PARK PREWETT HOSPITAL, Basingstoke

ickybeetsInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

4 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

84 εμφανίσεις

1


PARK PREWETT HOSPITAL
, Basingstoke

Particular
thanks to

Dilys Smith
, for her
book 'Park Prewett Hospital:
The History
1898
-
1984'
, private publication
(
19
86
)
.

Also
referenced,

'Taking the Pulse of Basingstoke: Memories from before the
National Health Servic
e and up to the present day'
, published

by Basingstoke
Archaeological & Historical Society. Basingstoke Talking History, Basingstoke
(
2005
)
.

The following is a timeline of the history of the Hospital taken from these two
publications.


TIMELINE
:

Note
: In

the last part of the
19th century

Victorian Asylums were

communities in
themselves, where mentally ill people were usually housed permanently.

1850
s

Knowle Asylum
in Fare
ham
served
the surrounding area, including
north
Hampshire.

1898

Overcrowding

at Know
le
;

the
County Council looked at feasibility of
building a new asyl
um

in north Hampshire,
near a railway line for
access, and therefore in Basingstoke.

Park Prewett Farm
was
selected
, part of the Vyne Estate,

and 300
acres of land
were
purchased for £30 an

acre
.

1899

Hine & Pegg, architects,

briefed


to build a modern asylum probably on
the cottage principle

.
(The impressive frontage of the final Park Prewett
main building looks very similar to that of Knowle Asylum.)

1905

P
lan
abandoned due to reduced pat
ients

in Knowle.

1908

Plan resurrected.

1913

£259,000 tender for building
.

1912

Detailed plan, 15 wards and units housing 1
,
300 patients, based on the
successful design of Long Grove Hospital, Epsom
, with
home farm,
recreational facilities, workshops and o
pen areas, including s
eparate
accommodation for staff and a chapel
.


Belt
s

of trees planted and railway spur built to transport building
materials (
mostly
on
the

present

site of
Basingstoke
northern bypass).

2


1913

No commemorative stone

was

laid
;

300 workme
n on site, including 119
bricklayers.
The
Wat
er Tower reached height of 50ft and
still
dominates
the
local landscape to
day
.

1914

War restrict
ed

supplies
,
finance, manpower,

and building progress

slow
ed down
.

1915/16

Army announce
d

it want
ed

to take over th
e
hospital as soon as it
was

ready,

but lack of men to do manual work hamper
ed

progress until late
1916 when
workers
we
re

provided by the Army
.

1917

150 beds made ava
ilable for Canadian soldiers
-

Number Four
C
anadian General

Hospital.

1919

Army le
ft

Park
Prewett, and proposals
reverted

to providing an asylum.
There
wa
s

also an a
bortive plan
for it to become Ministry of
Pensions
housing

for military pensioners.

1920/21

Finally, fitting and staffing as a mental hospital. Opened, in stages, from
August 1921.

Red brick buildings, slate roof and Italian red tiled walls.

Internal decoration institutional green and brown.


Austere and difficult place to be a patient, regimented with

quite awful


food,

according to Dilys Smith's research

-

in
these
early years
,

l
ittle or
no
therapeutic
care, people
were
there for life
.

1930

Mental Treatment Act enable
d

induction of
voluntary

patients, not just
the

insane



Introduction of occupational therapy

-

broom making, weaving, cane
work, mat making
-

employed 77% of patien
ts. Cricket and football,
tennis and bowling

introduced
. Some patients allowed
to walk grounds
without supervision.

1936

Over 1
,
300 patients, extra wards built.

1939/45


Hospital completely evacuated
to places
all over England to free the
building
s

for war

casualties
(
civilian and service
)
, under the Ministry of
Health
. London teaching
hospitals
given

wards, away from the
bombing. P
roblems

caused in newly
equipping
and staffing
for general
surgery, etc.,
and a gas supply

laid.

3
,
000 blinds fitted for blacko
ut.


Rooksdown House taken over by Sir Harold Gillies
,

eminent plastic
surgeon, who had made his superb reputation with facial surgery in
WW1.

3



Civilians from London also treated. Casualty clearing station for
Normandy invasion. O
ver 68,000

casualties tre
ated during war.

1945

Revert
ed

to mental hospital

slowly, took until January 19
48.

1948

Taken

under the

auspices of the
new National Health Service.

1950s

New psychiatric drugs and tranquilizers changed the treatment of
mental illness.
Rooksdown House pla
stic surgery continued until 1952
.
Rehabilitation Clinical Research Unit opened in 1955.

1959

Mental Health
Act

did away with

insanity


and psychiatric care became
more informal, oriented away from hospital towards community

care
.
Short stay wards establ
ished.

1960s


Rehabilitation an
d therapy facilities provided

-

carpentry, packing of
goods, car washing. All caused accommodation and staff problems
within the

now ag
e
ing

hospital complex.

1966

G
eneral hospital facilities
proposed

in the grounds
, to be b
uilt
in stages.

1969

Nurse Education Centre opened
, new integrated regime of staffing.


New p
lans for large new general hospital on the site, and Mini Hospital
opened. Staffing and union problems.

1973

Buildings transf
orm
ed and equippe
d for non
-
psychiatric

work,
orthopae
dics,
maternity, etc.
Industrial problems including Three Day
Week.

1974

Basingstoke District Hospital, a new building, officially opened.

1975

Continual upgrading of existing
old
buildings for changes of use and
different care patterns of m
entally ill.

1970s/80s

Gradual removal of remaining mental patients into the community.

1983

Mental Health Acts, non
-
detention of mental patients
-

large mental
hospitals had become obsolete.

1984

There were
600 psychiatric beds, proposed to reduce
them
by

half in a
decade.

The sto
ry in the book ended in 1984
.



4


Most of the

buildings
were
closed
and abandoned by

1996
, apart from those marked
for redevelopment or new use.

Headway, for brain injuries, and Parklands, a mental
health facility, still exist on t
he perimeter of the site.

In the
first

decade of
the
21
st century
, the Park Prewett and Rooksdown land
was
design
ated a conservation area
and
redeveloped

as the core of a

new housing
estate, Rooksdown, much of it u
sing the
original

road

and footpath

layout
. Many
houses and apartment
s use

the old

hospital structures. The

Water Tower has been
preserved and converted into flats.

(See photographs).

M
ore information

can be found on

the Rooksdown Parish Council site:

http://www.rooksdown.org.uk/joomla/index.php/history/park
-
prewett

I
mages of the deserted buildings

appear on
:


http://www.abandoned
-
britain.com/PP/p
arkprewett/1.htm

And finally, an online .pdf of a 2000 map showing the Park Prewett Conservation
Area,
indicates

how the
core buildings have been incorporated into modern housing
.

http://www.basingstoke.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/CDD209C0
-
B9F5
-
45B3
-
AEF8
-
BAB0722693D0/0/ParkPrewett.pdf

Archive references

Hampshire Archives and Local Studies

in Winchester holds 199 items relating to
Park Prewett Hospital
, for example:

278M87/*

Committee Minute Books, site plans, details of clinical conferences,
meal returns,

Renaissance News


(the patients' social club newsletter from the
1950s and 60s),

Park Prewett Staff Magazine

,

an amateur dramatic programme,

and m
ore.
..
..
this is a large and varied collection.

AV122/*

In the Wessex Film and Sound Archive, several interviews of people
who worked at the hospital, made by Basingstoke Talking History.

There are dozens of photographs, spanning across the history of the h
ospital, and
documents relating to the 21
st century

development, early land conveyances and
papers relating to the new Rooksdown Parish Council.

Unfortunately,
The National Archives

at Kew has very little, the most interesting item
is

MH 83/102
, containing

papers and reports from 1898 to 1912 relating to the
proposal to build a

second asylum


at Park Prewett Farm, Basingstoke.


July 2013