KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL

Change in Degree Requirements/Major Program Requirements


Major or Degree Affected
BSCS


Responsible Department
Computer Science

Proposed Effective Date
Fall Semester 2013


Signature Page

Submitted by:
Dick
Gayler









Name

Date






___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



Department Curriculum Committee, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



General Education Council*, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Ap
proved

________________________________



Professional Teacher Education Unit Program Area*,
Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



Department Chair, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



College/School Curriculum Committee AND/OR
Teacher Education Council*, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



College/School Dean, Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



Undergraduate Polici
es and Curriculum Committee,
Date

___ Approved ___ Not Approved

________________________________



Associate VP of Academic Affairs, Date

*For curriculum proposals involving General Education courses, there should be collaboration by the
Department Cur
riculum Committee and the General Education Council. For Teacher Preparation
proposals, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum Committee, the Professional
Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) Program Area Committee, the Teacher Education Counc
il, and the
College/School Curriculum Committee.

Form Updated October 6, 2011


KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL

Change in Degree Requirements/Major Program
Requirements


Major or Degree Affected
BSCS


Responsible Department
Computer Scienc
e

Proposed Effective Date
Fall Semester 2013


Please provide a brief summary of the changes proposed:

Very briefly, the major changes in the proposal are at the upper division level where the application of
fundamental computer concepts is covered. This
is necessary to keep the BSCS current i
n

a rapidly
changing field. These proposed changes will also provide a graduate better preparation for graduate
school. A science requirement change is proposed since computing is increasingly becoming an
important
tool in all the science disciplines.










I. Current Information


Current Degree/Major Program Requirements (please copy exactly from catalog):


General Education

(44 Credit Hours)

University
-
Wide Fitness For Living Requirement

(3 Credit Hours)

Specific General Education requirements f
or this major
:

Math
:

CS majors are encouraged to take MATH 1190 Calculus I as the first math course. However, it is
acceptable to start with MATH 1113 Pre
-
calculus

CS majors should take either Physics sequences
:



PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I and PHYS 11
12 Introductory Physics II

or



PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics I and PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics II


Lower Division Major Requirements (Area F) (16 Credit Hours)



Math 2202 Calculus II



CS 2301 Programming Principles I



CS 2302 Programming Principles II



CS

2350 Object Oriented Programming

Upper Division Major Requirements (4
3

Credit Hours)



CS 3150
-

Concepts of Programming Languages



CS 3310
-

Introduction to Database Systems



CS 3401
-

Introduction to Data Structures



CS 3510
-

Computer Organization, Architec
ture, and Communications



CS 3530
-

Operating Systems



CS 3610
-

Software Engineering



CS 4500
-

Advanced Data Communications



CS 4520
-

Distributed Systems Development



CS 4850
-

Computer Science Senior Project



MATH 3322
-

Discrete Mathematics I



MATH 3323
-

Co
mputer Applications of Discrete Modeling



MATH 3332
-

Probability and Statistical Inference



MATH 4322
-

Discrete Mathematics II

or

MATH 3260
-

Linear Algebra I



WRIT 3140
-

Technical Writing



PHYS 3340
-

Electronics

or

CHEM 3361
-

Modern Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 3361L
-

Modern Organic Chemistry Lab I

or

BIOL 3300


Genetics


Major Electives (9 Credit Hours)

Three 3
-
hour classes chosen from:



CS 3650
-

Object
-
Oriented Software Development



CS 4491
-

Advanced Topics in Computer Science



CS 4545
-

Applied Cryptogra
phy



CS 4580
-

Web Services with Java



CS 4620
-

Object
-
Oriented Methods



CS 4650
-

Advanced Object
-
Oriented Software Development

Free Electives (8 Credit Hours)

Any courses in the university curriculum.

Program Total (123 Credit Hours)



II. Proposed Informa
tion

Include an outline of the entire program and make all changes in
RED
:



General Education

(44 Credit Hours)

University
-
Wide Fitness For Living Requirement

(3 Credit Hours)

Specific General Education requirements for this major
:

Math
:

CS majors are en
couraged to take MATH 1190 Calculus I as the first math course. However, it is
acceptable to start with MATH 1113 Pre
-
calculus

CS majors should take one of the following sequences
:



PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics I and PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics II



CH
EM 1211
-

General Chemistry I and CHEM 1211L
-

General Chemistry I Laboratory and
CHEM 1212
-

General Chemistry II and CHEM 1212L
-

General Chemistry II Laboratory



BIOL 2107
-

Biological Principles I and BIOL 2108
-

Biological Principles II


Lower Divisi
on Major Requirements (Area F) (16 Credit Hours)



Math 2202 Calculus II



CS 2301 Programming Principles I



CS 2302 Programming Principles II



PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics I

or

BIOL 2107
-

Biological Principles I

or

CHEM 1211
-

General Chemistry I and CHEM

1211L
-

General Chemistry I Laboratory


Upper Division Major Requirements (
4
5

Credit Hours)



CS 3310
-

Introduction to Database Systems



CS 3401
-

Introduction to Data Structures



CS 3510
-

Computer Organization, Architecture, and Communications



CS 3530
-

Op
erating Systems



CS 3540
-

Systems Programming with Linux and C



CS 3550
-

Networking, Security, and Communications

or

CS 4300
-

Cloud Computing



CS 3610
-

Software Engineering



CS 4150
-

Concepts of Programming Languages



CS 4320
-

Web Development



CS 4401
-

Se
quential and Parallel Algorithms



CS 4810
-

Social and Ethical Issues in Computing



CS 4850
-

Computer Science Senior Project



MATH 3322
-

Discrete Mathematics I



MATH 3332
-

Probability and Statistical Inference



MATH 4322
-

Discrete Mathematics II

or

MATH 326
0
-

Linear Algebra I



WRIT 3140
-

Technical Writing

Major Electives (9 Credit Hours)

Three 3
-
hour classes chosen from:



CS 4310
-

Advanced Database & Data Mining



CS 4350
-

Mobile Clients



CS 4491
-

Advanced Topics in Computer Science



CS 4500
-

Advanced Data
Communications



CS 4530
-

Secure Communication Infrastructure



CS 4540
-

Wireless Networking and Protocols



CS 4550
-

Secure Software Development



CS 4620
-

Object
-
Oriented Methods



CS 4650
-

Advanced Object Oriented Design



CS 4680
-

Object
-
Oriented Game Desig
n



CS 4720
-

Introduction to Computational Science

Free Electives (
6
Credit Hours)

Any courses in the university curriculum.

Program Total (123 Credit Hours)



III. Justification for Change:

Computer Science is a rapidly evolving field. It is imperative t
hat a computer science degree program
remain current so that graduates from such a program will be competitive in the job market. The
underlying principles remain fairly constant but the manner in which these principles are applied is
constantly changing.

While there are a few proposed changes at the core principles level of the
curriculum, most of the proposed changes are at the upper division level where the applications of the
core principles are covered. There is also a proposal to change the require
d science component to a
breadth of coverage from a depth of coverage. This proposal is driven by the increased usage of
computing in all science disciplines.

This revision creates a concentration in the high
-
demand area of High Performance and Cloud
comp
uting, and another in Computer Security, Networking, and Communications. The High Performance
and Cloud computing areas are the focus of intense interest from employers and researchers.












Supporting Analyses of the Program


When d
egree or major program requirements or both are being revised, it is an opportunity to reconsider
the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of the entire structure of the program. Following are
some questions designed to provoke thoughtful evaluation of

a program.


If a program is being substantially revised, written responses to each of these items should be
included as part of the proposal for the UPCC.



If a minor change is being made to a program, writing out responses to all items is not necessary
.
However, UPCC members may ask about these issues during their evaluation of any proposal.


1.

What are the primary learning outcomes of the program?


Note that the BSCS is accredited by ABET and the following uses ABET’s terminology.

Program Educational Ou
tcomes



Our graduates will have the background to be successful in further study in computer
science.



Our graduates will have the ability to learn and to master new computing technologies
and new concepts.



Our graduates will have the ability to develop soft
ware for distributed environments
according to professional standards and practices.

Student Outcomes

The program enables students to attain, by the time of graduation:

A.

An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics to computing problems

B.

An abi
lity to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements
appropriate to its solution

C.

An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer
-
based system, process,
component, or program to meet desired needs

D.

An ability to function eff
ectively on teams to accomplish a common goal

E.

An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and
responsibilities

F.

An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences

G.

An ability to analyze the local and global impac
t of computing on individuals,
organizations, and society

H.

Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional
development

I.

An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.

J.

An ability to ap
ply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer
science theory in the modeling and design of computer
-
based systems in a way that
demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices.

K.

An ability to apply design and deve
lopment principles in the construction of software
systems of varying complexity.

Curriculum Requirements

1.

Coverage of the fundamentals of following topics:

a.

Algorithms

b.

data structures

c.

software design

d.

concepts of programming languages

e.

computer organization
and architecture

f.

operating systems

g.

database systems

h.

network communications

2.

Computing skill sets

a.

an ability to be productive development using multiple operating systems

b.

a basic understanding of network communication, infrastructure, and security
fundamenta
ls

c.

an ability to design & use database systems as a component in a larger system

d.

an ability to construct event
-
driven systems

e.

an ability to construct both client
-
side and server
-
side applications in a distributed
system

f.

proficiency in multiple programming
languages

3.

exposure to contemporary computing topics

4.

mathematics

a.

at least one half year of university level mathematics

b.

topics

i.

discrete mathematics

ii.

additional mathematics appropriate to computer science (such as
calculus, linear algebra, numerical methods,
probability, statistics,
number theory, geometry, or symbolic logic)

5.

science that develops an understanding of the scientific method and provides students
with an opportunity to experience this mode of inquiry in courses for science or
engineering majors t
hat provide some exposure to laboratory work.


2.

What assessment findings have led to the proposed change(s)?


The primary incentive for most of the proposed changes is the rapidly changing computing world.
Feedback from graduates and potential employers re
inforced the need for these changes.


3.

Evaluate the prerequisites.

Why are the specified courses needed as prerequisites?

Why are there no prerequisites for some courses?

What is the desired sequence of prerequisites?

How often are the prerequisites offered
?


Computer Science is an intensive science/engineering discipline where knowledge builds in
depth, requiring a strong and deep prerequisite structure. All CS courses except the entry
-
level
CS 2301 build on the knowledge developed in previous courses.


Cu
rrently, and in the projected future, all required courses are offered every semester. These
required courses are the major prerequisites for the rest of the courses in the program.


Computer science courses, like all science courses, require prerequisite

knowledge to be able to
understand the material. The courses have been designed so that a student can finish in four
years without prerequisites being a problem.


4.

Where within the program is an introductory overview of the major?


The BSCS program follow
s the standard computing curriculum models which do not have an
introductory overview course.


5.

What are the capstone experiences of the program?


CS 4850 is a capstone course where students working in teams address real
-
world computing
problems.


6.

Where wit
hin the program are there application activities and what are the activities? (E.g., field
experiences, practicums, applied projects, undergraduate research, service learning, co
-
ops,
internships, studio work, practical problem solving.)


Most of the seni
or level courses are applying core computing concepts. Many of these courses
have projects. CS 4850 is a capstone course where real
-
world problems are addressed.


7.

Where and how do the following occur in the program?

Writing, reading, critical thinking, presenting

Critical thinking is involved in almost every course. Students are continually
being required to use their computing knowledge to solve problems. Multiple
courses require written reports and presentations.


Participative and collaborative learning

Some of the upper division courses have team projects. CS 4850 has teams
addressing real
-
world problems.

Use of information technology

Global and multicultural perspectives

These topics are addressed in user int
erface construction and in CS 4810.


8.

What are the required courses that contribute to the interdisciplinary nature of the program?


Required mathematics and science courses introduce students to areas where
computing is a primary research tool.