THE GUILT TRIP

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11 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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1


THE
GUILT

TRIP


About The Production



You

want to drive cross country with
me
?”

--

Joyce Brewster



This holiday season, Andy Brewster (Seth Rogen)
is about to embark
on
the mother of all
road trips

. . .
when he is
guilted into bringing
his

mo
m
,

Joyce
(Barbra Streisand)
,

along for the ride

on a
cross
-
country adventure

that
careen
s

through
comical
curves

on the way to a surprising
connection
.

Across 3,000 miles
and 8 days
of shifting American landscape, Andy will be flummoxed
,
freaked out
, analyzed,
annoyed

and
lured into
one
anxiety
-
cranking
situation after

another by the
woman
who
knows him
--

or
rather, nudges him
--

better than anyone. But the farther they go, the
closer he gets to realizing he has more in common
with

mom
than he
ever

imagined
.


And
now,
as
they approach Andy’s
dreamed
-
of
destination, it turns out

that
a little
unsolicited

mother’s advice
might be just

what a
down
-
and
-
out
guy
most
needs to turn
his life
around.


The hilarious twists, sudden turns
and
emotionally bumpy terrain of

a
n epic

mother
-
son
journey
are brought to life
in
The Guilt Trip

by the
one of the most
unlikely pairing
s

in r
ecent movie
history: the
affably
charming
star
of
hit
teen buddy comedies,
Seth Rogen (
50/
50, Knocked Up,
Superbad, Pinea
pple Express
),
united
with th
e legendary
actr
ess, artist, filmmaker and
Academy
Award® winner
Barb
ra Streisand.


As Andy Brewster,
Rogen
plays a struggling young inventor
searching
for a lucky break.
As
his mother Joyce,
Streisand is a
pesky parent and vibrant widow
ready to
unravel her lonely lifestyle
.
But when they come together in the front seat of a sub
-
compact,
with years of family habits and
secrets between them,
it shakes up both their lives.
Director Anne Fletcher (
The Proposal, 27
Dresses
)
turns one of lif
e’s most
awkward

situations


unthinkably
close quarters with a parent
--

into a series of funny, relatable, and poignant moments that anyone who ever tangled
with f
amily
bonds will recognize.


Paramount Pictures
and Skydance Productions present
a Michae
ls/Goldwyn production of
an Anne Fletcher film,
The Guilt Trip
. The film is written by Dan Fogelman (
Crazy Stupid Love
) and
produced by Lorne Michael
s

& J
ohn Goldwyn

and Evan Goldberg
. The executive producers are Seth
2


Roge
n, Barb
ra Streisand, Mary
McLaglen, Dan Fogelman, David Ellison, Dana Goldberg
, Evan
Goldberg

and Paul Schwake. The behind
-
the
-
camera crew includes cinematographer Oliver
Stapleton (
The Proposal
), production designer Nelson Coates (
Flight
), costume designer Danny
Glicker (
Up in th
e Air
), editors Dana E. Glauberman (
Young Adult
) and Priscilla Nedd
-
Friednly (
The
Proposal
) and music by Christophe Beck (
Crazy, Stupid Love, The Hangover
).


Hitting
The Road

. .
. With

Mom



There may be no two people on earth more capable of pushing
each other’s button
s

than a
grown
-
up son and his mother


but in
The Guilt Trip

a mother and son end up pushing all the right
buttons to come closer in the midst of a wild and crazy trip that threatens to drive th
em both crazy.


The film’s comically
movi
ng journey began with a real
-
life road trip, when screenwriter Dan
Fogelman took his mom on an
marathon

two
-
week escapade across the U.S., one
that was
as full
of
revelations and
s
urprises

as it was
rife with
typical family love and friction
. It was an ex
peri
ment

that jibed with a movie idea that had been cooking in Fogelman’s mind for a long time.

“I’ve always been intrigued by mother
-
son relationships,” says Fogelman. “And I wanted to
write something about that moment in your life
--

which sometimes d
oesn’t come until later in life
--

where you really see your parents for the first time as
actual human beings; when
you suddenly say
‘Wow, this is
not just my mom, but
a person w
ith a whole life and relationshi
ps and past loves that
exis
ted long before I
ever existed’ and that transforms how you react to each other.




He continues:
“So I called up my mom and said ‘Hey, I’m going to pick you up; wou
l
d you
like to go on a cross
-
country trip with me?’ I
really
had no idea what might happen if a mother
and
son were actually locked in a car for several day
s

together.
But it was an incredible trip and
pretty
much everything that happens in the movie came from those two weeks with my mom.



Fogelman was prepared for anything

on his experimental escape with
his mother
, but he
had an even better time than he imagined. “Some of my friends said to me,

what are you doing
,
how can you possibly drive cross country with your mother?


And
of course,
we had our moments,
but we also hav
e a very fun, cool relationship
,” he notes. “As soon as we took off,
I started writing
down everything that happened to us verbatim


from getting stuck in an Arkansas snowstorm to
mom
attempting to eat a 72
-
ounce piece of meat at a Texas steak house.”


From these personal

experience
s

were born the characters of Andy and Joyce Brewster,
a
son and mother who have each
reached a kind of fork in the
ir

road

when

they set out on their trip
3


together
. Andy might have too much going on in his life and Joyce not enough, but they are each in
need of broader horizons . . .
they just can’t imagine finding that in their
often
exasperating

relationship, until they do.

“Andy’s at a crossroads in his career, faced with a do
-
or
-
die proposition of trying to sell this
device he’s invented and Joyce h
as been leading a kind of sol
itary life,” notes Fogelman. “
When
Andy hears a story about a guy his mom once loved before she was married, he decides to track him
down, and that’s what leads him to bring his mother across country with him, hoping to reunit
e her
with this love of her life. But she thinks
her son
just
wants to spend time with her, which of course
warms a mother’s heart.”


This duo might
have mixed
-
up agendas, but ultimately Andy and Joyce want the same thing:
to open up their worlds, whic
h in turn, allows them to see each other in ways they never have
before. It was

this mix of the acutely funny with
moving
qu
estions about what family bonds mean
th
at drew director Anne Fletcher


who was
a
sought
-
after choreographer when

she
cut her teeth

directing
the hit dance drama
Step Up,
then went on to conquer
the
modern romantic comedy with

27 Dresses

and
The Proposal
.
With
The Guilt Trip
, she saw a chance to combine everything she loves
in movies: comedy
, fluidity
and
heart.



I completely,
personally

identified with
this story
100 percent,”
Fletcher
recalls.
“I felt like
it was
a picture of
my relationship with my mom and also my brother’s relationship with my mom. I

immediately t
hought, ‘I have to tell this story as a love letter to all m
oms.’

We snip
e

at them
, we’re
short with them

and
yet
they’re
still always
there for us
because the
y love us more than anything

--

and they know no matter how rude we can get

sometimes
, that we love them.”


At the time, the idea of
Seth Roge
n and
Barbra
Streisand taking t
he lead roles was just that:
a madcap fantasy
that seemed
highly
unlikely to come to fruition. But Fletcher could see it no other
way

and committed
herself
to making it happen.

“From the first time I read the script, it was Seth and Bar
bra for me,” she
explain
s. “I

just
knew they would connect in the right way
to bring this story to life
. It took a lot of time and
meetings to

work it all out
, but it was everything to me because that was literally how I saw the
movie.

There were no alt
ernatives.”


Fletcher set out with
a
team
of
veteran comedy
producers


“Saturday Ni
ght Live”
creator/producer/maestro Lorne Michaels and
his partner John Goldwyn
,

along with Seth Rogen’s
long
-
time partner Evan Goldberg
--

to see if what sounded
just about impossible
could
actually
be
achieved.

4



Michaels was taken right away with Fogelman’s screenplay. “I love

that there i
s an instant
familiarity with these
two characters. I love how the story reflects

how
mothers irritate s
ons and
sons irrita
te mothers
but
at the same time,
that
you
really feel
their connection to each other,” he
says. “John
Goldwyn
was with me on it from the beginning and brought a really great perspective to
getting the script right.”


Goldwyn adds: “The thing that impress
ed me most about the s
c
ript was how
truly
authentic
it was


you could really sense that
Dan was writing from real life and his own relationship with his
mother. There was also something
very
fresh about it,
because the mother
-
son relationship has
never
really been explored in quite t
his way.

Still, we
understood from the start that
we would
to
find
just
the right balance

between comedy and emotion

in the story, and then we needed the
perfect casting

and the dead
-
on right director, which ultimately is wha
t happened.



Indeed, Goldwyn credits Anne Fletcher’s insistent loyalty to the film with helping the team
to shepherd the film to fruition. “She always spoke so eloquently about this movie from her heart,”
he explains. “Obviously, she had just done two

big,
crowd
-
pleasing hit movies with
Step Up

and
The
Proposal

but this would be a very different kind of challenge. I was sure when I met her that she
had what it wo
uld take to tackle this story, because in her gut, she was already devoted to staying
with

her vision of this story no matter what. And I think ultimately, Barbra Streisand came on board
in part because of Anne, and because she was excited to work with one of a few truly commercial
women directors. Barbra is a great supporter of women and I

think she enjoyed that about Anne,
and also I think she enjoyed that Anne is someone who calls it like she sees it. She doesn’t swaddle
her words in velvet


she’s very direct and I think Barbra liked in a woman director.”

Like
the rest
of the team, Mi
chaels couldn’t help but
personally
relate to the story. “It
makes you think
r
eflexively
back
to those times coming home to visit when you just move
into your
old
room because it feels both kind of wasteful and weird to stay at a hotel . . . and the bed i
s
smaller than you remember . . .
and
it’s hard not to become 14 again in that moment.
But
what
is
i
nteresting about Andy is that he has that experience


and then
he comes
to a realization that the

roles have changed. He realizes that
his
mother’s life was always centered around him
but
now he
wants
to take care of her because she gave him the chance to only think about himself for all those
years growing up.”


He continues: “Dan Fogelman had written this screenplay after taking a trip wi
th his own
mother, whose dream it was to have Barbra Streisand play her if there was ever a movie. So it
was a

lot of fun to get t
he script t
o a point where you had Barbra and Seth in a room reading together and
5


you could see that there was a
real
chemist
ry and magic there. I never do a comedy without a full
read through because that’s what we do at SNL. I have to hear it play to know it works


and when
the two of them were brought together, it really worked.”


Goldberg was also enamored
by
Fogelman’s

story

and having worked with Rogen for so long
could instantly envision him as Andy
. “The script was extremely surprising to me,” he recalls. “I am
pretty pessimistic when I start reading scripts, but I c
an pretty confidently say this wa
s the best
script

I’ve been handed in my life. The first time I read it, I
even
cried a little bit at one point. And
then it kind of blew my mind.”


He adds: “As things got underway, it
just seemed so natural to put Seth and Barbra
Streisand together. The best part i
s
that
in these roles, Seth
is
the straight man a
nd Barbra the
comedic

star
. And
while
some people
may c
ome to s
ee
The Guilt Trip

for Seth and others

for Barbra,
I think both
will be amused to find they are just as intrigued by the person they
didn’t

come to see.

It’s kind of the
ultimate mother
-
son
comedy
--

I can’t wait to take my mom to see this movie.”


Rogen Takes The Wheel



To bring to life the long, strange, ultimately life
-
transforming trip that Andy Brewster
undertakes, the filmmakers cho
se one of today’s

most distinctive comic stars: Seth Rogen. Rogen
has shown an unusual ability to be hilariously awkward, likeable and tru
e
-
to
-
life all at the same time,
coming to the fore i
n a series of films
, several of which he wrote,

for director Judd Apatow.
He was
most recently seen in Jonathan Levine’s acclaimed comedy
-
drama
50/50

alongside Joseph Gordon
-
Levitt.


But
The Guilt Trip

would giv
e Rogen a role unlike any other: a down
-
on
-
his
-
luck scientist
-
turned
-
inventor

and
a son
who is aggravated, annoyed, overwhelmed and then completely changed
around by taking his mother on his last
-
ditch trip to try to make a success of himself.



Producer Lorne Michaels, who has worked with Rogen as a host of “Saturday Night Live”
several ti
mes, notes that it was a bit of a leap into the unknown for the star. “Seth has been mostly
writing and producing his own works, so to come into this as just as an actor took a lot of trust


and
comedians are not really built to trust,” he observes. “Bu
t he came in and was brilliant.
He knows
how to confidently riff on a character. And h
e and Barbra really made room for each other; and
that’s what people do when they are stuck in a tiny car. If you don’t make room for each other it’s
going to get cro
wded. They both really did their part to make each other comfortable.”

6



Michaels’ partner John Goldwyn
was also impressed with Rogen from that first read
-
through
with Streisand. “
You could hear a pin drop,” he remembers, “and we all knew something spec
ial
was happening, even though it would take more time before Barbra committed.
Seth
just has
great
comic instincts, but he also was ver
y brave in taking on this role because it’s
the first time he’s
made
a major departure from the kind of characters he’s

best known for
,” Goldwyn observes. “I think it is
a break away performance from him. It’s very fun but it’s
also
wonderfully restrained and it
presents
him
in a new way.”


Anne Fletcher knew Rogen from choreographing him in
his
breakout

role in
The 40

Year
-
Old
Virgin



and she always felt he was a dead
-
on match for Andy Brewster.

“I’ve loved
Seth in all his
movies,” the director
says. “There isn’t anybody who can replicate him.

He’s brilliantly funny but he
also has the right sensibility for this ro
le because
he’s
a good actor

as well as comedian
.

And I think
it’s exciting that he

hasn’t done anything quite like this before.”


Rogen might never have
done a film
like this before, but he felt an instant affinity for it


and especially for its
playful
honesty about family relations. “
One of the things that made me want
to do the movie is that I think it really taps into a lot of things all people
experience with their
mothers,” he says. “
I think we all find
ourselves getting annoyed when we
r
e
ally shouldn't be, and
then we feel bad about it, and
then even that becomes annoying!

But at the same time
we
really
love
our mothers and care about them.
That’s the relationship between Andy and Joyce and it's
kind of
like the relationship I have at tim
es with

my mother.
It was a lot of fun to read the script,
because
I’d never seen a movie abou
t how annoyed you can get with your mother
while still
wanting very much for her to
be happy.”


The more he thought about

it
, the more Rogen
saw the film as the

one kind of buddy movie
no one has

yet dared to make


about the very specific
, and definitely complicated,

buddy
relationship of a
grown
-
up guy
with
his
overprotective, misunderstanding but kind of amazing
mom.
“I like making movies about relationships,

and as I read this, I realized I'd never really seen a buddy
movie about a guy an
d his mother, and that's what i
s so funny about it
,” Rogen observes. “
It was
like
Super Bad
, or
Pineapple Express
, but instead of
t
wo dudes, it w
as Andy and Joyce
, and that
was
such an interesting idea.



For Rogen, Andy’s dr
iving force throughout their trip is not just the

mountain of guilt that’s
accumulated over the years, but a real desire to see his mother more fulfilled

in her own life
. “I
think he sees Joyce as
being
a bit too
settled,

and not realizing
that there's a lot of fun stuff that she
could still be doing


an
d he also sees
that this causes
her to focus all her energy on him!
” he laughs.
7


“But the tricky thing is, that no matter
how annoyed he gets
,
all he
rea
lly desires
is
to see
her
being
happy.”


That’s what leads Andy to try to finagle a meeting between his mother and what he assume
s

is her lon
g lost love


though the outcom
e of that agenda goes in a

direction he could never have
foreseen
.


As for
joining forces
with
a global icon and cinematic powerhouse on the level of
Barbra
Streisand, Rogen says he went in
to their first meeting together

essentially cold. “I really had no
notion what Barbra would be like,” he
explains. “And when I met her,
to b
e honest,
she
really

reminded me a lot of my friends’ mother
s and my mother to a degree.”


Rogen continues: “We read the sc
ript together and it came off

really funny.
I couldn’t deny
that it seemed like the two

of us together in a movie was going to

be a

very
comical
thing.”




Streisand Brings The Guilt


And The Emotion



To play Joyce Brewster
in all her
colorful, contrasting shadings


overbearing and loving,
lonely and adventurous
, meddlesome and
savvy
--

Anne Fletcher always believed she needed to
somehow bring
Barbra Streisand to the rol
e. At first, that desire seemed

almost irrational.
After all,
Streisand, one of the
most universally r
ecognized
and
accomplished
personalities in all of show
business, h
ad not appeared as the lead in a film since the 1990s . . . and she had a reputation for
hand
-
picking
her
projects carefully and sparingly. But the upside was too huge for Fletcher to
ignore. Not only did Streisand come to mind every time Fletcher though
t of

Joyce, but she clearly
had the

rare
power
to
find and
bring out the heart and depth in the most
quirk
-
filled of
characters.


An Oscar
®

winner as Best Actress for
Funny Girl

and an Oscar nominee for
The Way We
Were
, Streisand is of course not only an
icon on screen
but also an acclaimed singer, film director,
writer, producer, designer and author.
As a testament to the
remarkable
breadth of her work, she is
the only
artist
ever
to have been awarded
the entire gamut of
Oscar®, Tony, Emmy, Grammy,
Direct
ors Guild of America, Golde
n Globe, National Medal of Arts and P
e
abody Awards, as well as
France’s Legion d’Honneur
and
the American Film Institute’s Lifetime Achievement Award.
Most
recently, she’s been seen in the hugely popular
Meet The Fockers

series,

playing wife to Dustin
Hoffman and mother to Ben Stiller.

But this would be something
rather
different


a leading role
that was not only full of comic repartee but also
would put her character through a transformation
at a time in life when she least e
xpects to have her perspective


on her son or herself
--

changed.

8



Barbra
was genuinely the only person I could
truly
see

m
aking this story something speci
al,
the one person

I felt could reach
both
people
’s

hearts and
their
funny bones

as Joyce,
” says
Fletcher. “
I knew
she was brilliant at comedy and I also knew her abilities as an actor c
ould be
mind
-
blowing.”


But first Fletcher need
ed to get Streisand on board, and that process
evolved
slowly
over
numerous meetings and re
-
workings of the script wi
th Dan Fogelman.
“It was a long, but fun,
journey,” says John Goldwyn. “Everyone wanted to see it happen, especially since Barbra hasn’t
played a role like this in two decades, but we all understood that

she had to come to her own
decision
. Even Seth Ro
gen
said: ‘Give her the room. This is a big commitment and she doesn’t need
this role, so she has to want to play it.’”

Fletcher recalls

that everything changed at her very

first
encounter
with Streisand
.

“We
vibed w
ith each other instantaneously,” she

remembers.


The thing I remember
most strongly is
that Barbra right away
dem
anded honesty and truthfulness.
I
loved that
because I’m not someone
who can
tiptoe

around the truth. We talked for about

five hours, and her big question was: ‘W
hy
would you
want me for this movie?’ And I told her it was her ability to reach people. I think Barbra
has an incredible talent for being able to be funny and at th
e same time completely sincere
.

She
captures things which are very true to human experience,
which is
truly rare among female actors.

And that’s what we needed
for this role: a genuine mother.”

Dan Fogelman says Streisand was on his mind even as he was writing.
“The character is
based on my mother and Barbra Streisand is my mother’s hero,” he muses.
“She was a Jewish girl
from Brooklyn who grew up idolizing Barbra, so from the beginning that was the dream.”


But when that dream became reality, even Fogelman was taken aback. “
There is something
wildly exciting about seeing Barbra play somebody this r
eal and this opposite from anything she has
been seen in recently.
She and Seth found an
incredi
ble chemistry as mother and son
.”


Streisand recalls that it was her son who
finally
convinced her to take the part. “My son fell
in love with the script

fir
st,” she says. “I said no to it for a couple of years because I had just played
a mother
twice
in
The Fockers

and I thought ‘I don’t want to play a third mother.’ But this mother
was so real and personal, and since my son loved it, I thought okay. Also,

Anne was so adamant
about me playing it and so sweet saying ‘I won’t make this movie without you.’ It was like, oh my
God, now I’ve got to worry abo
ut her finding another job! I

felt motherly towards her, also.”



Once she jumped in, Streisand took hold of Joyce
and began to see all her layers, and her
vivid
unfolding as a woman who hasn’t left the comforts of home in years.

“Y
ou have a woman who
9


lives in a sheltered kind of world, but it's a safe world. It's safe

and it's warm
,” she observes.


It's
okay. But it doesn’t have passion. So
she busies her
self with frogs, ceramic frogs, and her book club
and things like that. But
what
Andy
does fo
r her is give her an adventure


he gives her
a
way to
expand h
er world
, which really pays off. H
e becomes a better person so that they both
can
become
better

people. It's a transformative relationship without them even realizing

it.



Fletcher would later send to Streisand a collection of photos and videos of Fogelman’s
actual mother to help her
dive
into the character
even
more deeply. “She really almost channeled
her,” says Fletcher, “and at the same time she was channeling everybody’s mom. I don’t think you
can walk away from Barbra’s performance
as Joyce
without ide
ntifying with something in her.”


Lorne Michael
s

felt similarly. “
Barbra
is someone who is always very real, even in a comedy,
and
she has a way of being strong without having to show it all the time,” he says. “She’s so
comfortable in her own skin tha
t she could take on this role with ease. She
plays Joyce with
a
strength and vit
ality that are ageless.”


Adds John
Goldwyn
: “She gives a performance like you haven’t seen from her in a long
time: Intelligent, nuanced, really funny . . . and then, she sneaks up on you and breaks your heart.”


Once on the set, Streisand’s rapport with Seth Rogen

only strengthened
. “You just

never
know what's gonna come out of either one of our mouths, yo
u know?” says Streisand. “It was

fun,
because we
were
both very much in the moment. We work alike in a sense and from the first day,
we knew that this was going to

be wild. “


She goes on:
“I think anyone who is very in the moment is more than just a comedian, is
more than just funny. So Seth has that
and he has that realism
that comes from within.”


Fletcher
especially
loved the way Streisand played off Rogen’s improvisational style.
“What’s great about the two of them is that Barbra cannot be thrown off her
game.

She is ready to
play 100 percent. She knows her character and no matter what gets thrown at her, she’ll g
o with it.
There
were only a couple of times that she br
oke up during an improv moment
--

because Seth took
it so far, she could
n’t help but burst out laughing


b
ut
she really thrived off of it.”


Rogen, too, was surprised by Streisand’s improv s
avvy
. “She really can go with the flow in
an amazing way and she came up with some very funny stuff,” he says.


Adds Evan Goldberg:
“On the one hand,
Barbra
is
an absolute perfectionist when it comes to
character, taking everything through a process. But t
hen when
the camera starts rolling, she is
simply
dead on. She’s got
all
the right reactions and knows how to land
a
joke or move you.”

10


For Lorne Michael
s, the
r
apport
between Rogen and Streisand
was enhanced by Fletcher’s
willingness to let it evolve o
rganically

in the moment
. “Anne knows a lot about performance and
that’s where her energy goes,” h
e observes. “Barbra and Seth
are completely different in their
approaches but Anne

managed to get out of
both
their way
s

and
yet
always be there for them.
She
knows what she wants and is
unwavering but also patient.
She created an environment where they
were safe to explore the comedy and the level of emotion that is in this picture.”


Streisand

continually surprised Fletcher, even in her demeanor when th
e cameras weren’t
rolling.

“She’s such an icon that you start to think she might

be a certain way, but she wa
s beyond
down to earth, and so much fun to be with
,
” the director
comment
s. “
She connected with everyone
in the cast an
d crew and was always
genuine.”


One of Streisand’s most
challenging scenes comes when Joyce
suddenly
steps into the
spotlight
with
an
attempt
to chow
down a 50
-
ounce steak at a Texas s
teakhouse


plus
side dishes
--
in
an hour’s time in
order to get a free meal. Fletch
er says
Streisand attacked this g
astronomic
adventure
with gusto.


“Barbra

is a true foodie. She loves food with a passion,”

the director notes, “
and she had so
much fun with this scene.

We used a lot of different things to stand in for the steak

so she wouldn
’t
get too sick of it.
We had a skirt steak, then w
e had grilled watermelon and ahi

tuna
.
But
throughout,
she just went for

it. She was so committed and I think that moment brings
out t
he
classic,

physical side of her comedy in a beautiful way.



Laughs Streisand, “I usually go more towards pasta, vegetables, fish, things like that.
As a
matter a fact, I had thought ‘I can't do this scene’ a
t first. I thought, ‘How am I going to

eat this
much
steak?


But they were very clever in disguising other

things, and
in the end,
it was worth it.

With me, there's the filmmaker part and the act
ress part. The actress didn’t really
want to eat the
steak, but the part of me that's a filmmaker knows that this
was
the bes
t scene for this movie, so
those two sid
e
s

argue
. . .
and then the filmmaker wins.”



Another favorite scene for Streisand c
omes

when Joyce learns of her son’s ulterior motives
and, distraught, heads off for some drinks in the hotel bar. “I’ve never played drunk before,” notes
Streisand, “an
d I’ve never really been drunk, so it was a
lot of fun
or me
to play that scene.”


But most of all, S
treisand enjoyed
playing Joyce because she’s so

reflective of the funny,
poignant ways we all struggle to be seen for who we are with our family members
.


Sometimes you
resent the peopl
e you love and need the most,” Streisand

conclud
es. “Love is so fascinating in all its
forms. And I think everyone who has ever been
a mother will relate to this.”

11


En Route



As the journey of
The Guilt Trip

is set into motion, Andy and Joyce

Brewster

find themselves
meeting friends, strangers and blasts from the past who will change the course of their trip. This
roster of colorful characters
gave the filmmakers
a
chance to bring together a
talented
support
ing
cast who add

their own touches to Rogen and Streisand’s journey
.
Sums up
Anne
Fletcher: “This is
really Seth and Barbra’s film, but for the smaller parts, we were very lucky to get really amazing
actors
who each came
in and add
ed something special to

their moments.”


These include Kath
y Najimy, who
came to the fore in hit comedy
Sister Act

and has since
been seen in a wide variety and film and television roles. In
The Guilt
Trip
,

she plays Gail
, leader

of
Joyce’s “
weight loss club


and of a trio
of chatty friends
that includes English actress
Miriam

Margolyes
(
Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows
)
and Rose Abdoo, who was also seen in
The
40
Year
-
Old Virgin
.

They were very funny and
wonderful improviser
s
,” says Streisand of
Joyce’s New
Jersey
crew.


Also ta
king key roles are Yvonne Strahovski and Colin Hanks, both recently seen in “Dexter,”
who play An
dy’s long lost high school love, Jessica,
and
the
all
-
too
-
ideal

husband
,

she now has at her
side

Nick
. When the Brewster’s car breaks down in Na
shville, Tennessee, the couple turns out to be
Andy and Joyce’s only cha
nce at rescue


and give both an eye
-
opening
insight into
the myths
surrounding
Andy’s unresolved romantic history.


“They are only in a couple of scenes, but the casting works so ni
cely,” says Dan Fogelman.

As Nick,
Colin would be a completely non
-
threatening person but under the circumstances he’s
wildly threatening and overwhelming
to Andy in a strange way. And
as Jessica,
Y
vonne is so lovely
and sweet that
you
get why he’
s
been

so hung up on her.”


Colin Hanks was thrilled to have the chance to work opposite Rogen and Streisand, even in
such an awkward
scenario. “We decided to play Jessica and Nick

as so kind of perfect that they’re
annoying,” he explains. “But you also see
that they’re genuinely happy

together
. I think it creates a
really touching moment between Seth and Barbra, because Joyce finally sees the reality of her son’s
situation
with Jessica,
and she finds a great deal of empathy for him.”


Adds Strahovski: “I

think Joyce hasn’t quite let go of the memory of Jessica and Andy being
together. So the scene becomes a kind of pivotal moment between them. For me, it was so much
fun to watch Seth Rogen and Barbra Streisa
nd playing mother
-
and
-
son. Their dynamic was
so real
.”

12



Seth Rogen agrees that their scene is a turning point for Andy and Joyce. “Joyce has been
kind of nagging him about this relationships and I think she sees that it all went down differently
than she thought and that her son is a lot more woun
ded by it than she realized,” he observes. “I
think it’s a moment when she
appreciates

that her pushing him on the subject has real emotional
repercussions

for him. I think a lot of people have that kind of moment with their mother.”


Another transformative role is that of Ben Graw, the
dashing cowboy who roots for
Joyce in
her steak
-
eating quest, then charms her
almost to the point of breaking her
ironclad

resistance.
Taking the part is
Bret
t

Cullen, most recently seen in in
The Dark
Knight Rises
, who won Fletche
r
over after a concerted search for just the right kind of rugged allure.

“It was a tricky role to cast,
because he had to be someone
not only charming and manly but
able to sweep

even

Joyce off her
feet. As soon as I saw Bre
t
t, I thought ‘H
e’s

the guy.’ Then I had him meet
Barbra and when I saw
the two of them together, I knew we were done.

They were a perfect pair together.”


Adds Seth Rogen: “The ironic thing is that the role could have been played by James Brolin
[Streisand’s real
-
life husband], but that would have been too weird, so Brett Cullen came in and he
was really, really good and
amazingly
authentic. I think he act
ually comes from an oil tycoon family.
He was really natural and he didn’t come across at all as a kind of Yosemite Sam character, which
was my fear.”


Rounding out the
main
cast are
Adam Scott
of “Parks and Recreation”
and Ari
Graynor

(
The
Sitter
,
“Fringe”) as the son and daughter of Joyce’s long lost love Andrew

Margolis,
who complete
Andy and Joyce’s journey with an unexpected twist.


With the cast set, shooting

began in Los Angeles


and despite

The Guilt Trip’s

3
,000
-
mile

journey,
the main pro
duction
nev
er left Southern California.
Instead, Anne Fletcher and a team that
included veteran cinematographer Oliver Stapleton and production designer Nelson Coates largely
recreated the wide
-
open American road in one city.

“It was challenging, but we

had such a great team,” says Fletcher. “Nelson Coates found
amazing location
s

in Los Angeles that could
look and
feel just like other parts of the country. Then
our great director of photography, Oliver Stapleton, and the first A.D., Joe Camp,
headed ou
t
a real
road
trip to get additional footage. I like real locations but movie magic can also be very
, very

fun.”

Since a good portion of the film takes place in the car, a lot of work was done on a process
stage, where the focus was entirely on Rogen and Streisand, with the knowledge that backdrops of
the USA, from Alabama to the Grand Canyon, would be added later.

13



This worked
so well in part
because
Fletcher
was
interested less in
highlighting
what Joyce
and Andy see out the window and more in what they see in each other
after all the
mashugana
situations they find themselves in.

All the elements of the film, fr
om the design to the costumes to
the music, centered on that.


Lorne Michaels notes that the film’s road

trip


while as funny and full of surprise curves
as
road trips traditionally are


also becomes a kind of rite of passage. “The great thing about roa
d trip
movi
es is that as an audience, you really feel you are
getting somewhere.
You’re in the car with
these
characters
,
and
we

all know what that

is like
: it’s
about the music, it’s about conversation, it’
s
about looking out the window. But it also always about
moving forward and so that metaphor
hangs over
the story of Andy and

Joyce in a powerful way
.”

E
xecutive producer Mary McLaglen, who also worked with Fletcher
on
The Proposal
, says:
“Anne’s filmm
aking is all about performance and getting
i
nside the character’s
minds. She’s
great
with actors and
she creates a very fun set for everyone.”

John Goldwyn adds:

“Anne c
reated an environment that was

natural and relaxed and was
great for Barbra and Seth
to really build their relationship.

We had such a great team, and I also
think
Lorne’s understanding of talent and ability to quickly zero in on solutions was very valuable
throughout

this movie.”


The set of
The Guilt Trip

was not only fun, it also inspired more than a few calls home as cast
and crew couldn’t help but keep in mind their own mothers. Producer Ev
an Goldberg even headed
out on his own

5
-
day trip with his mom at the end of production.


Barbra
Streisand hopes t
hat audiences will experience a similar impact
. Concludes
Streisand: “I think it would be good if
sons and mothers
go to see
The Guilt Trip

together, you
know? And maybe the
y

will fee
l

closer at the end.”


# # # # #



14


ABOUT THE CAST


SETH ROGEN

(Andy

Brewster)

has emerged as a prominent figure in a new generation of
multi
-
hyphenates, a person who is an actor, writer, producer and a director who has the ability to
generate their own materials.


Rogen recently completed production on
The End Of The Worl
d

which
will mark his co
-
directorial feature film debut (with fellow co
-
writer Evan Goldberg).

The comedy
follows six friends trapped in a house after a series of strange and catastrophic events devastate Los
Angeles. As the world unravels outside, dwindl
ing supplies and cabin fever threaten to tear apart
the friendships inside.

Eventually they are forced to leave the house, facing their fate and the true
meaning of friendship and redemption.


Rogen will produce the film through his Point Grey Pictures
pr
oduction company banner which he runs with lifelong friend and writing partner, Evan Goldberg.




Rogen recently starred in and executive produced the dramatic comedy
50/50
, inspired by
the real life experiences of his best friend, Will Reiser, who also wr
ote the screenplay.


With an all
-
star cast including Joseph Gordon
-
Levitt, Anna Kendrick, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Anjelica Huston,
this heart
-
warming film has gone on to win over the hearts of audiences and critics alike and was
nominated for several Indi
e Spirit Awards.


The film’s screenplay has also received adulation as it
recently earned a National Board of Review award for “Best Original Screenplay.”


Nominated for an Emmy Award in 2005 for Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or
Comedy for
Da Al
i G Show
, Rogen began his career doing standup comedy in Vancouver, Canada at
the age of 13.


After moving to Los Angeles, Rogen landed supporting roles in Judd Apatow’s two
critically acclaimed network television comedies,
Freaks and Geeks

and

Undeclared
,

the latter of
which Rogen was also hired as a staff writer at the age of 18.


Shortly after, Rogen was guided by
Apatow toward a film career, first with the box office smash hit,
The 40
-
Year
-
Old Virgin
, which
opened No. 1 at the box office and remained at

the top perch for two weekends in a row.


The film
went on to gross more than $175 million worldwide and helped put Rogen on the map as a future
film star.


The film was named one of the 10 Most Outstanding Motion Pictures of the Year by AFI
and took home

Best Comedy Movie at the 11
th

annual Critics’ Choice Awards.


Rogen was a co
-
producer on the film as well.




Rogen headlined two summer blockbusters in 2007. First, with
Knocked Up
, co
-
starring
Katherine Heigl, Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann; the Apatow proj
ect grossed more than $140 million
domestically.


Distributed by Universal Pictures, Rogen was also an executive producer. Shortly
thereafter, Rogen starred in

Superbad

(a semi
-
autobiographical comedy), that he co
-
wrote and
executive produced with writing
partner Evan Goldberg.


The film grossed more than $120 million
domestically for Sony Pictures.


The duo also found success the following summer in the action
-
comedy
Pineapple Express
.


Starring opposite James Franco and Danny McBride, the No. 1 box
-
office

hit went on to make more than $100 million worldwide for Sony Pictures.


Rogen continued to demonstrate his wide
-
ranging ability as he co
-
wrote, executive
produced and starred as the main character, Britt Reid, in the comic book
-

turned action film,
The
G
reen Hornet
.


Rogen starred opposite the Academy Award®
-

winning actor Christoph Waltz, who
plays villain “Chudnofsky” for director Michael Gondry.


The film grossed over $225 million
worldwide and opened #1 in over 25 territories including the United Stat
es.


15


In addition to his on
-
screen roles, Rogen has also found great success lending his voice for
animated films.


In 2011, he starred as the voice of the title character in the comedy,
Paul,
teaming
once again with
Superbad
director, Greg Mottola.

Writte
n by Nick Frost and Simon Pegg, and co
-
starring Jane Lynch, Kristen Wiig and Jason Bateman, Rogen voiced an alien who has escaped
outside of Area 51 and encounters two geeks on their way to Comic
-
Con.


Rogen can also be heard
in
Kung Fu Panda

as Mantis alo
ngside Jack Black, Dustin Hoffman and Angelina Jolie. The Academy
Award
®
-
nominated film earned more than $626 million worldwide.


He reprised his role as the
sarcastic insect in the film’s sequel,
Kung Fu Panda 2
. Rogen also participated in the 3D animatio
n
phenomenon,
Monsters vs. Aliens

as the voice of “B.O.B.” where he was joined by Paul Rudd, Rainn
Wilson and the Academy Award®
-
winning actress, Reese Witherspoon.


The film was released by
DreamWorks Animation and grossed nearly $370 million at the world
wide box office.


Rogen currently resides in Los Angeles.


Director/actress/singer/writer/composer/producer/designer/author/photographer/activist/
philanthropist
BARBRA STREISAND (Joyce Brewster)

is the only artist ever to receive Oscar®, Tony,
Emmy, Gramm
y, Directors Guild of America, Golden Globe, National Medal of Arts and Peabody
Awards as well as France’s Legion d’Honneur and the American Film Institute’s Lifetime
Achievement Award.


She is, in fact, the recipient of 2 Oscars, 5 Emmys, 10 Grammys and 1
2 Golden
Globes.


She is also the first female film director to receive the Kennedy Center Honors.

She won Oscars® for both Best Actress (
Funny Girl
) and Best Original Song (for her
composition of “Evergreen” which has since become a standard). She also was nominated for Best
Actress for “The Way We Were.” The three films she directed received 14 Oscar® nominations.



Barbra Streisand is the only reco
rding artist to have number one albums in five consecutive
decades.


Her 51 gold albums, 30 platinum and 18 multi
-
platinum each of which, according to the
Recording Industry Association of America, exceeds all other female singers. With the debut
at #1 of
her “Love is the Answer” album, her 9th record to reach that top spot, the time
-
span between her
first and most recent Number One albums, exceeding that of any other performer, is now 46
years.


Her 2011 album, “What Matters Most,” was her 31
st

to reach th
e


Top Ten in the ratings
charts, with which she passed The Beatles to become the third highest achiever in that significant
statistic, exceeded only by the Rolling Stones and Frank Sinatra.

Her most recent album, “Release
Me,” also achieved top ten sales
status, her sixth straight to do so, and her 32
nd

such chartings now
places her only one behind Frank Sinatra’s total. She is the only female among the top ten album
-
selling recording artists.

Her activism and philanthropic pursuits are just as impressive
.


The Streisand Foundation has
given millions of dollars in more than 2100 grants to over 700 non
-
profit organizations

including her
substantial underwriting of the Barbra Streisand Women’s Cancer Center at Cedars
-
Sinai Hospital.
Powered by her raising
over $22 million, $10 million of which being her personal donation, the
cardiovascular research and education program addresses the leading cause of death among
women in the United States.


The legendary artist

also has raised many millions more for a vari
ety of
causes

through her performances.




16


ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS


ANNE FLETCHER (Director)

has proven herself a master at a comedy, adept with comedic
timing and high energy performers.She was one of the film industry's most sought after
choreographers when she was tapped to direct 2006’s
Step Up
. Since then, her films have grossed
over $900 mi
llion worldwide, establishing Fletcher as one of the most in
-
demand directors working
today. Fletcher is next set to direct
The Flight Before Christmas

for Shawn Levy’s 21 Laps banner.


In June 2009, Touchstone released Fletcher’s most recent directorial e
ffort,
The Proposal
, in
2009. The film stars Sandra Bullock as a powerful Canadian executive working in New York City who
forces her timid assistant, played by Ryan Reynolds, to marry her to avoid deportation.


After directing the first
Step Up
, Fletcher

served as executive producer on both
Step Up 2

and
Step Up 3
-
D
. In January 2008, Fletcher released
27 Dresses

starring Katherine Heigl, Ed Burns
and James Marsden. She also served as associate producer on
The Wedding Planner

directed by
Adam Shankman.


Fletcher recently signed on to direct
Most Wanted
, which will re
-
pair Fletcher with actors
Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds, and
The Proposal

screenwriter Peter Chiarelli. She will also
direct
The Matadors

for Offspring Entertainment; the movie follows t
wo men who take their
baseball fanaticism to another level when they form an all
-
male cheerleading team. Also in
development is a new, untitled project starring Sandra Bullock for Warner Bros. and Offspring
Entertainment, with Fletcher directing.


Born in

Detroit, Fletcher began dancing at age 12, was teaching at 13, and dancing
professionally at 15. She moved to Los Angeles at 18 to pursue a career in dance after graduating
from high school. She subsequently traveled all over the world, dancing in indus
trials and appeared
on such television shows as
The Tracy Ullman Show
,
The Smothers Brothers

and the mini
-
series "War
and Remembrance."


After making a music video with Dan
Aykroyd

and Tom Hanks for "Dragnet," she began
dancing in film, making her debut
in
The Mask
, which was followed by
The Flintstones
, the first two
features of many as a dancer and then as assistant choreographer to Adam Shankman.


She choreographed two successful films for Disney,
Ice Princess

and
The Pacifier
, and also
worked as chore
ographer on
The 40 Year Old Virgin
. She provided choreography for
Along Came
Polly
, and S
cooby
-
Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed
. Her work can also be seen
The Longest Yard
,
Down
With Love
,
Boogie Nights
, and
Bring It On.

Among her television credits are
Six F
eet Under
,
Judging
Amy
, and
Buffy The Vampire Slayer
.



DAN FOGELMAN’S (Writer/Executive Producer)

first feature film was Pixar’s
Cars
, directed
by Pixar co
-
founder John Lasseter. Fogelman continued his work for Pixar and Disney writing
Bolt

(2008) and
Tan
gled

(2010). His live action films include
Fred Claus

(2007) and
Crazy, Stupid Love

(2011) starring Steve Carell, Julianne Moore, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone. His feature
Last Vegas

goes into production September, 2012 for CBS Films and Mandate starring Ro
bert De Niro, Michael
Douglas, and Morgan Freeman with Jon Turteltaub directing.

17



Fogelman created and executive produces the new comedy television series
The Neighbors

on ABC, sarring Jami Gertz. Previously in television, he created and executive produced the half
-
hour
series
Like Family

(WB). His pilots since include
Lipshitz Saves The World

(NBC) starring Leslie Nielsen
and Ty Burrell as well as
The 12
th

Man

(Fox). Fogelman started in Hollywood working for
The Howie
Mandel Show, The Man Show
, and The TV Guide Channel, where he wrote 60
-
second celebrity bios.


A native of New Jersey, Fogelman graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a
degree in En
glish, which included a year of study at Oxford University.



LORNE MICHAELS (Producer)
is an Emmy
-
Award winning producer and writer, best known
as the creator and executive producer of
Saturday Night Live
.
SNL

is the longest running, most
Emmy
-
nominated,
and highest
-
rated weekly late night television program in history, currently in its
38
th

season. Michaels is also executive producer of the Emmy nominated
Late Night with Jimmy
Fallon
, the Golden Globe and Emmy winning
30 Rock
, NBC’s comedy
Up All Night
, a
nd IFC’s Peabody
Award
-
winning
Portlandia
.


Michaels’ previous television credits include:
The Kids in the Hall, Night Music
,
Late Night
with Conan O’Brien
, as well as specials with Lily Tomlin, Steve Martin, Paul Simon, The Rutles, Flip
Wilson, The Rollin
g Stones, The Beach Boys, Randy Newman, Neil Young and Simon and Garfunkel in
Central Park. On Broadway, he produced and directed
Gilda Radner Live from New York

and
produced the subsequent motion picture
Gilda Live
.


Lorne Michaels’ motion picture credits

as a producer include
Mean Girls

starring Lindsay
Lohan and written by Tina Fey,
Baby Mama,

starring Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, and
MacGruber
.
Other films include
Wayne's World
,
Tommy Boy
, and
Three Amigos

(which he produced and co
-
wrote with Steve Martin
and Randy Newman).


Michaels began his career in Toronto, where he attended the University of Toronto. He first
worked as a writer and producer for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and starred in the
comedy series
The Hart & Lorne Terrific Hour
.

In
1968, he moved to Los Angeles and worked as a
writer for NBC's
Rowan and Martin’s Laugh
-
In.

He left for New York in 1975 to begin
SNL.

In 1979,
Michaels founded his production company, Broadway Video.


Michaels has personally won 13 Emmys as a writer and p
roducer of television.

He was
inducted into the Television Academy of Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame in 1999, and in 2004 he
received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. In Canada, he was awarded the Governor
General’s Award for Lifetime Artistic Ach
ievement in 2006, and had previously been inducted into
the Order of Canada in 2002. In 2008, he was named one of Time Magazine's “Time 100”


a list of
the most influential people in the world.




JOHN GOLDWYN (Producer),

grandson of the legendary Hollywood producer Samuel
Goldwyn, began his motion picture career at The Ladd Company in 1981. During his tenure there,
Goldwyn developed the hugely successful
Police Academy

franchise, the second installment of
which he execut
ive
-
produced in 1985.


18


In the fall of 1985, Goldwyn joined Alan Ladd Jr. at MGM/United Artists and oversaw such
hits as
Running Scared
(1986),
Moonstruck
(1987) and
A Fish Called Wanda

(1988). In 1988,
Goldwyn became executive vice president of worldwide
production and was responsible for all
aspects of production and development for the studio.


In 1990, Goldwyn left MGM/United Artists to join Paramount Pictures and was promoted to
president of the Paramount Motion Picture Group one year later. In 2002,
chairwoman Sherry
Lansing elevated Goldwyn to vice chairman of the Paramount Motion Picture Group.


While Goldwyn was a senior executive at the studio, Paramount Pictures took home three
Best Picture Oscars
®

for
Forrest Gump
,
Braveheart

and
Titanic
. Other

notable films released under
his aegis include
Indecent Proposal
;
Wayne’s World

and its sequel,
Wayne’s World

2
;
The Firm
;
The
Truman Show
;
The First Wives Club
;
Mission: Impossible
and its sequel,
Mission: Impossible II
; Tom
Clancy’s

Patriot Games
,
Clear

and Present Danger

and
The

Sum of All Fears
;
What Women Want
;
Saving Private Ryan
;
Deep Impact
;
Mean Girls
;

and many others.


In 2004, Goldwyn became an independent producer at the studio. He produces the award
-
winning Showtime hit series
Dexter
,

starring

Michael C. Hall. He also produced the critically
acclaimed
I’m Not There
with Christine Vachon. This biography of Bob Dylan, written and directed
by Todd Haynes, stars Richard Gere, Cate Blanchett, Heath Ledger and Christian Bale. For her
outst
anding work portraying one of the many sides of Dylan, Cate Blanchett was nominated for an
Academy Award
®
.


In 2005, Goldwyn teamed with
Saturday Night Live

producer Lorne Michaels to form
Michaels/Goldwyn Productions at Paramount. Their first collaboration,
Hot Rod
, starring Andy
Samberg and directed by Akiva Schaffer, was released in August 2007. In 2008, they released the
comedy
Baby Mama
, starring Tina
Fey and Amy Poehler.
MacGruber
, starring Will Forte, Kristen
Wiig, and Val Kilmer was released in 2010 by Universal Pictures.


Goldwyn is currently producing
The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty

with Red Hour Films (Ben
Stiller & Stuart Cornfeld) for 20th Cent
ury Fox. The film is directed by Ben Stiller and stars Stiller,
Kristen Wiig, Sean Penn, Shirley MacLaine, Patton Oswalt, Adam Scott, and Kathryn Hahn. The film
will be released at Christmas 2013.



EVAN GOLDBERG

(
Producer)

and Seth Rogen grew up together
in Vancouver and wrote
their first screenplay,

Superbad
, at the tender age of 15. The film, which the pair also executive
produced, was released in the summer of 2007 and opened to overwhelming critical praise and
commercial success.



The dynamic duo foll
owed up the success of

Superbad

with the action
-
comedy

Pineapple
Express
, which they also wrote and executive produced. The film starred Seth Rogen and James
Franco and was directed by David Gordon Green.



Goldberg and Rogen also executive produced the sm
ash hit

Knocked Up
. Written and
directed by Judd Apatow with stars Rogen, Katherine Heigl, Leslie Mann and Paul Rudd,

Knocked
Up
tallied more than $148 million in domestic box
-
office receipts. Most recently, Goldberg produced
50/50 (starring Rogen and Josep
h Gordon
-
Levitt, directed by Jonathan Levine) and executive
19


produced

The Green Hornet

(an action film directed by Michel Gondry) and Judd Apatow’s

Funny
People
.
For the small screen, Goldberg and Rogen penned an episode of “The Simpsons” that aired
in
2009, “Homer the Whopper.”



Goldberg began his career as a writer on Sacha Baron Cohen’s cult favorite “Da Ali G Show,”
which aired on HBO. The series spun off the hit comedy feature

Borat

and Cohen’s follow
-
up,

Bruno.




DAVID ELLISON (Executive Producer
)

formed Skydance Productions to create and produce
elevated event
-
level commercial entertainment.


The company focuses on tent
-
pole action,
adventure, science fiction and fantasy films along with modestly budgeted comedy and genre films.
Skydance strives
to be filmmaker friendly in a town where it is increasingly difficult to get films
made.

In 2010, Skydance entered into a four
-
year production, distribution and finance deal with
Paramount Pictures. The first film to be released under the deal was
True Gr
it
, Joel and Ethan Coen’s
take on the Charles Portis novel.


The film was nominated for ten Academy Awards®, including Best
Picture and earned $250 million worldwide.


Skydance produced the Paramount feature
Mission: Impossible


Ghost Protocol
, produced
by J.J. Abrams and directed by Brad Bird.


The film was released on December 16, 2011, and made
over $460 million worldwide.


Skydance is also producing
G.I. Joe 2: Retaliation
, starring Bruce Willis,
Channing Tatum and Dwayne Johnson, set for release on M
arch 29
th
,
2013. Other films to be
produced by Skydance include the untitled Jack Ryan project, directed by Kenneth Branagh, starring
Chris Pine and produced by Lorenzo Di Bonaventura and Mace Neufeld.


The company will also be
co
-
producing
Without
Remorse
, written by Shawn Ryan.




Additional films in the works include the Christopher McQuarrie film
Jack Reacher
, with Tom
Cruise, set for release on December 21, 2012, the
Untitled Star Trek Sequel
, starring Zoe Saldana,
Zachary Quinto and Chris Pine,

set for release on May 17, 2013 and the Marc Forster thriller
World
War Z,

starring Brad Pitt, which is set for release on June 21, 2013. Currently in development is
The
Hitman’s Bodyguard
, written by Tom O’Connor.


Ever the film enthusiast, Ellison grew up in Northern California and attended the University
of Southern California’s prestigious School of Cinematic Arts.


While in school, Ellison produced and
starred in the World War I drama
Flyboys
, which combined his
love of film and aviation.

He is an
accomplished pilot with over 2000 flying hours, a commercial multi
-
engine instrument rating and a
helicopter rating.


In 2003, at 20 years old, Ellison was the youngest airshow pilot performer at the
Experimental Aircra
ft Association’s Airventure Show in Oshkosh, WI, where he was one of six pilots
performing as the “Stars of Tomorrow.”


Ellison is actively involved with Conservation International,
where he is a member of the Board of Directors and sits on several committ
ees.




DANA GOLDBERG

(Executive Producer)

joined Skydance Productions in 2010 as president of
production. She was formerly president of production at Village Roadshow Pictures, where she was
involved with the company’s entire slate of films including the

Ocean’s Eleven

franchise, the
Matrix
trilogy,
Training Day, Get Smart

and
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
. She also served as executive
producer on many of the company’s films, including
I Am Legend, The Brave One

and the Academy
Award©
-
winning animate
d feature
Happy Feet
. Prior to joining Village Roadshow in 1998, Goldberg
20


spent three years with Barry Levinson and Paula Weinstein at Baltimore/Spring Creek Pictures
where she was vice president of production. She began her career in entertainment as an

assistant
at Hollywood Pictures. Goldberg has been a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences since 2007.


Goldberg produced through Skydance, the Christopher McQuarrie film
Jack Reacher
, with
Tom Cruise, set for release on December 21,
2012 and
G.I. Joe 2: Retaliation
, starring Bruce Willis,
Channing Tatum and Dwayne Johnson, set for release on March 29
th
,
2013.


Additional films Goldberg is set to executive produce through Skydance include the untitled
Jack Ryan project, directed by Ke
nneth Branagh, starring Chris Pine and produced by Lorenzo Di
Bonaventura and Mace Neufeld, the Untitled Star Trek Sequel, starring Zachary Quinto and Chris
Pine, set for release on May 17, 2013, and the Marc Forster thriller
World War Z
, starring Brad Pit
t,
which is set for release on June 21, 2013.