Athlete Performance Pyramid

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11 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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Athlete Performance Pyramid




Athlete Performance Pyramid

Overpowered Performance
Pyramid

Underpowered
Performance Pyramid


Functional Movement

Optimum Functional Movement

Ability to explore full range of
motion

Demonstrates body control

Movement
awareness


Functional Movement

Poor mobility, stability,
flexibility

Many restrictions and
limitations

Power exceeds ability to
move freely



Functional Movement

Optimum movement

Excellent freedom of
movement


Functional Performance

Shows adequate amount of power

Well coordinated kinetic linking
(ie. Load and explode properly for
vertical leap without any wasted
movements)

Potential to learn more advanced
kinetic power productions
movements

Functional Performance

Scores high power
production

Power exceeds ability to
move freely


Functional Performance

Poor power production

Lacks gross athleticism
or ability to produce
power

Efficiency poor



As coaches we

have the responsibility as well as the best opportunity to
help develop the athletic/ functional performance of each player.

By simply incorporating the exercises in this hand
-
out into your warm ups
or other part of your training, you will see great resul
ts in each players
movement skills.



The importance of the Fundamental Movement Skills


Evidence exists that when the Fundamental Movement Skills are deficient then the attainment
of sport specific skills will also be negatively affected (Gallaghue and
Donnelly, 2003). This
leads to what experts call a ‘proficiency barrier’ meaning that they will not have either the
range or maturity in Fundamental Movement Skills necessary to advance or refine and
develop sport specific skills later on

For coaches, the
implications are that the young player should be exposed to a variety of
skills during these early formative years and through the early stages of development within
the Long Term Player Development Pathway. The intention is that by doing so, the player
wi
ll lay down a broad vocabulary of movement that can be used later to refine the more sport
specific skills. The skills of interest here include: running (at various speeds, from various
positions, through various directions and changes of direction); stopp
ing (with balance and
control); weaving and chasing through a variety of patterns, kicking using a variety of
techniques and from both left and right legs); passing, catching, punting and kicking using as
large a range of techniques and methods as possible
; falling; rolling; jumping, etc. To truly
develop these skills in young players, we must provide opportunities for them and encourage
them to be active on a regular basis. As coaches, parents, teachers and administrators (either
in the community, in educa
tion and in sport), we all have a great responsibility in this area.

See
Additional
Exercise Pictures




Lift leg up at right angle x 8. Leg slightly bent. Lean forward keeping back straight x 8




Long stride, drop into hips on each side x 14. Squat x 10



T Press Up x 10

Side plank 20sec x2

Lunge x 10




k
nee hugs
x 12

Developing Speed in Speed window # 1

**
Anyone can make someone sore and tired.


Proper planning is key and if you
can improve someone's speed you've also automatically improved their power,
s
trength, elasticity

etc.

You can’t train speed

For some reas
on it is a popular belief that you are born with a certain amount of ‘speed’ and
you can’t improve it. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Most young athletes are so
physically weak and mechanically out of tune that significant improvements in speed c
an be
made often just by working on technique and form. Athletes at any age and any level can
improve speed when implementing a program designed to improve and develop the entire
athlete.

The role of genetics

Genetics play a significant role in speed. For example, a speed athlete will have a
higher percentage of what we call fast
-
twitch fibres, greater fibre bundle (fascicle)
length and more efficient alignment of muscles to their long bones (Cissik, 2004).
Nev
ertheless, all players have the capacity to improve their speed, regardless of their
physical and physiological structure.


“Genes influence potential, but they don’t ensure it.”

(Sharkey & Gaskill, 2006)

1.

Have them Run at their Fastest on a Regular Basis

2.

Provide Good Instruction on Sprinting Technique

3.

Avoid Unnecessary Endurance Running

4.

Introduce Basic Strength Training Protocols

5.

Emphasize Relaxation, Ease of Effort and Patience
















ACL Injury Prevention

Although it is important to be
able to treat ACL injury, prevention should be your first
priority. So what are some of the things you can do to help prevent an ACL injury?

1.

Warm Up properly

A good warm up is essential in getting the body ready for any activity. A well
structured warm up
will prepare.

2.

Avoid activities that cause pain

Be aware of activities that cause pain or discomfort, and either avoid them or modify
them.

3.

Rest and Recovery

Rest is very important in helping the body recover from strenuous activity. Be sure to
allow
adequate recovery time between workouts or training sessions.

4.

Balancing Exercises

Any activity that challenges your ability to balance, and keep your balance, will help.

5.

Stretch and Strengthen

To prevent ACL injury, be sure to work on the strength and flex
ibility of all the
muscle groups in the leg.

Osteitis Pubis Prevention

Although it is important to be able to treat Osteitis Pubis, prevention should be your first
priority. So what are some of the things you can do to help prevent Osteitis Pubis?

1.

Warm Up
properly

A good warm up is essential for getting the body ready for any activity. A well
-
structured warm up will prepare you for strenuous activity.

2.

Avoid activities that cause pain

Be aware of activities that cause pain or discomfort, and either avoid th
em or modify
them.

3.

Rest and Recovery

Rest is very important in helping the body recover from strenuous activity. Be sure to
allow adequate recovery time between workouts or training sessions

4.

Stretch and Strengthen

To prevent Osteitis Pubis, it is importan
t that the muscles around the hips and groin be
in top condition. Be sure to work on the strength and flexibility of all the muscle
groups in this area. Core strength exercises like abdominal exercises and
strengthening exercises using exercise balls (or S
wiss balls) will help the most.