Specialist engineering schools presentation - EngineeringUK

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18 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 4 μήνες)

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Rob Robson

rrobson@swcc.beds.sch.uk

Principal,

Samuel Whitbread Community College

(a specialist Engineering School)


Chair,

Engineering Specialist Schools
Headteachers
’ Steering Group





Engineering in schools



What can we learn from the specialist
Engineering schools?

Engineering colleges are expected to develop as centres of excellence in
engineering, incorporating science, technology, engineering and mathematics
(STEM). They should develop a visible engineering ethos throughout the
school and within their local community to motivate and inspire learning for
all.



Engineering colleges promote engineering as a way of working and thinking,
using the subject to develop students’ personal learning and thinking skills.
Their problem

solving and teamwork draws on many curriculum areas.
Engineering encourages students to be innovative and creative and to envision
and make completely new things and making the world a better place; it lies at
the heart of developing a more sustainable society.



Engineering colleges help to drive the Government’s STEM programme,
developing the scientists, engineers, technologists and mathematicians of the
future. They develop learning and teaching approaches and opportunities that
incorporate science, technology, engineering and mathematics in ways that
motivate and inspire learners. They promote participation and achievement in
STEM including in partner schools and the wider community

The government’s expectation of
Engineering Colleges

Specific requirements of engineering
specialism



Engineering colleges should:



provide opportunities to follow a range of courses that support the study of
engineering and the development of construction skills



make effective use of ICT to raise the quality of teaching and learning in the
specialist subjects


offer triple science to all pupils achieving level 6 or above at the end of key
stage 3 and have strategies to increase uptake


actively contribute to the planning or delivery of related diplomas such as
Engineering, Construction and the Built Environment or Manufacturing and
Product Design and Science


increase post
-
16 participation in STEM subjects in their own school and in
partner schools


have the active support of the engineering industry through the provision of
real life contexts for learning.


offer inclusive STEM enrichment clubs to their students and support
secondary partner schools with their development and implementation


STEM


Science Technology Engineering Maths


Science


national curriculum subject

Technology


national curriculum subject

Maths


national curriculum subject

Engineering


not mentioned in the national




curriculum (apart from part of STEM)



Too often:
STeM


The image of Engineering

As we (Engineering Colleges) see it


“We are preparing students for jobs that don’t yet
exist using technologies that haven’t yet been
invented in order to solve problems that we
don’t even know are problems yet.”

Paraphrased from Sixteen Trends: Their Profound Impact on our Future


Gary Marx


At SWCC, we call this

Imagineering

What does the industry need?

Business Skills


Communication,


Team
-
working,


Problem solving


Independent
learning


Time management


Creativity,
innovation and
aesthetics


Specific Engineering

Skills



A sound knowledge of the
engineering fundamentals
within their discipline, built on a
solid base of mathematical
solutions to problems


The ability to apply theory in
practice leading to solutions for
real problems including an
awareness of the commercial
implications of engineering
decisions


Educating Engineers for the 21st Century: The Industry View.

A study carried out by Henley Management College

for The Royal Academy of Engineering

by Nigel Spinks, Nick
Silburn

and David
Birchall


8 March 2006

“If you want people to go and be
engineers you’ve got to make it a
bloody sight more fun.”




Communication,


Team
-
working,


Problem solving


Independent learning


Time management


Creativity, innovation
and aesthetics


Hi Tech


competing with the power in
bedrooms

Hi Tech


competing with the power
in bedrooms

Hi Tech


competing with the power in
bedrooms


“Even
more apparent was concern over
mathematical skills, a concern that
several
interviewees
traced back to what they saw as the
deficiency in mathematics teaching in schools.
One senior
executive summed
it up as follows:
‘there are some basic mathematical capabilities
issues. I think the maths teaching is not what
it
was
, or it is, but our demand exceeds our capacity.
So our demand to churn out people with maths
skills exceeds
our capacity
to teach them. And
I’m not just talking about university, I’m talking
about schools
’.




Educating Engineers for the 21st Century: The Industry View.

A study carried out by Henley Management College

for The Royal Academy of Engineering

by Nigel Spinks, Nick
Silburn

and David
Birchall


8 March 2006

Maths in schools

Maths in schools

A solid base of mathematical solutions
to problems


There is very little drive for students to
‘discover’ in maths


too often, ‘it is’.


Maths in action


the pedagogy of maths has to
change.


We need ‘how maths works’.


The maths classroom needs to become the
maths laboratory or workshop.


Schools and employers need to embrace
functional skills


they are useful.

Maths in schools

Maths in schools

“Some
firms are also involved in much earlier
targeting of
potential employees
by
liaising
with schools
. The survey data suggest,
however, that it is larger firms that are more
likely to
use this
strategy
.”

Educating Engineers for the 21st Century: The Industry View.

A study carried out by Henley Management College

for The Royal Academy of Engineering

by Nigel Spinks, Nick
Silburn

and David
Birchall


8 March 2006




Companies playing a part in Education

Companies playing a part in Education


Schools must invest time and seniority in this.


We must move beyond liaison.


Schools must ask for specific help (in particular,
time).


We must provide career progression routes below
graduate level.

Invest early

-

functional skills


pre
-
apprenticeship (putting the
pressure on schools to teach applied maths)
-

Level 1 apprenticeship
-


Commitment from both sides
-

a Memorandum
of Understanding

Real time projects


Magellan nose wheel
stressing of a training aircraft (Solid Works


3D CAD/CAM)


Playstation
/
xbox

360

Leading to a real project


design of fuselage
brackets and internal wing ribs for the A350
and A400M

Companies playing a part in Education


Sample of a Memorandum of Understanding




This memorandum applies to Magellan Aerospace UK and Samuel Whitbread Community College,
Faculty of Engineering.


This is a non
-
commercial agreement seeking to identify areas of collaboration between an
Engineering Company (Magellan Aerospace) and an Engineering College (SWCC).


Whilst we would seek substantive discussions to agree specifics for a closer lasting partnership we
have listed below the typical deliverables which we would see as a “road map to future learning”.


Arrangements to provide induction training for engineering students which will enable them to
understand the demands of the aerospace industry in relation to CAD/CAM 3D software design
packages, i.e. CATIA (Solid Works)


Acting as an effective customer advocate where we can engage the school in prototype exercises
driven by our first line manufacturers i.e. Airbus and Fokker


Engineering students will have a regular opportunity to be involved with the company and will be
able to share success through co
-
marketing opportunities such as case studies and press releases


As a values based organisation there is an industrial trainee scheme which would offer opportunities
for student mentoring and business mentoring programmes for appropriate students


Project and scenario based learning which is set within a live project context which would enable all
participants the pedagogical process to achieve a higher order of familiarity with their role. This
would entail user acceptance testing and would enable the student to engage with the interface
between what they learn at school/college and what they experience in a company.


Magellan Aerospace complies with all the local education and business partnerships protocols for
working with young people. Employers’ liability insurance and robust health and safety procedures
are in place.




Commitment from both sides
-

a Memorandum
of Understanding

Real time projects


Magellan nose wheel
stressing of a training aircraft (Solid Works


3D CAD/CAM)


Playstation
/
xbox

360

Leading to a real project


design of fuselage
brackets and internal wing ribs for the A350
and A400M

Companies playing a part in Education

Together we need to put Engineering at
the centre of the curriculum.