

When
both
the dowser and the source geometry are in the cage, and

b)

When only the source geometry is in the cage.


This suggests that magnetism is relevant between the
two

sourc
e lines, and not
necessarily between the dowser and the source geometry. Therefore,
this discovery

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
41

of
50

support
s

the
theory that
the waves

causing resonance a
re emanating from

e
ach source
line on the paper
, as opposed to t
he image of the 2 lines in the inform
ation field
, or

t
he
brain’s model of what is
being perceived.


This leads to an unfortunate anomaly, as it has been known for several years that
Type
s

2, 3, and 4 fields are unaffected by screening
. For example, it is possible from
within a Faraday cage,
to detect Type 2 fields from a plant, or
transmit mind
generated geometric shapes

via Type 4 fields

to a remote location
.

However,
these
irrelevances to screening only apply

to single objects, not two objects interacting.


Waves and P
hase

The null result from
dowsing
the geometry that resembles a half sine wave may be a
further clue to wave involvement in dowsing geometry.
A wave that is a reflection of
th
e half sine wave

shape, i.e. the same shape
, but

180° out of phase, would produc
e a
null/void interference dowsable pattern.

This suggests that the wavelength involved
when dowsing

this shape

may
equal the conceptual wave length and amplitude of the
source geometry being dowsed.

If so, the intent of a dowser generates an associated
wave, whose shape, wavelength, phase, and amplitude
are

determined by the
geometry being dowsed.


The above examples relate to dowsing single source objects
. The following situations
relate to 2 interacting objects.


Interactions, Resonance and Waves

That

a resonance

peak is obtained is good evidence that dows
ing two source objects A &
B, such as 2 circles or 2 lines,

involve
s

vibrations
. In other words,
conceptually,
when the
vibrations

perceiv
ed to be emitted by each of the two source
objects
are in phase,
resonance occurs. Figure
3
7

is a
general

pictorial representation of this standard effect for
two objects A and B. When the peaks of the waves emanating from A and B are both
superimposed,
a
larger
peak is produced, as in Figure
3
7
a. A half wavelength

is used in
this

simple

example
, but the same principle applies to other wave forms.

Figure
3
7
b
illustrates the two waves out of phase, producing a null effect.


Let us make

two reasonable postulates:

the 2
objects A & B

being dowsed
are 2 nodal points,

and

each object is associated with, or is emitting, the same vibrational frequency.


According to standard wave theory,
frequency

is a function of
wavelength

(
λ
).
As
resonance occurs when the wavelengths are superimposed (ie in phase), t
he optimum
separation distance
,
S
0
,

between the two
lines

is a fraction or an integer (
i
) of a particular
wavelength (
λ
).






i.e.
S
0 =

i .λ
.



(i)


So what is the valu
e of this wavelength
?
To answer this question, it is instructive to
discuss what happens when the two lines are more than 40 mm apart, or the 2 circles
are more than 60mm apart. The observations (as in Figures 13 and 27) are that no
do
wsable fields exist, leading to two possible reasons.

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
42

of
50


a)

The vibrations are fully out of phase, or

b)

There are no vibrations.


A good clue is that there is only one resonance

peak observed whilst the two
objects

separate. The author ha
s never observed more than one peak
, nor is there any
partially out of phase effects on separations greater than 40 mm or 60 mm
. The only

way this could be achieved is if the wave
-
length (
λ
)
involved

was greater

than
or
equal to

th
e maximum separation

distance
S
max

of the two bodies




i.e.
λ
=

> S
max




(ii)


A simple analogy is that it is not possible to obtain a low frequency note on a short
organ pipe, or short violin string.



Figure

3
7


Figure
3
8

illustra
tes what would happen if this was not true. In this pictorial example,
objects A and B are assumed to be
still emitting waves

with a wavelength shorter than
the
ir

maximum separation distance,

even though they are at
,

or have passed
,

their
maximum separati
on

distance
.


The
example

i
n Figure
3
8

w
ould

lead to

3 resonance

peaks be
ing detected
, which does not tie
-
up with observations.



Generalising this example
;

if the associated wavelengths

emitted by 2 objects being
dowse
d,

were shorter than the separation

distance

between the two objects
, there
Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
43

of
50

would be more than one occasion, as the
objects

separated, when the waves were in
phase, and therefore there would be a sequence of resonance

peaks

which does not
occur
.



Figure
3
8


As there is only 1 resonance peak there are no harmonics
so
mathematically, this is
identical to






i = 1/2




(iii)


Combining formulae (i) and (iii) gives




S
0 =

λ/2



(i
v
)


Combining formulae (ii) and

(iv) gives




S
max


=
2 S
0
.


(v)


This explains

the

observed

2:1 ratio.


The above analysis eliminates option (a) stated earlier

that null results
could be due to the
waves being out of phase, but supports opti
on (b) that there are no vibrations
.

In other
words, p
hase is relevant up to
S
max
, but wavelength is relevant when the separation
distances become greater than
S
max
. This
giv
es

a further clue to the mechanism of
dows
ing

and, pos
sibly, why fields seem to stop abruptly and not obey the inverse square
law
.

Great confidence now exists to further this concept to a tentative

set of

postulates
:
-


The detectable range of a dowsable object is always less than i
ts associated wavelength.

Two

dowsable objects will interact if the distance between them is less than the
wavelength

of the dowsable field perceived to be associated with those objects
.

T
here is no perceived interaction

between two objects when they are separated by a
distance greater than
S
max
.

Different source geometries produce different optimum separation distances,

S
0
.

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
44

of
50

Wave Velocities

& Frequencies

Having determined the wavelengths

involve
d
, it
should

now
be
possible to calculate

the

associated velocities and frequencies
.

The standard relationship between wavelength

(
λ
)
and frequency

(
ν
) is:
-



λ = c / ν

(where
c is the wave velocity
)


(vi)


In the case of the 2 lines

S
max


=
λ

= 40 mm



(vii)

so








c = 0.040 ν
, in metres per sec.



(viii)


In the case of the 2
circles

S
max


=
λ

=
6
0 mm



(ix)

so








c = 0.0
6
0 ν
, in metres per sec.



(x)


To help understan
d the ramifications of equation

(
v
i
ii
), it is helpful to undertake some
order of magnitude calculations. Table
8

shows different

wave

velocities and
frequencies that are mathematically correct, assuming the standard wave equation i
s
applicable
.

The selection of velocities
(
measured in metres per second
)

include:
-

nerve impulses,
pedestrian speeds, the uppermost limits of mechanical speeds,

3% and

3
3
% of the velocity

of light, the actual velocity of light, and a spe
ed
three

orders of
magnitude greater than the velocity of light.


Velocity
o
f 2 Line Resonance




Table
8

Table
7

suggests the following:

1.

For
low speed natural phenomena such as nerve impulses
,
and running,
which go up to 100
metres per second,
the associated frequencies

are
equivalent to those
within the low audio and sub
-
audio range
.

Schuman
resonance is included for comparison


2.

For velocities of 100,000 metres per second, the associated freq
uencies

are
similar to those in the electromagnetic

medium wave

radio frequency
.


3.

At

3% and

3
3
% of the speed of light up to the speed of light, the frequencies

are analogous
to

VHF

electromagnetic

radio and microwave frequencies.


Equivalent Physical

Velocity

Velocity

Frequency

Equivalent Physical

Velocity Description

c

c

ν

Frequency Description

m/sec

miles per hour

Hz

Brain Waves
-

Delta waves

0.04

0.1

1

Sub Audio

Schuman resonance

0.31

0.7

7.8

Sub Audio


Brain Waves
-

average Alpha w
aves

0.40

0.9

10

Sub Audio


Brain Waves
-

Beta waves

0.88

2.0

22

Sub Audio


Running
-

world record

10.29

23

257

Audio

Nerve Impulses
-

maximum

100

224

2,500

Audio

Fastest mechanical speeds

100,000

223,700

2,500,000

Medium wave radio


3% speed of light & Leaf Entanglement

1,000,000

2,236,997

25,000,000

VHF radio

33% speed of light

100,000,000

223,699,680

2,500,000,000

Micro waves

Speed of light

300,000,000

671,099,040

7,500,000,000

Micro waves

3 orders of magnitude >s
peed of light

3,000,000,000

6,710,990,400

75,000,000,000

Micro waves

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
45

of
50

4.

At
3

orders of magnitude greater than the speed of light, the frequencies

are
similar to
upper micro wave frequencies
.


Which of these orders of magnitude

relates to on
-
site observations and measurements?
Although possibl
y

not relevant to dowsing pure geometry, f
or earth energies
, which are
normally associated with matter,

it is generally accepted that velocities are at the bottom of
the range.
For exampl
e, at Avebury
, smaller stones (such as stone 41) have been observed
(e.g. by Wessex Dowsers

on 4
th

June 2001 at 11 am) to pulse at a rate of between 60


24
times per minute. i.e. 1


0.4 times per second.


Similarly
, before reaching erroneous conclusions

about velocities and frequencies
,
researchers should be

a
wa
r
e

that:
-


1. Brainwave activity ranges from about 22 Hz for beta waves
, via 8
-
12 Hz for alpha

waves
, 4
-
7 Hz for theta waves
, and down to 1
-
3 Hz for delta waves in deep sleep
.

2.

7.8 Hz is the Schumann

resonance

frequency

of the Earth
’s geomagnetic field, and

ionosphere
, and is the number of times light travels round the Earth in one second.

3.
50

m/sec is
an average

speed of nerve impulses,
but

can travel at a rate of
between 5
-


100 metres

per second.


It is

therefore

important that dowsers do not interfere with the
ir own experiments, and
finish up just measuring their own nervous systems! This concept also has a similarity to
the “Uncertainty Principle
” which is a facet of quantum

physics.


The Way Forward

The following

are suggested experiments

and theoretical challenges

that

other
researchers

may wish

to develop.


1

Independent
research

is required to duplicate and substantiate the findings

in
this paper
.


2

What are the mathematical transformations that give

rise to

the o
bserved
patterns?



3

In particular, w
hy is a cylindrical dowsable field perceived for
a
two line

s
ource
?

How does the resonance between these 2 lines

create and

affect the
dimensions of the observed cylinder?
Why does the length of this cylinder
vary fro
m 0


3m



a)

as the lines are separated
?

b)

over the course of a lunar month?




What is the sequence between the mind, the 2 lines, and the Information Field to
produce the

observed

complex pattern
?


4

If a

half sine wave

source

produces a null effect because
the interfering wave
emanating from the dowser mimics the geometry of the source, but is 180° out
of phase, h
ow
could this conceptual mechanism work a
s the
phase or
wavelength

would be

affected by the

varying

distance between the 2 nodal
points created by
the
dowser

and the source?


Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
46

of
50

5

A

half sine wave
produces a null effect, which is t
he opposite to

a full sine
wave which produces
a plethora of dowsable patterns:


This raises the
following queries
.

a)

Why
is
the dowsing associated with

a

half sine wave out of p
hase, but a
full sine wave is
not
?

b)

Why do no other geometric shapes investigated
above
give a null effect?


6

Does

the
theoretical
explanation for 2
-
body interaction patterns (e.g. 2 circles)
also explain
the

totally different patterns

for single object geom
etry (e.g.

dowsing

one circle)?


7

When a dowser is observing a single object, such as a circle, is this interaction
(i.e. between dowser and source object) the same as the explanation given
earlier for 2 circles interacting?

8

When a dowser
believes he is obs
erving a 2
-
body
interacti
o
n

(e.g.

2 circles), is
this really a 3
-
body interaction in which the 2 circles are each emitting waves
plus waves emitted by the dowser? A similar question applies to observing
a
single object
.



In other words, is this an exampl
e of the uncertainty principle,
with the dowser affecting results, or is the dowser actually creating the effect
by becoming a nodal point?


9

Are

the
dowser

and the objects being dowsed actively “emitting waves

/

vibrations”

or are they just passive nodes?


10

Why
are
20
mm

and 40
mm
, respectively,

the optimum and maximum
separation distances

for 2 lines
?
Th
e
s
e results

seem

unusual
; dowsing
m
easurements change depending on the time of the day, the day of the

lunar

month, the month

in the year
, etc.

Are these va
lues

universal or personal
?


11

The above

optimum separation distances
,
S
0
,

are for lines and circles. Do

other interacting shapes such as two triangles have different values for
S
0
?



12

I
t should be i
nvestigate
d

if the d
ivergen
ce angles of some

beams
are
arct
an1/137, or
if

the similar figure obtained was a coincidence.


13

It
h
as
been
shown that magnetism
i
s a factor in producing certain dowsable
lines. Is this just the earth’s magnetic field, or can any magnetism produce the
same effect?

Can magnetism affect o
ther dowsable results?



14

Apart from 2 parallel lines, what other source geometry produces Type 2, 3,
and 4 lines that are affected by magnetism?


15

It was shown earlier that for Type 2, 3, and 4 fields and magnetism, the
interaction between two lines occurr
ed on the source paper.
Does this apply
only where magnetism is involved, or
does it apply
in general?
Conceptually,
a
re the

associated

waves perceived to be emanating from each
object

occur:


a)

On the source paper

b)

In the information field

c)

Withi
n the model

in the
dowser’s

brain of the perceived dowsing?

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
47

of
50


16

What is the nature of these waves? Are they

a)

Transverse, like water waves, where the variations in the amplitude is
90° to the direction of the wave.

(e.g. a “stationary” cork bobbing
vertically up and down

in water waves).

b)

Longitudinal,

like waves in an organ pipe, where the variations in
amplitude are in the direction of the wave.

c)

Torsional, where the waves twist in a circular motion at right angles to
the direction of the wave?


On
information
dowsing,
th
e indication is obtained that
longitudinal waves are
the interaction mechanism, with a standing wave created between the 2 source
objects

that act as nodes
. Th
is is supported as the

maximum amplitude

of the
longitudinal waves

as measured by dowsing

is
, as

expected,

at the centre of 2
equal sized source objects.

This requires to be c
onfirm
ed

with different
experiments.


17


Table 5
contains

a range of velocities and frequencies

that

a)

Apply if the resonance model adopted for 2
-
bo
d
y interaction is correct.

b)

Ar
e mathematically logical if standard wave theory applies.

It is necessary to d
etermine experimentally if either or both of the statements
are true.




Please contact the author

at
jeffrey@jeffreykeen.co.uk

with any mathematical
transformation that
provides

an explanation for these Dowsing Geometry
observations. Alternatively, any relevant experimental results, comments, or
suggestions will be appreciated.




Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements are due to th
e UK Dowsing Research Group (DRG) members
who

assisted in this avenue of research,
helped to confirm many of the findings,
and
following their enthusiastic review of the author’s

lectures, encouraged its
documentation.


In particular, recognition is due to

Jim Lyons for his

suggestions, and
identifying some of the mathematical ratios
, and to Bob Sephton who initially
discovered some of the basic patterns and their properties
.



Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
48

of
50

References and
Relevant
Author

s Original Research Papers

1.

The British Society

of Dowsers, Earth Energies Group :
An Encyclopaedia of Terms

2.

The British Society of Dowsers website
http://www.britishdowsers.org/


3.

James Spottiswoode, Journal of Scientific Exploration : June 1997, Vol. 1
1, No. 2,
Cognitive Sciences Laboratory, Palo Alto

4.

Measuring Range,

September 2001, Vol. 39 No. 273 The Journal of the British Society
of Dowsers

5.

The Journal of the British Society of Dowsers :
Measuring Dowsing
, Volume 39 No.
273, September 200
1

6.

The Physics of Dowsing & the Brain
, December 2001, Vol. 6 No 24 The BSD Earth
Energy Group

Newsletter

7.

Two Body Interaction Part 1
, December 2002, Vol. 39 No 278 Dowsing Today

8.

Two Body Interaction Part 2
, March 2003, Vol.40

No 279 Dowsing Today

9.

Dowsing Today :
Auras Revisited
-

Parts 1, 2, 3,

December 2003


March 2005, Vol.
40 Nos. 282, 285, 287

10.

Keen, Jeffrey :
Consciousness, Intent, and the Structure of the Universe,

Trafford, 2005, 1
-
4120
-
4512
-
6,
http://www.trafford.com/robots/04
-
2320.html

11.

The American Dowser :
The Anatomy of Conical Helices, Consciousness, and
Universal Constants



Parts 1
-

4, February
-

October 2007, Vol. 47 Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4

12.

Physi
cs World :
Dark Energy
, December 2007, Vol. 20 No. 12

13.

Dowsing Today : The Journal of the British Society of Dowsers :
Angkor Wat,
Consciousness, and Universal Constants


Parts 1
-

2
, September
-

December 2007,

Vol. 41 Nos. 297, 298

14.

ASD Digest :
The Tree

of Life and Universal Constants
, Winter 2008
-
09, Vol.49 Issue
No. 1

15.

Further details can be found on the author’s website
www.jeffreykeen.org


16.

Physics World :
The Digital Universe
, Seth Lloyd, November 2008, Vol.

21 No. 11

17.

Dowsing Today :
Measuring the Size of a Dowsable Field
, September 2008, Vol. 41,
No. 301

18.

Network Review :
From Banks and Ditches to Dowsing Two
-
Dimensional Geometry
,
Spring 2009, No. 99

19.

Model of Consciousness
, April 2009, Vol. 65 No 4 World F
utures


The Journal of
General Evolution

20.

The Causes of Variations When Making Dowsable Measurements; Part 1
-

Introduction and Personal Factors
, 28 November 2009, e
-
paper online at

http://vixra.org/abs/0911.00
62



21.

The
Causes of Variations When Making Dowsable Measurements; Part 2 Daily
Variations Caused by the Earth Spinning on Its Axis
, 10 Dec
ember 2009
, e
-
paper
online at
http://vixra.org/abs/0912.0024


22.

The Ca
uses of Variations When Making Dowsable Measurements; Part 3
-

Monthly
and Annual Variations caused by Gravity
, 24 December 2009, e
-
paper online at

http://vixra.org/abs/0912.0049

23.

The Causes of Variations When

Making Dowsable Measurements; Part
-

4 The Effects
of Geometric Alignments and Subtle Energies
, 7 January 2010, e
-
paper online at

http://vixra.org/abs/1001.0004


24.

The Causes of Variations When Making Dowsable

M
easurements; Part 5
-

Communicating Information Instantaneously across the Solar System
,
7 January 2010,
e
-
paper online at

http://vixra.org/abs/1001.0012

25.

Auras Revisited
-

Parts 1, 2, and 3
, December 2003
, Vo
l. 40 No 282 Dowsing Today

Dowsing Geometry v28



Page
49

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50

26.

Is Dowsing a Useful Tool for Serious Scientific Research?


October

2010,

Vol. 66 No 8, World Futures:

Taylor & Francis
-

The Journal of General Evolution

27.


A Standard “Yardstick” and Protocol for Dowsing Research Measurements
; Oc
tober
2009, e
-
paper online at
http://vixra.org/abs/0910.0037


28.


Using Noetics to Determine the Geometric Limits of 3
-
Body

Alignments that Produce
Subtle

Energies
, 10 January 2010, e
-
paper online at
http://vixra.org/abs/1005.0018

29.


From Banks and Ditches to Dowsing 2
-
dimensional Geometry
, Network Review,
Spring 2009, No 99

30.


The Effects of Gravity on the Mind's Perception
, 12 November 2010,

Published as an e
-
print in
http://vixra.org/abs/1011.0026


31.

Th
e Auras of Circles and Abstract Geometry, their Interaction wit
h Space
-
time, and
their Effects on the Mind’s Perception
,
28

February 2011
, e
-
paper online at
http://vixra.org/abs/1102.0055


32.

2
-
Body Interaction with Space
-
Time and the Effects on the Mind's Perception
,
6 Ma
r
2011,
Published as an e
-
print
in
viXra:1103.0017

33.

The Positive Feedback of Tetrahedral Geometry with Space
-
Time and Its Effects on the
Mind's Perception
,
10 Mar 2011,
Published as an e
-
prin
t in
viXra:1103.0029



34.

Variation in Dowsing Measurements due to the Combined Vorticity in the Ecliptic
Plane of the Earth’s Orbit around the Sun, and the Spin of the Earth around its Tilted
Axis
, 25 May 2011, Published as an e
-
print in
http://vixra.org/abs/1105.0039

35.

Consciousness,
Vorticity, and Dipoles, July 2006, Vol. 62 No 5
World Futures


The

Journal of General Evolution

36.


How Dowsing Works,
10 June 2011 Published as an e
-
print

in




http://vixra.org/abs/1106.0015


37.


The Mind, Intergalactic Space
, and Phi (φ
), 23 June 2011, Published as an e
-
print

in
http://vixra.org/abs/1106.0051






Bibliography

and
Further Reading

38.

Bird, Christopher

:
The Divining Hand
,
Shiffer Publishing, 1993
.

39.

Bekenstein,

Jacob

:

Information in the Holographic Universe,

Scientific

American, 2003

40.

Bohm, David

:
The Undivided Universe
,

Routledge, 2005, 041512185X

41.

Bohm, David

:
Wholeness and the Implicate Order
, Routledge,1980

42.

Currivan, Jude

: The Wave,
O
-
Books;

20
05, 1
-
905047
-
33
-
9

43.

Dyer, Dr Wayne

: The Power of Intention,
Hay House 2004

44.

Edwards, Lawrence

: The Vortex of Life
, Floris, 1993, 0
-
86315
-
148
-
5

45.

Greene, Brian :

The Fabric of the Cosmos,
Allen Lane, 2004

46.

Hansard, Christopher :

The Tibetan Art of Positive T
hinking
, Hodder, 2003

47.

Hawking, Stephen :

The Universe

in a Nutshell,
Bantam Press, 2001

48.

Laszlo, Ervin :

The Connectivity Hypothesis
, SUNY Press, 2003

49.

Laszlo, Ervin :

Science and the Akashic Field,
Inner Traditions; 2004;


50.

Lloyd, Seth:

The

Digital Universe
, Physics World
, November 2008, Vol. 21 No. 11


51.

Lyons, James :

Quantifying Effects In Consciousness,
University of Hull 1998

52.

McTaggart, Lynne :

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