FOOD SECURITY IN THE FRAMEWORK OF G20

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20 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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FOOD SECURITY IN THE

FRAMEWORK OF G20

2012 G20 Leaders’ Summit, Loc Cabos
(MEXICO)

http://www.g20.org/index.php/en/mexican
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presidency
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of
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the
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g20



On June

18
-
19, leaders of the G20 me
t in Los Cabos, Mexico

to continue addressing global
challenges such as food security and food price volatility. The 2011 G20 Summit led to
important steps to reduce price volatility, including the creation of the Excessive Food Price
Variability Early Warning system and the Ag
ricultural Market Information System (AMIS).


Food Security

The priority of improving food security and increasing agricultural productivity is discussed
within the Sherpas’ Track with the participation of the ministers of Agriculture. The ministers of
Ag
riculture of the G20 countries meet as part of the preparatory process for the summits in order
to share their views and seek solutions to problems affecting the stability of global economy,
such as food security and agricultural price volatility.


Report
of the G20 Study Group on Commodities under the chairmanship of Mr. Hiroshi
NAKASO

http://www.g20.org/images/stories/canalfinan/gexpert/01reportG20.pdf


G20 Commodities
Seminar

http://www.g20.org/en/financial
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track/426
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seminario
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de
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materias
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primas
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del
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g20

The G20 Commodities Seminar was organized jointly with the World Bank and
included the
participation of renowned members of the academia, international organizations and the public
and private sectors. The seminar complemented the work of the Energy and Commodity Markets
Working Group; it built on recent studies to, first, asses
s the effects of commodity markets
volatility on different economic agents and, second, identify policy options

including market
-
based tools

to deal with them. The seminar provided an opportunity for an open discussion
about many of the topics under consid
eration by the G20 in the

run
-
up to the Los Cabos Summit.


Interagency Report to the Mexico G20 Presidency “Sustainable agriculture productivity
growth and bridging the gap for small
-
family farms”

http://ebrary.ifpri.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15738coll2/id/126955


Increasing global agricultural productivity faces many challenges, including a growing global
population, increasing incomes (and thus increased demand
for more labor
-

and resource
-
intensive foods such as meat and dairy), and climate change. Finding ways to sustainably
increase agricultural production, particularly in developing countries, is crucial for food security.




2011 G20 Leaders’ Summit, Cannes
(FRANCE)



http
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presidency
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html



Addressing Food Price Volatility and Increasing Agriculture Production and Productivity

-

Final
Declaration

http://www.g20.org/images/stories/docs/eng/cannes.pdf

Among the issues addressed at this year's summit was the challenge posed by food price
volatility and its impact on global food securi
ty, as well as the need to create an international
emergency humanitarian food reserve system. In this final statement, G20 leaders welcomed the
plan of the Economic Community of Western African States (ECOWAS) to set up a regional
emergency food reserve s
ystem as a pilot program.


Agriculture Ministers’ Action plan on food price volatility and agriculture


Ministerial
Declaration

http://agriculture.gouv.fr/IMG/pdf/20
11
-
06
-
23_
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_Action_Plan_
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_VFinale.pdf

On June 22nd and 23rd 2011, Bruno Le Maire gathered the ministers for Agriculture of the G20
and the main international institutions (World Bank, WTO, FAO, WFP...) for the first time. An
action plan on food price volati
lity and agriculture has been adopted and is currently
implemented.


All along its presidency of the G20, France intends to give priority to the volatility of the
agricultural markets and to the prevention of food crisis, including the improvement of the
transparency of agricultural markets, a better coordination to prevent and manage agricultural
crisis, the regulation of financial markets of commodity derivatives, and the situation of the most
vulnerable countries, especially in order to boost the sustai
nable development of agriculture.


Improving Food Market Transparency and Policy Response for Food Security: The Agricultural
Market Information System / A Scoping Report

http://www.foodsecurityportal.org/sites/default/files/scoping_report%20_Agricultural%20Market%20Inf
ormation%20System.pdf

Emergency Humanitarian Food Reserves Feasibility Study, Cost
-
Benefit Analysis an
d Proposal for
Pilot Programme

http://www.foodsecurityportal.org/sites/default/files/PREPARE_feasibility_study_and_pilot_proposal.pdf


2010 G20 Leaders’ Summit, Seoul
(REPUBLIC OF KOREA)

http://www.g8.utoronto.ca/g20/summits/2010seoul.html



Multi
-
Year Action Plan on Development

http://www.g8.utoronto.ca/g20/2010/g20seoul
-
development.html

We emphasize the need for increased investment and financial support for agricultural
development and welcome commitment
s made through the Global Agriculture and Food
Security Program (GAFSP) and other bilateral and multilateral channels. We encourage
additional contributions by the private sector, the G20 and non
-
G20 actors to support country
-
led
plans and ensure predictab
le financing. We endorse the Rome Principles for enhancing global
policy coherence and mitigating risks to sustainable agricultural productivity, access to food,
nutrition and crisis prevention.

Action 1: Enhance Policy Coherence and Coordination

Action 2:

Mitigate Risk in Price Volatility and

Enhance Protection for the Most Vulnerable


2010

G20 Leaders’ Summit,
Toronto

(
CANADA
)

http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/g20/summit
-
sommet/2010/toronto
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toronto.aspx?lang=eng&view=d



The G20 Toronto Summit Declaration

http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/g20/summit
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sommet/2010/toronto
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declaration
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toronto.aspx?lang=eng&view=d

23. At the Pittsburgh Summit, we recognised the importance of sustained funding and targeted
investments to improve long
-
term food security in low income countries. We welcome the
launch of the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program (GAFSP), which wi
ll provide
predictable financing for low income countries to improve agricultural productivity, raise rural
incomes, and build sustainable agricultural systems. We are particularly pleased that the fund has
approved inaugural grants totalling $224 million
for Bangladesh, Rwanda, Haiti, Togo, and
Sierra Leone. We also support the development of the private sector window of the GAFSP,
which will increase private sector investments to support small and medium sized agri
-
businesses and farmers in poor countries
. We welcome the support already received, and
encourage additional donor contributions to both the public and private sector windows of the
GAFSP.

2009

G20
Leaders’ Summit,
Pittsburgh (USA
)

http://www.g20pittsburghsummit.org/
http://www.g8.utoronto.ca/g20/summit
s/2010seoul.html



The Leaders Statement

http://www.g20.org/images/stories/docs/eng/pittsburgh.pdf

39. Sustained funding and targeted
investments are urgently needed to improve long
-
term food
security. We welcome and support the food security initiative announced in L’Aquila and efforts
to further implement the Global Partnership for Agriculture and Food Security and to address
excessive

price volatility. We call on the World Bank to work with interested donors and
organizations to develop a multilateral trust fund to scale
-
up agricultural assistance to low
-
income countries. This will help support innovative bilateral and multilateral eff
orts to improve
global nutrition and build sustainable agricultural systems, including programs like those
developed through the Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Program (CAADP). It
should be designed to ensure country ownership and rapid dis
bursement of funds, fully
respecting the aid effectiveness principles agreed in Accra, and facilitate the participation of
private foundations, businesses, and non
-
governmental organizations (NGOs) in this historic
effort. These efforts should complement t
he UN Comprehensive Framework for Agriculture. We
ask the World Bank, the African Development Bank, UN, Food and Agriculture Organization
(FAO), International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), World Food Programme
(WFP) and other stakeholders to co
ordinate their efforts, including through country
-
led
mechanisms, in order to complement and reinforce other existing multilateral and bilateral
efforts to tackle food insecurity.