B.E. Chemical Engineering

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B.E. Chemical Engineering

Syllabus: Second Year, Pattern
B

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

________________________________
_____________________________

1


Semester I

________________________________
________________________________
___

2

Theory Courses

________________________________
______________________________

2

CH1012 : Process Calculations

________________________________
______________________

2

CH1022 : Fluid
-
Flow Operations

________________________________
____________________

4

CH1032 : Chemical Synthesis

________________________________
_______________________

6

ES0342: Chemistry III

________________________________
_____________________________

8

IP0952 : Chemic
al Engineering Materials

________________________________
____________

10

Laboratory Courses

________________________________
__________________________

12

CH6022 : Fluid
-
flow Operations

________________________________
____________________

12

ES5342 : Chemistry III

________________________________
___________________________

13

IP5952 : Chemical Engineering Materials

________________________________
____________

15


Semester II

________________________________
________________________________
_

16

Theory Courses

________________________________
_____________________________

16

CH2012 : Heat Transfer

________________________________
___________________________

16

CH2022 : Mechanical Operations

________________________________
___________________

18

CH2032 : Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
-

I

________________________________
__

20

ES0352 : Chemistry IV

________________________________
____________________________

22

ES0122 : Engineering Mathematics III

________________________________
______________

24

Laboratory Courses

________________________________
__________________________

26

CH7012 : Heat Transfer

________________________________
___________________________

26

CH7022: Mechanical Operations

________________________________
___________________

27

ES5352 : Chemistry IV

________________________________
____________________________

28


Professional Development (PD) Courses (SE

/ TE)

________________________________
_

30

CH501: Pipe Stress Analysis

________________________________
_______________________

30

CH502: Process simulation

________________________________
________________________

31

CH503: Water Treatment

________________________________
_________________________

32

ES501: Electrical Machines and Switchgear

________________________________
__________

33

Semester I

Theory Courses

CH1012

: Process Calculations

Prerequisites:

Basic know
ledge of chemistry and mathematics.

Objectives:

1.

To understand material balance over a unit with and without chemical reaction.

2.

To understand energy balance over a unit.

3.

To understand steady state, unsteady state, recycle, by
-
pass,

purge adiabatic, isotherm
al,
operations and material and energy balances for them.

Contents:

Unit 1 : Basic Chemical Calculations






(6Hrs)

Dimensions and Units, chemical calculations including mole, equivalent weight, solids, liquids,
solutions and their properties, properti
es of gases.

Unit 2 : Material Balances without Chemical Reactions




(8Hrs)

Concept, Material balance calculations, recycling and bypassing operations, introductions to
unsteady state processes.

Unit 3 : Material Balances involving Chemical Reactions


( 8Hrs )

Mass balance with chemical reactions, single, multiple reactions, excess and limiting reactants,
conversion, yield and selectivity. Material balance with recycle bypass and purge operation.

Unit 4 : Energy Balances

( 8Hrs )

Specific heat of gases, liquids solids, latent heat of phase change, heat of reaction, energy
balance of unit process, combustion of fuels and combustion calculatio
ns.

Unit 5 : Unsteady state processes




( 8Hrs )

Unsteady state material balance , unsteady state energy balance.

Unit 6 : Complex Chemical Calculations ( 6Hrs

)

Psychometric calculations, Non ideal calculations for gaseous and liquid mixtures, calculations
for n number of reactions, simultaneous material and energy balance, adiabatic flame
temperature calculations..


Outcomes:

Ability to carry out material and

energy balance over a chemical process unit and over entire
plant.

Textbooks:

1.

Bhatt B. I. and Vora S. M.; ‘Stoichiometry’, Tata McGraw
-
Hill, 4th Edition, 2004.

2.

Himmelblau D. M.; ‘Basic Principles & Calculations in Chemical Engineering’, Tata
McGraw
-
H
ill, 7th Edition, 2004.

References:

1.

Hougen O. A. and Watson K. M.; ‘Chemica
l Process Principles (Part I)’,
John Wiley and
Sons, 1968
.

2.

Rao D. P. and Murthy D. V. S. ; ‘Process Calculations for Chemical Engineers’, Mcmillan
Publications.

CH1022
: Fluid
-
Fl
ow Operations

Prerequisites:

Fundamental knowledge of units and dimensions, physics and Mathematics.

Objectives:

1.

To understand the fundamental aspects of fluid motion, fluid properties, flow
regimes, pressure variation, fluid kinemati
cs and methods of flow description and
analysis.

2.

To study the conservation laws in their integral and differential forms, and their use in
analyzing and solving the fluid flow problems.

Contents:

Unit 1 : Fundamentals of fluid Mecha
nics:





( 6 Hrs )

Fluid definition and properties, continuum hypothesis, Newton’s law of viscosity pressure and
temperature dependence, analogy with heat and mass transfer, applications of fluid mechanics in
chemical engineering, Rheological classi
fication of fluids, types of flow, lines to describe the
flow

Unit 2 : Fluid Statics and Dynamics






( 8 Hrs )

Fluid statics, fundamental equation of fluid statics, gauge and absolute pressure, pressure
measurement by simple and differential manometer,

Concepts of Buoyancy and floatation for
floating and submerged bodies and applications in chemical engineerin
g.

Mass and energy balance, Bernoulli’s equation and applications; Pitot tube, venturimeter,

orificemeter, flow through orifice and applications

Unit

3 : Dimensional analys
is and scale up






( 6 Hrs )

Fundamental dimension of quantities, dimensiona
l homogeneity, model studies


geometric and
kinematic and dynamic similarities, problem solving by Buckingham’s Pi theorem, Rayleigh’s
method, Scale
-
up using dimensionless numbers

Unit 4 : Laminar and turbulent flow through chemical engineering systems

( 8 Hrs )

Shell balance based solutions for laminar flow through circular tube (Hagen Poiseuelle
equation), on inclined plane, through annular space (
concentric pipes), Concept of Reynolds
number; transition and turbulent flow in pipes. Applications in heat and mass transfer, Darcy
-
Weisbach equation, Moody diagram for obtaining friction factor

Unit 5 : Boundary layer theory







( 6 Hrs )

Concept of
hydrodynamic boundary layer, growth over a flat plate, change in nature of boundary
layer, and different thicknesses of boundary layer (nominal, displacement, momentum and
energy thickness), Qualitative discussion of thermal and hydro dynamic boundary laye
r for heat
and mass transfer, Drag on flat plate, coefficient of drag and its variation

Unit 6 : Fluid flow machinery and transport of fluids




(8 Hrs )

Series and parallel pipe systems, minor losses and major losses in pipes, concept of equivalent
pipe
, cavitation and water hammer and engineering analysis, Pumps; centrifugal pump,
compressors, fans and blowers, Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).


Outcomes:

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:



Determine distribution i
n fluids at rest and to calculate hydrostatic forces acting on plane and
curved surfaces.



Determine pressure variation in a flowing fluid using Bernoulli's principle.



Determine velocity and acceleration of a fluid at a point.



Apply control volumes to solve

fluid flow problems through the application of integral
conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy.



Apply the differential conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy to fluid flow
problems.



Apply basic fluid mechanics principles to the flow

of viscous fluids in pipes and ducts

Textbooks:

1.

McCabe W. and Smith J.C.; ‘Unit operations in Chemical Engineering’, McGraw Hill , 7th
edition, 2007.

2.

Bansal R.K.; ‘A Textbook of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic’, Laxmi Publications, 2005.

References:

1.

Den M.
M.; ‘Process fluid mechanics’, Prentice Hall, 1998.

2.

Evett J.B. and Lin C.; ‘Fundamentals of Fluid mechanics’, McGraw Hill, 1987.

CH1032

: Chemical Synthesis

Prerequisites:

N
il

Objectives:

1.

The focu
s of the course is

on understanding strategies and metho
ds used in
chemical synthesis for a wider range of applications.

2.

The course intends to train students in the use of research methods and techniques involved
in the discovery and development of chemical species.

Contents:

Unit 1: Synthe
sis of natural products






(7 Hrs)

Analysis of pathways of reactions, strategies for bond recognition, chemoselectivity, effect of
solvent and stereocontrol, kinetic and thermodynamic control, group chemistry, classes of
biologically active natural prod
ucts.

Unit 2: Synthetic chemistry








(7 Hrs)

Synthesis of dyes, drugs, proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, steroids etc, evaluation of different
routes to the same compound, convergent and divergent synthesis.

Unit 3: Stereochemistry








(7 Hrs)

Stru
ctural isomers, stereoisomers, diastereomers, enantomers, chirality, optical activity, naming
conventions
-

by configuration, by optical activity, properties and applications in pharma
industry.

Unit 4:
Asymmetric

synthesis







(7 Hrs)

Design of a
symmetr
ic

synthesis, Diels
-
Alder reaction; drugs, dyes and pigments; asymmetric
synthesis of inorganic compounds.

Unit 5: Biomaterials chemistry







(7 Hrs)

Processing and manufacture of biomaterials, coating of biomaterials, surface modification of
biomateria
ls, development of techniques for the analysis of biological interfaces, biofouling ,
biomolecular and immunological interactions with biomaterials.

Chemical aspects of medical devices.

Unit 6: Inorganic Synthesis








(7 Hrs)

Catalyst synthesis, synthe
sis of organometallic compounds.

Outcomes:

Students should be able to create proposal projects to examine literature pertaining to new ideas
in chemical synthesis. The report should include assessment of a new idea relative to the topical
areas covered in
the course.

Textbooks
:

1.

Corey E. J. and Cheng X.M.; ‘The Logic of Chemical Synthesis’, Wiley
-
Interscience, 2nd
edition, 2002.

2.

Nicolaou, K.C.

Sorensen

E. J.; ’Classics in Total Synthesis: vol 1’, Wiley
-
VCH, 1996.

3.

Hudlicky,T.;Reed,J.W.; ‘The Way of Synthesis: Evolution of Design and Methods for
Natural Products’, Wiley
-
VCH, 2007.

4.

Kurty, L.: Czako, B.; ‘Stategic Application of
Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis’,
Academic Press, 2005.

References
:

1.

Clayden, J.; Greeves, N.; Warren, S.; Wothers, P. ‘Organic Chemistry’, Oxford University
Press, 2001.

2.

Warren, S.; ‘Organic Synthesis: The Disconnection Approach’, John Wiley, 2004.

3.

Wu
ts, P.G.M.; Greene, T.W. ‘Greene’s Protective Groups in Organic Synthesis’, Wiley
Interscience, 4th ed, 2006.

4.

Coxon, J.M., Norman, R.O.C.; ‘Principles of Organic Synthesis’, Blackie Academic and
Professional, 3rd ed., 1993.

5.

March, J.; ‘Advanced Organic Che
mistry: Reactions, Mechanisms and Structure’, Wiley
Interscience, 6th ed., 2007.

6.

Morrison, R.T., Boyd, R.N.; ‘Organic Chemistry’, Prentice Hall of India, 6th ed, 1992.

ES0342:
Chemistry
III

Prerequisites:

N
il

Objectives:

1.

To get acquainted
with organic co
mpounds which are used in different chemical

industries.

2.

To develop different chemical synthesis processes.

3.

To

understand the mechanism underlying various reactions.


Contents:

Unit 1 : Structural Effect and Reactivity






( 7 Hrs )

Benzene and aro
maticity, concept of aromaticity (4n+2), conditions necessary for
demoralization, breaking and formation of bonds (Reaction intermediate).Factors affecting
electron availability

Inductive effect, Resonance effect (resonance structures of naphthalene ,
ant
hracene , aniline , phenoxide ion, benzaldehyde, nitrobenzene, etc..), hyperconjugation, steric
effect, tautomerism. Effects of resonance, inductive effect, steric effect on pKa, and pKb value of
simple acid and bases. Types of reactions, types of reagents
.

Unit 2 : Reaction Mechanisms







( 7 Hrs )

Mechanism of reaction involving carbonium ion intermediates:

Nucleophilic substitution

Hydrolysis of alkyl halide (SN1 Mechanism).Also discuss SN2
mechanism and factors affecting SN reactions.

Electrophilic
substitution in benzene and mono
-
substituted benzene nitration, sulphonation,
halogenation, Friedel Craft alkylation and acylation.

Electrophilic addition to C=C, polar addition of hydrogen halides and water, alkylation,
dimerisation.

Elimination’s
-

E1 re
action s in acid catalyzed dehydration of alcohols, base catalyzed dehydro
-
halogenation of alkyl halides, comparison of elimination with substitution. Also cover E2
mechanism.

Rearrangement
-
Beckman rearrangement.

Unit 3 : Mechanisms of Reactions Involving
Carbanion Intermediates


( 7 Hrs )

Addition of carbon nucleophilic to C=O
-

Grignard reaction for preparation of primary, secondary
and tertiary alcohol’s and carboxylic acids.

Nucleophilic substitution by carbon nucleophile
-

Wurtz reaction.

Carbanion inv
olves in condensation
-

Aldol condensation and Claisen ester condensation.

Rearrangement involving carbanion
-
Favorskii rearrangement.

Reactions involving free radical intermediates:

Addition of hydrogen halides to C=C in presence of peroxides

Substitution r
eaction
-

Halogenation of methane

Dimerization
-

Kolbe synthesis.

Unit 4 : Stereochemistry & Heterocyclic Compounds




( 7 Hrs )

Stereochemistry
:
Basic concepts of Stereochemistry, conformational isomerism of ethane,
propane, butane, cyclohexane, monosubs
tituted cyclohexane. Optical isomerism with one , two
chiral centres (AA and AB types), erythro, threo , meso distereoisomers. Geometrical isomerism
(compounds containing one double bond).

Heterocyclic compounds
: S
tructure, preparations and reactions, five

membered rings
-

Furan,
Pyrolle thiophene, Six membered ring
-

Pyridine, Fused rings
-
Indole, Quinoline.

Unit 5 : Functional Group Synthesis






( 7 Hrs )

Definition, common functional group abbreviations, functional group manipulation, synthesis of
carbox
ylic acids, esters, amides, acids chlorides, aldehydes, ketones, imines, alcohols,alkanes,
alkenes.

Unit 6 : Instrumental Methods of Analysis





( 7 Hrs )

Instrumental methods of analysis (chromatographic methods, spectroscopic methods and other
techniq
ues such as XRD) with focus on interpretation of data.

Outcomes:

1.

Ability to phrase reaction mechanisms leading to a specific product.

2.

Ability to interprete results of various instrumental methods of analysis.

Textbooks:

1.

March J.; ‘Advanced Organic Chemistr
y’, McGraw Hill International Book Company, 5
th

edition, 2001.

2.

Sykes P.; ‘A Guide To Mechanism in Organic Chemistry’, Orient Longman, 1981.

References:

1.

Morrison R.T. and Boyd R.N.; ‘Organic Chemistry’, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., 6th
ed, 1992.

2.

Gl
asstone Samuel; ‘Textbook of Physical Chemistry’, Mcmillian and Co. Ltd., 1966.

3.

Barrow G.M.; ‘Physical Chemistry’, McGraw Hill Publications, 3rd ed, 1974.

4.

Atkins P.W. ; ‘Physical Chemistry’, ELBS Publications, 7th ed, 2002.

IP
0952

: Chemical Engineering

Materials

Prerequisites:

N
il

Objectives:

1.

To understand mechanical properties of materials

2.

To understand various methods used for testing and charaterisation of materials

3.

To understand the following three classes of materials with an emphasis on structure
-
property relationships and materials selection: metals, polymers and ceramics

4.

To understand corrosion and its control

Contents:

Unit 1 : Introduction








( 7 Hrs )

Introduction to materials and their principle properties, Simple stresses and strains,

Concept of
stress, strain, shear stress, shear strain, Hooks law, Elastic limit, stress
-
strain curve for mild steel
and elastomeric materials, factor of safety, Poisson’s ratio, Strain energy due to axial load and
impact.

Unit 2 : Materials Testing








( 7 Hrs )

Testing of materials, destructive and nondestructive tests, structure of atom and chemical bonds,
crystal structures and their influence on material properties, Deformation and slip processes.

Unit 3 : Metals and their alloys







( 7 Hrs )

I
ron


carbon diagram, Ferrous and nonferrous alloys, mild steel, special steels, stainless steels,
brasses, aluminum alloys and titanium alloys, high and low temperature material, insulation,
refractories.

Methods for fabrication, rolling, bending, central

punching, revetting, welding.

Unit 4 : Corrosion and its control







( 7 Hrs )

Different types of corrosion: chemical, biochemical, and electrochemical; Internal and external
factors affecting corrosion of chemical equipments, Methods to minimize corro
sion, corrosion
charts for process equipments.


Unit 5 : Polymers, natural & synthetic






( 7 Hrs )

Selection of polymetric materials for chemical equipments, fiber reinforced plastic, applications
of special polymers like Nylon 66, Teflon in engineerin
g.

Unit 6 : Ceramic and glasses







( 7 Hrs )

Crystalline and non
-
crystalline ceramics, silicates, refractories, clays, cements, glass vitreous
silica, and borosilicate.

Outcomes:



Ability to correlate materials properties to their structure.



Ability to

carry out materials selection for chemical engineering applications.

Textbooks:

1.

Callister W.D. Jr.; ‘Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction’, John Wiley and
Sons, 7th

edition, 2006.

References:

1.

Shacketford J.F.; ‘Introduction to material scie
nce’, McMillan publishing company,
Newyork ISBN, 1990.

2.

Jestrazebaski D.Z. ; ‘Properties of Engg. Materials’, Toppers Co. Ltd., 3rd edition, 1987.

3.

Lee J. L. and Evans; ’Selecting Engineering Materials for Chemical and Process Plants’,
Business Works, 1978.

4.

Spott M.M.; ‘Design of machine elements’, Prentice Hall, 4th edition, 1971.

5.

Khurmi R.S. and Gupta J.K.; ‘A textbook of machine design’, Chand (S.) & Co Ltd ,India,
2005.

Laboratory Courses

CH6022

: Fluid
-
flow Operations

Prerequisites:

Fundamental knowledg
e of mathematics and physics

Objectives:

To make the students understand practically the fundamentals of fluid flow, working of different
fluid flow measuring equipments, how to determine different fluid flow parameters etc.

List of Practicals

8
-
10 practi
cals out of the f
ollowing list:

1.

Determination of viscosity.

2.

Reynolds experiment to determine laminar and turbulent flow.

3.

Flow through packed bed

4.

Flow through venturimeter

5.

Flow through orifice meter

6.

Flow through pipe fitting

7.

Determination of friction facto
r

8.

Verification of Darcy’s law

9.

Characteristics of centrifugal pump

10.

Verification of stokes law

11.

Calibration of rotameter

12.

Computer based solutions for fluid flow problems

Outcomes:

After completion of the practical course students will be able to:



Determine
viscosity of liquid, friction factor for fluid flow, flow regions



Calibrate rotameter, orificemeter, venturimeter



Determine characteristics of centrifugal pump etc

Textbooks:

1.

McCabe W. and Smith J.C.; ‘Unit operations in Chemical Engineering’, McGraw Hill
, 7th
edition, 2007.

2.

Bansal R.K.; ‘A Textbook of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic’, Laxmi Publications, 2005

References:

1.

Den M.M.; ‘Process fluid mechanics’, Prentice Hall, 1998.

2.

Evett J.B. and Lin C.; ‘Fundamentals of Fluid mechanics’, McGraw Hill, 1987.

ES5342

: Chemistry
III

Prerequisites:

Nil


O
bjectives:

1.

To create an acquaintance with organic compounds which are used in different chemical

industries.

2.

To develop different chemical synthesis processes.

3.

To make the students understand the mechanism unde
rlying various reactions.

List of Practicals
:

Group I

1.

Purification of organic compound by recrystalization and sublimation and to find their
physical constants (any two compounds).

2.

Organic preparations with M.P. after crystallization and TLC (any two
experiments).

3.

Preparation of benzoic acid from benzamide.

4.

Preparation of osazone derivatives of glucose.

5.

Preparation of aspirin from salicylic acid.

6.

Preparation of m
-
nitroaniline from m
-
dinitrobenzene.

Group II

Organic qualitative analysis
-

preliminary te
sts, type, elements, functional group and physical
constants
-

atleast one function from each type.

1.

Acids
-

benzoic acid, salicylic acid, phthalic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid.

2.

Phenols
-



naphthol,


naphthol, resorcinol, O
-
nitrophenol, P
-
nitrophenol

3.

Bases
-

Aniline, p
-
toludine, diphenylamine

4.

Neutral
-

Benzaldehyde, glucose, acetone, ethylmethyl ketone, ethyl acetate, naphthalene,
nitrobenzene, urea, thiourea, m
-

dinitrobenzene.

Group III

Any two experiments on instrumental methods of analysis focused on inte
rpretation of data:
GC, HPLC, UV
-
visible spectroscopy etc

Outcomes:

1.

Ability to prepare various chemicals.

2.

Ability to carry out qualitative analysis.

3.

Ability to use instrumental methods of analysis.

Textbooks:

1.

March J.; ‘Advanced Organic Chemistry’, McGra
w Hill International Book Company, 5th
edition, 2001.

2.

Sykes P.; ‘A Guide To Mechanism in Organic Chemistry’, Orient Longman, 1981.

References:

1.

Morrison R.T. and Boyd R.N.; ‘Organic Chemistry’, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., 6th
ed, 1992.

2.

Glasstone S
.; ‘Textbook of Physical Chemistry’, Mcmillan and Co. Ltd., 1966.

3.

Barrow G.M.; ‘Physical Chemistry’, McGraw Hill Publications, 3rd ed, 1974.

4.

Atkins P.W. ; ‘Physical Chemistry’, ELBS Publications, 7th ed, 2002.

IP
5952

: Chemical Engineering Materials

Pre
requisites:

Nil

Objectives:

To carry out experiments related to various aspects of materials science and engineering such as
materials structure determination, testing, etc.

List of Practicals

Minimum 8 experiments to be performed based on but not restrict
ed to
:

1.

Microstructure observation and study of metals and alloys. (Minimum five) low carbon steel,

medium carbon steel, high carbon Steel, tin, bronze, brass, phosphor bronze.

2.

Study of properties of polymeric materials; impact test and polymeric tests.

3.

C
orrosion testing (salt spray test for different samples such as plain carbon steel, chrome
plate

steel, galvanized steel.)

4.

Different types of hardness test on metals. i.e. Rockwell hardness test, Brinell hardness test,

Shore scleroscope tests.

5.

Izod and C
harpy impact test on mild steel, copper, brass and aluminum.

6.

Chemical analysis of metals and alloys (Any one element to be analyzed e.g. molybdenum
from stainless steel, carbon from steel, copper from brass etc.)

7.

Macrostructure observation: (flow lines obs
ervation in forging by macro etching sulphur
printing of steel.)

8.

Study experiments based on, i) Dye penetration ii) Rubber lining, iii) Ultrasonic test, iv) Heat
t
reatments.

Outcomes:

At the end of the laboratory course the student should be able to charac
terize various materials
and correlate the results with their properties and selection of materials for chemical engineering
applications.

Textbooks:

1.

Callister, W.D. Jr. ‘Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction’, 7th ed, John Wiley
and Sons
, 200
6.

References:

1.

James F. Shacketford, introduction to material science, McMillan publishing compony,
Newyork ISBN 1990.

2.

D. Z.Jestrazebaski, properties of Engg. Materials, 3rd Ed. Toppers.Co. Ltd.

3.

J.L.Lee and Evans, Selecting Engineering Materials for Chemic
al and Process Plants,
Business Works, 1978.

4.

Khurmi, R.S. and Gupta, J.K.; ‘A textbook of machine design’, Chand (S.)

& Co Ltd India,
11th ed, 1996.

Semester II

Theory Courses

CH2012

: Heat Transfer

Prerequisites:

F
undamental knowledge of units and dime
nsions, physics, Mathematics and fluid flow
operations.

Objectives:

1.

To develop a good understanding of physical principles underlying heat transfer.

2.

To understand the methodology and the quantitative approach of the process engineer and to
be able to u
se this approach in problem solving.

Contents:

Unit 1 : Conduction:









(8 Hrs )

Introduction to heat transfer, Fourier’s law of heat conduction, thermal conductivity of liquid,
gases and solids. General Differential equation for unsteady and stead
y state conduction.
Introduction to unsteady state condition. Steady state condition in infinitely long slab, infinitely
long hollow cylinder and hollow spheres.. Thermal insulation and optimum thickness of
insulation

Unit 2 : Convection without phase Chan
ge:





( 8 Hrs )

Newton’s law of cooling, individual and overall heat transfer coefficient. Natural and forced
convection in laminar and turbulent flow. Heat transfer from extended surfaces with uniform
cross section, Concept of thermal boundary layer a
nd its significance. Significance of
dimensional analysis in heat transfer, dimensional analysis by Rayleigh’s method and
Buckingham’s method

Unit 3 : Convection with phase Change:






( 6 Hrs )

Condensation: Modes and features: Theory and derivation o
f Nusselt’s equation, Condensation
on vertical plate and horizontal plate.

Heat transfer in boiling liquids: Pool boiling of saturated liquid, Concept of maximum heat flux
and critical temperature drop.

Unit 4 : Radiation









( 6 Hrs )

Fundamental facts and definition of terms, basic equation of heat transfer by radiation, various
cases of radiation between two surfaces, the shape factor, radiation shields

Unit 5 : Heat Exchanger








( 6 Hrs )

Classification of heat exchangers, dou
ble pipe heat exchangers, Shell and tube heat exchangers
LMTD and NTU methods for heat exchanger calculation to estimate heat transfer area and
overall heat transfer coefficient

Unit 6 : Evaporation









(6 Hrs )

Types of evaporators, material and ener
gy balance, calculations, performance, capacity and
economy, multiple effect evaporators, effect of liquid head and boiling point elevation

Outcomes:

At the end of this course, the student should be able to:

1.

Derive basic heat transfer equations from fir
st principles

2.

Obtain physical properties of fluids from Thermodynamic Property Tables

3.

Apply Fourier's and Newton's laws to solve heat transfer problems

4.

Solve heat transfer problems using empirical correlations

5.

Solve heat transfer problems using trial and
error methods

6.

Design simple heat exchangers.

Textbooks:

1.

McCabe W.L. and Smith J. C.; ‘Unit operations in Chemical Engineering’, McGraw Hill,
7th edition, 2007.

2.

Holman J. P.; ‘Heat Tranfer’, McGraw Hill, 7th edition, 1993.

Reference
s:

1.

Kern D.Q.; ‘process

Heat Transfer’, Tata McGraw Hill, 1997.

2.

Coulson J.M. and et.al.; ‘Coulson Richardson’s Chemical Engineering Vol.1’, Butterworth

Heinemann Ltd., 5th edition, 1996.

3.

Backhurst J.R. and Horker J.H.; ‘Coulson and Richardson’s chemical engineering' Vol. 4’,
Per
gamon, 2nd edition, 1994.

4.

Sinnout R.K.; ‘Coulson Richardson’s chemical engineering vol.6’, Pergamon press, 1993.

CH2022

:
Mechanical Operations

Prerequisites:

Basic knowledge of fluid flow operations.

Objectives:

1.

To understand the solid
-
fluid op
erations

2.

To understand working, principles of various mechanical operations.


Contents:

Unit 1 : Particle Technology and size reduction:





( 8 Hrs )

Particle size and shape, Mixtures of particles, Determination of particle size, Standard screen
series,
screen analysis, Screen effectiveness and capacity, Industrial screening equipments.
Crushing efficiency, energy requirement calculations by using different crushing laws, Size
reduction equipments, Open circuit & Closed circuit grinding.

Unit 2 : Handling

And Transport of Solids:





( 5 Hrs )

Storage of solids, characteristics of Bulk solids. Conveyors: design, calculation of Screw
conveyors, Belt Conveyors, Chain & Flight conveyors, Bucket elevators, Pneumatic conveyors.

Unit 3 : Mixing and Agitation:







( 6 Hrs )

Necessity of mixing & agitation in chemical industries, Types of Impellers & propellers,
Different flow patterns in mixing, Calculation of power requirement of mixing equipment,
Mixing equipment of pastes & viscous material, Solid


Solid M
ixing, Agitator selection.

Unit 4: Filtration:








( 6 Hrs )

Filter media and filter aids, classification of filtration, pressure drop through filter cake, filter
medium resistance, specific cake resistance, Continuous F
iltration, Washing and dewatering of
filter cakes, Centrifugal filtration.

Unit 5: Fluid


Solid systems:







( 8 Hrs )

a.

Motion of particles in liquid, drag force, drag coefficients

b.

Gravity settling method: Terminal velocity, Stoke’s law and Newton’s law
, free sett
ling,
sink and float method, differential settling.

c.

Sedimentation and thickening: Batch sedimentation, equipments for sedimentation,
Kynch theory of sedimentation, calculation of area and depth of continuous thickeners,
batch thickeners, and con
tinuous thickeners.

d.

Fluidization: flow through packed beds, characteristics of fluidized systems, minimum
fluidization velocity, types of fluidization, applications of fluidization technique, spouted
beds and fixed bed.

Unit 6 : Beneficiation Operations, M
ineral dressing and centrifugal settling operations:












( 6 Hrs )

Froth flotation, magnetic separator, scrubbers, fiber and fabric filter, and electrostatic
precipitators. Mineral jig, cyclone separator, hydro cyclone types and centrifuges, centri
fugal
clarifier.






Outcomes:

After studying this course student should be able to apply the knowledge of various mechanical
operations in chemical process industries.

Textbooks:

4.

McCabe W. L. & Smith J. C.; ‘Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering’, M
cGraw

Publications, 7th edition, 2007.

1.

Coulson J.M. & Richardson J.F.; ‘Chemical Engineering Vol. 2’, Pergamon Press, 5th ed
.
,
2002.

References:

1.

Badger W. L. & Banchero J. T.; ‘Introduction to Chemical Engineering’, McGraw Hill

Publications, 1997.

2.

Foust A.
S.; ‘Principles of Unit Operations’, John Wiley & Sons, 1965.

CH2032

: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
-

I

Prerequisites:

Chemistry I, Chemistry II, Physics, Calculus, Differential equations, Computer programming.

Objectives:

After successfully compl
eting this course, students should be able:

1.

To understand the fundamental concepts of chemical engineering

2.

To solve complex chemical engineering problems using thermodynamic concepts, data, and

models.

Contents:

Unit 1 : Basic Concept and First Law of The
rmodynamics



( 6 Hrs )

The scope of thermodynamics, fundamental and derived quantities, first law of thermodynamics:
Formation of 1st law of thermodynamics, state and path functions, thermodynamic systems,
statements of first law for non flow and flow sy
stem, phase rule, reversible processes, Internal
Energy, Equilibrium.

Unit 2 : Volumetric properties of pure fluids





( 8 Hrs )

The P.V.T. behavior of pure substance, the viral equation, Compressibility factor, the ideal gas,
the constant volume, consta
nt pressure, adiabatic, polytrophic processes, real gas, applications of
Viral equation, critical properties, Vander Wall equation, Benedict
-

Webb


Rubin equation,
Redlich

Kwong equation, Peng Robinson Equation.

Unit 3 : Heat effects








( 6 Hrs )

latent heat of pure substances, sensible heat effects, temperature dependence of heat capacity,
standard heat of reaction, standard heat of formation, standard heat of combustion,

temperature
dependence of ΔH0, heat effects of industrial reactions.

Unit 4 : Second law of thermodynamics






( 6 Hrs )

Carnot cycle, entropy, mathematical statement of 2nd law of thermodynamics, application of
second law, statement of 3rd law. Refrige
ration cycle.

Unit 5 : Thermodynamic properties of Fluids





( 8 Hrs )

Maxwell relationships, homogeneous phases, residual properties, residual properties by
equations of state, two
-
phase systems, Clausius
-

Clapeyron equation, tables and diagram of
therm
odynamic properties.

Unit 6 : Statistical Thermodynamics






( 6 Hrs )

The distribution molecular states, the canonical partition function, internal energy, entropy and
thermodynamics functions in terms of partition function, Sackur


Tetrode equation.

O
utcomes:

Students will be able to:

1.

state

the terminology associated with engineering thermodynamics.

2.

r
eiterate the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and understand the practical
implications of these laws in engineering design.

3.

state
the concepts o
f heat, work and energy conversion, and calculate heat and work
quantities for industrial processes.

4.

c
alculate the properties of ideal and real mixtures based on thermodynamic principles.

5.

d
etermine changes in the properties of gases, fluids and solids unde
rgoing changes in
temperature and volume.

6.

state
processes involving power production, refrigeration, and liquefaction, and calculate
relevant system efficiencies for these processes.

7.

a
pply mass, energy and entropy balances to flow processes.

Textbooks:

1.

Sm
ith J.M. and Van Ness H.C.;‘Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics’ ,
Kogakushai, 1976.

2.

Narayanan K.V.; ‘Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics’, Prentice
-
Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.,
2006.

References:

1.

Rao Y.V.C.; ‘Chemical Engineering thermodynamics
’, Universities Press, 1997.

2.

Dodge, B.F.; ‘Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics’, McGraw
-
Hill, 1960.

3.

Kyle, B.G.; ‘Chemical & Process Thermodynamics’ 3rd ed, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1999.

4.

Sandler S.I..; ‘Chemical & Engineering Thermodynamics’ 3rd ed
., John Wiley, New York,
1999.

5.

Atkins P. and Paula J.D.; ‘Atkins’s Physical Chemistry’, 7th ed, Oxford University press,
New York, 2002.

6.

Hougen, O.A., Watson, K.M., and Ragatz, R.A.; ‘Chemical Process Principles Part II,

Thermodynamics ‘, John Wiley 1970.

7.

Reid R., Praunitz J., Sherwood T.; ‘The Properties of Gases and Liquids’, 3rd ed., McGraw
-
Hill, New York, 1977

8.

Kondepudi, D. and Prigogine, I; ‘Modern Thermodynamics’, Wiley, 1998.

9.

Kenneth D.; ‘The Principles of Chemical Equilibrium’, 4th ed, Cambridge Un
iversity Press,
1981.

ES0352

: Chemistry
IV

Prerequisites:

Chemistry

I

Objectives:

1.

To create an

acquaintance with inorganic compounds which are used in different chemical

industries.

2.

To develop different chemical synthesis processes.

3.

To impart the knowle
dge about catalytic activity of transition metal complexes which are
used in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis in industries.

4.

To get an insight into surface behavior of materials for the promotion of reactivity.

5.

To get an understanding of
the relatio
nship between chemical structure and properties.

Contents
:

Unit 1 : Atomic structure and Bonding






( 7 Hrs )

Review of atomic structure
-

electronic configuration, energy levels, orbitals, quantum number.

Chemical Bonding:
Covalent Bond, VBT, hybridiza
tional shape of molecules with examples
(upto C.N.6), Molecular orbital theory, LCAO, M.O. diagrams for diatomic molecules like H2,
CO, O2, N2.

Unit 2 : Surface Chemistry








( 7 Hrs )

Adsorption and Chemisorptions, adsorption isotherms (Langmuir, Freu
ndlisch, B.E.T.),
Chemisorption and Catalysis, Surface Tension, Gibb's isotherm, Classification & properties of
colloids, detergency and their industrial applications.

Unit 3 : Biomolecules








( 7 Hrs )

Carbohydrates


Definition, classification, rea
ctions of carbohydrate oxidation, reeduction,
osazone formation, ester formation, isomerization, D.L. configuration, cyclic structure of
glucose, fructose fisher, Haworth projection chair form. Brief account and cyclic structure of
disaccharides
-

maltose,
sucrose, cellobiose polysaccharide
-

starch.

Aminoacids proteins and enzymes
-


-

amino acids
-

fischers projection and relative
configuration, Classification of

-

amino acids, properties and reactions.

Proteins
-

Formation of peptide linkage, features of pe
ptide linkage,

-

helical configuration,

-
pleat6ed structure, primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins.

Unit 4 : Chemistry of Enzymes







( 7 Hrs )

Composition of enzymes, international classification of enzymes, cofactors and
coenzymes,
primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of enzymes, how it works as catalyst.
Industrially important reactions catalyzed by enzymes.

Unit 5 : Transition elements and their complexes





( 7 Hrs )

Transition elements, study of I
st transition series w.r.t. oxidation states, magnetic behaviour,
color, ability to form complexes and catalytic behaviour.

Co
-
ordination compounds
-
different terms
-
C.N., ligands, EAN, etc.

Nature of metal ligand bonding
-

VBT and CFT
-

Formation and above pr
operties of tetrahedral
square planar and octahedral complexes of Ist transition series on the basis of VBT and CFT.

Unit 6 : Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis





( 7 Hrs )

Organometallic Chemistry: Metal
-
carbon main group organometallics, sigma bon
ded TM
complexes, TM carbonyls, TM complexes of unsaturated organic ligands, sandwich compounds,
organometallics of f
-
block elements

Homogeneous & heterogeneous catalysis.

Outcomes:

They will be equipped with theoretical and practical inputs to mitigate t
he needs of chemical
industries in catalytic activity, surface complexes formation and role of biomaterials in it.

Textbooks:

1.

Hoffman R.V.; ‘Organic Chemistry
-

An Intermediate Text’, Oxford University Press, 1997.

2.

Morrison R.T. and Boyd R.N.; ‘Organic Chem
istry’, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., 6th
ed, 1992.

References:

1.

Dyer J.R.; ‘Application of adsorption spectroscopy of organic compounds’ Prentice Hall of
India Ltd, 1965.

2.

Shriver D.F., ‘Inorganic Chemistry’, ELDS Publications, 2nd ed, 1994.

3.

Cotton
F.A and Wilkinson; ‘Advanced Inorganic Chemistry’, Wiley, 6th ed, 1999.

4.

Chatwal G. and Yadav M.S.; ‘Co
-
ordination Chemistry’, Oscar Publications, 2nd ed, 1995.

ES0122

: Engineering Mathematics
III

Prerequisites:

Engineering Mathematics I and II

Objectives
:

1.

The course is focused on ordinary and partial differential equations and transforms such as
Fourier, Laplace and z Transforms.

2.

Chemical engineering applications of the theory portion covered will be emphasized.

Contents
:

Unit 1: Linear Differential equat
ions of higher order




(7 Hrs)

Homogeneous Linear Differential Equations of Second Order, Higher Order Homogeneous &
Non Homogeneous Linear Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients, Solutions by
undetermined coefficients and Variation Of Paramete
rs method ,Euler


Cauchy Equation,
System of Ordinary Differential equations and application to Engineering problems.

Unit 2: Series solutions of differential equations & Special functions


(7 Hrs)

Power Series Method, Theory of Power Series Method, Lege
ndre’s Equations, Legendre’s
Polynomials P
)
(
x
n
, Frobenius Method, Bessel’s Equation. Bessel Functions ,J
)
(
x

, Bessel
Functions of the Second Kind Y
)
(
x

, Sturm
-
Liouville problems,Orthogonal Functions,
O
rthogonal Eigen function Expansions

Unit 3: Complex Analysis and Z Transform





(7 Hrs)



Derivative, Analytical function, Cauchy
-
Riemann equations, Complex Integration, Cauchy’s
Integral Theorem and formula, Residue Theorem and applications to Engineering Problems,
Introduction to Z Transform, properties of Z
-
Transform, Inverse Z
-
Transfo
rm, application of Z
-
transform to difference equations.

Unit 4: Fourier and Laplace Transforms






(7 Hrs)

Complex Fourier series and frequency spectrum, Fourier integrals, Fourier transforms, Fourier
cosine and sine transforms. I
ntroduction and definition of Laplace Transform, Transforms of
simple functions, basic properties of Laplace Transform, Inverse Laplace Transform and its
evaluation.Laplace Transform of unit step function, impulse function & periodic functions.

Unit 5: Ve
ctor Calculus








(7 Hrs)

Vector and scalar functions & fields, Derivative, Gradient of a scalar field, Directional
derivative, Divergence and curl of a vector field, vector identities, Irrotational and solenoidal
vectors and potential functions, line
and surface integrals, Green’s, Stoke’s and Gauss theorems
and applications to Engineering Problems.

Unit 6: Applications of Partial Differential equations




(7 Hrs)

Classification of Partial Differential Equations. The heat & wave eq
uations. The equation of
Laplace. Applications involving Bessel functions, Laplace & Fourier transform techniques for
solving Partial Differential Equations.

Outcomes:

At the end of the course the students should be able to:

1.

Solve ordinary and partial diff
erential equations.

2.

Solver problems involving various transforms.

3.

Demonstrate the relevance of the mathematical methods learnt to chemical engineering.

Textbooks:

1.

Kreyszig E.; ‘Advanced Engineering Mathematics’, John Wiley and sons, 8th ed, 2003.

2.

Grewal B
.S.; ‘Higher Engineering Mathematics’, Khanna Publishers, 38th ed, 2000.

R
eferences:

1.

Spiegel M.R.; ‘Schaum’s out line of Advanced Calculus’, Mcgraw
-
Hill, 1968.

2.

Thomas G.B. and Finney; ‘Calculus and analytic Geometry’, Addison Wesley, 9th ed,1985.

3.

Zill D
.G. and Cullen M.R.; ‘Advanced Engineering Mathematics’, CBS, 2nd ed, 2000.

4.

Greenberg M.D.; ‘Advanced Engineering mathematics’, Prentice Hall , 2nd ed, 1998.

5.

Wylie C.R. and Barrett L.C.R.; ‘Advanced Engineering mathematics’, McGraw
-
Hill, 6th ed,
1
995.

6.

Pip
es L.A. and Harvill L.R.; ‘Applied Mathematics for Engineers and Physicists’, McGraw
-
Hill, 1980.

7.

Larry C.A. and Philips R.L.; ‘Mathematical Techniques for Engineers & scientists’, PHI Pvt.
Ltd., 2005.

8.

Jeffrey A.; ‘Advanced Engineering mathematics’, Academ
ic Press, 2002.

9.

Mickley H.S.; ‘Applied Mathematics in chemical engineering’, Tata McGraw
-

Hill ,2000.

Laboratory Courses

CH7012

: Heat Transfer

Prerequisites:

Fundamental knowledge of mathematics and physics

Objectives:

To make the

students understand th
e practical aspects of
heat transfer, working

of

heat exchange
equipments, how to determine different properties like thermal conductivity, heat transfer
coefficient, emissivity, efficiency and effectiv
eness of heat exchanging bodies etc.

List of Practical
s
:

8
-
10 practicals out of

the following list:

1.

Determination of thermal conductivity of insulating powder.

2.

Determination of thermal conductivity of composite wall.

3.

Determination of thermal conductivity of metal rod and to study temperature effects.

4.

To study

heat transfer through fins

5.

Determination of heat transfer coefficient in natural convection

6.

Determination of heat transfer coefficient in forced convection

7.

Determination of emissivity of non
-
black surface

8.

Determination critical heat flux in pool boiling

9.

Determination of Stefan Boltzmann constant

10.

Determination of overall heat transfer coefficient in double pipe heat exchanger

11.

Determination of effectiveness of double pipe heat exchanger

12.

Computer based solutions for heat transfer problems

Outcomes:

After com
pletion of the practical course students will be able to:



Determine thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient, emissivity etc



Evaluate performance of different heat exchange equipments



Determine constants used in heat transfer.

Textbooks:

1.

McCabe W.L
. and Smith J. C.; ‘Unit operations in Chemical Engineering’, McGraw Hill,
7th edition, 2007.

2.

Holman J. P.; ‘Heat Tranfer’, McGraw Hill, 7th edition, 1993.

References:

1.

Kern D.Q.; ‘process Heat Transfer’, Tata McGraw Hill, 1997.

2.

Coulson J.M. and et.al.; ‘
Coulson Richardson’s Chemical Engineering Vol.1’, Butterworth
Heinemann Ltd., 5th edition, 1996.

3.

Backhurst J.R. and Horker J.H.; ‘Coulson and Richardson’s chemical engineering' Vol. 4’,
Pergamon, 2nd edition, 1994.

4.

Sinnout R.K.; ‘Coulson Richardson’s chem
ical engineering vol.6’, Pergamon press, 1993.

CH7022
: Mechanical Operations

Prerequisites:

Basics knowledge of unit operations

Objectives:

To get hands on experience of different unit operations and should be able to handle them
efficiently and

independently.

List of Practicals
:

8
-
10 practicals out of the
following list:

1.

Properties of solids
:
To determine Avg. Particle size, Specific surface of mixture and No. of
particles in the mixture
.

2.

Screening
:

To determine the effectiveness of screen
.

3.

Sedi
mentation
:
To determine area of thickener by conducting batch sedimentation test
.

4.

Ball mill
:
To determine crushing law constant (by using Rittingers law, Bonds law and Kicks
law)
.

5.

Jaw Crusher
: T
o determine crushing law constant (by using Rittingers law, Bo
nds law and
Kicks law)
.

6.

Vacuum Leaf Filter
:
To determine filter medium resistance and cake resistance by using
vacuum leaf filter
.

7.

Cyclone Separator
:
To determine efficiency of cyclone separator
.

8.

Froth Flotation
:
To determine separation e
fficiency using fr
oth flotation.

9.

Fluidization
:
To determine minimum fluidization velocity and verify with Ergun Equation
.

10.

Drag Coefficient
:
To determine terminal settling velocity and compare with theoretical
settling velocity
.

11.

Magnetic Separator
:
To determine separation ef
ficiency using magnetic separator

12.

Basket Centrifuge
:
To determine filter medium resistance and cake resistance by using basket

c
entrifuge.

Outcomes:

After completion of practical they should be able to handle different unit operations in chemical
process i
ndustries.

Textbooks:

1.

McCabe W. L. & Smith J. C.; ‘Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering’, McGraw

Publications, 7th edition, 2007.

2.

Coulson J.M. & Richardson J.F.; ‘Chemical Engineering Vol. 2’, Pergamon Press, 5th ed
.
,
2002.

References:

1.

Badger W. L. & Ba
nchero J. T.; ‘Introduction to Chemical Engineering’, McGraw Hill

Publications, 1997.

2.

Foust A.S.; ‘Principles of Unit Operations’, John Wiley & Sons, 1965.

ES5352

: Chemistry
IV

Prerequisites:

Chemistry I

Objectives:

1.

To create an acquaintance with inorga
nic compounds which are used in different chemical

industries.

2.

To develop different chemical synthesis processes.

3.

To impart the knowledge about catalytic activity of transition metal complexes which are
used in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis in in
dustries.

4.

To get an insight into surface behavior of materials for the promotion of reactivity.

5.

To get an understanding of chemistry to manifest itself in properties which are structure
sensitive.

List of Practicals
:

Group I
:

a.

Study of adsorption of acetic
acid on charcoal from solution.

b.

Measurement of surface tension using stalagnometer.

c.

Measurement of radius of molecule by Ostwald’s viscometer.

Group II
:

Any two from

-


a.

To standardise KM
nO
4
solution by preparing oxalic acid and to estimate ferroius ions.

b.

T
o standardise Na
2
S
2
O
3

solution by preparing K
2
Cr
2
O
7

and to estimate percentage of Cu
from brass

c.

To
standardise KM
nO
4

solution by preparing oxalic acid and to estimate managnese ions
by Volhard’s method.

Any two from

-


a.

Preparation of tetramine Cu(II) sulph
ate

b.

Preparation of pottassium trioxalato aluminate

c.

Preparation of tris ethylene diamine nickel (II) thiosulphate.

d.

Seperation and identification of metal ions from binary mixture of cations using column
chromatography (at least three mixture).

Group III
:

Su
itable experiments on biomolecules. Tests of carbohydrates, proteins, fats. Determination of
optical activity by polarimeter.

Outcomes:

At the end of the course the students should be able to



synthesize, separate and identify

inorganic
chemicals.



carry out

experiments based on surface activity


Textbooks:

1.

Hoffman R.V.; ‘Organic Chemistry
-

An Intermediate Text’, Oxford University Press, 1997.

2.

Morrison R.T. and Boyd R.N.; ‘Organic Chemistry’, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., 6th
ed, 1992.

References:

1.

Dye
r J.R.; ‘Application of adsorption spectroscopy of organic compounds’ Prentice Hall of
India Ltd, 1965.

2.

Shriver D.F., ‘Inorganic Chemistry’, ELDS Publications, 2nd ed, 1994.

3.

Cotton F.A and Wilkinson; ‘Advanced Inorganic Chemistry’, Wiley, 6th ed, 1999.

4.

Cha
twal G. and Yadav M.S.; ‘Co
-
ordination Chemistry’, Oscar Publications, 2nd ed, 1995.

Professional Development (PD) Courses

(SE / TE)

CH501: Pipe Stress Analysis

Prerequisites:

Applied mechanics

Objectives:

To use software tools to carry out pipe stress
analysis.

Theory Content:

Unit I: Internal Pressure I: Pressure Design of Piping, Pressure Design of Plant Piping.

Unit II: Internal Pressure II: Yield and Burst Pressure, Pressure rating, ASME Code.

Unit III: Pressure Stress in Fittings, Design Pressure,
Over
-
Pressure Protection, Burst

Energy.

Unit IV: External Pressure: Buckling Pressure, ASME Code Design.

Unit V: Fluid Transients: Single Liquid Phase, Two
-
Phase Vapor
-
Liquid Water hammer, Non
-
Condensable Two
-
Phase Water hammer, Stress Analysis.

Unit VI:
Cavitation and Numerical Simulation: Introduction, Nuclei and Cavitation, Dynamics of
Bubbles.

List of Practicals:

1.

CAESER II configuration /setup

2.

Toolbar from CASEER II understanding Part I

3.

Toolbar from CASEER II understanding Part II

4.

Piping Input (Date fe
eding)

5.

Flexibility Analysis

6.

Static Analysis

7.

Dynamic Analysis (Not used in Industry) (Optional)

8.

Static Analysis with Manual Hand calculation

9.

Tutorial
-
I

10.

Tutorial
-
II

Outcomes
:

At the end of the course the students should be able to use tools such as Caeser I
I to carry out
pipe stress analysis.

Textbooks:

1.

Bausbacher E. and Hunt R., ‘Process Plant Layout and Piping Design’, 1st Edition, Prentice
Hall, 1993

2.

Rhea R. A., Parisher R. A., ‘Pipe Drafting and Design’, 2nd Edition, Gulf Professional
Publishing

Refer
ence
s:

1.

Turton R., Bailie R. C., Whiting W.B., and Shaeiwitz J. A., ‘Analysis, Synthesis,and Design
of Chemical Processes’, Prentice Hall, 1998.

2.

Mcketta J. J.,‘Piping Design Handbook’, Marcell
-
Dekker, New York.

3.

Nayyar M., ‘Piping Handbook’, 7th edition, M
cGraw
-

Hill, 2000.

CH502: Process simulation

Prerequisites:

Process calculations, heat transfer, fluid flow operations.

Objectives:

To carry out chemical process simulation using software tools such as ASPEN and gProms.


Theory Content:

Unit 1: Scope fo
r process simulation and introduction to ASPEN and gProms.

Unit 2: Design and rating problems in chemical reactor theory and separation process principles.

Unit 3: Material and energy balance for a chemical plant; various methods to carry out mass and
he
at balances.

Unit 4: Special applications


process intensification; heat integration for distillation column;
design of equilibrium stages.

Unit 5: Design projects:

5.

Energy audit of a reactor
-
separator sequence and associated utilities.

6.

Process optimizatio
n of a chemical plant.

Unit 6: Industrial applications
-

1.

Preparing initial quotation

2.

Thermal rating of heat exchangers.

3.

E
nergy balance of a furnace.

4.

Design of a catalytic reactor (assembly).

Practicals:

Around two practicals per unit on the topics mentioned

above.

Outcomes:

At the end of the course the students should be able to carry out chemical process simulation
using software tools such as ASPEN and gProms.

Textbooks:

1.

Houghen, O.A.; K.M. Watson and R.A. Ragatz, ‘Chemical process principles, part
-
1,
Mate
rial and energy balances (2nd Edition); Reprint 2001.

2.

Coulson and Richardson’s, ‘Chemical Engineering’, volume

2, Butterworth
-
Heinemann, 1st
edition, 2002.

3.

V. V. Veverka, ‘Material and energy balancing in the chemical industry’, Elsevier Science, 1
edition
,1997.

4.

Ernest j. Henley;J. D. Seader, ‘Equilibrium
-
Stage Separation Operations in Chemical
Engineering’, Wiley ,1981.

5.

Seader Warren D.; Seader J. D. and Lewin Danial R; ‘Product and Process Design Principles:
Synthesis, Analysis, and Evaluation’, Wiley,

2nd edition, 2003.

CH503: Water Treatment

Prerequisites:

Nil

Objectives:

To understand the problem of industrial waste water pollution and methods of treatment
.

Course Content:

Lectures will have focus on understanding MSDS sheet/ COD/ BOD/ Various w
aste water
treatent Techniques.

Experimental part will comparise of Finding cod / bod of model synthetic waste. Model synthetic
waste may be used for treatment using ion
-
exchange resin / carbon adsorption and AOPs and the
degradation will be observed.

Outc
omes:

At the end of the course the students should be able to analyse waste water and suggest suitable
treatment technology.

Tex
tbooks:

1.

S. P. Mahajan
-

Industrial waste water treatment

ES501: Electrical Machines and Switchgear

Prerequisites :

Elements of

Electrical Engineering course in First Year.

Ob
jectives:

The student studying this professional development (PD) course
should

1.

Understand the basic concepts of electrical machines.

2.

Understand the relevance of electrical machines as applied to industrial
applications.

3.

Understand the concepts of electrical switchgear and safety as applied to industry.

4.

Be able

to make safe electrical connections

and switchgear
.

5.

Development of
ability
of testing
as applied to different electrical machines.

6.

Verify the charact
eristics of different electrical machines.

Contents:

Theory Lectures:

Basic concepts of electrical machines (ac and dc), motors, generators and Transformer.

Measurement of electrical power, concept of power factor, p.f. improvement.

Electrical switchgear,
substation, electrical safety, protection, earthing etc.

List of Practicals:

1.

Speed control of a d.c. shunt motor by armature voltage and flux control methods.

2.

Load test on a d.c. shunt motor.

3.

Load test on a d.c. series motor

4.

Measurement of active power in
a three phase balance circuit.

5.

Measurement of reactive power in a three phase balance circuit.

6.

Direct Load test on Transformer.

7.

Open circuit and short circuit test on a single phase transformer to determine efficiency,
regulation and parameters of equivale
nt circuit.

8.

Load test on three phase induction motor.

9.

Study of LT billing

10.

Study of HT billing.

11.

Study of electrical substation.

12.

Study of electrical switchgear.

13.

Study of Earthing.

Outcomes:

After the completion of syllabus student
should

1.

be able to underst
and the basic concepts of electrical machines.

2.

be ready to work in industrial environment.

3.

gain knowledge of safe working with electricity.

4.

be able to identify and test different electrical machines.

5.

be able to make electrical connections for testing of t
he same.

6.

be able to take readings, draw graphs and find inference from the them.

Textb
ooks:

1.

Electrical Machinery and Transformer by Irvin Kosow, Prentice Hall.

2.

Switchgear and Protection by Soni, Gupta, Bhatnagar.

References:

1.

Electrical engineering handboo
k by Siemens, Wiley eastern

2.

Process Instrumentation Hand Book. By Cinsidine MGH

3.

Electrical machinery by S.K. Bhattacharya, T.T.T.I. Chandigarh

4.

Electrical machines & Power system vol 1. by Syed A. Asar , McGraw hill

5.

Fractional and sub fractional horse power

electrical motors. By
C.E. Veinou and J.E. Martits,
McGraw hill