ANNEX 4: Excerpt from the draft IST Work Programme 2001 - CORDIS

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W
ORKSHOP

S
EMANTIC
W
EB
T
ECHNOLOGIES


22
-
23 November 2000, Luxembourg





















Information Society Technologies (IST) Programme

Key Action III: Multimedia Content and Tools

Area 4: Information Access, Filtering, Analysis and Handling



EUROP
EAN COMMISSION

Directorate
-
General Information Society

Information Society Technologies: Content, Multimedia Tools and Markets

Management of information and content,

including the Action Plan on illegal and harmful content on the Internet


2

Table of Content
s


(
Please be advised that the presentations are copyrighted to their
respective owners)

Table of Contents

................................
................................
.............................

2

Introduction

................................
................................
................................
......

4

Invited talks

................................
................................
................................
......

6

Beyond R
DF(S): the Ontology perspective for the Semantic Web (Rudi Studer, University of
Karlsruhe and ontoprise GmbH)

................................
................................
............................

6

Semantics for the wireless Web (Johan Hjelm, Ericsson)

................................
.....................

6

Describing multimedia (Wol
fgang Klas, University of Vienna)

................................
...............

6

Multimedia for the Semantic Web (Lynda Hardman, CWI)

................................
....................

6

Agents on the Semantic Web (David De Roure, University of Southampton)

.......................

7

Bu
siness opportunities on the Semantic Web (Janne Saarela, ProSolutions, Nice)

.............

7

Short presentations

................................
................................
..........................

7

On
-
to
-
Knowledge: Content
-
driven knowledge
-
management through evolving ontologies
(Dieter Fensel
, Free University of Amsterdam)

................................
................................
.....

7

OIL: an ontology language for the Semantic Web (Ian Horrocks, University of Manchester)

7

Conceptual open hypermedia: informed WWW link navigation using ontologie
s (Carole
Goble, University of Manchester)

................................
................................
...........................

7

Enabling technologies for semantic interoperability (Jérôme Euzenat, INRIA Rhône
-
Alpes)

8

Objectifying the Web the "light" way: an RDF
-
based framework
for the description of Web
objects and services (Pasqualino Assini, The Data Archive
-

University of Essex)

..............

8

Querying RDF using an SQL
-
ish query language (Libby Miller, ILRT, University of Bristol)

.

9

Defining and managing semantics and datatypes
-

Is there a role for ISO 13250 Topic
Maps? (Martin Bryan, The SGML Centre)

................................
................................
.............

9

Notion System (R.A. Poell,
Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research
(TNO)
)

................................
................................
................................
................................
..

10

The OpenMath project (Mike Dewar, NAG Ltd)

................................
................................
...

10

An e
-
commerce platform for complex configurable products and services (Jürgen Nicklisch
-
Franken, Persist AG; Heinz Schweppe, FU Berlin)

................................
.............................

10

Inferential semantics for networked image data: supporting the derivation and management
of semantic attributes for Web
-
based multimedia content (Harold Boley, DFKI, and Jos De
Roo, AGFA)

................................
................................
................................
..........................

10

Inducing Semantics
from Structures (Paolo Avesani, ITC
-
IRST)

................................
........

11

Teachware on demand
-

the role of semantic annotations for individualised courses (Peter
Fankhauser, GMD
-
IPSI)

................................
................................
................................
......

11

Semantic user and content modeling fo
r an adaptive distance learning environment (Luca
Botturi, Universita della Svizzera Italiana)

................................
................................
...........

11

Open Learning Repository: a project idea in the field of computer science and cognitive
science (Heidrun Allert, University of H
annover)

................................
................................
.

12

PhotoRDF and rdfpic,an application of RDF to holiday photos (Bert Bos, W3C/INRIA)

.....

12

A tool for pictorial contents retrieval (Zdenek Mikovec, Czech Technical University)

.........

12


3

Semantics for voice recognition systems
-

a project idea (Christian Gronoff, Semiosphere)

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............

12

Knowledge based indexing (Ralph Traphoener, tecinno GmbH)

................................
........

13

OntoMap: facilitating e
asier access, understanding and comparison of the existing upper
-
level models (Cyc, SENSUS, WordNet, EuroWordnet, SIMPLE, GUM) (Atanas Kiryakov,
OntoText Lab., Sirma AI Ltd. )

................................
................................
.............................

13

Semantic interoperability in agentspace (Stanis
law Ambroszkiewicz, Institute of Computer
Science Polish Academy of Sciences)

................................
................................
................

13

Non
-
holistic agents (Patrick De Causmaecker, KaHo Sint
-
Lieven)

................................
.....

14

Visual data navigation in Web documents (Mikael J
ern, Advanced Visual Systems Aps and
Linkoping University)

................................
................................
................................
............

14

Visual modelling and the Web: conceptual browsing with Conzilla (Mikael Nilsson, Royal
Institute of Technology, Sweden)
................................
................................
.........................

16

RSS 1.0 and

its taxonomy module: bringing metadata back into RSS (Eric van der Vlist,
DYOMEDEA)

................................
................................
................................
.......................

16

Written contributions

................................
................................
......................

16

Ontology based access to digital libraries (Sonia Bergamaschi, DSI
-

Universita di
Modena
e Reggio
-
Emilia,
Fausto Rabitti, CNUCE
-
CNR
)

................................
................................
..

16

XCC
-

eXtensible Computation Context (Antonio Capani, Explo
-
IT Research)

..................

17

An ontology for planning applications (Peter Demeester, KaHo Sint
-
Lieven)

.....................

17

OntoWeb
-

Ontology
-
based information exchange for Knowledge Management and
electronic commerce (Dieter Fensel, Free University of Amsterdam)

................................
.

18

Self
-
Organizing Maps for Knowledge Manage
ment (Timo Honkela, Gurusoft Oy)

............

18

Web access to real time and numeric data (Web
-
SCADA) (David: Leal, CAESAR Systems
Limited)

................................
................................
................................
................................

19

Web and text mining through the Online Analyst (Alessandro Zanasi
, IBM)

.......................

19

ANNEX1: Business opportunities on the Semantic Web
-

slide texts (Janne
Saarela, ProSolutions, Nice)

................................
................................
..........

21

ANNEX 2: Workshop Programme

................................
................................
..

23

ANNEX 3: List of part
icipants

................................
................................
.........

25

ANNEX 4: Excerpt from the draft IST Work Programme 2001

.......................

28

ANNEX 5: Contacts in the European Commission, Information Society DG,
Directorate D, Unit 5 (DG INFSO/D5):

................................
...........................

29


4

Introduction

‘Multimedia Content and Tools’
is the theme of
Key Action III

of the European
Commission’s
IST

(Information Society Technologies) Programme 1998
-
2002.

Multimedia
content

has many, largely application domain specific facets per
taining for
instance to:



education and training,



information services,



entertainment (games, interactive digital TV, etc.).

It may also serve specific or general purposes such as



preservation of intellectual and cultural heritage (including fragile mat
erials) traditionally
kept in archives, libraries and museums,



support to a range of tasks carried out by professionals: engineers, architects, scientists,
medical doctors, surgeons, etc.;



enhancing workflow (including CSCW), transaction oriented (e.g. e
-
commerce) and other
systems.

Tools

are needed to perform operations on content, such as:
creation
,
description
,
annotation

storage
,
management
,
manipulation
,
analysis
,
search
,
access
,
retrieval
,
communication
,
presentation

… . Many if not all of these ta
sks are to a greater or lesser extent generic, i.e.
independent of any given content application domain.

Areas 1 (Interactive Publishing and Digital Culture) and 2 (Education and Training) of Key
Action III are mainly content related and address applicatio
n specific aspects, whereas Areas
3 (Human Language Technologies) and 4 (Information Access, Filtering, Analysis and
Handling or
IAF
, for short) provide the more generic underpinning, focusing on the 'tools' part
of the overall agenda of Key Action III.

Ar
ea 4

(IAF) in particular, has been defined to include

… advanced technologies for the management of information content to empower the user to
select, receive and manipulate (in a manner that respects the user’s right to privacy) only the
information requ
ired when faced with an ever increasing range of heterogeneous sources.
Improvements in the key functionalities of large
-
scale multimedia asset management systems
(including the evolution of the World Wide Web) will support the cost effective delivery of
i
nformation services and their usage.

The
Council Decision

establishing the IST Programme describes the IAF RTD priorities as
follows:

… mastering information: rich descriptive models of digital information content, covering all
media types and supporting

all human senses, …,radically new cognitive relations between
the system and users via individualised metaphors or visualisation techniques …

‘Semantic Web Technologies’
, the IAF Action Line in the IST Work Programme 2001,
translates this mandate into an
agenda which picks up on ideas that have been looming for a
number of years and that have received their perhaps greatest push from the World Wide
Web Consortium (W3C). An informal paper published on the Web in September 1998, by Tim
Berners
-
Lee, entitled
"Semantic Web Road Map", and a more formal note on "Web
Architecture: Describing and Exchanging Data" (June 1999) may be considered the seminal
documents.

'Making content machine
-
understandable'

is a popular paraphrase of the intentions behind
the Semantic

Web. In spite of its potential philosophical ramifications, however, this phrase
should be taken very pragmatically: content (of whatever type of media) is 'machine
understandable' if it is bound (attached, pointing, etc.) to some formal description of it
self
(often referred to as
metadata
). Ideally, adding 'semantics to content' in this sense should be
achieved through algorithmic content analysis.

'Machine understanding' is not an end in itself. Rather, it should lead to automating a range of
tasks withi
n the context of distributed systems (such as the Web): from (chains of) business
transactions to searching and filtering relevant and trustable information on whatever subject
a user may be interested in. The kind of software performing such tasks is comm
only known
as 'agents', decorated with varying attributes and qualifications, such as
information
,
intelligent
,
autonomous
,
cooperative
,
adaptive
,
rational
,
mobile
, etc.


5

Lastly, human users should be able to interact with their agents (or directly with co
ntent) in an
intuitively appealing fashion. Visual and/or virtual reality metaphors are perhaps the most
likely candidates for representing the semantics of Web content at the man
-
machine interface
(to make, in a manner of speaking, machine
-
understandable
content understandable to
humans) and for providing new ways of navigation and search.

The above considerations underly the structure of the 'Semantic Web Technologies' action
line, as defined in the draft IST Work Programme 2001 (cf. Annex 3). Indeed, its

four strands
may be characterized roughly as:
formalizing

(using
XML
,
RDF

and other techniques for
semantic interoperability

and
reasoning

such as
ontology languages
)
,
grounding

(formalisms
through
content analysis)
,
acting

(to support
knowledge / resourc
e discovery
,
transactions
,
intelligent
filtering

and
profiling
,
collaborative filtering
,
knowledge sharing
)
and
interacting

(e.g. through intuitive
visual interfaces)
.

It relies on knowledge and know
-
how gained in various Computer Science subdisciplines
su
ch as formal modelling, formal logics and formal languages, information retrieval,
(multimedia) databases, knowledge engineering, image analysis, etc. Where interoperability
(e.g. among information agents) is concerned there is a strong case for agreeing o
n Web
wide standards.

With its focus on
Web

technologies this new action line takes account of the fact that t
he
rapid growth of the World Wide Web stimulates and motivates R&D opening up new ways of
managing multimedia content (primarily images, video and

audio but of course also text and
plain data) and its delivery via stationary and (increasingly) mobile platforms. It is designed
with a view to giving these developments more momentum by creating synergies between
hitherto relatively separate R&D (and st
andards) communities, both in industry and
academic/public research.

The IST Key Action III initiative in this field is certainly not isolated or unique. Other IST Key
Actions, in particular II (New Methods of Work and Electronic Commerce) and IV (Essentia
l
Technologies and Infrastructures), are contributors (and are in fact already hosting relevant
projects such as IBROW or ONTOKNOWLEDGE). Yet our initiative may differ from other,
similar ones (outside Europe or in individual EU Member States) in that it i
s slightly broader
and more open to knowledge management, multimedia and interface issues.

This workshop may be considered a first test of our agenda and it is heartening to see that
our Call for Participation has met with a response well beyond initial ex
pectations, both in
terms of number of participants and number of proposed presentations of projects and project
ideas. Equally remarkable is the mix of different interests represented. It not only reflects the
various aspects of our ‘Semantic Web Technolo
gies’ action line, but also its potential for
further research and for viable business applications of current and future developments.

It should be noted that this is just a beginning. Discussions have started on the next European
RTD framework programme.

We believe that the technologies addressed by this workshop
will become crucial for the development and exploitation of digital content in an increasingly
networked world. And we are confident that the contributions to this workshop, the ones
actually pre
sented and the ones made only in writing, provide enough substance to justify a
prominent place for these technologies in any future IST programme.


6


Abstracts


Invited talks


Beyond RDF(S): the Ontology perspective for the Semantic Web (Rudi Studer,
Unive
rsity of Karlsruhe and ontoprise GmbH)

Currently, we are entering the process of transforming the 'first generation web', that is
characterized by HTML pages and human processing of the Web contents, to the 'second
generation web' or the 'Semantic Web' tha
t aims at machine
-
processable information. To
achieve that next level one needs means and standards not only for describing the syntactic
structure of Web documents as offered by XML, but also means and standards for specifying
the semantic content of Web
sources. RDF/RDF schema offers a first step in this direction.

We argue that ontologies will play a crucial role in enabling the 'Semantic Web'. In our context
ontologies provide a formal conceptualization of particular domains that is shared between
peopl
e and/or application systems. Ontologies may be specified by languages that are
defined as extensions of RDFS, as e.g. OIL, and may be supported by a 'Semantic Web'
infrastructure that offers means for storing ontologies and for making inferences. Of cours
e,
sophisticated ontology engineering environments are required that support the construction,
learning, reuse and maintenance of ontologies.

Ontologies are also the backbone for metadata management since they pave the way for the
semi
-
automatic semantic a
nnotation of Web pages as well as for information extraction from
Web sources.

Interesting Links:

http://Ontobroker.SemanticWeb.org/

http://www.semanticweb.org

http://www.ontoknowledge.org/oil

http://DAML.SemanticWeb.org/

http://www.w3.org/RDF/

e
-
mail
:
studer@aifb.uni
-
karlsruhe.de
,

URL
:
http://www.aifb.uni
-
karlsruhe.de/WBS
,
http://www.ontoprise.de




Semantics for the wireless Web (Johan Hjelm, Eric
sson)

e
-
mail
:
johan.hjelm@era
-
t.ericsson.se
,

URL
:
http://www.42forlag.com/Johan/whois.htm



Describing multimedia (Wolfgang Klas, University of Vien
na)

e
-
mail
:
Wolfgang.Klas@univie.ac.at

URL
:
http://www.informatik.uni
-
ulm.de/dbis



Multimedia for the Semantic Web (Lynda Hardman, CWI)

A brief introduct
ion to SMIL, and that as an XML based format it is ripe for integrating with
semantic markup. (It already contains a number of elements for including metadata.)

Annotating within different media formats. Two things need to be described, the data
-
dependent
part that is being referred to and the semantic markup describing it.

The use of semantic markup for generating hypermedia presentations (the thrust of our
current research). What types of semantic information are needed?

e
-
mail
:
Lynda.Hardman@cwi.nl
,

URL
:
http://www.cwi.nl/~lynda/
,
http://www.w3.org/AudioVideo






7

Agents on the Semantic Web (David De Roure, University of Southam
pton)

e
-
mail
:
dder@ecs.soton.ac.uk

URL
:
http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/info/people/dder



Business opportunities on the Semantic Web (Janne Saarela, ProSoluti
ons, Nice)

see slide texts in Annex 1

e
-
mail
:
js@pro
-
solutions.com


URL
:
http://www.cs.hut.fi/~jsaarela




Short presentations


On
-
to
-
Knowledge: Content
-
driven knowled
ge
-
management through evolving
ontologies (Dieter Fensel, Free University of Amsterdam)

The Information Society builds on the convergence of information, communication and
networking technologies and takes advantage of infrastructures like the Internet and

the Web.
The aim of the IST
-
Programme is to help to create a user friendly information society.
Currently there is a large gap between the information needs of a user and the way
information is made available online.

Within the On
-
To
-
Knowledge
-
Project we
will develop tools and methods for supporting
knowledge management relying on sharable and reusable knowledge ontologies. The
technical backbone of On
-
To
-
Knowledge is the use of ontologies for the various tasks of
information integration and mediation.

The

application focus of On
-
To
-
Knowledge is the knowledge management in large and
distributed organisations. This aspect of On
-
To
-
Knowledge is emphasised by three case
studies in the areas of Organisational Memory of a large company, help desk functionality o
f a
call centre, and the knowledge management in a virtual enterprise.

e
-
mail
:
dieter@cs.vu.nl
,

URL
:
http://www.cs.vu.nl/~dieter
,
h
ttp://www.ontoknowledge.org



OIL: an ontology language for the Semantic Web (Ian Horrocks, University of
Manchester)

Exploiting the full potential of the World Wide Web will require semantic as well as syntactic
interoperability. This can best be achieve
d by providing a further represen
-
tation and
inference layer that builds on existing and proposed web standards. The OIL language
extends the RDF schema standard to provide just such a layer. It com
-
bines the most
attractive features of frame based languag
es with the expressive power, formal rigour and
reasoning services of a very expressive description logic. The re
-
sult is a language that is
both intuitive to human users and accessible to autonomous agents, thus facilitating the
development of the Semanti
c Web.

In this short talk I will:

1. give an illustrated overview of the OIL language;

2. show how the stated design principals are reflected in the language;

3. explain how OIL can form the core of a complete ontology development envi
-
ronment for
the Sema
ntic Web.


e
-
mail
:
horrocks@cs.man.ac.uk


URL
:
http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~horrocks
,
http://www.ontoknowledge.org/oil



Conceptual open hypermedia: informed WWW link navigation using ontologies (Carole
Goble, University of Manchester)

The aim of this project is to research into methods to improve significantly the quality,
consistency and breadth of linking of WWW docum
ents at retrieval time (as readers browse

8

the documents) and authoring time (as authors create the documents). The objective is
link
creation

rather than resource discovery.

The project plans to produce a COHSE (Conceptual Open Hypermedia Services
Environm
ent) using three leading
-
edge technologies:

1. an ontological reasoning service which is used to represent a sophisticated conceptual
model of document terms and their relationships;

2. a Web
-
based open hypermedia link service that can offer a range of di
fferent link
-
providing
facilities in a scalable and non
-
intrusive fashion;

3. the integration of the ontology service and the open hypermedia link service to form a
conceptual hypermedia system to enable documents to be linked via metadata describing
thei
r contents.

A first phase pilot has already been developed and demonstrated with a museum collection
application. COHSE is a system powered by OIL (Ontology Inference Layer).

e
-
mail
:
carole@cs.man.ac.uk


URL
:
http://img.cs.man.ac.uk/carole
,
http://inanna.ecs.soton.ac.uk/cohse


Other contacts: Sean Bechhofer (seanb@cs.man.ac.uk), Les Carr, Steve Harris, Dave de
Roure, We
ndy Hall (<lac,swh,dder,wh>@ecs.soton.ac.uk)


Enabling technologies for semantic interoperability (Jérôme Euzenat, INRIA Rhône
-
Alpes)

The vision of a "semantic web" is realised by the annotation of each web page, containing
informal knowledge as we know it

now, with formal knowledge whose terminology is
described in an ontology. For several reasons (legacy knowledge, ease of use, heterogeneity
of devices and adaptability, timelessness), it is not likely that this formal knowledge will be
encoded in the very

same language. The interoperability of the formal knowledge languages
must then be studied in order to gather, to transform and to adapt the knowledge acquired
through the semantic web.

We are pursuing researches for achieving interoperability between the
se formal annotations
at the semantic level (i.e. based on the meaning of the knowledge language constructs).
Several complementary tracks of research are developing: describing modular families of
languages allows to deal with adaptability by choosing the

most suitable language while
easing the exchange of knowledge; the pattern approach (followed with Heiner
Stuckenschmidt) allows to describe structures shared by languages from which it is easier to
transform knowledge; the transformation and property app
roach allows to define the
properties satisfied by elementary transformations (e.g. meaning preservation) and the
combination of such transformations preserving properties.

These tracks share common grounds such as the description of the semantics of the u
sed
languages and proof checking techniques that can be part of the web of trust.

e
-
mail
:
Jerome.Euzenat@inrialpes.fr

URL
:
http://www.inrialpes.fr/exmo



Objectif
ying the Web the "light" way: an RDF
-
based framework for the description of
Web objects and services (Pasqualino Assini, The Data Archive
-

University of Essex)

Although the advantages of object
-
oriented (OO) programming are well
-
known none among
the main
distributed OO middlewares (DCOM,CORBA and Java RMI) has been widely
adopted for the developing of Internet applications. Developers seems to perceive these
approaches as over
-
complex (COM and CORBA), proprietary (COM and RMI), and
incompatible with curren
t WWW development practices. Recognizing these difficulties more
WWW
-
friendly proposals are starting to appear (e.g., XML
-
RPC , SOAP). The paper
describes a 'light' approach to objectifying the WWW that provides most of the advantages of
object
-
orientation

while mantaining full compatibility with the existing WWW infrastructure and
requiring only modest changes to existing applications to allow them to partecipate to the
Object Web.

e
-
mail
:
titto@essex.ac.uk


URL
:
http://www.data
-
archive.ac.uk



9



Querying RDF using an SQL
-
ish query language (Libby Miller, ILRT, University of
Bristol)

The major query APIs in Java for RDF have been graph navigation APIs, which work at a very

low level, for example Sergay Melnik's RDF API and Brain McBride's Jen API. A typical query
would be

Model find (Resource, Property, Resource); where any argument can be null.

Navigating RDF graphs at this level of detail is necessary for the specialist

RDF application
developer, but for the mainstream web developer low level queries like this are offputting, and
as it turns out, unnecessary. It is important to simplify the access to RDF data stores, so that
simple and ontology
-
enabled RDF data stores ca
n be exposed to mainstream developers. We
have developed a prototype query langauge which can do this.

A great deal of work has been done on semi
-
structured query languages: the work here
draws on R. V. Guha's RDFDB QL and also the Algae work by Eric Prud'
hommeaux, the QL
described in the recent paper by Karvounarakis, Christophides, Plexousakis and Alexaki on
RQL, as well as those described in 'Data on the Web' by Abiteboul, Buneman and Suciu.

We have taken the JDBC API and RSS as canonically mainstream te
chnologies that can be
usefully co
-
opted by RDF. We have built a demonstration query system over the top of the
Java Jena and Melnik APIs which uses an SQL
-
like query language to query in
-
memory or
on
-
disk (Postgres) RDF data stores.

We used a cut
-
down JDB
C API to query the RDF data stores. This means that there is a
familiar interface for Java developers to the RDF data store, which returns a ResultSet object.
It also means that we can write simple jsp pages to query RDF databases and display the
results.

One application of this is to the new RSS 1.0 channel data. RSS 1.0 is an RDF format. Its
usual application is for providing a summary view of information from a site, which can then
be displayed by a viewer or aggregator. Since it is implemented in RDF, h
owever, we can
also aggregate the data and query it using the SQL
-
like query language. For example, if the
RSS data includes information about job adverts, we could have a query:

SELECT ?z, ?a FROM
http://ilrt.org/discovery/2000/11/rss
-
query/jobs
-
rss.rdf
,
http://ilrt.org/discovery/2000/11/rss
-
query/jobs.rss

WHERE ({job::advertises} ?x ?y)
({job::salary} ?y ?z) ({job::t
itle} ?y ?a) AND ?z > 55000 USING job FOR
http://ilrt.org/discovery/2000/11/rss
-
query/jobvocab.rdf
#

producing a result set

?y ?z web developer 60000 perl programmer 56000

Result: simpl
e or complex RDF data becomes accessible to mainstream Java server
-
side
developers.

Thanks to Dan Brickley for much useful input.

More detail is at
http://ilrt.org/discovery/2000/10/swsql


related work
:
http://ilrt.org/discovery/2000/11/rss
-
query


demo/download:
http://swordfish.rdfweb.org/rdfquery


RQL:
http://www.ics.forth.gr/proj/isst/RDF/RQL/rql.html


Algae:
http://www.w3.org/1999/02/26
-
modules/User/Algae
-
HOWTO.html


Guha's RDFDB
http://web1.guha.com/rdfdb


e
-
mail
:
libby.miller@bristol.ac.uk


URL
:
http://www.ilrt.bris.ac.uk

,
http://www.ilrt.bris.ac.uk/discovery



Defining and managing semantics and datatypes
-

Is there a role for ISO 13250 Topic
Maps? (Martin Bryan, The SGML Centre)

e
-
mail
:
mtbryan@diffuse.org


URL
:
http://www.diffuse.org




10

Notion System (R.A. Poell,
Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research
(TNO)
)

Notion System exists since 1991 and can be considered as a prototype of a large
-
scale
implementation. The gener
ated contents consist of concepts (notions) and relationships
between them. The multilingual system manages distributed data and is not domain specific.
Various levels of detail of information can be registered. There are metadata available for
automatic m
aintenance, filtering et cetera. Exploitation and inference logic are available as
notions too. In many aspects Notion System is comparable to RDF(S).

The ideas behind this system can be a possible implementation of the Semantic Web in the
future.

The Sema
ntic Web based on these ideas will enable the enhancement of existing techniques
(content analyses, NLP, and others) and enable automatic extension of the network. It will
also allow new ways of searching and navigating and will promote new presentation
te
chniques (probably 3D or 4D) using context sensitive delivery of information. Agents can
deploy automatic information maintenance activities (relevance, validity). Probabilistic
answers can be given to some questions, other questions will receive clear ans
wers.

The resulting Semantic Web will be the collaborative work of all users, agents and systems
connected to it.

One step further in the future, when the concepts themselves will be agents, the Semantic
Web will be enhanced with even more features. Next,
when the various devices, up till that
moment only connected TO the Web, will be integrated IN the Semantic Web, new openings
will be possible.

e
-
mail
:
poell@fel.tno.nl


URL
:
http://ww
w.tno.nl



The OpenMath project (Mike Dewar, NAG Ltd)

Although mathematical notation is incredibly expressive and flexible, it is also surprisingly
ambiguous. OpenMath, developed largely under an IST multimedia project, is a lightweight
mechanism for enco
ding the semantics of mathematical objects so that they can be
exchanged between applications and users. When combined with other emerging
technologies such as MathML and XSL it has the potential to under
-
pin a new generation of
mathematical applications.

This talk will give a brief technical overview of OpenMath before moving on to discuss how it
can be used to build other frameworks and applications such as mathematical components,
interactive books, formula databases etc.

See also:
http://www.openmath.org


e
-
mail
:
miked@nag.co.uk


URL
:
http://www.nag.co.uk



An e
-
commerce platform for complex configurable products and services (Jürgen
Nicklis
ch
-
Franken, Persist AG; Heinz Schweppe, FU Berlin)

e
-
mail:
nicklisch
-
franken@persistag.com


URL
:
http://www.persistag.com



Inferential semantics for networked
image data: supporting the derivation and
management of semantic attributes for Web
-
based multimedia content (Harold Boley,
DFKI, and Jos De Roo, AGFA)

At Agfa, the declarative Eve and Euler systems have been developed for capturing and
transforming networ
ked image data. The Euler work has incorporated image annotations on
the basis of the W3C's RDF standard. At DFKI, the inference rule system RFML has been
developed, which can be applied to annotations for deriving new semantic attributes. The joint
RuleML

Initiative has started to unify the various markups for XML and RDF inference rules.

In practice, there is a lot of simple rules that can operate on a combination of extracted image
features (obtained via image analysis) and additional image
-
related data.

The implicit
meaning in image data can thus be made explicit. We study the issue of how to infer (only)

11

meaningful facts from networked image data. In the non
-
distributed case, the semantics of
some centralized image data can be regarded model
-
theoretical
ly, as the set of facts whose
deduction is sanctioned by the given rules. For example, rules can infer the transitive closure
of a centralized 'connected' attribute. In the distributed case, we usually have an open
network of image data, for which no model
-
theoretic semantics exists. In the example, the
transitive closure of a distributed multi
-
sensor
-
derived 'connected' attribute may never form a
single stable set.

We thus propose tailored, "least power" mechanisms for inferencing with attributes specific
for
images such as topology, geometry, texture, and color. These mechanisms will be layered
such that the appropriate mechanism is easily identified for each given task (e.g., a functional
mechanism will be used for computing with measurements, thus avoidi
ng relational search
whenever possible). The work will be done on the basis of real
-
world (Agfa) image examples
and their annotations. The examples will be classified along relevant dimensions, e.g.
according to descriptive complexity, for testing the laye
red inference mechanisms.

Furthermore, to exploit the networked character of the given (Agfa) image data, we will study
a "Webized" architecture for distributing inference mechanisms over appropriate subsets of
input data, and for channelling output data t
o possible further processing steps. For this,
metadata content and capability descriptions of, respectively, data and mechanisms will be
explored. We envisage an efficient, platform
-
independent Java implementation of the
developing inferential semantics f
or networked image data.


e
-
mail
:
boley@informatik.uni
-
kl.de
,
jos.deroo.jd@belgium.agfa.com


URL
:
http://www
.dfki.uni
-
kl.de/~boley
,
http://www.agfa.com



Inducing Semantics from Structures (Paolo Avesani, ITC
-
IRST)

Our claim is that a new communication protocol could be enabled that is in between a
collection of keywords, wher
e terms are not related, and a sentence, where terms are
organized in a sequence determined by the rules of natural language. XML documents
represent an evidence of how such a kind of communication protocol is spreading.

Consider the scenario where the str
uctured terms represent a web site hierarchy. The term
_home_ could refer different meaning: the concept of homepage of the web site, or the
personal address of people. We could also represents such a kind of information as a XML
document where tags are th
e terms used to refer the main entry point of a web site, and the
structure is derived from the links between URIs. The right meaning of term _home_ will we
disambiguated taking into account the related position in the structure: a very narrow position
to
the root will favor the interpretation of _homepage_, while whether neighbour terms will be
related to _address_ or _office_ the interpretation of _domestic location_ will be preferred.

Though the example is really simple, what we would like to stress is t
hat the disambiguation
process can detect the right interpretations as result of a learning effort.

e
-
mail
:
avesani@irst.itc.it


URL
:
http://sra.itc.it


Other contacts: P. Bouquet(
University of Trento,
http://www.cs.unitn.it

), R. Rizzi(
ITC
-
IRST
)


Teachware on demand
-

the role of semantic annotations for individualised courses
(Peter Fankhauser, GMD
-
IPSI)

e
-
mail
:
fankhaus@darmstadt.gmd.de


URL
:
http://www.darmstadt.gmd.de/~fankhaus



Semantic user and content modeling for an adaptive distance learning environment
(Luca Botturi, Universita della
Svizzera Italiana)

The goal of the talk is to outline research issues in information modeling starting from a short
analysis of distance learning developments, potentialities and needs in different contexts.

It starts identifying the major distance learnin
g options such as self
-
learning, collaboration,
virtual simulation, etc. from both cognitive and social perspectives. These options are then
embodied in different application contexts (corporate training, learning institutions, etc.), trying
to identify so
me focus points for possible interventions in learning environments.


12

The claim is that we need now flexible distance learning development environments (as
opposite to course
-
products or teaching materials) that exploit semantic technologies such as
adaptiv
e hypermedia. Moreover, these development environments should not be edge
technologies, but simple and user
-
friendly, providing defined functions as answers to
particular needs.

In order to do that, two kinds of information should be formalized: the user p
rofile and the
content to be taught. Some models coming from our research are presented.

e
-
mail
:
luca.botturi@lu.unisi.ch


URL
:
http://www.lu.unisi.ch



Open Learning Rep
ository: a project idea in the field of computer science and
cognitive science (Heidrun Allert, University of Hannover)

e
-
mail
:
allert@kbs.uni
-
hannover.de


URL
:
http://www.kbs.uni
-
hannover.de
,
http://www.etl.uni
-
hannover.de



PhotoRDF and rdfpic,an application of RDF to holiday photos (Bert Bos, W3C/INRIA)

e
-
mail
:
bert@w3.org


URL
:
http://www.w3.org/people/bos



A tool for pictorial contents retrieval (Zdenek Mikovec, Czech Technical University)

As the complexity of pictures increases and the need for more detailed information about
individu
al images is steadily increasing, it is necessary to use new type of information for
picture description. This sort of information usually includes description of relations among
various objects in the picture. These relations may have different forms and
meanings
beginning from purely geometric relations (like an object is below another object) and ending
up with relations that have semantic character (like a person talks to another person).

Both types of information might be in general linked up in variou
s manners. This fact requires
an easy switching from one type of relations to different type of relation. Another important
topic is the possibility to filter out the information that is not relevant in given context. This
feature would ease the browsing i
n a picture as the number of relations could be limited by
means of proper filter. In principle the filtering process could be interpreted as data
transformation process. The need for data transformation is more general in picture
databases. The solution t
o this problem is highly influenced by the implementation tool used.

The tool that has all features necessary is XML where data transformations could be easily
specified by means of XSL transformation sheets. We have implemented experimental
system for pic
ture description creation, filtering and browsing based on these standards
(XML, XSL).

Due to generality of XSL it is possible to describe the querying process in various stages of
data transformation (e.g. picture data input, internal data transformation
s, picture data output).
It is also possible to define the way the query results are visualized.

e
-
mail
:
xmikovec@fel.cvut.cz


URL
:
http://www.cgg.cvut.cz
;
http://www.cgg.cvut.cz/Research/bis

Other contact: Pavel Slavik,
slavik@cs.felk.cvut.cz



Semantics for voice recognition systems
-

a project idea (Christian Gronoff,
Semiosphere
)

WHAT we wish to achieve:



The Intelligent Conversation Management Agent is the missing link for users and the
building component for today’s vocal applications.



The agent dialogues with the user thanks to text
-
to
-
speech and speech recognition,
associate
d with semantic engine, until it has an acceptable response to establish a sharp
and balanced search.



Query is transfered to the application which delivers required results.



IMCA takes advantage of the VoiceXML standard.


13

Benefits:



SAIMCA will be configure
d as to be engine vendors independant (text to speech &
recognition)



Key component to Natural Langage understanding



Major innovation for Multilingual Voice portal.



Improve efficiency of vocal browser applications



Voice technology nearer to match Write tech
nology

Applications



NEW MULTILINGUAL MAIL READER GENERATION: Retrieve mail over the phone
using powerfull filters.(name, date, priority…)



MULTILINGUAL VOCAL CONFIGURATOR: Perform configuration over the phone,
pricing, real estate activity….etc…

e
-
mail
:
semiosphere@wanadoo.fr



Knowledge based indexing (Ralph Traphoener, tecinno GmbH)

e
-
mail
:
ralph.traphoener@tecinno.com


URL
:
http://www.tecinno.com



OntoMap: facilitating easier access, understanding and comparison of the existing
upper
-
level models (Cyc, SENSUS, WordNet, EuroWordnet, SIMPLE, GUM) (Atanas
Kiryakov, OntoText Lab., Sirma AI Ltd. )

The goal of the project is to
facilitate an easy access, understanding, and reuse of upper
-
level
and general purpose ontologies as well as lexical knowledge bases. The guideline of
OntoMap is that currently the evaluation of the existing upper
-
level models is too expensive
mostly becau
se of technical problems such as different representations and terminologies
used. Additionally, the situation could be improved by making available formal mappings
between the upper
-
level ontologies that will make easier any kind of comparative studies.

T
echnically the result will be a web site that provides a number of upper
-
level ontologies and
mappings between them in a number of different formats


PROLOG, KIF, SQL, OIL, XML,
etc. An application server will be developed giving a uniform access to the r
esources via
widely accepted standards such as OKBC (on a semantic and pragmatic level) and RMI,
SOAP, and CORBA (on implementation level). A conceptual model (meta
-
ontology) will be
developed inspired by the property classification of Guarino and Welty, O
DE (Methontology)
and Cyc. All the ontologies and mappings will be classified according to the KIF (ANSI draft
proposal) conformance dimensions.

After the end of the project the server will be further supported and developed by OntoText
Lab. Paid services
for ontology conversion, classification, hosting and mapping based on
OntoMap will be provided for both upper
-
level and domain specific ontologies.

e
-
mail:
naso@sirma.bg


URL
:
http:
//www.ontotext.com



Semantic interoperability in agentspace (Stanislaw Ambroszkiewicz, Institute of
Computer Science Polish Academy of Sciences)

Since the autonomous software agents are supposed to "live" in the cyberspace, they must
be intelligent, that

is, they must efficiently realize the goals delegated to them by their human
masters. To do so they must perceive the world, interact with the world, as well as with other
agents and humans. It is clear that a single agent cannot perform efficiently its t
asks in a large
open world without cooperation with other agents. Sophisticated agent interaction
mechanisms and services are needed. During interactions the agents communicate,
negotiate, and form organization structures. Hence, along the development of c
yberspace the
new world (called agentspace), inhabited by the new intelligent creatures called software
agents, is being created. It seems that the process automation in the Web makes the
development of agentspace inevitable. Human users are situated at th
e border of the
agentspace and can influence it only by their agents by delegating to them complex and time
consuming tasks to perform.


14

Since the Internet and Web are open distributed and heterogeneous environments, agents
and services can be created by d
ifferent users according to different architectures.
Interoperability is crucial to assure meaningful interaction, communicationand cooperation
between heterogeneous agents and services. The interoperability is not only restricted to
interaction and commun
ication, but it also comprises semantic interoperability. In order to use
services established by different users working in heterogeneous domains, agents have to be
capable of acquiring knowledge how to use those services and for what purposes. Hence,
het
erogeneous agents must exchange knowledge and understand each other.

It is clear that agents can not interact meaningfully and understand each other if they have
nothing in common. However, interaction interoperability must be assured first, i.e. to
under
stand each other the agents must be able to interact. The idea of our research is to
extract the absolute minimum (the very something in common) sufficient and necessary for
achieving interoperability in Agentspace. According to our view this absolute mini
mum is
agent interface to environment. The interface consists of three layers:

I. The first layer, called interaction layer, is responsible for interactions. In the first step of our
project it is based on Pegaz our Mobile Agent Platform. In the final ste
p it should go far
beyond OMG MASIF and FIPA standard proposal, and be based on Java Enterprise. It
assures interaction interoperability.

II. The second layer, called representation layer, consists of formal representation of
Agentspace structure. Local e
vents are the basis for the representation. It allows the agents
to perceive and reason about the Agentspace in the same way.

III. The third layer, called language layer, consists of agent programming language ENTISH.
A communication language is built-in,

so that the agents can cooperate, form, maintain and
reconfigure virtual organizations.

e
-
mail
:
sambrosz@ipipan.waw.pl


URL
:
http://www.ipipan.waw.pl/mas/stan




Non
-
holistic agents (Patrick De Causmaecker, KaHo Sint
-
Lieven)

Agents are essentially non holistic. They are small components in a larger system,
communicating with each other about the subject, which concerns them. They are typically
specialized in on
e problem domain, and do not know about other domains.

In contrast the systems in which they are to function are essentially holistic. These systems
govern whole businesses, from the management layers to the cells of the production system.
They are concern
ed with the supply chain as a whole but must be able to access a simple QC
unit to obtain the data.

To obtain optionally functioning agents, these must be constructed by specialized groups. For
commercial competitiveness, these groups should be able to pro
duce agents for a diverse set
of systems. They need a marketplace for their small components optimising the system
functions in a specific domain.

The traditional way to arrive at such a marketplace is to impose an ontology for the domain.
Another way, wh
ich we want to pursue, is to design mapping tools for systems not designed
for compliance to ontology. This approach will enable agents to find their way in foreign
territory. They will become useful for systems which have often been optimised over the yea
rs
and should thus be disturbed as little as possible.

See also the abstract “An ontology for planning applications” (Peter Demeester)

e
-
mail
:
Patrick.DeCausmaecker@kahosl.be


URL
:
http://www2.kahosl.be/~patdc



Visual data navigation in Web documents (Mikael Jern, Advanced Visual Systems Aps
and Linkoping University)

The contents in Web documents are normally restricted to static items such as text, imagery

and animations. “SmartDoc” will deliver “Collaboratories” that incorporate not only text but
also the entire interactive data visualisation and navigation process (Figure 2) into a Web
document,
allowing users and project teams to collaborate and share da
ta, information and
insight while distributed over standard or mobile Internet, using intuitive visual navigation
techniques
. In other words, publishing a text document on the Web is only half the story. The

15

other half is enabling others to interact with t
he published result and gain insight into context
that’s meaningful.

A SmartDoc contains embedded Collaboratories that give the reader full access to any
discovery and insight, data navigation tools and underlying data. Visual data navigation is
provided t
hrough interactive 2D and 3D Web
-
based visualisation components with a small
footprint. The “discovery” is described in one or several snapshots providing the history of the
visualisation process. These snapshots are a copy of the component’s state at the
time when
the snapshot was taken and allow the user to further interact from the state when the
visualisation was snapped. They can be included as an image for printing the document. The
underlying data or spreadsheet is either embedded in the document or
accessed through a
hyperlink. “What are users looking for?” is the key question guiding a SmartDoc process.

The visual data navigators “Collaboratories” is designed to be used ‘Out
-
of
-
the
-
Box’,
developed from a true “atomic” (low
-
level) component infrastru
cture
(COM and/or Java)

with
a small footprint suitable for Web distribution and therefore scalable and customisable to any
level of expertise. A “SmartViewer” client
-
side plug
-
in, responsible for interactivity and
graphics rendering, will be developed an
d distributed as “freeware” to allow free distribution of
SmartDoc on the network.
Integration and assessment of application component sharing
through Web documents and a network infrastructure based on the component industry
standards providing real
-
time
data interactivity, reducing the load on the network and with
zero administration client deployment.

SmartDoc scales to accommodate massive amounts of data presented in a visual format,
allows full real
-
time interaction with on
-
screen presentations, and g
ives business users an
unprecedented level of high
-
quality visual presentation. Our integration of visualisation and
data analysis through an “atomic” component architecture combined with special data
reduction components and fast scene tree rendering by t
he SmartViewer enables the visual
data navigation of large data sets.

Of central importance to SmartDoc is the Visual User Interface (VUI) that enables the user to
directly manipulate graphical objects, which respond interactively and immediately to the
us
er’s input actions. The user interacts with both 2D and 3D objects with an immediate
graphical feedback response, without the need for moving to a secondary menu window.
Example of Direct Manipulation features in an interactive SmartDoc scenario: full
-
feat
ured
scroll bars, filter planes and other interactors, dynamically threshold, crop, filter and downsize
data, link charts to identify correlations, drill down through multidimensional data sets, pan,
zoom or rotate and "Tilt" interactor constrains rotation
s to specified angles.

Integration of our visual data navigation techniques in information and knowledge
management (KM) systems is another essential goal, which is achieved through
emphasis on
application
-
oriented projects, with leading
-
edge commercial pa
rtners in medical, engineering
and KM.
In particular, the SmartDoc solution creates the means for the decision
-
makers to
fully employ their innate ability to immediately grasp complex relations between coloured,
spatial objects as a response to the ever
-
i
ncreasing information load.

SmartDoc’s features include:

-

Dynamic multi
-
dimensional graphics that users can interact with in real time

-

Rich set of component resources with granular control of details

-

Platform/rendering library independence through Sm
artViewer Plug
-
in

-

Visual User Interface
-

Tight integration between data and visualisation objects

-

Optimised rendering based on scene tree hierarchical graphics structure

-

Binning, filter, crop, sort, and aggregation to achieve good interactive respon
se

-

Drag, rotate, zoom, pick empowers users to explore data

-

Data reduction integrated into visual data navigation

-

Full integration with the data warehouse or spreadsheet

-

Presentation graphics with axes, legends, annotation and high
-
resolution hard c
opy

-

Validated through knowledge management, medical and engineering large
-
scale industrial
environments


16

e
-
mail
:
m.jern@helsingborg.se

or
mikael@avs.dk


URL
:
http://www.avs.com



Visual modelling and the Web: conceptual browsing with Conzilla (Mikael Nilsson,
Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

Conzilla is the first incarnation of the idea of a "conceptual browser". A conceptual browser
pre
sents the conceptual relationships between a set of concepts in the form of surfable
"concept maps", and allows the surfer to, separately, engage in content describing these
concepts. Concept maps are visually similar to UML diagrams, or more general mind
-
maps,
but adds "browsing" capabilities in the form of hyperlinks to other maps as well as content
links, linking any type of textual or multimedial content. This results in a clear separation
between the context and the content of the presented material, s
omething that is missing in
today's web environment. It can also be seen as a form of meta
-
data oriented browser, as all
objects in the system are marked up using IMS conforming meta
-
data.


Conzilla is being developed at CID, Center for user oriented Infor
mation technology Design
at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, where it takes part of an
interdisciplinary initiative in the field of interactive learning environments.

e
-
mail
:
mini@nada.kth.se


UR
L
:
http://cid.nada.kth.se/il/conzilla



RSS 1.0 and its taxonomy module: bringing metadata back into RSS (Eric van der Vlist,
DYOMEDEA)

"RSS ("RDF Site Summary") is a lightweight multipurpose extensible met
adata description
and syndication format. RSS is an XML application, conforms to the W3C's RDF Specification
and is extensible via XML
-
namespace and/or RDF based modularization."

RSS 0.9 was introduced in 1999 by Netscape and has been one of the first RDF
vocabularies
to be widely adopted. This format has rapidly given birth to RSS 0.91 introducing many
application specific features but losing its RDF nature.

RSS 1.0 is a proposal to come back to RSS roots
--
by reintroducing RDF
--

and to define a
namespace

based modular structure. The proposed modules include modules to embed
metadata using the Dublin Core syntax.

Amongst the other points to highlight: the attempt to keep a coherent dual view on the object
models for both XML and RDF parsers and an experime
ntal implementation of a taxonomy
module assigning RDF resources to DC subjects.

See also:

http://purl.org/rss/1.0


http://www.e
groups.com/files/rss
-
dev/Modules/Proposed/mod_taxonomy.html


http://4xt.org/news/000919
-
0001.xml


e
-
mail
:
vdv@dyomedea.com


URL
:
http://www.dyomedea.com/english/vdv

or
http://xmlfr.org



Written contributions


Ontology based access to digital libraries (Sonia Bergamaschi, DSI
-

Universita di
Modena e Reggio
-
Emilia,
Fausto Rabitti, CNU
CE
-
CNR
)

The Internet is making accessible a large, and increasing, number of Digital Libraries,
originally intended for specific and specialised groups of users, to a wide range of potential
users. The problem of controlling, exchanging and integrating the

semantics associated to
Digital Libraries (i.e., the associated
metadata
) is becoming more and more important.

This need has been stressed by several initiatives. For example, the Open Archives initiative
(OAi), in US, aims at guaranteeing interoperabilit
y among Digital Libraries (
e
-
print

archives).

It
has established a set of relatively simple but potentially quite powerful interoperability
specifications that facilitate the development of services implemented by third parties.

Metadata in Digital Librar
ies, for bibliographic data, are usually expressed according to
models like Dublin Core or MARC. However, there is the need to
generalise

the description of

17

data and metadata made available in a large variety of Digital Libraries. The wide acceptance
on th
e Web of XML can be a decisive factor in this direction.

XML, a standard proposed by W3C, is a mark
-
up language intended to make the information
as self
-
describing, separating the function of document structural description and document
presentation. The d
ocument tags can be use to describe the
meaning

of the document
components. Controlling the semantic associated to XML tags will be a decisive task. This will
open new perspective in accessing Digital Libraries, since XML is going to become the new
interop
erability standard for distributed Digital Libraries. We foresee a situation where XML
will be used both for exchanging digital (often multimedia) documents and their multi
-
modal
presentations (via XSL), and for defining their metadata, using XML DTD or Sc
hema
descriptions, with associated RDF (Resource Description Framework) schema descriptions.

For this purpose, we propose an ontology
-
based approach which aims to build a Digital
Library Ontology representing a global virtual view of distributed Digital L
ibraries and defining
mapping rules between local and global views: this mapping will be obtained by building a
“Common Thesaurus” of intensional and extensional intra and inter
-
schema relationships able
to reconcile different representation of similar con
cepts. The starting point is the MOMIS
system (Mediating system environment fOr Multiple Information Sources) (see:
sparc20.dsi.unimo.it), whose prototype has been recently presented at the VLDB 2000
conference.

e
-
mail:
sonia.bergamaschi@unimo.it


URL
:
http://www.dsi.unimo.it/staff/st12/Bergamaschi.idc



XCC
-

eXtensible Computation Context (Antonio Capani, Explo
-
IT Research)

XCC consist
s of a methodology and a set of tools which act as Integration Technology (or
middleware) between Mathematical Systems and other Systems (e.g.: tools for doing
education, or business systems).

XCC proposes a new (meta)language (XCL, eXtensible Computation
Language) for
communicating not only data, but also programs.The syntax of XCL is based on the XML
language. The semantics of XCL is given in a declarative way and is "plugged" to each
program during its execution.

XCL is at a low level but it is human rea
dable (because it is based on XML). So programs
may extend XCL and apply semantics to it even before designing a high level language. This
is really useful for teams like the CoCoA Team in which the research is oriented to the
mathematics rather than the c
omputer science aspects. Other people may develop and
maintain the high level language and the parser for converting it in XCL.

XCL proposes a unified approach for denoting data, programs, and documents. A tight
integration of XCL with the XSL language (fo
r mapping XML into HTML or other languages)
will permit to implement, within a unified framework, "active documents", that is documents
containing formulas which may be executed within the document itself. The XCL language is
protocol independent and so mu
ltiple protocols may be used, (e.g.: OpenMath, MathML).

An application of XCC (called CoCo) is in progress for the new major release of the CoCoA
System in collaboration with the CoCoA Team (
http://cocoa.dima.unige.
it

) led by Prof.
Lorenzo Robbiano of the University of Genova.

e
-
mail:
capani@Explo
-
IT.com


URL
:
http://www.Explo
-
IT.com



An ontology for planning applications (Peter Deme
ester, KaHo Sint
-
Lieven)

Problems arise when people with different backgrounds want to communicate with each
other: they use their own specialized jargon or they use words in the wrong context. The
same problem arises when two software systems want to co
-
o
perate with each other: they
lack a common consensus about the domain they want to co
-
operate on.

The way to solve this is to introduce a kind of shared understanding
-

this is more or less what
the word ontology in the title means. The above
-
described pr
oblem also exists with planning
applications. Two planning systems can generate more or less the same results although they
can use different concepts. When we want to merge these two applications, problems arise

18

since the developers of each system can use

different concepts, or, if they use the same
concept, it can mean something completely different.

The goal of this project idea is to construct first an ontology for planning applications and to
develop a method to filter those elements out of a set of da
ta that have a meaning in the
ontology. Areas of application are for example: timetabling, scheduling, rostering, shop floor
control, planning of television programs, and so on,… The mapping we want to make from the
set of data to the ontology should enabl
e bi
-
directional communication. Someone who uses a
program that is not really based on an ontology, should be able to continue using that
program in the same way he is used to, even if the program is merged with another
application. When the ontology is bu
ilt, software agents which have an ontology of the domain
can be used to search the set of possibly unstructured data. This ontology can then be used
to map the set of unstructured data.

See also the abstract “Non
-
holistic agents” (Patrick De Causmaecker)
.

e
-
mail:
Peter.Demeester@kahosl.be


URL
:
http://www2.kahosl.be/~ocapi/coala



OntoWeb
-

Ontology
-
based information exchange for Knowledge Management and
electronic commerce (Dieter Fensel, Free University of Amsterdam)

The goal of the OntoWeb Network is to bring together researchers and industrials coming
from the research and applications areas above, promoting interdisciplinary work and
strengthening the

European influence on Semantic Web standardisation efforts such as those
based on RDF and XML. Europe's cultural diversity and multi linguality, together with the
strong scientific competences existing in the ontology field, may give Europe a unique
oppor
tunity to fully exploit ontology
-
based technology and to play a leading role in these
emerging area.

The main long term goals of the network are:



To stimulate and support the transfer of research on the Semantic Web from academia to
industry;



To stimulate
the translation from industrial needs to technical and scientific problems;



To represent and co
-
ordinate ontology
-
related research being carried out in different
research areas, such as: Web Markup Languages, Knowledge Acquisition, Knowledge
Engineering, K
nowledge Representation, Information systems and database integration,
Information Retrieval, Language Engineering, Digital Libraries, Software Agents, and
Machine Learning;



To disseminate information, research and application results about ontologies and
related
fields;



To represent the European ontology community world wide and co
-
operating with related
initiatives like DAML in the US;



To enhance the training in ontology
-
related technologies at the European level;



To distribute results and stimulate appli
cations in all areas, with special emphasis on
Web
-
based applications, electronic commerce, and information integration;



To cooperate with content standardisation committees to promote the development of
ontology
-
based standards and the harmonization/inter
operability across different
standards (with special emphasis on standards being developed for electronic commerce
in the B2B area);

To cooperate with language standardisation committees as the W3C to promote the
development of standard languages for meta
data (future versions of RDF and RDFS);
(Dieter Fensel, Free University of Amsterdam)

e
-
mail:
dieter@cs.vu.nl


URL
:
http://www.cs.vu.nl/~dieter



Self
-
Organizing Maps for Kn
owledge Management (Timo Honkela, Gurusoft Oy)

Gurusoft (Espoo, Finland) creates commercial tools and solutions for information and
documentation exploration, classification, search, and visualization. Solutions cover new
media, e
-
commerce, extranets a
nd intranets. The products are based on advanced neural

19

network and natural language processing technology. Gurusoft technology is based on the
groundbreaking research on the self
-
organizing maps and the WEBSOM method at Helsinki
University of Technology.

The approach based on self
-
organizing maps allows detailed analysis and efficient
personalisation of information flows without or with minimal human intervention. The tools
even allow in
-
depth conceptual and dynamic analysis of any domain ranging from prod
uct
areas and customer feedback to business models and decision making. All this is made
available in the web.

Gurusoft approach replaces methods that are based on, for instance, symbolic rule
-
based AI
or specification of fixed classes or categorizations.
The underlying self
-
organizing map
applies unsupervised learning. This enables Gurusoft systems to adapt automatically and
follow the conceptual changes of the application domain even with no human supervision.
Moreover, the system can tune itself to the p
ersonal needs and preferences. Gurusoft
approach gives basis for systems that are semantically autonomous and that even create a
mapping between different conceptual systems. Gurusoft provides tools that make
information retrieval more efficient and intuit
ive, tools that makes handcoding of metadata
unnecessary, tools that help information needs and supply to meet each other.

e
-
mail:
timo.honkela@gurusoft.fi


URL
:
http://ww
w.gurusoft.fi



Web access to real time and numeric data (Web
-
SCADA) (David: Leal, CAESAR
Systems Limited)

The project will develop a flexible Internet based solution to the sharing and exchange of
system monitoring and control data. The project will bri
ng together two technologies:



XML for the definition of the semantics of the data (based upon the EPISTLE core model
developed by the European process industry, and the MathML DTD);



the portable binary format HDF5 for tables of numeric values.

The project
will support access to:



real time information about current system status; and



historic information over any time scale
-

minutes, hours, days.

The demonstrators will cover the following applications:



a flood warning system based upon measurements of rain
fall and river flows;



the planning, control and metering of a distributed electrical generation system with many
small hydro and wind generation producers



the operation of a generator
-
consumer 'balance
-
group' within an electric power market;



a condition ba
sed maintenance system, based upon on
-
line condition monitoring of
components in electrical networks and production sites;



a system for domestic market access and energy control, allowing on
-
line household
metering.

e
-
mail:
david@cedarlon.demon.co.uk


URL
:
http://www.cedarlon.demon.co.uk



Web and text mining through the Online Analyst (Alessandro Zanasi, IBM)

While the amount of data available to us through the

Web and the Intranets is increasing, our
capacity of reading and analyzing this information remains constant. Search engines instead
of reducing the problem augment it making more and more documents quickly available to us.
Web (and text) mining is a new
research area that tries to solve the information overload
problem by exploiting recent advances in different fields of technology: language and data
mining technology. Documents and web pages are a source of knowledge in an unstructured
data format that c
an be decodified, analyzed and turned into actionable intelligence thanks to
online analysis by text mining.

In this paper an example of a real and operative application to competitive intelligence (CI) is
given: the Online Analyst. The final objective of
this application is to give to end
-
users an
intelligent agent to read and quickly analyze huge volumes of documents retrieved online,

20

especially from the web (almost 5000 press sources and more than 70 web sites). Its typical
users are intelligence analyst
s, in military as in business or politics field.

The most exciting

conclusion
is that the shown approach, as also the prototype, here shown
in a CI application case, may be already easily used in all e
-
commerce applications (currently
under development wo
rldwide), that take into account the necessity of working with web and
/or text data: e
-
commerce market places, CRM, competitive intelligence.

e
-
mail:
zanasia@it.ibm.com

a_z
anasi@yahoo.it


URL
:
http://open.cineca.it/datamining



21

ANNEX1: Business opportunities on the Semantic Web
-

slide texts
(Janne Saarela, ProSolutions, Nice)


Overview

Business potential on



Business
-
to
-
custo
mer (B2C)



Business
-
to
-
business (B2B) interfaces

Requirements for



content providers



service providers



end
-
users

Action proposals for



EC



companies


Business opportunities in B2C

Users of electronic services look for



configurability

while being



independent o
n the type of content

Variety of content objects poses challenges:



can we write software that understands ~400 different file formats?



of course not: some of the formats encode little semantics (e.g. audio, video)



aren’t formats supposed to be only for pre
sentation purposes for human beings?



human
-
consumption

Machine
-
consumption can be accomplished by:



remaining independent of the file formats



introducing metadata



metadata needs common ontologies i.e. shared vocabularies



Side note: marketing departments are

not doing a wonderful job for XML when they say
that ’everybody can invent their own element names’

Customers are used to interactivity at the office but morning and evening are rather spent
’relaxing’

Examples:



deliver the financial news on home TV in th
e morning



deliver the calendar entries in to the car stereo system while driving to work



get shopping reminders from your home fridge



get news summaries on TV in the evening

Can I have all of the above without interactivity, please.


Business opportunities

in B2B

Ecommerce in B2B has so far consisted of



textual

and
numeric

content for which XML has been a perfect match!



e.g. online transactions

Multimedia is getting associated with standardized metadata



Web (W3C) provides us today with Resource Description
Framework (RDF)



next year ISO will deliver MPEG
-
7

Media sector: content sales over the Internet



business customers order for specific type of content both in
format

(e.g. text, graphics,
images, audio, video) and in
content

(e.g. domestic, forestry, financ
ial)



Example: a forestry company is interested in receiving notifications in real
-
time about all
new content related to forestry in EU area


Requirements for content providers

Understand the benefits of spending more time on generating metadata



e.g. in med
ia sector the journalists need to understand the new way of working


Requirements for service providers

Creation of new services that no longer operate on content but on metadata



E.g. news summaries are enabled by (who, where, when, what) type of metadata
on
videos


22



E.g. demonstration versions of new PC games are automatically notified to interested
customers


Requirements for end
-
users

End
-
user software is today a browser



whether an HTML browser or a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA)

Main observation: the br
owser only views data



could we integrate browser better with other applications?



could this integration benefit from metadata? (today the integration is typically done
through MIME types e.g.
application/pdf

is managed by Acrobat Reader)

Take advantage of
the available metadata with new tools


Action proposal for EC



If EC cannot be asked to produce common vocabularies i.e. ontologies for different
business areas



Can we ask for vocabulary tools (creation/maintenance?) development support?


Action proposal fo
r companies

In order to create common vocabularies



stay tuned to relevant interest groups (national/international)



participate in the interest groups



promote the shared vocabularies

Why?



in order to promote openness



in order to interoperate with other ’sem
antic systems’


Summary

Business potential on



Business
-
2
-
customer (B2C)



Business
-
2
-
business (B2B) interfaces

Requirements for



content providers



service providers



end
-
users

Action proposals for



EC



companies



23

ANNEX 2: Workshop Programme


W
ORKSHOP

S
EMANTIC
W
EB
T
ECHNOLOGIES



22
-
23 November 2000, Luxembourg, Plateau de Kirchberg,

Bâtiment Jean Monnet, Conference Centre, Room M6



Workshop Programme




Workshop chair
: Franco Mastroddi, Dep. Head of Unit, European Commission, Information
Society DG, Unit D5 "C
ontent and Information Management",



22 Nov

Day 1

13.00

Registration

13.30

Welcome and introduction (Franco Mastroddi and Hans
-
Georg Stork, CEC DG
INFSO/D5)


14.00


14.45

Invited talks

Beyond RDF(S): the Ontology perspective for the Semantic Web (Rudi
Studer,
University of Karlsruhe)

Semantics for the wireless Web (Johan Hjelm, Ericsson)

15.15

Coffee

15.30

Short presentations 1
(Chair: Rudi Studer)

On
-
to
-
Knowledge: Content
-
driven knowledge
-
management through evolving
ontologies (Dieter Fensel, Free U
niversity of Amsterdam)

OIL: an ontology language for the Semantic Web (Ian Horrocks, University of
Manchester)

Conceptual open hypermedia: informed WWW link navigation using ontologies
(Carole Goble, University of Manchester)

Enabling technologies for sem
antic interoperability (Jérôme Euzenat, INRIA Rhône
-
Alpes)

Objectifying the Web the "light" way: an RDF
-
based framework for the description of
Web objects and services (Pasqualino Assini, The Data Archive
-

University of
Essex)

16.45

Break

17.00

Short p
resentations 2
(Chair: Johan Hjelm)

Querying RDF using an SQL
-
ish query language (Libby Miller, ILRT, University of
Bristol)

Defining and managing semantics and datatypes
-

Is there a role for ISO 13250
Topic Maps? (Martin Bryan, The SGML Centre)

Notion S
ystem (R.A. Poell, TNO)

The OpenMath project (Mike Dewar, NAG Ltd)

An E
-
Commerce platform for complex configurable products and services (Jürgen
Nicklisch
-
Franken, Persist AG; Heinz Schweppe, FU Berlin)

18.00

Discussion

18.30

End of day 1


24


23 Nov

Day
2



9.00


9.45

Invited talks

Describing multimedia (Wolfgang Klas, University of Vienna)

Multimedia for the Semantic Web (Lynda Hardman, CWI)

10.30

Coffee

10.45

Short presentations 3
(Chair: Wolfgang Klas)

Inferential semantics for networked image dat
a: supporting the derivation and
management of semantic attributes for Web
-
based multimedia content (Harold
Boley, DFKI, and Jos De Roo, AGFA)

Inducing Semantics from Structures (Paolo Avesani, ITC
-
IRST)

Teachware on demand
-

the role of semantic annotatio
ns for individualised courses
(Peter Fankhauser, GMD
-
IPSI)

Semantic user and content modeling for an adaptive distance learning environment
(Luca Botturi, Universita della Svizzera Italiana)

Open Learning Repository: a project idea in the field of computer

science and
cognitive science (Heidrun Allert, University of Hannover)

11.40

Break

11.50

Short presentations 4
(Chair: Lynda Hardman)

PhotoRDF and rdfpic,an application of RDF to holiday photos (Bert Bos,
W3C/INRIA)

A tool for pictorial contents retriev
al (Zdenek Mikovec, Czech Technical University)

Semantics for voice recognition systems
-

a project idea (Christian Gronoff,
Semiosphere)

Knowledge based indexing (Ralph Traphoener, tecinno GmbH)

OntoMap: facilitate easier access, understanding and compari
son of the existing
upper
-
level models (Cyc, SENSUS, WordNet, EuroWordnet, SIMPLE, GUM)
(Atanas Kiryakov, OntoText Lab., Sirma AI Ltd.)

12.30

Discussion

13.00

Lunch


14.00

14.45

Invited talks

Agents on the Semantic Web (David De Roure, University of Sou
thampton)

Business opportunities on the Semantic Web (Janne Saarela, ProSolutions, Nice)

15.15

Coffee

15.30

Short presentations 5
(Chair: David de Roure)

Semantic interoperability in agentspace (Stanislaw Ambroszkiewicz, Institute of
Computer Science Pol
ish Academy of Sciences)

Non
-
holistic agents (Patrick De Causmaecker, KaHo Sint
-
Lieven)

Visual data navigation in Web documents (Mikael Jern, Advanced Visual Systems
Aps and Linkoping University)

Visual modelling and the Web: conceptual browsing with Con
zilla (Mikael Nilsson,
Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

RSS 1.0 and its taxonomy module: bringing metadata back into RSS (Eric van der
Vlist, DYOMEDEA)

16.45

Discussion

17.15

Conclusions

17.30

Close



25

ANNEX 3: List of participants


Heidrun

Aller
t

Universitaet Hannover

allert@kbs.uni
-
hannover.de

Stanislaw

Ambroszkiewicz

Institute of Computer Science
Polish Academy of Sciences

sambrosz@ipipan.waw.pl

Pasqualino

Assini

The Data Archive
-

University
of Essex

titto@essex.ac.uk

Paolo

Avesani

ITC
-
I
RST

avesani@irst.itc.it

Sonia

Bergamaschi

DSI
-

Universita di Modena
e Reggio
-
Emilia

sonia.bergamaschi@unimo.it

Harold

Boley

Deutsches Forschungszentrum
für Künstliche Intelligenz

boley@informatik.uni
-
kl.de

Matteo

Bonifacio

Arthur Andersen Italia

matt
eo.bonifacio@it.arthurandersen.com

Bert

Bos

W3C/INRIA

bert@w3.org

Luca

Botturi

Universita della Svizzeria
italiana

luca.botturi@lu.unisi.ch

Malek

Boualem

France Telecom R&D

malek.boualem@rd.francetelecom.fr

Paolo

Bouquet

University of Trento (Italy)

bouquet@cs.unitn.it

Paul

Brandt

TNO Physics and Electronics
Laboratory

p.brandt@fel.tno.nl

Dan

Brickley

ILRT/W3C

danbri@w3.org

Martin

Bryan

The SGML Centre

mtbryan@diffuse.org

Gerhard

Budin

University of Vienna

gerhard.budin@univie.ac.at

Joe

Bullock

Canon Research Centre
Europe

joeb@cre.canon.co.uk

Stephen

Buswell

Stilo Technology Ltd

sb@stilo.com

Antonio

Capani

Explo
-
IT Research

capani@Explo
-
IT.com

Paola

Capitani


pcapitan@dada.it

Nicola

Capuano

Università degli Studi di
Salerno

niccap@crmpa.u
nisa.it

Jens

Christensen

CE


Ioannis T.

Christou

Intracom S.A.

ichr@intracom.gr

Vania

Conan

Thomson
-
CSF Comsys

vania.conan@tcc.thomson
-
csf.com

Stefan

Covaci

POPNET AGENTSCAPE AG

s.covaci@agentscape.de

Zhan

Cui

BT Plc, UK

zhan.cui@bt.com

Cinzia

D’
Ascanio

CE

cinzia.dascanio@cec.eu.int

Patrick

De Causmaecker

KaHo Sint
-
Lieven

Patrick.DeCausmaecker@kahosl.be

Jos

De Roo

AGFA

jos.deroo.jd@belgium.agfa.com

David

De Roure

University of Southampton

dder@ecs.soton.ac.uk

Jean

Delahousse

Mondeca

Jean.D
elahousse@mondeca.com

Peter

Demeester

KaHo Sint
-
Lieven

Peter.Demeester@kahosl.be

Steven

Depuydt

KUL, ESAT, Docarch

steven.depuydt@esat.kuleuven.ac.be

Mike

Dewar

NAG Ltd

miked@nag.co.uk

Hadhami

Dhraief

University of Hannover

dhraief@kbs.uni
-
hannover.
de

Ying

Ding

University, Amsterdam

ying@cs.vu.nl

Edd

Dumbill

XML.com (O’Reilly Network)

edd@xml.com

Kurt

Englmeier

DIW
-
German Institute for
Economic research

kurt@diwsysv.diw
-
berlin.de

Jérôme

Euzenat

INRIA Rhône
-
Alpes

Jerome.Euzenat@inrialpes.fr

Pe
ter

Fankhauser

GMD
-
IPSI

fankhaus@darmstadt.gmd.de


26

Dieter

Fensel

Free University of Amsterdam

dieter@cs.vu.nl

Christian

Fillies

Fillies & Friends Consulting

cfillies@cfillies.de

Gerti

Foest

DFN (German Academic
Network Association)

foest@dfn.de

Marti
n

Fredriksson

Blekinge Institute of
Technology

martin.fredriksson@ipd.hk
-
r.se

Maurizio

Gabbrielli

Universita' di Udine

gabbri@dimi.uniud.it

Carole

Goble

University of Manchester

carole@cs.man.ac.uk

Guido

Grau

ITV Denkendorf

guido.grau@itv
-
denkendorf.d
e

Volker

Grienitz

UNITY AG

grienitz@unity.de

Christian

Gronoff

SEMIOSPHERE

semiosphere@wanadoo.fr

Lynda

Hardman

CWI (Centrum voor
Wiskunde en Informatica)

Lynda.Hardman@cwi.nl

Bent

Hauschildt

CE


Birgit

Hay

University LUC Diepenbeek

birgit.hay@luc.a
c.be

Pat

Hayes

IHMC, University of West
Florida

phayes@ai.uwf.edu

Andrea

Helbach

MedienRaum asbl

andrea.helbach@mediatel.lu

Erik

Hellman

Blekinge Institute of
Technology

erik.hellman@ipd.hk
-
r.se

Johan

Hjelm

Ericsson

johan.hjelm@era
-
t.ericsson.se

Ti
mo

Honkela

Gurusoft Oy

timo.honkela@gurusoft.fi

Bernard

Horan

Sun Microsystems

bernard.horan@sun.com

Ian

Horrocks

University of Manchester

horrocks@cs.man.ac.uk

George

Ioannidis

University of Bremen

gtis@tzi.org

Mikael

Jern

Advanced Visual Systems A
ps
and Linkoping University
Sweden

m.jern@helsingborg.se

or mikael@avs.dk

Charalampos

Karagiannidis

Centre for Research and
Technology


Hellas (CERTH)

karagian@iti.gr

Atanas

Kiryakov

OntoText Lab., Sirma AI Ltd.

naso@sirma.bg

Wolfgang

Klas

Universi
tät Wien, Institut für
Informatik und
Wirtschaftsinformatik

Wolfgang.Klas@univie.ac.at

Claudia

Kunze

University of Tübingen

kunze@sfs.nphil.uni
-
tuebingen.de

David

Leal

CAESAR Systems Limited

david@cedarlon.demon.co.uk

Steffen

Lindek

International DOI

Foundation

steffen@lindek.de

Maite

López
-
Sánchez

iSOCO, Intelligent Software
Components S.A.

maite@isoco.com

Sigfrid

Lundberg

Lund university library/NetLab

sigfrid.lundberg@lub.lu.se

Valerie A.

Martin

Brunel University

valerie.martin@brunel.ac.uk

M
ia

Marttiini

Gurusoft Oy

mia.marttiini@uiah.fi

Brian

McBride

HP Laboratories

brian_mcbride@hp.com

Robert

Meersman

VUB STARlab

meersman@vub.ac.be

Zdenek

Mikovec

Czech Technical University
Prague

xmikovec@fel.cvut.cz

Libby

Miller

ILRT, University of

Bristol

libby.miller@bristol.ac.uk

Amedeo

Napoli

CNRS
--

INRIA
--

Universités
de Nancy

napoli@loria.fr

J.

Nicklisch
-
Franken

Persist AG

nicklisch
-
franken@persistag.com


27

Mikael

Nilsson

Royal Institute of Technology

mini@nada.kth.se

Francis

Norton

Inte
lligent Environments

Fnorton@ie.com

Bert

Paepen

KUL, ESAT, Docarch

bert.paepen@esat.kuleuven.ac.be

Chaitali

Patel

Brunel University
-

Semantic
Integration Environment (SITE)

chaitali.patel@brunel.ac.uk

Patrick

Peiffer

TADORO.COM Servolutions
GmbH

patr
ick.peiffer@tadoro.com

Domenico

Perrotta

CE


A.

Persidis

Biovista

biovista@ath.forthnet.gr

R.A.

Poell

Netherlands Organisation for
Applied Scientific Research
(TNO)

poell@fel.tno.nl

Yann

Pollet

Matra Systèmes & Information

ypollet@matra
-
ms2i.fr

Sylvi
e

Regnier
-
Prost

GIE EADS CCR

sylvie.regnier@eads
-
nv.com

Francesco

Ricci

ITC
-
irst

ricci@itc.it

Michael

Rose

Technical University of
Denmark

rose@tele.dtu.dk

Günther

Rothfuss

successnet ag

rothfuss.gunther@successnet.de

Catherine

Roussey

LISI

croussey@li
sisun1.insa
-
lyon.fr

Janne

Saarela

Pro Solutions

js@pro
-
solutions.com

Norman

Sadeh

CE



Salerno

University of Salerno

salerno@unisa.it

Demetrios G.

Sampson

Centre for Research and
Technology


Hellas (CERTH)

sampson@iti.gr

Heinz

Schweppe

Freie Univer
sität Berlin

hs@inf.fu
-
berlin.de

Mark

Seaborne

Sterling Commerce

mark_seaborne@stercomm.com

Frederique

Segond

Xerox Research Centre
Europe

frederique.segond@xrce.xerox.com

Dave

Snowdon

Xerox Research Centre Europe

Dave.Snowdon@xrce.xerox.com

Xavier

Sosnowska

Cedefop

xso@cedefop.eu.int

Samuel

Sourdeu

FOREM

samuel.sourdeau@forem.be

Kilian

Stoffel

University of Neuchâtel

Kilian.Stoffel@unine.ch

Rudi

Studer

Univ. of Karlsruhe

studer@aifb.uni
-
karlsruhe.de

York

Sure

University of Karlsruhe

sure@aifb.u
ni
-
karlsruhe.de

Christos

Tatsiopoulos

EPIS LTD

atatsio@europeanprofiles.gr

Ralph

Traphöner

tecinno GmbH

ralph.traphöner@tecinno.com

Eric

van der Vlist

DYOMEDEA

vdv@dyomedea.com

Piek

Vossen

Sail Labs BVBA

Piek.Vossen@sail
-
labs.be

Gerhard K.

Wagner

A
ustrian Federation for the
Information Industry

gkwagner@via.at

Frauke

Weichhardt

beratung im netz

fweichhardt@01019freenet.de

Alessandro

Zanasi

IBM

zanasia@it.ibm.com a_zanasi@yahoo.it



28

ANNEX 4: Excerpt from the draft IST Work Programme 2001


III.
4 Information access, filtering, analysis and handling (IAF)

The World Wide Web is becoming a major vehicle for the distribution and delivery of
multimedia content including video and audio, accessible from stationary (including domestic)
and mobile platfo
rms. It is, however, necessary to impose more semantic

structure on Web
content in order to facilitate, for example, resource and knowledge discovery, information
filtering and intelligent browsing. It is, in short, necessary to make Web content machine
u
nderstandable. Given the sheer size and dynamics of the Web this can only be achieved
through highly automated procedures.


IST2001
-

III.4.1

Semantic Web technologies

Objectives:

To enable users to access, retrieve and filter information from the Web,
relevant
to their interests and needs, and matching their quality expectations. This requires new and
advanced methods, models, tools and systems for services related to access, retrieval and
filtering of Web
-
based content, in particular the development of

new search systems and
machines, in line with existing and emerging relevant standards. These services would
typically be provided by intelligent agents.

Focus:


This Action Line focuses on content technologies that contribute to the creation and
exploita
tion of the Semantic Web. It invites projects that develop, apply and benchmark these
technologies in a Web context. They include:



Methods and tools for coding and structuring digital content, for defining and declaring its
semantics. These would typically

employ XML, RDF and other techniques for semantic
interoperability and reasoning such as ontologies for domain specific applications.



Methods and tools for the derivation of semantic attributes of Web
-
based content (in
particular video, audio and images)
through, for example,. automatic feature detection,
video segmentation and post
-
processing. This would facilitate multimedia indexing based
on content analysis as well as automated categorization of Web resources.



Semantics based tools for knowledge discov
ery and intelligent filtering and profiling such
as information agents and specific query languages. Semantics based tools for
collaborative filtering and knowledge sharing in specific or general user communities.



Information visualisation: intelligent and

visual interfaces which take advantage of
semantic information structures to provide users with radical new ways to navigate and
search naturally through unknown and complex information spaces.

Issues to be addressed by projects under this Action Line inc
lude the sustainability and
scalability of the proposed approaches concerning, for example, metadata repositories and
ontologies. Projects may also wish to focus specifically on the constraints and special
requirements of domestic platforms (such as WebTV)

and mobile platforms (such as WAP
and UMTS) for Web access, and their user communities. Ease of access as well as scalability
and presentation of content are likely to be the main challenges here. Moreover, the
integration of geographic information into W
eb
-
based service environments could greatly
benefit the usability of mobile platforms.


Types of Actions addressed:

Research and Development, Demonstration, Combined projects,
Thematic Networks

Links with WP2000
: New Action Line


29

ANNEX 5: Contacts in the E
uropean Commission, Information Society
DG, Directorate D, Unit 5 (DG INFSO/D5):


Franco Mastroddi, Dep. Head of Unit,
Franco.Mastroddi@cec.eu.int


Gerhard Heine, Principal Administrator,
Gerhard.Heine@cec.eu.int


Martin Littlejohn, Principal Administrator,
Martin.Littlejohn@cec.eu.int


Pierre
-
Paul Sondag, Principal Administrator,
Pierre
-
Paul.Sondag@cec.eu.int


Hans
-
Georg Stork, Principal Scientific Officer,
Hans
-
Georg.Stork@cec.eu.int


Webmaster: Joseph Kirsch,
Josep
h.Kirsch@cec.eu.int


Secretary: Elvire Lanners, Tel. +352
-
4301
-
36115, Fax. +352
-
4301
-
38099


Mail address:

European Commission

EUFO

rue Alcide de Gasperi

L
-
2920 Luxembourg

Location:

Euroforum Building

10, rue Robert Stumper

L
-
2557 Luxembourg


Relevant URLs
:

http://www.cordis.lu/ist/ka3/iaf/home.html

(IST Key Action III, Area "Information access,
filtering, analysis and handling")

http://www.cordis.
lu/ist/ka3/home.html

(IST Key Action III "Multimedia content and tools")

http://www.cordis.lu/ist/home.html

(IST website)