Deploying an Application Server

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31 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 10 μέρες)

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Deploying an
Application Server

Lesson 1

Skills Matrix

Technology Skill

Objective Domain

Objective #

Installing Windows
Deployment Services

Deploy images by using
Windows Deployment
Services

1.1

Activating Windows

Configure Microsoft
Windows activation

1.2

Lesson 1

Understanding Server Roles


Directory Services


Infrastructure Services


Application Services

Lesson 1

Assigning Multiple Roles


Fault tolerance


Resource allocation


Availability


Scalability


Security


Network traffic


Update management


Lesson 1

Selecting Application Server
Roles


File Services role


Terminal Services role


Web Server (IIS) role


UDDI Services role

Lesson 1

Selecting Application Server
Roles
(cont.)


Application Server role


Print Services role


Fax Server role


Streaming Media Services role

Lesson 1

Selecting Application Server
Hardware


Servers hosting complex applications might
require more memory and faster processors.


File servers can benefit from hard drives with
higher speeds and larger caches or even a high
-
performance drive interface.


SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment)


SCSI (Small Computer System Interface)

Lesson 1

Selecting Application Server
Hardware
(cont.)


Web servers receiving large amounts of traffic
might need higher
-
end network adapters or
multiple adapters to connect to different
subnets.


Streaming media servers require sufficient
hardware in all subsystems because any
performance bottleneck in the server can
interrupt the client’s media experience.

Lesson 1

Using Virtual Application Servers


Fault tolerance


Security


Disaster recovery


Resource allocation


Training and testing


Deployment server


Transport server

Lesson 1

Configuring a WDS Server


Click Start.


Click Administrative
Tools > Windows
Deployment
Services.


In the scope (left)
pane, expand the
Servers node.

Lesson 1

Configuring a WDS Server
(cont.)


Right
-
click your
server.


From the context
menu, select
Configure Server.


Click Next to bypass
the
Welcome

page.

Lesson 1

Configuring a WDS Server
(cont.)


In the Path text box, key or browse to the folder
where you want to locate the WDS image store.


The folder you select must be on an NTFS drive
and must have sufficient space to hold all of the
images you want to deploy.


Click Next to continue.

Lesson 1

Configuring a WDS Server
(cont.)


If the DHCP role is running on the same server
as the Windows Deployment Services role, select
the Do not listen on port 67 and the Configure
DHCP option 60 to ‘PXEClient’ checkboxes.


Click Next.


Select one of the listed options.

Lesson 1

Configuring a WDS Server
(cont.)


Click Next to complete the configuration
process.


Select the Add images to the Windows
Deployment Server now checkbox to launch the
Add Image Wizard.


Click Finish to complete the Windows
Deployment Services Configuration Wizard.

Lesson 1

Adding Image Files


Click Start, and then click Administrative Tools >
Windows Deployment Services.


Expand the Server node and the node for your
server.


Right
-
click the Boot Images folder.


From the context menu, select Add Boot Image.

Lesson 1

Adding Image Files
(cont.)


Key or browse to the location of the boot image
you want to add to the store, and click Next.


Specify different Image Name and Image
Description values for the image file you
selected, if desired.


Click Next to continue twice.

Lesson 1

Adding Image Files
(cont.)


When the operation is complete, click Finish.


Right
-
click the Install Images folder.


From the context menu, select Add Install
Image.


With the default Create a new image group
option selected, supply a name for the group, if
desired, and click Next.

Lesson 1

Adding Image Files
(cont.)


Key or browse to the location of the boot image
you want to add to the store, and click Next.


Select the images you want to add to the store,
and click Next.


Click Next to continue.


When the operation is complete, click Finish.

Lesson 1

Configuring a Customer DHCP
Option


Click Start, and then click Administrative Tools >
DHCP.


In the scope pane, expand the node for your
server.


Right
-
click the IPv4 node and, from the context
menu, select Set Predefined Options.


Click Add.

Lesson 1

Configuring a Customer DHCP
Option
(cont.)


In the Name text box, key
PXEClient
.


From the Data Type drop
-
down list, select
String.


In the Code text box, key
060
.


Click OK.


Click OK again to close the Predefined Options
and Values dialog box.

Lesson 1

Configuring a Customer DHCP
Option
(cont.)


In the scope pane, right
-
click the Server Options
node and, from the context menu, select
Configure Options.


In the Available Options list, scroll down and
select the 060 PXEClient option you just created.


In the String Value text box, key the name or IP
address of your WDS server, and click OK.

Lesson 1

Performing a WDS Client
Installation


The client computer starts and, finding no local
boot device, attempts to perform a network
boot.


The client computer connects to a DHCP server
on the network, from which it obtains a
DHCPOFFER message containing an IP address
and other TCP/IP configuration parameters, plus
the 060 PXEClient option containing the name of
a WDS server.

Lesson 1

Performing a WDS Client
Installation
(cont.)


The client connects to the WDS server and is
supplied with a boot image file, which it downloads
using the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).


The client loads Windows PE and the Windows
Deployment Services client from the boot image
file onto a ram disk (a virtual disk created out of
system memory) and displays a boot menu
containing a list of the install images available
from the WDS server.

Lesson 1

Performing a WDS Client
Installation
(cont.)


The user on the client computer selects an
install image from the boot menu, and the
operating system installation process begins.


From this point, the setup process proceeds just
like a manual installation.


Lesson 1

Modifying a Boot Image


Click Start, and then click Administrative Tools >
Windows Deployment Services.


Expand the Server node and the node for your
server.


Select the Boot Images folder.


If you have not done so already, add the Windows
Server 2008 boot.wim image to the Boot Images
store by using the procedure described earlier in
this lesson.

Lesson 1

Modifying a Boot Image
(cont.)


In the detail pane,
right
-
click the boot
image.


Select Create
Capture Boot Image
from the context
menu.

Lesson 1

Modifying a Boot Image
(cont.)


On the
Capture Image Metadata

page, specify a
name and description for the new image as well
as a location and filename for the new image
file.


Click Next.


When the image is created successfully, click
Finish.

Lesson 1

Deploying an Unattend File


Copy your WDS client unattend file to the
\
RemoteInstall
\
WDSClientUnattend folder on the
WDS server.


Click Start, and then click Administrative Tools >
Windows Deployment Services.


Expand the Servers node.


Right
-
click the node for your server and, from
the context menu, select Properties.

Lesson 1

Deploying an Unattend File
(cont.)


Click the Client tab.


Select the Enable unattended installation
checkbox.


Click the Browse button corresponding to the
processor architecture of the client computer.


Browse to your unattend file, and click Open.

Lesson 1

Deploying an Unattend File
(cont.)


Click OK to close the server’s Properties sheet.


Expand the node for your server and the Install
Images node.


Locate the image you want to associate with an
unattend file.


Right
-
click the image file and, from the context
menu, select Properties.

Lesson 1

Deploying an Unattend File
(cont.)


Select the Allow image to install in unattended
mode checkbox.


Click Select File.


Key or browse to the unattend file you want to
use, and click OK.


Click OK to close the Image Properties sheet.

Lesson 1

Activating Windows


Key Management Service (KMS)


Multiple Activation Key (MAK)

Lesson 1

Adding Roles


Click Start, and then
click All Programs >
Administrative Tools
> Server Manager.


In the scope (left)
pane, click the Roles
node.


Click Add Roles.

Lesson 1

Adding Roles
(cont.)


Click Next to skip the
Before You Begin

page.


Select the checkbox for the role (or roles) you
want to install.


If the role you select is dependent on other roles
or features, the Add Features Required For Web
Server (IIS) dialog box appears.


Click Add Required Features, and then click
Next.

Lesson 1

Adding Roles
(cont.)


Click Next twice.


Click Install.


After you confirm that all of the installations
have completed successfully, click Close.

Lesson 1

You Learned


Applications in the enterprise can take several
forms including client
-
run applications,
client/server applications, and distributed
applications.


The roles provided by the Add Roles Wizard fall
into three basic categories: directory services,
infrastructure services, and application services.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


Windows Server 2008 includes a collection of
features that you can select individually. You
can also augment a given role by adding
features that increase its capabilities.


The number of roles a server can perform
depends on the computer’s hardware
configuration, the hardware requirements of the
role, and the size and scope of the enterprise.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


Distributing server roles among several
computers has several distinct advantages
including fault tolerance, ease of resource
allocation, high availability, server scalability,
security configuration, dispersed network
traffic, and simpler update management.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


Not until you have decided how you will deploy
your applications and the roles an application
server will perform should you begin selecting
the hardware that goes into the computer.


Terminal Services can provide a number of
benefits in an enterprise application
deployment, including substantial savings in the
cost of workstation hardware and conservation
of network bandwidth.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


The Windows Server Core installation option of
Windows Server 2008 gives you a stripped
-
down version of the operating system. There is
no Start menu, no desktop Explorer shell, no
MMC console, and virtually no graphical
applications. All you see when you start the
computer is a single window with a command
prompt.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


A virtual server is a complete installation of an
operating system that runs in a software
environment emulating a physical computer.
Applications such as Microsoft Virtual Server
2005 and the Windows Server virtualization
technology in Windows Server 2008 make it
possible for a single computer to host multiple
virtual machines, each of which runs in a
completely independent environment.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


Windows Deployment Services (WDS) is a role
included with Windows Server 2008 that
enables you to perform unattended installations
of Windows Server 2008 and other operating
systems on remote computers by using
network
-
based boot and installation media.


Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


Volume Activation (VA) 2.0 is Microsoft’s
program for automating and managing the
activation of products obtained using volume
licenses. VA 2.0 does not alter the terms of the
license agreement with Microsoft in any way; it
is simply a tool to simplify the activation
process. For end users, the activation process is
completely transparent, and administrators do
not have to supply individual product keys
when installing Windows.

Lesson 1

You Learned
(cont.)


Volume licenses for Windows Vista and
Windows Server 2008 now include two types of
keys that are designed to support the following
two activation services: Key Management
Service (KMS) and Multiple Activation Key
(MAK).