coventry_ba_ires_handbook_2012-2013

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TABLE OF CONTENTS



The Programme

4

Important Administrative Information

6

Admission Procedures

6

The Degree

8

Erasmus Exchange Programme

12

Assessment

12

Details of Course Assessment

15

Marking Scheme

18

Degree Criteria

19

Unfair Practice



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Core Modules


27

Academic Writing I and II

27

Critical Thinking

31

Europe in the World


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3


Polish Foreign Policy

7
9

Statistics and Demographics

8
1

Western Civilisation I

8
3

Western Civilisation II

8
6

Elective Modules

8
9

American Civilisation

8
9

American Foreign Policy

9
1

American Rights and Freed
oms

9
3

Diplomacy

9
5

East Asia

9
7

Ethnic Cleansing and Displacement in the Modern World

100

EU Common Foreign and Security Policy

10
3

Genocide and Crimes against Humanity in the XXth century

10
6

Human Rights in the Post
-
Soviet Space

10
9

Media and Pol
itics

11
2

Political Leadership In Africa

11
5

Russia, Eastern Europe and Soviet Legacy

11
8

Terrorism and Anti
-

Terrorism

11
9


Teaching Staff


12
1

Useful Vocabulary and Terms

13
8

Appendix A


Directions to Students at Examinations

13
9

Appendix B


Int
erim Verification and Appeals Procedure

14
1

Appendix C


Unfair Practice Procedure

14
6




This Handbook may be updated. It
s latest version is available on the Łazarski University website
:
http://zasoby.lazarski.pl
.



4


PROGRAMME



Basic Information


Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and European Studies (BA in IRES) is a thre
e
-
year, six
-
semester
programme offered by the
Łazarski

University in Warsaw, Poland. The language of instruction is English.

Teaching, assessment, grading and quality assurance

are also conducted in English and
meet
British

standards.
The graduates of the
programme will be awarded a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) degree.


The students of the IRES Programme at
Łazarski

University receive double BA degree, British
(issued by
Coventry University)
and Polish

(issued by Łazarski University)
. The programme itself is ide
ntical for both
degrees, with the same number of credits and one BA thesis. There are, however, some differences relating the
final average grade, the thesis and the final mark (see below).



Rationale


The International Relations and European Studies (IR
ES) Programme responds to the great challenges and
opportunities of the internationalisation and globalisation of the contemporary world, and


at the same time


of the integration of Europe.


Internationalisation and globalisation determine the lives of
nations, individuals and all human communities.
Politics, religion, human rights, the economy, business, the environment, health, terrorism, war, high and popular
culture, science and education are interconnected and interdependent across national borders,

continents and
oceans. Truly international in nature are the biggest challenges of today and tomorrow.


So are and will be the greatest professional opportunities for the young ambitious people of the world’s all regions
and civilisations, including the l
eaders of the future.


Europe unites in a way unprecedented in history and unique in the world. The continent of nearly fifty soverei
gn
nations old and new, twenty
-
seven

of which already joined the European Union, rejects its imperial and
totalitarian lega
cies and builds instead a democratic community founded on the ancient ideals of freedom, justice
and solidarity.


The EU is the world’s largest integrated market and the biggest exporter. It also is a great centre of human capital
and culture, and of the v
ital dialog between West and East, North and South.


International Relations is one of the world’s most popular and fastest growing areas of multidisciplinary social
science studies on all levels. There is also a fast developing interest in Europe and the
unique and inspiring
phenomenon of European integration. In an innovative way, the combined IRES Programme meets the needs
and expectations of international students from Europe itself and from other regions and civilisations of the world.


We offer Intern
ational Relations and European Studies in one of the best possible observation points: Warsaw,
the capital city of Poland in Central Europe, between Berlin and Moscow, Brussels and Kiev, Stockholm and
Budapest, Vilnius and Vienna. Here the West encounters
Eastern Europe and different traditions and interests
meet. Poland is by far the largest new member nation of the EU and the North Atlantic Alliance (NATO) after
being a key part of the former Soviet bloc. Poland’s complete political and economic transitio
n became an
internationally recognised success worth studying.


IRES students will be provided with deep insight into global and European politics through courses taught by
current or former diplomats, including ambassadors, political directors and other f
oreign policy makers.


5


To gain practical professional experience, the IRES students will take internships in IR
-
related organizations of
their choosing. The choice includes, among others, government agencies, embassies and consulates, offices of
intergover
nmental organizations, international NGOs, business corporations, and the media.


The IRES Programme is run in accordance with the
Łazarski

University Rules and Regulations governing English
Language Programmes.


The IRES programme satisfies the Internatio
nal Relations component of the Politics and International Relations
benchmark statements that can be found at:

(
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGui
dance/Documents/politics.pdf



Aims And Objectives


To gain the qualification the student will have demonstrated i) subject knowledge and understanding ii) cognitive
skills iii) subject
-
specific practical and professional skills and iv) other general skil
ls and capabilities specified in
the learning outcomes for modules within the programme.


Upon successful completion of the IRES program, students will acquire the following qualities and capabilities:




Knowledge and understanding of political, economic, c
ultural, military, religious, legal aspects of
contemporary global and regional international relations, especially in Europe;



Awareness of the historic roots and present cultural and political European identity, within and without
the European Union;



Awar
eness of similarities and differences between Europe and other major regions and civilisations of
the world, as well as cooperation and conflict between them;



Understanding of diplomacy, its methods and institutions



Critical thinking and critical evaluati
on of concepts and arguments;



Knowledge and ability to use appropriate theories, concepts and principles from a range of
International Relations and European Studies
-
related fields;



Locating, extracting, evaluating, analysing and combining different types
of information sources;




Creative thinking.


Specifically the graduate will demonstrate the following qualities, skills, capabilities and values:


i) Intellectual



Background general education in history, economics, international politics;



Identification an
d evaluation of problems combined with proper tool application;



Analytical skills: ability to use analysis and synthesis, to draw conclusions, to formulate and test
hypotheses and build theories;



Ability to make forecasts considering different time periods
;



Research skills: ability to locate, collect and evaluate relevant evidence;



Effective usage of various quantitative and qualitative research techniques for social sciences.


ii) Practical



Communication, presentation, interaction skills;



Ability to find
and use relevant information;



Knowledge of the diplomatic protocol;



Effective written and oral communication in English;



Teambuilding


the ability to work creatively and flexibly with others as part of a team;



Mediating skills.


iii) Personal and Social



E
ffective managing of time and resources;

6




Effective usage of IT, particularly the Internet, for professional purposes;



Personal and leadership skills;



Working in a multicultural environment;



Creative and innovating thinking allowing to develop and debate id
eas and problems.



Graduates


International Relations and European Studies (IRES) graduates will be specialists well
-
trained in modern
scholarship


including both academic and applied knowledge with practical professional skills


and aware of
the civili
sational, historical, social, economic and political complexity of Europe and the world. They will:



be prepared to work as policy makers, planners or analysts, particularly in foreign service

especially in the
diplomatic and consular corps

and in internati
onal non
-
governmental organisations (INGOs); as global and
EU marketers and consultants in multinational business organisations; or as international journalists in the
media, including the new (Internet
-
based) media;



learn analytical skills, quantitative a
nd qualitative research techniques and the use of computers and the
Internet for professional purposes;



know how to think critically and optimise decision
-
making processes;



be able to understand the interrelated political, military, cultural and economic i
ssues globally, from
governmental as well as business and NGO perspectives;



be open
-
minded, creative, inventive, flexible and ready to look for opportunities in the changing world.



IMPORTANT ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION


Academic Year 2012/13 important dat
es

Winter semester dates: 0
4
/
10
/201
2

-

1
8
/01/201
3

Winter semester examination session dates:
21
/01/201
3

-

01
/0
2
/201
3

Winter semester re
-
sit examination session dates:
11
/0
2
/201
3

-

22
/0
2
/201
3


Summer semester dates: 1
8
/02/201
3
-

31
/05/201
3

Summer semester
e
xamination session dates:
3
/0
6
/201
3

-

14
/06/201
3

Summer semester re
-
s
it examination session dates:
24
/0
6
/201
3

-

5
/0
7
/201
3


Useful addresses

http://recruitment.lazarski.pl/


www.lazarski.pl

http://wwwm.coventry.ac.uk/Pages/index.aspx


http://www.lazarski.pl/en/faculties/validated
-
studi
es
-
registrar/

http://zasoby.lazarski.pl/


U
seful

info

Students are asked to contact the
Validated Studies Registrar

personally (
362 room/3
rd

floor/sector F
), by
phone (
022 54 35

369
) or e
-
mail (
validated.studies@lazarski.edu.pl
) when they, i.e.:



need an application form to the Programme Director and want to submit it to him;



need a statement about their student status;



change their personal details, address,

e
-
mail address or telephone number;



face a sudden personal situation that has influenced their current mode of studies;



have lost their ID card;



have a disability;



wish to withdraw;



have a complaint;



have any other issues related to the studies.


7




ADMISS
ION PROCEDURES


Łazarski

University offers the BA in International Relations and European Studies Programme with the thought of
attracting international (especially East European) as well as Polish students. The candidates must complete
secondary education

prior to the admission. Additionally, we expect that they are proficient in English. They need
to present either internationally recognized English certificates or pass a language test at
Łazarski

University.
For
applicants whose first language is not Eng
lish, the minimum English Language Requirements is 6.0 IELTS.

The required documents are:



Original or certified true copy of second level diploma (A
-
level certificate or an appropriate local
equivalent) translated into English by a sworn translator);



Origi
nal or certified true copy of IELTS, Cambridge Advanced Proficiency, or TOEFL scores;



To be eligible for admittance to study, a candidate shall have attained the age of 17 years or over at the
time of entry.


8


THE DEGREE


Programme Title:

International Rel
ations and European Studies (IRES)


Degree Awarded:

BA (Hons)


Credit Points:


360 British Credit Points

180 European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) Credit Points


Duration:


3 years


To be awarded the BA (Hons) in International Relations and European Studi
es degree, students must complete
all three levels of the Programme and earn 360 credit points (180 ECTS credits).


Each year of the BA in IRES Programme carries 120 credit points (60 ECTS credit points) and each semester
carries 60 credit points (30 ECTS
credit points) divided into required (core) and elective modules (courses).


Part I of the Programme (1st and 2nd semester) carries 120 credits, on the basis of twelve core modules, 10
credits each. Additionally, the students take a two semester Athletics
required by Polish law.


Part II of the Programme (3rd and 4th semester) carries 120 credits, on the basis of seven core modules and five
electives., 10 credits each.


Part III of the Programme (5th and 6th semester) carries 120 credits, on the basis of ei
ght core modules and
three electives, each worth 10 credits.. One of the core modules

BA Thesis seminar

is worth 20 credits.



Course

Lecturer

Workshop
lecturer

Lec
-
ture

work
shop

hours
total

credits /
ECTS
credits


1st Year


semester 1

Introduction to
International
Relations

Spazimir
Domaradzki

Ostap Kushnir

30

30

60

10/5

Introduction to Law

Pawel Kowalski

Małgorzata Pyziak







10/5

Microeconomics, Introductory

Katarzyna
Kopczewska

Krzysztof

Beck

30

20

50

10
/
5

Statistics and Demographics

Krystyna Iglicka

Katarzyna Gmaj

30

30

60

10/5

Information Technology

Wojciech Grabowski

Bartosz Kowalski

30

15

45

10/5

Academic Writing I

Joanna Zientek

Jacek Galązka







10/5

Athletics

staff



0

30

30

0

1st semester together



195

190

385

60/30

semester 2

Western Civilisation I

Krzysztof Łazarski

g慮⁇rzó浳ki







10/5

History of International
Relati
ons

Christopher Lash

Christopher Lash

30

30

60

10/5

9


Europe in the World


Political and Economic
Geography

Spazimir
Domaradzki

Artur Wróblewski

30

30

60

105

Introduction to Social
Anthropology

Jaroslaw Jura

Pawel Marczewski

30

30

60

10/5

Macroeconomics,

Introductory

Piotr Stolarczyk

Krzysztof Beck

30

20

50

10/5

Academic Writing II

Joanna Zientek

Adam Figurski

45

30

75

10/5

Athletics

staff



0

30

30

0

2nd semester together



195

200

395

60/30

1st Year together



390

390

780

120/60


2nd Year


semeste
r 3

Western Civilisation II

Krzysztof
Łazarski

Jan Grzymski

30

30

60

10/5

Introduction to European
Union

Jens Boysen

Ostap Kushnir

30

30

60

10/5

Critical Thinking

Clifford Bates JR

Jan Grzymski

30

30

60

10/5

Intercultural Communication

Jaroslaw Jura

Pa
wel Marczewski

30

30

60

10/5

International Economics

Piotr Stolarczyk

Krzysztof Beck

30

20

50

10/5

French, German or Russian

Foreign L. staff



60

0

60

10/5

3rd semester together



210

140

350

60/30

semester 4

Five electives assigned for
the 2nd Year

IRES staff



150

75

225

50/25

French, German or Russian

Foreign L. staff



60

0

60

10/5

4th semester together



210

75

285

60/30

2nd Year together



420

215

635

120/60


3rd Year


semester 5

Polish Foreign Policy

Spazimir
Domaradzki

Jan Grzymski

30

20

50

10/5

Introduction to Political
Philosophy

Krzysztof
Łazarski

Krzysztof
Łazarski

30

20

50

10/5

Government and Comparative
Politics

Spazimir
Domaradzki

Artur Wróblewski

30

30

60

10/5

International Public Law

Pawel Kowalski

Małgorzata Pyziak

30

20

50

10/5

Issues in Macroeconomic
Policy

Piotr Stolarczyk

Krzysztof Beck

30

20

50

10/5

BA IRES Thesis Methodology

Christopher Lash

Christopher Lash

30

15

45

10/5

10


5th Semester together



180

125

305

60/30

semester 6

Three electives assigned for
3rd year

IRE
S staff



90

45

135

30/15

International Organizations

Jens Boysen

Ostap Kushnir

30

20

50

10/5

BA IRES Thesis Research and
Writing Seminar

IRES staff

K.
Łazarski

20
hours / Joanna
Zientek 45 hours.

30

65

95

20/10

6th Semester together



150

130

280

60/30

3rdYear together



330

255

585

120/60















Total for the 1st
-
3rd Years



1140

860

2000

360/180


Electives for the 2nd Year


American Civili
sation

Andrzej Bryk

Adam Figurski

30

15

45

10/5

American Rights and
Freedoms

Andrzej Bryk

Adam Figurski

30

15

45

10/5

Diplomacy

Amb. Maciej Górski

Artur Wroblewski

30

15

45

10/5

EU Common Foreign and
Security Policy

Jens Boysen

Ostap Kushnir

30

15

45

1
0/5

Media & Politics

Wieslaw
Waclawczyk

Ostap Kushnir

30

15

45

10/5

Human Rights in the Post
-
Soviet Space

Wieslaw
Waclawczyk

Wieslaw
Waclawczyk

30

15

45

10/5

Political Leadership in Africa

Emmy Irobi

Emmy Irobi

30

15

45

10/5

Terrorism and Anti
-
Terroris
m

Artur Wróblewski

Artur Wróblewski

30

15

45

10/5

East Asia

Jarosław Jura

Jarosław Jura

30

15

45

10/5

Ethnic Cleansing and
Displacement in the Modern
World

Christopher Lash

Christopher Lash

30

15

45

10/5

Genocide and Crimes against
Humanity in XX centur
y

Myroslava Keryk

Myroslava Keryk

30

15

45

10/5


Electives for the 3rd Year


American Civilisation

Andrzej Bryk

Adam Figurski

30

15

45

10/5

American Rights & Freedoms

Andrzej Bryk

Adam Figurski

30

15

45

10/5

American Foreign Policy

Spasimir
Domaradzki

Artur Wróblewski

30

15

45

10/5

EU Common Foreign and
Security Policy

Jens Boysen

Ostap Kushnir

30

15

45

10/5

11


Ethnic Cleansing and
Displacement in the Modern
World

Christopher Lash

Christopher Lash

30

15

45

10/5

Human Rights in the Post
-
Soviet Space

Wies
law
Waclawczyk

Wieslaw
Waclawczyk

30

15

45

10/5

East Asia

Jarosław Jura

Jarosław Jura

30

15

45

10/5

Genocide and Crimes against
Humanity in XX century

Myroslava Keryk

Myroslava Keryk

30

15

45

10/5

Russia, Eastern Europe and
Soviet Legacy

Wieslaw
Waclawc
zyk

Myroslava Keryk

30

15

45

10/5


*An elective course should have no fewer than ten students and no more than twenty. The list of the
elective courses can be modified.


12


ERASMUS EXCHANGE PROGRAMME


Students admitted into the BAIRES programmes, can apply

for Socrates/Erasmus study during the 4
th

semester
of study only.


Students can apply for exchanges solely to institutions recognized by
Łazarski

University


The maximum number of credits that a candidate can undertake at an institution elsewhere should not exceed
120 (assuming a 360 credit degree).


Students should pursue modules at a level which is applicable to their level of study at
Ła
zarski

University.


Modules pursued elsewhere should not normally be core modules. Where core modules are substituted, the
module leader should have made an evaluation of the replacement modules to be pursued by the candidate. If an
equivalent module is no
t offered, the student should pursue the module(s) concerned on his/her return.


Candidates trailing modules are permitted to undertake study elsewhere, provided that they attempt retrieve
failures on their return.


The methods of assessment should have be
en agreed by the module leaders concerned.


The Program Director must approve the details of Socrates/Erasmus study program three months before
undertaking such study, therefore students are asked to provide the Registrar with an accepted Learning
Agreemen
t by the Program Director until the end of May.



ASSESSMENT


Teaching and Learning


Each year of the BA in International Relations and European Studies Programme carries 120
British

credit points
(60 ECTS credit points) and each semester carries 60
Britis
h

credit points (30 ECTS credit points) divided into
required (core) and elective modules (courses) worth 10
British

credit points (5 ECTS credit points) each.


The only exception in terms of credit points is


during the final Semester 6


the IRES BA The
sis Research
and Writing Seminar worth 20
British

credit points (10 ECTS credit points) because it includes the writing of a
10

000
-
word BA Thesis.


Students’ presence in all classes is obligatory. Absence in 3 classes without serious reasons may lead to f
ailing
the course. Repeated unexcused absence (more than 3 classes missed) may lead to deleting a student from the
Programme by its Director or by the Dean. Student can excuse his/her absence due to illness and other serious
reasons. All absences must be r
eported to the Programme Director. Students, who without good cause, fail to
complete their forms of assessment by the required date or absent themselves from examinations, will be
awarded a zero mark for the component concerned.


Contact Hours


Each typic
al IRES module (course) of 10 credits points (5 ECTS credits) requires about 120 hours of student
workload. This includes:



50
-
60 hours of contact time comprising lectures, seminars, and workshops;



Workshops taught by assistants play an important role, part
icularly during the first 3 semesters as a
method of enforcing regular study, therefore gaining proper study habits; they also allow us to conduct
frequent in
-
class exams



60
-
70 hours of individual study, including preparation of presentations and other pro
jects, writing of term
papers and examinations.

13



Elective modules of 10 credit points (5 ECTS) require about 120 hours of student workload. This includes:



45 hours of contact time comprising lectures, seminars, and workshops;



75 hours of individual study,
including preparation of presentations and other projects.


The IRES BA Thesis Research and Writing Seminar of 10 ECTS credit points requires additional 100 hours,
approximately, of individual study in the form of writing the BA Thesis.


Methods of assessm
ent


The assessment process is adjusted to the requirements of each particular level (years of study). The system is
based on continuous assessment of the students’ knowledge and skills throughout the year. Final exams are
never worth more than 50% of a co
urse assessment, and there are a number of assignments and exams that
students are expected to complete throughout the course. The students are informed from the beginning of the
rigorous workload that they are expected to carry out.


The accepted methods
of assessment include:




Examination papers



Essays



Presentations



Written and oral tests and quizzes



Debates



Reports on projects



Group projects



Thesis prospectus



Extended dissertations


Indicative proportion of the assessment methods

Final examination




20%

-

60%

Mid
-
term exam




20%
-

40%

Case studies, projects, tests


20%
-

50%

Essays, written assignments


10%
-

40%

Quizzes





5%
-

20%


The above assessment methods are applied to the various years of study in the following way:


Level 4 (1
st

Year of Stu
dy)

Frequent, brief in
-
class exams are particularly important during the first year of study (level 4). The students must
be aware that they have to study regularly and that their knowledge is checked continuously. This method not
only helps the student to

gain solid knowledge but also teaches them proper study habits. Regular study habits is
a quality that is crucial for the student to succeed in next stages of their education.



Level 5 (2
nd

Year of Study)

Assessment includes a combination of written exa
minations and quizzes (less frequent), short papers in various
forms, and highly interactive in class activities such as conducting debates and participating in group projects.
Such kind of assessment stimulates communication within the group, teach proble
m
-
solving and develop team
-
building skills and abilities.


Level 6 (3
rd

Year of Study)

Assessment puts a stress on writing papers and preparing presentations. The essential change in the
assessment process applies to BA dissertation (thesis). The student w
rites BA thesis prospectus in the 5
th

semesters (within the IRES BA Thesis Methodology) and then the BA Thesis of approximately 10 000 words in
14


semester 6 (within the IRES BA Thesis Research and Writing Seminar). Both the prospectus and the Thesis
proper m
ust be researched, written and presented. Each thesis is marked independently by two members of the
tutorial staff of the Programme. Students must obtain a pass mark on their Thesis in order to obtain the BA
degree. Such kind of assessment helps in gaining

skills in gathering and utilizing information, developing
problem
-
solving abilities, increasing effectiveness of studying, and, finally, increasing the position of the graduate
on the job market.



15


DETAILS OF COURSE ASSESSMENT



COURSE TITLE

COORDINATOR

STATUS

ASSESSMENT METHODS

YEAR I


The Foundations of International Relations

SEMESTER 1

Introduction to
International Relations

Spasimir
Domaradzki

Required

Midterm exam 20%; Quizzes 30%;
Presentations 10%; Final exam 40%

Microeconomics,
Introductory

Katarzyna
Kopczewska

Required

Final examination 40%, 6 short examinations,
10% each, together 60%

Introduction to Law

Pawel Kowalski

Required

Two presentations (10% each), at least four in
-
class exams (40%), and final exam (40%)

Information Technology

W
ojciech Grabowski

Required

Students’ performance on two projects 50%;
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m牥獥r瑡t楯湳 潦⁤o浯杲慰m楣 灲潪pcts′ BI
浩d
J
瑥牭⁥ a洠


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g潡湮愠婩敮
t敫

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J
c污ss⁡ s楧湭敮瑳″ BⰠ
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SEMESTER 2

Western Civilisation I

Krzysztof Łazarski

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慮搠a
ct楶攠灡牴pc楰慴楯渠㄰BK

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o敬慴a潮s

`桲楳瑯灨敲⁌慳h

o敱畩牥r

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J
c污ss⁥ 慭a
㐰BⰠIl慳s⁰慲瑩c楰慴楯渠nMB

b畲潰攠u渠n桥⁗潲h搠


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d敯杲慰桹

p灡p業楲i
a潭慲慤oki

o敱畩牥r

A琠t敡et

f潵爠煵楺z敳‴ BⰠ瑷o⁰牥 敮e慴a潮s
㈰BⰠ晩n慬⁥x慭a湡瑩o渠㐰B

䵡j牯rc潮o浩csⰠ
䥮瑲潤畣t潲o

m楯瑲⁓瑯t慲czók

o敱畩牥r

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s桯牴⁥x慭a湡瑩o湳ⰠI〠B⁥ ch

䥮瑲潤畣t楯渠n漠卯捩慬
A湴牯灯n潧ó

g慲潳a慷⁊畲u

o敱畩牥r

䙩c
慬 數a洮m㐰BⰠ m楤瑥t洠 ex慭a


㈰BI 敳s慹
㈰BⰠ景畲Is桯牴h楮
J
cl慳sⁱ畩zz敳′ B

Ac慤敭楣⁗ 楴楮朠䥉

g潡湮愠婩敮w敫

o敱畩牥r

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c污ss⁡ s楧湭敮瑳″ BⰠ
杲慭g慲ac潭灥瑥pc攠㌰BI⁦ 湡n⁥ 慭″MB

YEAR II


The Global and European System

SEMESTE
R 3

Western Civilisation II

Krzysztof
Łazarski

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J
cl慳s
數慭s⽱畩zzes″ BI⁡⁳h潲琠o慰敲′aBⰠ
灡牴楣i灡瑩o測‱nBI

Introduction to European
Union

Jens Boysen

Required

Final written examination 50%; mid
-
term exam
30%; essay 15%; active participation 5%

Critical

Thinking

Clifford Bates

Required

Three short essay/reaction paper assignments,
3 to 5 pages (600
-
1000 words, each worth
10%; quizzes (in
-
class, short 15 minutes,
30%); final essay, 7
-
10 pages (worth 40%)

16


Intercultural
Communication

Jaroslaw Jura

Requir
ed

Final examination: 40%; Midterm: 25%;
Quizzes: three quizzes 5% each; Essay: 20%

International Economics

Piotr Stolarczyk

Required

Final examination 40; presentations based on
short papers 20%; two short test 20% each.

SEMESTER 4

FIVE YEAR
-
II
ELECTI
VES

Staff

Elective

List of Year
-
III

electives below

YEAR III


The Civilisations

SEMESTER 5

Polish Foreign Policy

Spasimir
Domaradzki

Required

Final written examination 40%; two midterm
exams, 30%; workshop quiz(es) 30%

Introduction to Political
Philos
ophy

Krzysztof
Łazarski

Required

Final exam, 1,5 hour, 40%; paper, 2500 words,
30%; 2 short in
-
class tests, 20%, and
participation, 10%.

Government and
Comparative Politics

Spasimir
Domaradzki

Required

Midterm exam 20%; Workshops 40%;

Final exam 40%

International Pub
lic Law

Pawel Kowalski

Required

Final examination 40%, midterm 30%, case
study 30%.

Issues in
Macroeconomic Policy

Piotr Stolarczyk

Required

40% final exam, 20% mid
-
term exam, 40%
discussions and presentations

BA IRES Thesis
Methodology

Christopher Lash

Required

BA thesis prospectus 60%; BA thesis
prospectus defence 30%; participation in class
10%

SEMESTER 6

International
Organizations

Jens M. Boysen

Required

Final

exam, 50%; mid
-
term exam, 25%; essay,
15%; active participation, 10%

THREE YEAR
-
III
ELE
CTIVES

Staff

Elective

List of Year
-
III

electives below

IRES BA Thesis
Advanced Research and
Writing Seminar

Thesis Advisors
assigned by
Programme Director

Required

BA Thesis, 80% (approximately 10

000 words;
mid
-
term submission of a thesis advanced
draft,

20%

YEAR
-
II ELECTIVES

Electives for the 2
nd
Year

Diplomacy

M. Górski

Elective

final examination (1,5 hours) 50%, four short in
-
class examinations (30 minutes) 5% each,
presentation of the paper 15% and overall
activeness 15%.

Terrorism and Anti
-
Terro
rism

A. Wróblewski

Elective

Quizzes 20%, mid
-
term exam 30%, in class
Final exam 40%, participation 10%

American Civilisation

A. Bryk

Elective

final written examination 40%, in
-
class test
30%, two presentations worth 15% each.

Media & Politics

W. Waclawcz
yk

Elective

Final exam 40%, term paper (2000 words) 20%,
four in
-
class tests 20%, debates 20%.

American Rights &
Freedoms

A. Bryk

Elective

final written examination 40%, in
-
class test
30%, two presentations worth 15% each.

17


EU Common Foreign and
Security

Policy

J. Boysen

Elective

final exam 50%, mid
-
term exam
30%,
presentations 20%

Ethnic Cleansing and
Displacement in the
Modern World

C. Lash

Elective

Final

examination

50%,

2,000

word

essay

4
0%,
class

participation

1
0%

History of Genocide in the
XXth Ce
ntury

M. Keryk

Elective

Participation 10%, Presentation10%, Written
work 40%, Exam


40%

East Asia

J. Jura

Elective

Final exam 50%, midterm exam
30
%, essay
20
%.

Political Leadership in
Africa

E. Irobi

Elective

Final exam 40%, mid
-
term paper (2500 words)

25%, presentation, 15%, and two in
-
class
exams (20%)

Human Rights in the Post
-
Soviet Space

W. Waclawczyk

Elective

Final exam 40%, four in
-
class quizzes 40%,
presentation 20%

Electives for the 3
rd
Year

EU Common Foreign and
Security Policy

J. Boysen

El
ective

final exam 40%, mid
-
term exam
30%, essay
20%, presentations 10%

American Foreign Policy

S. Domaradzki

Elective

Final examination 40%, mid
-
term examination
(30%), a written paper, 2000
-
2500 words (30%)

East Asia

J. Jura

Elective

Final exam 50%, mid
term exam 20
%, project
presentation (group)
30
%.

History of Genocide in the
XXth Century

M. Keryk

Elective

Two presentations 20%, written works 40%,
Final exam


40%


American Rights &
Freedoms

A. Bryk

Elective

final written examination 40%; midterm exa
m
30%; two presentations 15%

Ethnic Cleansing and
Displacement in the
Modern World

C. Lash

Elective

Final

examination

5
0%,

two

2,000

word

essays

40%,

class

participation

10
%

Russia, Eastern Europe
and Soviet Legacy

W. Waclawczyk

Elective

final written ex
amination 40%; mid
-
term paper
30%;
two presentations 10%;
two

multiple
-
choice tests 10%; active participation in the
class 10%

Human Rights in the Post
-
Soviet Space

W. Waclawczyk

Elective

Final exam 40%, four in
-
class quizzes 30%,
presentation 20%, active

participation 10%.

American Civilisation

A. Bryk

Elective

final written examination 40%; midterm exam
30%; two presentations 15%



MARKING

SCHEME


Assessment of modules and module components shall be made on the basis of percents, with those translated
into the both the British letter grade system (A, B, B, C, D, F), and the Polish number grade system (5, 4.5, 4, 3.5,
3, 2).


Students will be assessed in English
-
language Programmes according to the following marking scheme:

70
-
100%

A

60
-
69%



B

50
-
59%


C

40
-
49%


D

0
-
34%


F*

*mark 35
-
39% is a Marginal Fail (E)


18


For the purposes of translating percentage
-
scale grades into the Polish number scale,
Łazarski

University shall apply
the following criteria:

76
-
100%

5,5 (celujący)

70
-
75%

5,0

63
-
69%

4,5

54
-
62%

4,0

49
-
53%

3.5

40
-
48%

3,0

0
-
39%

2,0


Students who receive 76% or above may also classify for a Polish grade of 5.5, or “celujący”. This grade
is
po
ssible to achieve by such a student who
fulfils all the criteria listed
below:

1.

does scientific research or participates in group research,

2.

demonstrates outstanding knowledge and skills which are beyond the module content,

3.

is excellent at an analysis and sy
nthesis of issues,

4.

doesn’t make any content
-
related errors.


Class

Mark range

Guidelines







Class I







90


100%



80


89%



70


79%

In addition to that for 70


79% below, an outstanding answer that could
hardly be bettered. High degree of under
standing, critical/analytic skills
and original research, where specified. Outstanding in all respects.

In addition to that for 70


79% below, the answer will demonstrate an
excellent level of understanding, presence of clear description,
critical/analyt
ical skills or research, as appropriate.

Answer entirely relevant to the assignment set. Answer will demonstrate
clear understanding of theories, concepts, issues and methodology, as
appropriate. There will be evidence of wide
-
ranging reading and/or
rese
arch, as appropriate, beyond the minimum recommended. Answers
will be written
/
presented in a clear, well
-
structured way with clarity of
expression. At level 3, evidence of independent, critical thought would
normally be expected.





Class II : I



65


69%




60


64%

Answer demonstrating a very good understanding of the requirements of
the assignment. Answer will demonstrate very good understanding of
theories, concepts, issues and methodology, as appropriate. Answer will
be mostly accurate
/
appropriat
e, with few errors. Little, if any, irrelevant
material may be present. Reading beyond the recommended minimum
will be present where appropriate. Well organised and clearly
written
/
presented.

A good understanding, with few errors. Some irrelevant mat
erial may be
present. Well organised and clearly written
/
presented. Some
reading
/
research beyond recommended in evidence.






Class II : II




55


59%




50


54%


Answer demonstrating a good understanding of relevant theories,
concepts, issues and me
thodology. Some reading
/
research beyond that
recommended may be present. Some errors may be present and
inclusion of irrelevant material. May not be particularly well
-
structured,
and/or clearly presented.


Answer demonstrating a reasonable understanding

of theories, concepts,
issues and methodology. Answer likely to show some errors of
understanding. May be significant amount of irrelevant material. May not
be well
-
structured and expression
/
presentation may be unclear at times.



Marginal fail


35


39%

Some relevant material will be present. Understanding will be poor with
little evidence of reading
/
research on the topic. Fundamental errors and
misunderstanding likely to be present. Poor structure and poor
19


Class

Mark range

Guidelines

expression/presentation. Much material ma
y not be relevant to the
assignment.









Fail





30


34%



20


29%



0


19%

Inadequate answer with little relevant material and poor understanding of
theories, concepts, issues and methodology, as appropriate.
Fundamental errors and misunderstand
ings will be present. Material may
be largely irrelevant. Poorly structured and poorly expressed
/
presented.


Clear failure to provide answer to the assignment. Little understanding
and only a vague knowledge of the area. Serious and fundamental errors
and lack of understanding. Virtually no evidence of relevant
reading
/
research. Poorly structured and inadequately
expressed
/
presented.


Complete failure, virtually no understanding of requirements of the
assignment. Material may be entirely irrelevant.

Answer may be
extremely short, and in note form only. Answer may be fundamentally
wrong, or trivial. Not a serious attempt.




DEGREE CRITERIA


To be awarded BA in International Relations and European Studies Degree students must pass all three levels
of
the scheme and earn 360 credits. The final grade for the degree is counted according to the following criteria:


The first year, level 4 (120 credits)





0% of the final grade

The second year, level 5 (120 credits)




33,3 % of the final grade

The thir
d year, level 6 (120 credits, including thesis, 20 credits)


66,7 % of the final grade


The following table shows a scale for undergraduate awards:


First Class Honours

70
-
100%

Upper Second

60
-
69%

Lower Second

50
-
59%

Third

40
-
49%

Fail

0
-
39%


A student

who is admitted to the programme but is subsequently unable, or is not permitted, to progress to
completion may, depending upon the number of credits attained at the appropriate levels at the time of exit,
qualify for one of the following awards:



Polish Degree

The students of the BA in IRES at
Łazarski

Universi
ty receive also a Polish BA degree (
licencjat
).
Polish rules
require BA thesis defense examination. The final mark for the Polish BA degree is counted as follows: the average
grade for all three years is worth 60%, the thesis 20% and the thesis defense exa
mination, 20%.





Credits

Pursued

Candidate may exit the scheme with eligibility for:

not fewer than 120

Undergraduate Certificate of Higher Education

not fewer than 240

Undergraduate Diploma of Higher Education

20


EXAMINATION PAPERS


For the BA Programme in International Relations and European Studies, the predominant form of assessment will
be mid
-
term and final written examinations (tests, essays).
Examinations will be conducted according to the

norms set out in
Łazarski

University.


Examination Marking


According to
Łazarski

University

regulations,
students are not permitted to appeal against academic
judgement of the

Examiners

as fairness and consistency are ensured through the double marking p
rocess.
Both the overall results of assessment as well as each individual student’s result will be further scrutinized at the
meeting of the internal examiners and at the final, decision
-
making
Examination
Board.


Internal

Examination Marking


As soon as p
ossible after completion of an examination the answer papers should be passed to the Examiner for
marking. The marks awarded for each answer should be shown clearly on the paper. Increasingly it is the
practice for papers included in the determination of t
he class of degrees to be ‘double marked’, that is, marked by
two examiners.
Second internal examiner should be given sample copies of the answer papers, consisting of a
sample of no less than
1
0% of the examinations
.
Additionally, where possible and pract
ical, student anonymity
should be maintained during the internal marking process. When the marking is completed the answer papers
should be returned to the Programme Director. Examiners will draw the Director’s attention to any papers which
pose problems.
Such papers may include those which are marginal with respect to classification, fails, and those
suspected of irregularities.


External

Examination Marking


All examination papers and grades of both first and second internal examiners are available for th
e External
Examiner and
Academic Link Tutor
.
It is usual for the papers of a student who is marginal with respect to his/her
overall classification to be included in such a sample.


Thesis Assessment


The BA thesis is marked independently by two internal
reviewers (one of them is the teacher of the thesis
seminar). The External Examiner reviews a sample of theses.



PROGRESSION


The pass mark for a module at BA level is 40%. Students are normally required to complete successfully the full
annual assessment

programme
before being permitted to proceed to the next year of study, and students who
pass all modules will automatically progress to the following year/level of study. For students who have failed
some modules the regulations
regarding
a re
-
sit examina
tion, module repetition and compensation can be
applied as follows:


Compensation
:
means that a student is given a pass grade,
in exceptional circumstances
, for work which was
not of the expected standard or for the non
-
submission of work. If a student fai
ls to pass a course, there is a
possibility to compensate lacking points provided that the overall average mark is higher than 45%.

i.

For BA students, the compensation is possible only within the number of 4 points on any course.

ii.

A student can compensate in
both core and elective courses.

iii.

The decision whether to apply compensation or not belongs to the Examination Board.

BA students may carry forward (or ‘trail’) failed modules forward to the following year (from level 4 to 6). However,
the student cannot tra
il more than 40 credits.


21


Re
-
sit examination:
The student who failed a module may take only one re
-
sit examination for that module. It
should be noted that modules recovered after a re
-
sit or resubmission can only achieve the bare pass mark
(40%) for the m
odule concerned, regardless of the mark actually obtained. A student may not re
-
sit any module
or unit of assessment for which a pass
-
mark has been previously attained.

A BA student who failed a large number of modules or made no progress during a semeste
r might be:

i.

required to repeat the academic year/level by the programme director or the Examination Board. The
marks for the repeated level would not be capped.

ii.

deleted from the programme by the programme director or the Examination Board. The deletion is
automatic for BA students if they fail five modules in one academic year, fail more than five modules in
the programme, or fail to pass a repeated module.


Repetition
.

BA students who are not able to achieve pass in the re
-
sit exam may repeat the module. T
he final
grade for the repeated course cannot be higher than 40%. Students of the BA level have a possibility to repeat a
maximum of five modules throughout the programme.


Deletion from the Programme


The Programme Director or Examina
tion Board may delete

from the p
rogramme a student who, i.e.:



fails more than 5 modules throughout the Programme,



fails to redeem the failure to pass any module within
all

available attempts,



has made no progress during a semester.


Deleted students can be allowed to repeat
an entire academic year. However, the marks for any modules in the
level concerned that were already passed have to be forfeited by a student (they would not be capped).This
cannot be applied to students in the final year of their studies.


Absence from Ex
aminations and Assessments


Absence from examination at
Łazarski

is only permitted on medical grounds and satisfactory evidence for
absence together with application must be submitted to the Programme Director for consideration within 7 days
starting from
the day of leaving a hospital. The Programme Director and the Examination Board shall have
discretion to decide whether, on the basis of the evidence received, a student has been absent with good cause.
The Programme Director/Examination Board may also acc
ept another excuse for not taking an
examination/assessment at the time set for it stating other documented exceptional personal circumstances.


A student who, without good cause, has been absent from any examination or failed to complete other forms of
as
sessment by the required date, shall be awarded a zero mark for the examination/assessment concerned. This
zero mark shall be treated as any other mark in an Examining Board's procedure for arriving at the degree result.


Time
-
limits


All requirements for
the completion of the BA degree must be met within not more than 5 years from the start of
the scheme.


EXAMINATION BOARD


Łazarski

University establishes an Examination Board to consider results and make recommendations on
students pursuing programmes leading to awards of the University. The Examination Boards shall convene at the
end of the academic year, following the colle
ction of final grades and exams for the passing year. Interim
Examination Boards shall also meet at the end of semester one following the collection of final grades and exams
for the passing semester.


Examination Board a part of the quality assurance proc
ess. The

decision whether a student can or cannot
proceed to the next semester/year of study belongs to the
annual

Examination Board
.
Examination Board

s
decision with respect to any student is final

and cannot be appealed against.

22



The main tasks of Exam
ination Board are to:

i.

ensure that the diet of assessment established in the course scheme has been duly administered by
scrutinizing examination scripts, projects, course work, and any other evidence of assessment;

ii.

ensure that marking has been fair, inter
nally consistent, and consistent with marking in UK higher education
institutions;

iii.

ensure that students have satisfied the programme and university regulations in order to either progress or
qualify for an award
of the accrediting UK institution
;

iv.

determine

appropriate action, such as re
-
sits, for students who have not satisfied the conditions for
progression or qualification;

v.

take into account any special circumstances that may have affected student performance in any element of
assessment and apply appropr
iate measures if necessary;

vi.

take decisions on any borderline cases;

vii.

decide final degree classifications

viii.

discuss any cases of unfair practice or other breaches of the regulation,

ix.

make recommendations for future assessment exercises.



DISCLOSURE OF MARKS AN
D FEEDBACK TO STUDENTS


It is important to distinguish between unconfirmed marks and confirmed marks. Unconfirmed marks are those that
have not been confirmed by an
E
xami
nation

Board. Confirmed marks are those that have been confirmed by
an
Examin
ation

Boa
rd.

Confirmed marks are released to students after having been finally approved.


Students are given individual feedback on their performance to date as this promotes learning and facilitates
improvement. Any feedback should be constructive and timely, in
order for a student to benefit from the feedback
and to improve their performance If unconfirmed marks are provided, students should be made aware that any
marks are subject to final confirmation by an Examin
ation

Board.


LU
Student Complaints, Verificati
on and
Appeal

Procedures


Appendix B.


LU
Unfair Practice Procedure


Appendix C



UNFAIR

PRACTISE



RULES REGARDING CHEATING AND PLAGARISM


Cheating and plagiarism (or unfair practice) means any act
whereby a person may obtain for himself/herself or for

another, an unpermitted advantage which may or may not lead to a higher mark or grade than his/her abilities
would otherwise secure.
In particular it means the following:


i.

introduce into an examination room any unauthorized form of materials such as a boo
k (including
mathematical tables), manuscripts, or loose papers of any kind or any source of unauthorized
information;

ii.

communicate with any other person in the examination room, except as authorized by an Invigilator;

iii.

copy or use in any other way unauthori
zed materials or the work of any other student;

iv.

impersonate an examination student or allow oneself to be impersonated;

v.

engage in plagiarism by using other people’s work and submitting it for examination as though it were
one's own work;

vi.

claim either to ha
ve carried out experiments, observations, interviews or any form of research which one
has not in fact been carried out or to claim to have obtained results which have not in fact been obtained.


All these and any other unfair practices are strictly prohib
ited.
Łazarski

University implement the following policy
on cheating and plagiarism:


23


1.

The overall principle is that cheating on exam or plagiarism always leads to 0 mark, i.e., student fails
such an exam or paper, although this does not automatically lead
to failing the entire course.

2.

Additional penalties which may be imposed on the offender by the Comm
ittee of Enquiry

are:

a.

failing the entire course with a possibility of re
-
sit exam
;

b.

failing the entire course without a possibility of re
-
sit exam
;

c.

temporary

suspension of student status
;

d.

issuing a formal reprimand
;

e.

removing from the program
;

f.

removing from the
university.

3.

Each case of plagiarism is reported by the teacher in writing to the Program Director who then sends it
to the
Programme
Committee of Enquir
y
. The report should include a brief description of the occurrence
and the steps undertaken by the teacher.

4.

The
Programme
Committee of Enquiry

reviews those reports to check whether teacher’s reaction was
appropriate. The Comm
ittee

can annul it, change it
or impose additional penalties.

5.

Students may appeal teacher’s decisions to the
Programme
Committee of Enquiry

and ask for
reconsideration of their cases.

6.

From the decisions of the
Programme
Committee of Enquiry
, students may appeal to the
Provost
of

Łazarski

University.


Ł
azarski University uses
the following
software fighting against plagiarism
:

1.

Polish

program
plagiat.pl; see
https://www.plagiat.pl/webplagiat/main.action?menu=cli
ents

2.

British program
turnitin
.
uk to which
ŁU personnel

have access through
the

current British partner

of the
University
.



QUALITY ASSURANCE


The ultimate responsibility for Quality Assurance rests with the Provost. It is exercised through a series of
c
ommittees and additional measures that ensure that everyone from professors to students is involved in the
process. This structure differs according to type of course, scope of study and individual case. However below
common features are described includin
g parties involved in process with respect to English Language
Programmes.


Internal quality assurance procedures


I.

The Senate


Duties
: To oversee the general running of the University and to ensure that proposed alterations of
academic programmes are fully

discussed and agreed before implementation and comply with general
regulations. It has the authority to consider any other matter of relevance to its members.


The Senate comprises the following members:

Provost

Deputy Provosts

Deans of the Faculties of E
conomy and Management; and of Law

Chairpersons

Representatives of the Professors

Representatives of junior Faculty

Representatives of Administration

Representatives of Students

Meeting: at least once a semester.


II.

Board of the Faculty of Economy and Manage
ment
(Rada Wydziału)


Duties
: Faculty Board is an equivalent of the Senate on the level of the Faculty.

24



Membership:

Dean and his/her deputies (among them the
Associate Dean in charge of English Language
Programmes
)

Chairpersons

Senior Faculty (faculty mem
bers holding a “habilitation”)

Representatives of Junior Faculty

Representatives of Students

Meeting: At least once a semester.


III.

Faculty Executive Board

(
Komisja Programowa i Kolegium Dziekańskie
)


Duties:

To supervise day
-
to
-
day operation of the Faculty.
Specifically, to prepare and propose curriculum
changes, to be approved by the Faculty Board.


Membership:

Dean

Dean’s deputies,

Head of the Registry

Faculty financial controller

Dean’s plenipotentiaries

Meetings: Generally once a week during the term.



IV.


Chairs
(Katedry)


Duties:

Overseeing the task of preparing new syllabi and student handbooks
.
Overseeing efforts of staff,
students, Committees of Experts and business representatives over the creation, evaluation and development of
course programmes, te
aching methods, and other aspects related to Quality Assurance Policy. Evaluation of the
results of students and staff questionnaires
.
Control methods, aims and other matters during the classes
inspections.


Membership:

Chairperson

Chair Secretary

Members

of faculty attached to particular chair according to their area of specialisation

Meetings: Generally once a month



V.

Programme Faculty Meetings


Duties:
To oversee running of the Programme and to propose alterations.


Membership:

Dean and Associate
-
Dean

P
rogramme Director

Faculty teachers in the Programme

Meetings: At least once a semester



VI.

The Examination Board


Duties
: To review the marks of individual students following his/her final exam and to make the decision
on granting the degree at the end of th
e programme.


25


Membership:

Programme Director (chairman)

Moderator

Internal Examiners and in general the faculty involved in teaching in a given programme

External Examiners

Meeting: at least once a year.



VII.

Joint Board of Studies


Duties:

to discuss and app
rove programme changes for the next academic year.

Membership:

Programme Directors for both English
-
language Economics and International Relations Programmes

Representatives of Faculty members of both English
-
language Economics and International Relations

Programmes

Academic
l
ink
t
utors

or examiners from UK accrediting institution

Student representatives

Meeting: Once a year



VIII.

Staff


students meetings


Duties:
To review and resolve any problems relating to teaching and students’ performance.


Membership:

Programme Director

Faculty teachers in the Programme

Students of the Programme

Meeting: At least once a semester



General principles:


The Dean

The overall responsibility lies with the Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Management. The Dean remains in
r
egular contact with the Heads of Chairs attached to the Faculty. The Dean has a specific responsibility to review
the performance of all his/her staff every two years. He/she supervises the work of the

Associate Dean in charge
of English Language Programme
s
.


Associate Dean in charge of English Language Programmes


The Associate Dean reports directly to the Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Management. He/she has
overall responsibility for English Language Programmes, supervises the work of Programme Dir
ectors and
overviews the Programme structure and organization as well as the quality of the teaching process. He/she
arranges Examination Boards and Joint Board of Studies and maintains contact with the external validating
bodies.


Arrangements for Program
me Monitoring

The direct responsibility for Programme structure and organization, and for ensuring the quality of teaching in
terms of content and delivery lies with the Programme Director. It is the Director who maintains day
-
to
-
day
contacts with individu
al lecturers, oversees their performance as well as their academic development and
research. He/she maintains contacts with the students and arranges for Programme Faculty meetings and Staff
-
Students meetings

who oversees their performance as well as disc
usses their academic development and research.


Students’ Programme Evaluation

26


Students are encouraged to talk to both their own lecturers and their Programme Director regarding any problems
or complaints they may have with delivery of any course. At the
end of each semester, they are obliged to
complete a questionnaire on each course. These questionnaires are regularly reviewed by the Associate Dean
and by the Dean of Economics and Management Faculty.


Staff Appraisal Scheme

The Dean of the Faculty revie
ws any staff changes proposed by the

Associate Dean in charge of English
Language Programmes
. In general, direct responsibility for staff appraisal rests with the Chairpersons and
through them with the Dean of the Faculty. Ultimate responsibility rests wit
h the Provost.


Chairs

The Chair Secretrary calls regular evaluation meetings of lecturers associated with particular Chair and sets the
performance objectives of the unit. Chairpeson review the syllabi, discuss the content of the courses, visit the
classe
s taught by junior staff and provide feedback about performance. He/she also acknowledges the
achievements and reacts in case of students’ complaints.


Each Faculty has also a Committee for Staff Appraisal which reviews teachers’ performance by reviewing
it every year. The evaluation process concerns the following:



research and publication



teaching performance



activities in professional associations and organizations



student evaluation.


The Provost additionally collects information about the academic staf
f from the Student Union and from the
Deans who receive feedback on the academic performance of the staff from the heads of departments and the
students. The results of lecturer’s overall assessment constitutes the basis for reward, promotion or dismissal.


Moreover, there is a special plenipotentiary responsible for quality assurance who is responsible and monitor
compliance of faculty programs with requirements of Polish Ministry of Higher Education.



27



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


(IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER OF COUR
SE TITLES)


CORE MODULES



ACADEMIC WRITING I AND II


STATUS

LEVEL

SEMESTER

Credits:10 each sem.

Required

4

I and II

ECTS credits: 5 each sem.


UNIT COORDINATOR

Joanna Zientek, MA; Teaching Assistant: Jacek Gałązka, MA


COURSE DELIVERY

180 hours


pres
enting rules of the art of writing and the sentence structure, analyzing samples of texts
corresponding to the program, class brainstorming, discussions, writing sentences, paragraphs and essays.


ASSESSMENT
-

per one semester

Course requirements:

1.

partici
pation 10% (results in learning outcomes 1 and 2),

2.

in
-
class assignments 30% (results in learning outcomes 1 and 2),

3.

grammar competence 30% (results in learning outcomes 1 and 2),

4.

final exam 30% (results in learning outcomes 1 and 2).


BRIEF DESCRIPTION

& AIMS

The aim of the course is to enable non
-
native speakers of English to express themselves coherently in
writing. It is also to provide samples of academic writing and appropriate practice material for students who need
to write essays. It takes stude
nts from sentence and paragraph structuring to essay writing through a process
approach. Alongside with rhetoric, it teaches learners how to build sentences and paragraphs using various
linguistic devices, how to order and link paragraphs into cohesive and

coherent essays, and to create the various
paper types that are used in written assignments. It makes them familiar with different strategies of development.
It teaches writing in a straightforward manner, using a step
-
by
-
step approach. Clear models and v
aried practice
help students develop confidence and a mature style of writing, adjusted to the academic context.

The course includes work on how to generate ideas, organize material, draft and revise written work. The
course also combines the theoretical b
ackground with plenty of exercises and comments, providing an in
-
depth
analysis of the issues. The method of group brainstorming aiming at a better understanding of rules is used in
classes.

Students are actively involved in correcting their mistakes with
guidance, so they are not likely to repeat
them. Using this approach, mistakes are not corrected by the teacher but indicated (both their type and location).

Students are gradually prepared how to import information from outside sources in their writing,

so that
they avoid committing plagiarism. A great emphasis is placed on the documentation of other authors’ works,
which is the first stage preparing the students for approaching their final dissertation papers. Different strategies
of summarizing and par
aphrasing, as well as synthesizing are explained and practiced.


LEARNING OUTCOMES


On completion of the module students

1.

will be able to write papers and essays in English on a variety of topics

2.

will be able to carry out research.


CONTENT



General advic
e on academic essay writing

28




Punctuation and mechanics



Writing sentences (modifiers, participles, verbal nouns, subject
-
verb agreement, coordination, parallel
construction, subordination, direct and indirect reporting of discourse)



Types of sentences



Pre
-
wr
iting (choosing and narrowing a topic, gathering ideas, editing ideas)



Shaping your material (outlining the raw material, using generalizations and specifics, discovering your
strategy and tone, thinking about your readers, thinking in paragraphs)



Strategi
es of development (description; narration; exposition: using examples, comparison, contrast
and analogy, explaining cause and effect; persuasion: using argument, induction and deduction)



The structure of a paragraph (definition, parts of a paragraph, ident
ifying and writing topic sentences)



Writing paragraphs (unity, emphasis, coherence)



The development of a paragraph (paragraph support, writing concluding sentences, peer editing)



Descriptive and Process paragraphs (organizing and writing paragraphs express
ing opinions and
arguments, using transition words to express cause and effect, using modal expressions to make
recommendations)



Comparison/contrast paragraphs (organizing, connecting words used for comparing and contrasting
topics, writing about the advan
tages and disadvantages of a topic)



Problem/solution paragraphs (using first conditionals, writing a two
-
paragraph text with linking phrases)



From paragraph to essay (introductory, body and concluding paragraphs)



Essay outlining



Different types of essays (
process, cause/effect, comparison/contrast essays)



Paraphrase and summary



Unity and coherence of an essay



Research and documentation of sources



Elements of writing the research paper (making an outline, first draft, citing sources, citing with notes,
writ
ing the bibliography)


COMPULSORY READINGS AND TEXTBOOKS

Hogue, A., Oshima, A.(1991),
Writing Academic English
. Fourth Edition. New York: Pearson Longman.

Jordan, R.R (2002
), Academic Writing Course
. New York: Pearson Longman.


ADDITIONAL READINGS

Heffern
an J.(1982
), Writing
-

A College Handbook
. New York: WW Norton and Company.


Optional Readings

Mc Carthy,M., O’Dell,F. (2008),
Academic Vocabulary in Use
. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Macpherson, Robin.(2006),
English for Academic

Purposes.
Warsza
wa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Macpherson, Robin.(2006
), Advanced Written English
. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Swales,J.M. and Feak,C.B.(1994),
Academic Writing Course for Graduate

Students
. Michigan: The University of
Michigan Press.

Zemach, Dorothy.
(2005),
Academic Writing
. Oxford: Macmillan.



COURSE OUTLINE


I SEMESTER

WEEK 1

Introduction into the process of writing

Different stages of writing

Organizing the material

WEEK 2

Punctuation rules

WEEK 3

Summary and paraphrase

29


Direct and indirect speech

WEEK 4

I writing assignment

Quiz discussion and correction of mistakes

Sentence structure

Structure of a paragraph

Different types of paragraphs

WEEK 5

Unity and coherence rules

WEEK 6

Formal and informal language

Confusing words and phrases

II writing a
ssignment

WEEK 7

Quiz discussion and correction of mistakes

Using outside sources and documentation of sources in accordance with Harvard Referencing

WEEK 8

Words to be avoided in academic writing

Words of foreign origin used in academic writing

WEEK 9

Es
say structure

WEEK 10

Cause/ result essay

WEEK 11

Academic vocabulary and linking devices used for cause/result

III writing assignment


WEEK 12

Presentations of different political and economic systems delivered by students

Quiz discussion and correction o
f mistakes



ACADEMIC WRITING II


II SEMESTER


WEEK 1

Revision of I semester material

Outlining the essay

WEEK 2

Noun, verb, adjective, and adverb phrases

Process essay

WEEK 3

Linking devices for the process writing

Describing changes, processes and proced
ures
-

vocabulary

I writing assignment

WEEK 4

Quiz discussion and correction of mistakes

Reporting what others say

Summary and conclusion

WEEK 5

Comparison/contrast essay

WEEK 6

Comparing and contrasting
-

vocabulary

WEEK 7

30


II writing assignment

Quiz disc
ussion and correction of mistakes

Formal and informal academic words and expressions

WEEK 8

Critical review of a film and a book/article

WEEK 9

Spelling variations

Argumentative thesis statements

Presenting an argument
-

vocabulary


WEEK 10

Argumentative es
say

WEEK 11

Academic vocabulary and linking devices used for argumentative essay

III writing assignment


WEEK 12

Quiz discussion and correction of mistakes

Describing research methods

Presentations of famous leaders

31



CRITICAL THINKING FOR INTERNATIONAL RE
LATIONS


STATUS

LEVEL

SEMESTER

Credits: 10

Required

5

III

ECTS credits: 5



UNIT COORDINATOR

Clifford Bates, Dr; TA Jan Grzymski, MA


LEARNING APPROACH

30 hours of lectures (using lecture and interactive
-
discussion), 30 hours of workshops


ASSESSMENT

1.

Th
ree short essay/reaction paper assignments, 3 to 5 pages (600
-
1000 words, each worth 10%; result in
learning outcomes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8);

2.

quizzes( in
-
class, short 15 minutes, 30%; result in learning outcomes 1, 2, 4, 7);

3.

final essay, 7
-
10 pages (worth 40%
; results in learning outcomes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)


AIMS

This course aims at introducing undergraduate students to critical thinking as a fundamental tool by which
students can learn how to effectively use judgment and discernment in their course of study. T
his course hopes to
aid the student in their ability to discover what are in
-
fact the most important issues/questions/problems and aid
them in identifying rational solutions to address those issues/questions/problems. Topics and areas examined
include 1) a
nalyzing and building arguments, 2) the various methods and standards of critical thinking
(introducing students to classics of critical thought) and 3) evaluating sources of information used to underlie
judgement.


LEARNING OUTCOMES

All objectives listed

here will be demonstrated in writing unless otherwise stated.

1.

Differentiate between inference and fact.

2.

Identify types of fallacies in reasoning.

3.

Trace the development of an argument from its proposition to its conclusion.

4.

Compare and contrast attitudes
or values as expressed by writers with differing perspectives.

5.

Evaluate the reliability of source materials.

6.

Apply the principles of critical thinking to writing, with and without the use of outside sources.

7.

Analyze arguments for examples of fact and infer
ence, inductive and deductive reasoning, and
emotional appeal.

8.

Construct an argument that defends a claim with appropriate supporting data and logical consistency.


CONTENT

1.

Basics of Reasoning and Practical Logic

2.

Understanding Judgement and how to use it

3.

L
earning to understand phenomena as they are and distinguish between those phenomena are
important to what you are dealing with and which are not.

4.

Learning how to distinguish between what is important to the thing you are doing and what is not.

5.

Learning how

to read carefully as a means to learn how to make judgements critically.

6.

Learning how to apply what one has learned to how one acts.


COMPULSORY READING

Anthony Weston,
A Rulebook for Arguments,

3
rd

edition (Indianapolis: Hacket Publishing, 2000).

Plato's

The Apology of Socrates
, trans by Thomas West

Niccolo Machiavelli,
The Prince
, trans Leo Paul de Alvarez (Propects Heights, Illinois: Waveland, 1989)

Thucydides, selection from
History of the Peloponnesian War

32



Week

Topic

Reading


1

Introduction

Practi
cal Logic

Weston cpt I

Weston cpt II
-
IV


2

Rules of Reasoning

Weston V
-
VI, X


3

Argument

Weston VII
-
IX


4

Truth and Opinion

Ways of Life

Plato’s Apology


5

Defending one’s Life

Plato’s Apology


6

Types of Princes

The Prince


7

Arms and the Man

The
Prince


8

Virtues of the Prince

The Prince


9

Prudence of the Prince

The Prince


10

Chaos of Existence

The Art of War


11

Ways of Victory

The Art of War


12

The Meaning of Victory

The Art of War


13

Final Exam



33


EUROPE IN THE WORLD


POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY


STATUS

LEVEL

SEMESTER

Credits: 10

Required

4

II

ECTS credits: 5


COORDINATOR

Spasimir Domaradzki, Dr; TA Artur Wróblewski, MA


COURSE DELIVERY

30 hours of lectures, 30 hours of workshops


ASSESSMENT

At least four quizzes 40% (result
in learning outcome 1), two presentations 20% (10% each; result in learning
outcomes 2, 3), final examination 40% (result in learning outcomes 1, 2, 3)


BRIEF DESCRIPTION

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of political and eco
nomic geography and to
examine the impact that Europe has had on the development of the global political landscape