Modbus TCP/IP Interface for Traction Chargers User Guide

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Modbus TCP/IP Interface for Traction Chargers
User Guide




Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 1 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning

For Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV) Applications



NOC

LAN / IP
Network
TCP/IP Adapter

Traction
Charger
Remote Access
- Modbus TCP/IP

+ Web
+ SNMP








- Modbus slave
- Web server
- SNMP Agent







Table of Contents

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 2 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
Table of Contents
1
!
Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 4
!
1.1
!
General Use of TCP/IP Adapter (‘TAD’) and Charger ................................................. 4
!
1.2
!
Used Nomenclature ...................................................................................................... 4
!
2
!
System Overview ................................................................................................................. 5
!
2.1
!
Traction Charger ........................................................................................................... 5
!
2.2
!
BATCOM (Option) ......................................................................................................... 5
!
2.3
!
TCP/IP Adapter .............................................................................................................. 5
!
2.3.1
!
Wi-Fi, Cellular Modem – Network Options ............................................................... 6
!
2.3.2
!
USB-RF (Option, TCP/IP Adapter) ........................................................................... 6
!
2.4
!
Benning Managed Services, eNOC ............................................................................. 6
!
3
!
Functional Overview ............................................................................................................ 7
!
3.1
!
Adapter Continuously Polls ......................................................................................... 7
!
3.2
!
Reads from Higher-Level .............................................................................................. 7
!
3.3
!
Controls from Higher-Level .......................................................................................... 7
!
3.4
!
Automatic- or Manual Mode Depending on Network Access ................................... 8
!
3.4.1
!
With TCP/IP Adapter and Charger ........................................................................... 8
!
3.4.2
!
A Stand-Alone Charger ............................................................................................ 8
!
4
!
Charger State Machine ........................................................................................................ 9
!
4.1
!
When Finished a Program .......................................................................................... 11
!
5
!
Modbus Interface ............................................................................................................... 12
!
5.1
!
Addressing .................................................................................................................. 12
!
5.2
!
Registers ...................................................................................................................... 13
!
5.2.1
!
Control Charger (40001) ........................................................................................ 14
!
5.2.2
!
Read Charger Status (40006) ................................................................................ 15
!
5.2.3
!
Read Fault Code (40111) ....................................................................................... 16
!
5.2.4
!
State of Charge (40112) ......................................................................................... 16
!
5.2.5
!
Equal Time Remaining (40113) ............................................................................. 16
!
5.2.6
!
Battery Temperature (40114) ................................................................................. 16
!
5.2.7
!
Control Display Strings (40011-) ............................................................................ 16
!
6
!
Web Interface ..................................................................................................................... 17
!
6.1
!
Configure AGV Mode Functionality ........................................................................... 18
!
7
!
Troubleshooting ................................................................................................................. 19
!
7.1
!
No Network Communication with Site Equipment ................................................... 19
!
7.2
!
No Visible AGV Mode .................................................................................................. 19
!
Appendix A
!
Modbus in General ........................................................................................... 20
!
A.1
!
Four Basic Reference Types ..................................................................................... 20
!
A.2
!
5-Digit v. 6-Digit Register Addresses .......................................................................
20
!
Appendix B
!
TCP/IP Adapter Network Address .................................................................. 21
!
Appendix C
!
Firmware History .............................................................................................. 22
!
C.1
!
TCP/IP Adapter ........................................................................................................... 22
!
C.2
!
Charger ........................................................................................................................ 22
!
References ................................................................................................................................ 22
!

Table of Figures

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 3 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
Terminology ............................................................................................................................. 22
!
Document History .................................................................................................................... 23
!


Table of Figures
Figure 1: Network with Components ............................................................................................ 5
!
Figure 2: Charger State Machine – AGV Mode ........................................................................... 9
!
Figure 3: Example of Web Interface – Dashboard [v1.1b7] ....................................................... 17
!
Figure 4: How to Access AGV Configuration Screen ................................................................. 18
!
Figure 5: AGV Mode Configuration ............................................................................................ 18
!
Figure 6: Module Main Switch .................................................................................................... 19
!

Table of Tables
Table 1: Charger AGV Mode Default Setting ............................................................................... 8
!
Table 2: Charger States ............................................................................................................. 10
!
Table 3: Addresses .................................................................................................................... 12
!
Table 4: Modbus Registers ........................................................................................................ 13
!
Table 5: Charger Control (40001) .............................................................................................. 14
!
Table 6: Charger Status (40006) – Interpreting Bits .................................................................. 15
!
Table 7: Charger Status (40006) – Examples ............................................................................ 15
!
Table 8: Interpretation of Fault Code (40111) ............................................................................ 16
!
Table 9: Four Basic Reference Types ....................................................................................... 20
!
Table 10: Relevant Factory Default Settings for TCP/IP Adapter .............................................. 21
!
Table 11: Network Settings to Use on Your TCP/IP Adapter ..................................................... 21
!



1. Introduction

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 4 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
1 Introduction
This document describes additions to TCP/IP Adapter firmware that enables using Modbus
TCP/IP for Benning traction charger applications.
It describes all features currently available via Modbus TCP/IP but it needs emphasizing this is
a limited subset of all available functionality of Benning chargers. Other interfaces – like web
interface and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) – are more comprehensive.
1.1 General Use of TCP/IP Adapter (‘TAD’) and Charger
For general use of TCP/IP Adapter, please see the TCP/IP Adapter user guide [1], which
includes more information on (e.g.) web interface, SNMP interface (with MIBs), general setting
up and installing an adapter, et cetera.
For chargers, please see documentation included with charger (e.g.) Operating Instructions,
PowerHouse IHF Motive Charger [2].



1.2 Used Nomenclature
‘80% charge’ is used for discussions for running the opportunity part of the charge program and
‘100% charge’ is used for discussions for allowing the program to continue into the equalization
phase.
For numerical values (e.g. addresses and contents in registers) all numbers are in decimal
form - sometimes explicitly clarified with ‘d’. Values on hexadecimal format are suffixed by ‘h’
or prefixed by ‘0x’ and values in binary form are suffixed by ‘b’.



The charge program used is called LP 8 IUIa Charging (Standard Charge) – as
described in charger manual.

The charger firmware includes modifications for handling external commands to start,
stop, and control opportunity and/or equalize portions of program.

2. System Overview

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 5 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
2 System Overview
The complete information-chain from battery to network operations center is shown in Figure 1:
NOC
LAN / IP Network
TCP/IP Adapter
Traction Charger
Battery
Remote Access
- Modbus TCP/IP

+ Web
+ SNMP






Network
options











- Modbus slave
- Web server
- SNMP Agent







USB-RF (Opt)






BATCOM (opt)

Figure 1: Network with Components
2.1 Traction Charger
Autonomous Operation – Standard Behavior
The Benning chargers normally work autonomously – i.e., does not need or depend on
any external controls but automatically starts charging a battery when connected. And
stops when finished – according to charge profile – or by user interaction, user presses
Stop button on charger (recommended) or simply disconnects battery.
Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV) Applications with Modbus TCP/IP Interface
In this special application, starting and stopping of charging is controlled by a higher-
level controller using the Modbus TCP/IP interface – see section 5.2.1 Control Charger
(40001) on page 14 for more details.

2.2 BATCOM (Option)
The module is permanently installed on each battery and enables advanced monitoring of
important characteristics of the battery.
2.3 TCP/IP Adapter
This component is used in many different Benning systems to enable remote access to various
Benning power systems over a TCP/IP-Ethernet – network.
It has a RJ-45 for 10/100 Mbps Ethernet for northbound communication (to network) and a
variety of other ports (e.g. USB, RS-232, RS-485, and I
2
C) for southbound communication with
devices on site. One option is the USB-RF module, which provide wireless (RF) communication
to Benning BATCOM modules.
There are currently two different firmware: Standard (for AC, DC applications; P/N 10003653)
and Charger (P/N 10045100) and it’s only the latter that support chargers with Modbus TCP/IP.
Depending on application (mounting), the physical adapter can be more or less visible.
Ethernet
USB
IP Address

2. System Overview

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 6 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
2.3.1 Wi-Fi, Cellular Modem – Network Options
The TCP/IP Adapter is also easily connected to a standard, off-the-shelf, Wi-Fi bridge to enable
Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11) wireless access to equipment.
For wide area network (WAN) access, we also have cellular modem solutions.
Contact us for more information.
2.3.2 USB-RF (Option, TCP/IP Adapter)
For direct communication with BATCOM modules from TCP/IP Adapter – enable advanced
battery monitoring, including (e.g.) non-Benning chargers.
2.4 Benning Managed Services, eNOC
Benning also offers managed services for pain-free and convenient monitoring of power
systems via the Internet. Simply logging onto a web server to view performance, retrieve
reports, etc. Contact us for more information.




3. Functional Overview

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 7 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
3 Functional Overview
The TCP/IP Adapter (‘TAD’) works as a proxy between charger and higher-level management
applications in (e.g.) a network operations center (NOC).
Remote access can be performed by:
• A Modbus Master (Client)
o With the adapter acting as Modbus Slave (Server)
• Any standard web browser
o The adapter include a web server
o The web interface is used for initial configuration of (e.g.) network settings.
• SNMP-based network management station (NMS)
o The adapter also include a simple network management protocol (SNMP) Agent
Note that all information is not available via all interfaces - different applications (e.g. telecom –
more SNMP-use – has different needs compared to industrial applications using Modbus).
3.1 Adapter Continuously Polls
The adapter continuously polls the charger of information and stores this in a local database
thus making status indications, charge- and event- logs, available to remote applications
without any delays.
It may need noting that this is not a real-time system with exact timing and responses in
milliseconds or microseconds.
Polling all data from a charger and any other attached devices (e.g. BATCOMs) depend on a
number of factors but can take anywhere from some thirty seconds up to a minute or so.
3.2 Reads from Higher-Level
Reading status indications with Modbus (or SNMP or Web) retrieves latest stored data from the
adapter’s database, not directly from attached equipment (e.g. charger). Thus responds within
milliseconds instead of otherwise seconds or even minutes (section 3.1 above).
3.3 Controls from Higher-Level
Controls from higher-level system are immediately forwarded to charger. Due to
communication bandwidth and other considerations there may be a small delay in area of
seconds.
If any retrieval (polling) of data by adapter is already in progress, the control command is still
pushed to charger, i.e. no waiting for communication in process to first finish.




3. Functional Overview

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 8 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
3.4 Automatic- or Manual Mode Depending on Network Access
3.4.1 With TCP/IP Adapter and Charger
(New feature in TCP/IP Adapter firmware v1.1b7)
1. The first time the TCP/IP Adapter (TAD) recognizes a charger is connected via the USB
interface, the TAD starts an internal timer.
2. The TAD sets the charger in the AGV Mode as configured via web- or Modbus
interface, stored in the TCP/IP Adapter’s own non-volatile memory.
3. The TAD then repeatedly checks for network access, by trying to ping the default
gateway, and
a. As soon as detect network, stops checking for network and leaves charger in
mode as set in #2 above.
b. Or, if no network is found within around 30 seconds, sets the charger in
automatic (non-AGV) mode independently of configured setting.
This means:
• Incorrectly configured network settings may result in automatic, non-AGV, mode.
• A default gateway that doesn’t respond to ping will result in automatic, non-AGV, mode.
• If – for any reason – the charger has been set in automatic mode, use either web
interface or Modbus interface (40001.2) to (re-) enable AGV mode in charger.

3.4.2 A Stand-Alone Charger
A charger without any connected TCP/IP Adapter isn't by itself aware of any networking (it only
has a USB interface), and thus cannot itself determine if have network or not.
The charger keeps settings in non-volatile memory and remembers last configured AGV Mode
also if powered down and will start in the last mode – AGV Mode enabled or disabled – as
configured via a at some point connected TCP/IP Adapter.
If no configuration has ever been made, the charger has AGV Mode enabled per Table 1:
Table 1: Charger AGV Mode Default Setting
Charger Firmware
Factory Default
Configuration via local LCD
V1.50 (interim; 2012-05-18) AGV Mode Enabled No
V1.51 (interim; 2012-12-03) AGV Mode Disabled No
V1.0x (future, standard) AGV Mode Disabled TBD*




4. Charger State Machine

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 9 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
4 Charger State Machine

Figure 2: Charger State Machine – AGV Mode
1


Some highlights:
(0) Start of any variant (80%/Opportunity or 100%/Equalize) charge cycle – charger is waiting
for battery to be connected.
(2) Command to start charging, via Modbus TCP/IP
(4) If reached 80%, battery must be disconnected/reconnected for any new charge cycle.
(6) When equalization is enabled, and has finished its regular program to 100%, the charger
automatically will ‘top off’ battery according to a Refresh Charge’ portion of the complete
charge profile.
Usually kicks in 12 hours (configurable) after finished regular charge.
See charger manual [2] for more information.
(10) State 10 is not shown in figure above – the state when a user has pushed the stop button
on the charger.

More details on the different states are provided in Table 2: Charger States on next page.


1
New state machine introduced in charger firmware v1.51 especially for AGV mode (‘CMD 45’). This is a
more detailed machine compared to the regular used for all sorts of other charge programs (’CMD 20’).
For information on v1.50 firmware, see revision 2012-09-06 of this document.
0
2
4
6
10

4. Charger State Machine

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 10 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
Table 2: Charger States
#
Display Unit (on
physical charger)
TCP/IP Adapter Web Interface, ~
Charger LCD
Charger
In Use
1

Ready to
Charge
2

0

Waiting for Battery 0 (No) 0 (No)
1 Different LEDs are
flashing. See charger
manual for more.
Preparing Charge (searching for
BATCOM module, et cetera)
0 (No)
3
0 (No)
2
(Flashing)
Waiting for External Start 0 (No) 1 (Yes)
3

Charging <80%, Opportunity 1 (Yes) 0 (No)
4

Charge Finished 80%
Send Stop (9) before disconnect battery.
0 (No)
[~20s]
4

0 (No)
5
(Flashing)
Charging >80%, Equalize (only when
Equalize bit set when reached 80%)
1 (Yes) 0 (No)
6

Charging Finished 100%
Send Stop (9) before disconnect battery.
0 (No)
[~20s]
4

0 (No)
7
(Flashing)
Refreshing Charge
Send Stop (9) before disconnect battery.
1 (Yes) 0 (No)
8

Safety Stop 0 (No) 0 (No)
9
(Flashing)
External Charge Stop (/Paused)
This is the state when battery can be
safely disconnected from charger.
0 (No) 1 (Yes)
10

Local Stop (user pressed button) 0 (No) 0 (No)


1
Modbus register (40006.0, section 5.2.2, page 13) when running charge program.
2
Modbus register (40006.4, section 5.2.2, page 13) battery is connected AND charger’s ready to charge,
that the charger is actually ready to accept commands from remote management system.
3
During initialization, the charger is putting out short bursts of current in discovering and matching any
existing Benning BATCOM, wireless battery monitors, devices. (This was set to 1 (Yes) in <= v1.1b4.)
4
There is a delay of about 20 seconds before bit is cleared (1.1b6).

4. Charger State Machine

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 11 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
4.1 When Finished a Program
NOTE: If charger has finished the selected program (i.e. ’80%’ or ‘100%’):
• Sending a stop, and then start command will not restart any program but will change
indications on charger:
Command: Send OFF (40001: 0) Send ON (40001: 1 or 3)
Traffic Light
on charger
(Flashing)
LCD on charger: ‘Remote Off’ ‘Charge Finished’
• The Charger in Use bit (40006.0) is SET (1) for around 20 seconds after last Enable
Charge (40001.0) was set (1).
• Battery must be disconnected before a new program can be started.
(This is required by charger firmware version 1.50 – evaluation version. A change of
this requirement has been requested and we are evaluating changing this to NOT
require disconnect/reconnect of battery.)










5. Modbus Interface

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 12 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
5 Modbus Interface
The Modbus interface is limited to a specific subset of the functions of the adapter and charger
to provide functions requested for handling automatic guided vehicles (AGVs).

5.1 Addressing
Summary of addresses on different levels:
Table 3: Addresses
Address
Description
d
1. IP Address of TCP/IP Adapter As configured when installed in network.
1

2. Slave Address (Modbus) 1 (always, non-configurable)
3. Register Addresses (Modbus) See Table 4 on next page

There is also some additional information on the selected reference registers and register
addressing in Appendix A Modbus on page 20.



1
Factory default IP address is 10.10.10.10 but that is in most cases changed either to another fixed IP or
by using dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP).

5. Modbus Interface

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 13 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
5.2 Registers
The Modbus interface is limited to a specific subset of all functions of the adapter and charger
to provide functions required for handling automatic guided vehicles (AGV).

Table 4: Modbus Registers
Register
6-Pos
Address
Name, Description
Length
Access
More in
Section
40001
400001
(First Holding Register)
16 bits
RW 5.2.1, page 14

(All controlled at
once)
40001.0 400001.0 Enable Charge
1: Enable Charger; 0: Disable
1 bit
40001.1 400001.1 Enable Equalize
1: Equalize Charge; 0: Normal
1 bit
40001.2 400001.2 Manual (AGV) Mode (v1.1b7+)
1: AGV/Manual; 0: Regular/Auto
1 bit
40002-5 400002-5 (Reserved Holding Registers)
40006
400006
(6
th
Holding Register)
16 bits
RO 5.2.2, page 15

(All read at
once)
40006.0 400006.0 Charger In Use, = Is Charging 1 bit
40006.1 400006.1 Is Equalizing 1 bit
40006.2 400006.2 Charger Warning 1 bit
40006.3 400006.3 Charger Fault 1 bit
40006.4 400006.4 Ready to Charge 1 bit
! ! (Reserved Holding Registers)
40111 400111 Fault Code (111
th
holding reg.) 16 bits RO 5.2.3, page 16
40112 400112 State of Charge
SOC in percent (0-100)
16 bits RO BATCOM Plus
5.2.4, page 16
40113 400113 Equal Time Remaining
Remaining equalization time
in minutes (0-65535 max)
16 bits RO NOT AVAIL.
For future use
5.2.5, page 16
40114 400114 Battery Temperature
(0-65535, max), in Fahrenheit
16 bits RO 5.2.6, page 16
40011-20 400011-
20
Host Message 1
20 characters (10 Words)
! RW NOT AVAIL.
For future use
5.2.7, page 16
40021-30 400021-
30
Host Message 2
20 characters (10 Words)
! RW
Access: RW=Read-Write, RO=Read-Only
NOTE: The host messages registers starts at the 11
th
holding register. The register map and
order used in the table is simply based on customer use and requirements.

5. Modbus Interface

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 14 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
5.2.1 Control Charger (40001)
As one holding register (4xxxx) is used, all 16 bits within are set or read at once.
Table 5: Charger Control (40001)
Bit (weight)
Value
Control
2
(4)
1
(2)
0
(1)
1
0

0

04h

Disable Charge
1
0

1

05h
Enable Charge, without Equalization
1
1

0

06h
(No action)
1
1

1

07h
Enable Charge, and continue into Equalization when ready)
0
X
X

Bit 2 UNSET: charger is working stand-alone, automatically
(Bits 3 through 15 are reserved/undefined)

I.e. by writing a 5 (or 7; bit 0 set) to register 40001, the charger starts running charge program
and outputs current to battery.
To stop, write a 4 (keep AGV mode bit, #2, set.
Equalizing charge - when enabled (bit 1 set) – starts when normal charge is finished. I.e.
simply enabling equalization doesn’t mean equalization phase starts immediately but simply
means the charge program will continue into equalization per regular programming).

The currently used and verified charge
program is the ‘LP8 IUI Charging’.
See the operating instructions for the charger
for more details, including how to modify
program parameters for specific battery sizes.
Please contact Benning for more assistance,
including other batteries / charge programs.



5. Modbus Interface

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 15 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
5.2.2 Read Charger Status (40006)
Read holding register – all 16 bits are read at once – 40006 (400006).
Table 6: Charger Status (40006) – Interpreting Bits
Bit #
(Weight)
Name
Notes
0 (1) Charger in Use Set when charger is charging the battery, running charge
program
1
(
2
) Is Equalizing Set when charger is in equalization phase
2 (4) Charger Warning Set when charger or connected battery indicate some
recoverable problem (e.g. low battery level)
3 (8) Charger Fault Set when charger or connected battery indicate some
non-recoverable problem (e.g. hardware failure)
4 (16) Ready to Charge The charger has recognized that a battery is connected
and is ready to start charging.
Note: a battery may be connected without charger being
ready for external command, and thus this bit is not set.
(E.g. during initialization or already in progress of some
other operation.)
5-15 (Reserved)


Table 7: Charger Status (40006) – Examples
Read Value
Interpretation
0d
(
0000h
) No bits set, no charging, no warnings or faults, no battery connected
16d
(
0010h
) Bit 4 set: a battery is connected
17d
(
0011h
) -“-, And bit 0 set: is charging
19d
(
0013h
) -“-, And bits 0 and 1 set: charging, in equalization phase
21d
(
0015h
) -“-, Bit 0 set: is charging, Bit 2 set: has Warning
4d
(
0004h
) Bit 2 set: last charge ended with Warning

For both Charger Warning (bit 2) and Charger Fault (bit 3), the Fault Code register (section
5.2.3) is set and details are also available via the web interface (e.g. Figure 3 on page 17).





5. Modbus Interface

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
| User Guide Page 16 of 23
2012-12-13 (C) 2012 Benning
5.2.3 Read Fault Code (40111)
The fault code is primarily intended for high-level guidance in troubleshooting, and for logging.
The code is best viewed in hexadecimal or binary form for easy interpretation per Table 8.
Table 8: Interpretation of Fault Code (40111)
Value
Interpretation
0xHHhh

The higher 8 bits are used for indication where problem originate:
0x10hh
(
4096d
) TCP/IP Adapter hardware – some hardware problem.
0x20hh
(
8192d
) TCP/IP Adapter software – some software problem.
0x40hh
(
16384d
) TCP/IP Adapter configuration – some configuration problem.
0x
8
0hh
(
32768d
) Problem with communication between TCP/IP Adapter and Charger.
0x0
1
hh
(256d) Some discrepancy between TCP/IP Adapter and Chargers (e.g. a newer
Charger firmware that implement a new state not known to TCP/IP Adapter).
0x0
2
hh
(
512d
) Problem originating in Charger or connected equipment (e.g. Battery)
0xhh
HH

The lower 8 bits are used for internally used codes, to assist Benning in further
troubleshooting.
(As only one register is used for fault code – per customer request – it’s not possible to
immediately indicate all types of warning and fault indications possible in charger or adapter.
With 16 bits, only 16 different unique indications are possible, as these can exist concurrently.)
For example, the most likely code to see is 0x02hh (512d) – some warning indication detected
by the charger (like low electrolyte level or high temperature). Use charger’s own user interface
or the web interface for further troubleshooting, looking at main page and event records log.
5.2.4 State of Charge (40112)
We are just in the midst of introducing a new product for improved battery monitoring, which
includes state of charge (SOC) - the BATCOM Plus module. Please contact Benning for more
information.
5.2.5 Equal Time Remaining (40113)
(Reserved register. This optional requirement is at this point not implemented.)
5.2.6 Battery Temperature (40114)
Battery temperature is provided via the charger. See also charger manual for more.
Temperature via Modbus interface is currently only provided in degrees Fahrenheit (customer-
request; non-configurable).
5.2.7 Control Display Strings (40011-)
(Reserved registers. This optional requirement is at this point not implemented - as existing
charger does not have a display that allows remote modifications of display messages.)
(The optional requirement is to remotely set two lines of operator messages, max 20
characters, ten 16-bit words.)


6. Web Interface

Modbus TCP/IP Interface
for Traction Chargers
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6 Web Interface
The exact looks of screens may vary depending on release of TCP/IP Adapter firmware.)
The below is only provided as introduction and general use is basically self-explanatory.

Figure 3: Example of Web Interface – Dashboard [v1.1b7]

(1) Mirroring information displayed on physical charger in what’s often called the ‘traffic light’.
Note: texts shown inside colored area is only available in web interface, not on physical
charger (only light indications).
(2) General information about charger operations (not AGV-specific)
(3) Mirror of Modbus registers, for easy view of operations as indicated via Modbus interface
Click the ‘configure’ link (in the AGV area) to modify AGV mode functionality.
(4) Content in the page footer is from Benning’s eNOC – managed services server, and require
Internet access to be visible.

For more on web interface and general use of TCP/IP Adapter, see (e.g.) TCP/IP Adapter –
Charger Firmware (10045100), User Guide [1].
2
3
4
1

6. Web Interface

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6.1 Configure AGV Mode Functionality
There are only a few AGV-specific settings to make – including the master switch to toggle the
display of features in dashboard (first, home, page) and behind-the-scene functions.
To enter configuration (Figure 4):
1) Press configure in the AGV mode box (when AGV main switch is enabled); or
2) Press Configure in main menu, and select AGV Configuration in left navigation section
(Figure 5)


Figure 4: How to Access AGV Configuration Screen



Figure 5: AGV Mode Configuration

1
2

7. Troubleshooting

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Brief explanations of the items in Figure 5:
Module Main Switch: show/hide display in Dashboard, and internal functions. Enable for AGV.
Enable Mode in Charger: to enable remote control, like in AGV applications. Enable for AGV.
Read for Charger: Actually state/mode read from a charger. Should indicated Enabled and if
not, try toggling Enable Mode in Charger, or contact Benning for troubleshooting.
80% Reference Point: for battery and equalization control. Talk to your battery expert for any
value to configure, if any.

7 Troubleshooting
7.1 No Network Communication with Site Equipment
Problem: Can’t access the ‘charger’, or rather the network adapter, nothing happens when
entering the IP address of the system. Web page times out with ‘Could not
connect to <IP>’.
Cause: You have some general network problem (your computer has issues with
accessing the network), you’re using the wrong IP address, or the network
adapter it self hasn’t been properly configured.
Solution: Make sure you have the correct IP address of the network adapter. And that the
device definitely has been configured with this IP address. See also Appendix B
TCP/IP Adapter Network Address on page 21. Use ping to verify address.

7.2 No Visible AGV Mode
Problem: The Dashboard screen doesn't include the Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV) Mode
box (as per Figure 3 on page 17).
Cause: No AGV mode has not been enabled what so ever in the TCP/IP Adapter.
Solution: Enter configuration per (2) in Figure 4: How to Access AGV Configuration Screen
on page 18. I.e. click on Configure in the top menu and select AGV Configuration
in the following left-side navigation section.
Set Main Module Switch to Enabled and press Apply.

Figure 6: Module Main Switch



Appendix A Modbus in General

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Appendix A Modbus in General
A.1 Four Basic Reference Types
There are four basic reference data types available in the Modbus protocol for intended use as
described in Table 9.
Table 9: Four Basic Reference Types
Reference
Description
Smallest Unit
0xxxx Read/Write Discrete Outputs or Coils. A 0x reference address
is used to drive output data to a digital output channel.
1 bit
1xxxx Read Discrete Inputs. The ON/OFF status of a 1x reference
address is controlled by the corresponding digital input
channel.
1 bit
3xxxx Read Input Registers. A 3x reference register contains a 16-bit
number received from an external source—e.g. an analog
signal.
16 bits
(=1 Word,
or 2 Bytes)
4xxxx Read/Write Output or Holding Registers. A 4x register is used
to store 16-bits of numerical data (binary or decimal), or to
send the data from the CPU to an output channel.
16 bits
(=1 Word,
or 2 Bytes)
(Descriptions from Introduction to Modbus TCP/IP, © 2005, Acromag, Inc.)
Due to customer requirements, for the Benning charger application and Modbus support, we
are only using holding registers (4xxxx, as described in Table 4: Modbus Registers on page
13). Even if in some regards, use of discrete outputs (coils, for controls), discrete inputs (1xxxx,
for status indications), and input registers (3xxxx, for e.g. fault code and temperature) could be
viewed as more appropriate.
A.2 5-Digit v. 6-Digit Register Addresses
The address field of Modbus Requests for accessing a register is 16 bits, which allows the
Modbus protocol to support 65536 registers, of each reference type.
Historically, Modbus client devices used 5-digit decimal addresses that limit addressable
registers to the x0001 – x9999 range.
Modern Modbus client devices often provide means to access the full range of 65536 register
by using 6-digit decimal addresses from x00001 to x65536.
For the lower 9999 registers (of each type), there is no difference between (e.g.) x0001 and
x00001. That is, 40001 and 400001 identifies the exact same Modbus register in a device.


Appendix B TCP/IP Adapter Network Address

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Appendix B TCP/IP Adapter Network Address
This section is simply included for convenience – how to set the network address of the TCP/IP
Adapter (‘TAD’). For more information on general use of TAD, please see [1].
Factory default values for the TCP/IP Adapter are as follows:
Table 10: Relevant Factory Default Settings for TCP/IP Adapter
Setting
Setting
Comments
IP Address: 10.10.10.10 (Static)
Password: benning For changing configuration

Required Material
1. PC with web browser (e.g. Mac or Win; Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, !)
2. Ethernet cable
3. What network settings to use (must be provided by your local IT department).
Table 11: Network Settings to Use on Your TCP/IP Adapter
Setting
Default
Note
Your Settings
Hostname: Benning! 1)
Manual or DHCP: Manual (Static) 2)
IP Address: 10.10.10.10 -“-
Network Mask: 255.255.255.0 -“-
Default Gateway: 10.10.10.10 -“-
Password:
benning
3)
1) Doesn't have to be changed by is recommended, and especially if using DCHP.
2) Must be provided by local IT department, to avoid serious network problems.
3) Never leave default passwords on any devices. Major security risk.

Procedure
For experienced users (must set up small local LAN with cross-over cable or switch):
Point web browser to 10.10.10.10, click on Configuration tab, enter password (benning), to
configure network settings, and optionally but recommended, network time server settings.


Appendix C Firmware History

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Appendix C Firmware History
C.1 TCP/IP Adapter
Firmware P/N: 10045100 (for use in Benning TCP/IP Adapters) .
Version
Released
Notes
1.1b6 2012-09-06 Improvements in Charger In Use indications (at first connecting
battery, delayed clearing of indication when connecting fully
charged battery)
1.1b7 2012-10-09 Released was rushed for fixing bug in changing 80% Ref.
1.3b2 2012-12-13 Required for Charger Firmware v1.51 (2012-12-03; below)
C.2 Charger
Firmware P/N: 10001724 (for loading onto Benning IHF motive chargers, traction chargers).
Version
Released
Notes
1.06 2011-03-11~ Most current standard charger firmware
1.50 2012-05-18 AGV evaluation special build; for TCP/IP Adapter <= v1.1b7
1.51 2012-12-03 AGV evaluation special build; req. TCP/IP Adapter >= v1.3b2


References
[1] TCP/IP Adapter – Charger Firmware (10045100), User Guide, Benning (US)
[2] Operating Instructions, PowerHouse IHF Motive Charger, Benning, document id 4496.
Terminology
AGV Automatically Guided Vehicle
DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
DNS Domain Name System
HTTP Hypertext Transfer Protocol
IP Internet Protocol

Document History

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MIB Management Information Base
NOC Network Operations Center
NMS Network Management Station (Network Management Station System)
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol
TAD TCP/IP Adapter (Benning US abbreviation)
TCP Transmission Control Protocol
USB Universal Serial Bus
Document History


Date
User
Notes
2012-12-13 Thu
JOHSAR
New release with modifications for charger firmware v1.51.
Also adding information on new bit 40001.2, Manual (AGV)
Mode. Multiple new sections including
* 3.4 Automatic- or Manual Mode Depending on Network
Access on page 8 and
* Appendix C Firmware History on page 22.
Updated screen shot Figure 3: Example of Web Interface –
Dashboard on page 17.