By: Katie Velencia EDUC 318 Computers in Education

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3 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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By: Katie
Velencia

EDUC 318

Computers in Education


Safety should be a primary concern for educators
when using technology in the classroom.


Schools policies must ensure that students have
access too and are viewing information appropriate
for education.

Ethical issues for
Safety and Security

Ethical
Issues for
Safety
and
Security

Social
Networking

Acceptable use
of Policies

Netiquette

Cyber
Bullying

Student Data

Internet Privacy


U
sers may create a profile page to display
personal information.


Communicate with peers using the internet


Promotes collaboration with peers and
colleges .



Ethical issues for
Safety and Security


Mandatory school guidelines for proper use of
technology


Acceptable Use Policies (AUP)


Agreement of terms and conditions for using technology
during school hours must be signed by students, caregiver,
and teacher (Virginia Department of Educuation,2010).


All school personal and students must monitor
use of technology for:


Appropriateness


Ethics


Safety




Ethical issues for Safety and Security





Rules of acceptable behavior for social
networking purposes


Respect


Anything on the internet is fair game to the
public.


If you do not want certain people to know
something, do not post it anywhere on the
Internet.

Ethical issues for Safety
and Security


Repeated harassment online


Increasing popularity


Bullies feel they can harass others online because
they are less likely to be caught.


Do not need to see their victim face to face


Easier


Parents and teachers: Monitor child’s Internet
usage and check for bullying.


National Public Radio Broadcast

Ethical issues for
Safety and
Security


Privacy


Students, Parents, Teachers, Administrators


All Student’s records are confidential


Keep records protected unless it is being shared
with professionals for educational purposes.


Keep computer security systems up to date to
prevent online hackers.


Ethical issues for
Safety and Security


Never share passwords.


At home and School: Block inappropriate
websites for students.


View privacy statements on websites to make
sure you do not provide too much personal
information, or information that you do not
intend to share with the public.


Keep your eyes open for the “seal of
approval.”


Ethical issues for
Safety and Security


Never leave students unattended when using
technology; especially the Internet.


Administration should block inappropriate websites.


Schools web use policies should be visible and known
to all students.


Inform students of the crime of cyber bulling.


Make them aware of its existence and harmful affects.


As the adult, be aware of the signs of students who are
victims and signs of bullies.


Keep a log of each students computer use.


Refer to it if issues arise


Update the web security system to prevent hackers.


Ethical issues for
Safety and Security

The gap between those who have and do not
have access to technology and its tools.


“Being disconnected in the Information Age is
not like being deprived of a Mercedes or
some other luxury. [It] means being
disconnected from the economy and
democratic debate”

Mark Lloyd, Executive
Director of the Civil Rights Forum on
Communications Policy(
Dickard
, 2002).

Digital Divide

Digital
Divide

Race

Gender

Socio
Economics

Resource
Equity

Teacher
Bias


Asians


Highest rates of computer ownership and Internet
access.


Most affected


Blacks and Hispanics


Households are 40% less likely to have Internet than White
households ( Carlin, 2000).


Native Americans


25% of homes on a Navajo Reservation in New Mexico have
phone service (Carlin, 2000).


“At the highest incomes ($75,000+), the White/Black divides
for computer ownership decreased by 76.2% between 1994
and
1998”
(Racial Divide continues to
Grow, 1999).



Digital Divide


Women tend to use the
Internet
for
communication
purposes as oppose to men who
use
the computer
for task oriented
processes
(
Kennedy, 2003).


Men spend more time online than woman.


Girls tend to find programming tedious and
computer games repetitive (Starr, 2000).


View computer careers as boring and uninspiring




Digital Divide

Integrate technology in various ways:



Interpreting information


Design concepts


Multimedia presentations


Communication


Word Processing


Encourage girls to think of themselves as
designers (Starr, 2000).

Digital Divide


25% of America’s poorest households are online vs.
80% of homes earning over $75,000 that are online
(
Dickard
, 2002).


30% of youth from low income households use
computers at home vs. 90% of youth from high
income households who use computers at home
(
Dickard
, 2002).


Low SES


Use public libraries or facilities


Time constraint on use


Less time to explore and fully complete assignments

Watch this for more information:

How does income affect the digital divide?


Digital Divide


High poverty areas


Teachers are less likely to assign students multimedia
presentations or assignments that require internet
research.


Students without computers in the home can not
practice skills learned in school outside of school.

“Students with limited technology resources miss out
on opportunities to use the Internet as a virtual tutor
or study group, as a guidance counselor, or as a
notebook to store notes and resources for future
reference”(
Celano
, 2010).


Digital Divide


School systems may lack interest in
technology.


Counties with higher income households and
higher taxes have more funding for
technologies in schools.


Baltimore City: Lower income households, but
less funding available for schools.


Howard County: Higher income households and
higher taxes, but more funding for better quality
technology in schools.

Digital Divide


Properly trained educators


U
se technology for success in the classroom


Teachers are set in traditional methods of
instruction.


Not provided with training


Teachers may view technology as negative
and not an assistive tool.


Digital Divide


All schools: train teachers to properly use
technology and software for classroom
instruction


Internet is not just a research library.


Showcase its dynamic and integrative aspects


Train teachers to have a positive outlook on
technology integration.


Transfers to students

Digital Divide


Community technology access centers


Search for and take advantage of free computer
giveaways.


Opportunities available to households and schools


Use multi racial and gender grouping in
classroom.


Assessment tools to evaluate a student’s work
not solely based on ability to use technology
(Starr, 2000).


Evaluate:


C
ritical thinking skills


Problem solving strategies


Digital Divide


Altering and/or plagiarizing copyrighted
material is a criminal act.


In your classroom, you must be aware of laws
for copyrighting and consider them when
using digital and non
-
digital sources from the
Internet.

Be aware of alterations
you make to a published
work. The original work
must be cited.

Legal Use of Digital
Media

Legal Use
of Digital
Media

Copyright

Fair Use

Creative
Commons


Laws easily violated (Johnson & Simpson, 2005).


Unclear copyright laws


Teachers and administrators can mistakenly
misunderstand copy right laws.


Why are Laws beneficial?


Teacher s and students can create and control works that
they produce.


Schools should support use of published software.


Company profits financially


Improve and update software for education purposes (Johnson &
Simpson, 2005)

Legal Use of
Digital Media

Four Laws:

I.
Purpose and Character of Use

I.
Is use of product for nonprofit education purposes or
commercial nature?

II.
Nature of Copyrighted work

III.
Amount and substantiality of the copyrighted work
that is used in proportion to the whole size.

IV.
The effect of the use on the market for the value of
the copyrighted work.

Legal Use of
Digital Media

A non profit organization providing a wealth of creative
and educational materials free to share and re
-
use by
educators and students.


Users can share, remix, and use published work
commercially.


Global collaboration and sharing


Enhancing learning and inspiring creativity with technology.


Transformative Factor:
Make sure you are altering the work
to create a new project.


Nature of Copyrighted work:
A violation of the law is of less
consequence if the work is unpublished because the author
can change its appearance.


Legal Use of Digital
Media

Authors of works choose from six licenses that are under four main
categories:


1.
Attribution

1.
Allows others to copy, distribute, display, and perform the copy written
work and derivatives of work if given credit how the author asks.

2.
Share Alike

1.
Author allows others to distribute other works and derivatives of the work under a
license that is the same as the license they have placed on their work.

3. Non
-
commercial


1. Author allows others to copy, distribute, and display, and perform their work and
derivatives of the work for non
-
commercial purposes only.

4. No Derivative


1. Allow others to copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of the
work, not derivative works based on the original.

How does this relate to use in the classroom?


Amount and Substantiality Taken


It is always better to use less of a work.


If the majority of the piece of work is used, it is more likely to violate fair use laws because
it will be easily recognized by the author.

Legal Use of
Digital Media


licenses are non
-
exclusive


Author’s of works can still make a profit.


Author is not tied down to only make their
content available under a Creative Commons
license
(Frequently asked Questions).


Can publish work under other revenue
-
generating
licenses


The author of work decides if they want to make the
piece commercial.


If others want to use derivatives of work for financial gain, they
must have your permission.

Legal Use of
Digital Media


Teach students to properly cite material that is not their own.


Inform them of the significance of the crime of plagiarizing.


Explain the Fair Use Laws to the students.


Display a poster in the room for students to use a
reference.


Encourage use of work and media that is copyrighted
under the creative commons.


Works available on

Google
,
CCMixter
,
flickr
, Public Library
of Science
(Who uses CC?)


Make sure as the educator you are aware of the types of
Creative Commons licenses and what they mean as far as
making derivatives of work and citing the originals.


Inform your students this work still must be cited even
though it is free to use!

Legal Use of
Digital Media


Block, Melissa. (2010, Sept. 30). The Rise in Cyber Bullying.
National Public Radio podcast.
Podcast retrieved from
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130247610.


Carlin
-
Steele, S. (2000). Caught in the Digital Divide. Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech041.shtml


Celano
, Donna (2010). Roadblocks on the Information Highway.
Educational Leadership
,68(3). Retrieved from
http://content.ebscohost.com/.


Dickard
, N. & Schneider D. (2002). The Digital Divide: Where We Are. Retrieved from

http://www.edutopia.org/digital
-
divide
-
where
-
we
-
are
-
today.



Digital Divide Staff. (2000) Digital Divide: Next Steps. Retrieved from http://www.edutopia.org/digital
-
divide
-
next
-
steps.


Ferris, B. (2010). Archive for the ‘Copyright’ Category Teachers
.
Instructify
.

Retrieved from http://instructify.com/.


Franks, K. (2009, June 27). Digital Divide.
Digital Divide by Kristen Franks.

Podcast retrieved from http://www.apple.com/itunes/.


Frequently asked questions
.
Retrieved from http://wiki.creativecommons.org/FAQ.


Hoffman, J. (2010). As Bullies Goes Digital, Parents Play Catch
-
Up.
The New York Times.

Retrieved from
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/05/us/05bully.html?ref=facebook_inc.


Kennedy, T, Wellman, B &
Klement
, K. (2003). Gendering the Digital Divide.
IT&Society,
1(5). Retrieved from
http://labweb.education.wisc.edu/steinkuehler/elpa940/readings/


Kennedy.pdf.


Membis
,
Liane
. (2010). Cyber Bullying. http://clutchmagonline.com/newsgossipinfo/mtv
-
launches
-
campaign
-
to
-
end
-
cyberbullying/


Owners, borrowers, & Thieves 2.0. Cat not in the Hat. iplitigator.huschblackwell.com


Racial Divide Continues to Grow. (1999). Falling Through the Net: Defining the Digital Divide.
NTIA Report.

Retrieved from
http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/digitaldivide/factsheets/


racial
-
divide.htm.


Schumacher, B. (2008). Digital Divide.
You Tube
. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl6k8bBCaoI.


Starr, L. (2000). Educating Girls in the tech age: A Report on Equity. Retrieved from
http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech/tech028.shtml.


Sullivan, B. (2002). Netiquette.
Computerworld, 36(10).
Retrieved from http://researchport.umd.edu.


What is CC? Retrieved from
http://creativecommons.org/about/what
-
is
-
cc



Who uses CC? Retrieved from http://creativecommons.org/about/who
-
uses
-
cc.


(2010). Acceptable Use Policies: A Handbook.


Retrieved from
http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/safety_crisis_management/internet_safety/acceptable_use_policy.shtml.


(2009). Children’s Online Privacy: A Resource Guide for Parents.
Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

Retrieved from
http:/www.privacyrights.org .


(2010).
Facebook
.
The New York Times.
Retrieved from
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/facebook_inc/index.html?scp=8&sq=what%20is%20social


%20networking?&
st
=
cse



(2007). Measuring Fair Use: The Four
Factors.
SULAIR
.
Retrieved from http://fairuse.stanford.edu/.


(2010). Protecting Student Rights in Schools.
Ohio State University of Social Work 4(1).
Retrieved from
http://ckm.osu.edu/sitetool/sites/caycipublic/…policybrief_4_1.pdf.