Recognizing and Helping Distressed Students - Montana State ...

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29 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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Sponsored by:


Provost’s Office &

Student Health Services


April 2nd and 4th, 2013




Overview:


Statistics re: college students and mental health



Recognizing warning signs of distress



Communicating with a student in distress



Referring students for help



Managing student requests and situations

Top 5 Academic Impacts


MSUB ACHA
-
NCHA II Fall 2012 (N=588)



1. Stress 26.6%


2. Sleep 21.5%


3. Work 21.1%


4. Anxiety 20.4%


5. Depression 13.4%



National Data Spring 2012 (N= 90,666)



1. Stress 29.0%


2. Sleep 20.6%


3. Anxiety 20.2%


4. Cold/Flu/Sore Throat 15.6%


5. Work 13.9%





“Academic Impact”


Received a lower grade
on an exam, or an
important project;



R
eceived a lower grade
in the course;



R
eceived an incomplete

or dropped the course;



O
r experienced a
significant disruption in
thesis, dissertation,
research, or practicum
work

Stress and Sleep


48% rated their overall level of stress as

“more than average”



63% felt “tired, dragged out, or sleepy” at least

3 days/week



54% felt they did not get enough sleep to feel rested
in the morning at least 3 of the past 7 days



Mental Health


Within the last 12 months, %
of students who said the
following has been traumatic
or very difficult to handle:



Finances




47%


Academics



40%


Family problems


33%


Sleep difficulties


31%


Intimate relationships 29%


Career
-
related issue


29%




National Data:



Academics



46%


Finances



34%


Intimate Relationships

32%


Family problems


28%


Sleep difficulties


26%


Other social relationships

25%

Mental Health


Within the last 12 months:



85% felt overwhelmed by all they
had to do


31% felt so depressed it was
hard to function


49% felt overwhelming anxiety


36% felt overwhelming anger


7% seriously considered suicide



* Note: What may be the
unintended message we send
students when we craft and ask
these questions (vs. questions that
focus on resiliency)?






National
Data:



86
% felt overwhelmed by all
they had to do


31% felt so depressed it was
hard to function


51% felt overwhelming anxiety


37% felt overwhelming anger


7% seriously considered
suicide


NAMI Survey data



64% of students who experience mental health problems end up
withdrawing



50% of students who withdrew from school never accessed
college mental health services and
support



78% believe mental health training very important for
faculty/staff



22% learned about college services through faculty or
staff



National Alliance on Mental Illness web
-
based survey

August
-
November 2011 N=765


Recognizing Students in Distress


Students in
mild distress
may exhibit behaviors that do not disrupt
others but may indicate something is wrong and that assistance is
needed
.



Behaviors may
include:


Serious
grade problems or a change from consistently passing
grades to unaccountably poor performance
.



Excessive absences, especially if the student has previously
demonstrated consistent attendance
.



Unusual or markedly changed patterns of
interaction



Other characteristics that suggest the student is having trouble
managing stress successfully


Adapted
from University of Michigan (2008)


Recognizing Students in Distress


Students in moderate distress
may exhibit behaviors that
indicate significant emotional distress. They may also be
reluctant or unable to acknowledge a need for personal help
.



Behaviors include:


Repeated requests for special
consideration,
especially if the
student appears uncomfortable or highly
emotional.



New or repeated behavior
which
interferes with effective
management of the immediate environment
.



Unusual or exaggerated emotional responses that
are
obviously
inappropriate to the situation.



Adapted
from University of Michigan (2008)


Recognizing Students in Distress


Students in
severe distress
exhibit behaviors that
signify a crisis and that necessitate emergency
care.




Behaviors include
:


Highly disruptive behavior


Inability to communicate clearly


Loss of contact with reality


Stalking behaviors.


Inappropriate communications


Overtly suicidal thoughts or threats to harm
others


Adapted from University of Michigan (2008)


Recognizing Students In Distress


Symptoms of Depression


Persistent sadness


Feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness, guilt


Lack of motivation


Lack of enjoyment of activities or class material the
person previously enjoyed


Sleep disturbance


Significant weight gain or loss


Suicidal ideation


Recognizing Students in Distress


Symptoms of
Anxiety


Excessive worry that is difficult to control


Restlessness


Fatigue


Difficulty concentrating


Irritability


Muscle tension


Sleep disturbance


Panic attacks


Recognizing Students in Distress


Symptoms of Psychosis


Delusions (false beliefs)


Hallucinations (false sensory experiences)


Disorganized speech


Disorganized behavior


Flat or inappropriate affect (emotional display)


Absence of motivation


Speech
disturbances


Change in hygiene and appearance


Recognizing Students in Distress


Counseling isn’t just for mental illness!


Time management techniques


Stress management techniques


Sleep hygiene


Balancing work/family/school


Help managing significant life events (e.g., break
-
ups,
homesickness, roommate difficulties)


Communication and interpersonal skills


Relationship issues


Communicating with a Student

in Distress


Move the student to a quiet and secure
location



Express your concerns in behavioral, nonjudgmental
terms



Be direct and specific



Avoid judging, evaluating or criticizing


respect the
student’s value system even if you disagree



Listen
attentively


Give student your undivided attention



Communicate understanding by repeating what he/she
has told you



Let the student talk



Do not minimize or immediately provide reassurance



Praise student for openness and honesty






Remain calm and respond in a soothing manner



Validate the student’s feelings and experiences



Take the student seriously



Be supportive and express your concern about the
situation


A Victimized Student


Recognize the student may be vulnerable and
experiencing a range of intense feelings, including
shame, anger, fear and denial


Believe the student


Respect the student’s right to make his/her own decision


Let the student know that you must, as a university
employee, report any abuse, but it can be reported as a
“Jane or John Doe”


Refer to MSUB Student in Distress Guide


www.msubillings.edu/VCSA/PDF/GuideforFacStaff
-
StudentBehavior.pdf


A Severely Disoriented or
Psychotic Student


Recognize that psychotic states can involve extreme
emotion or lack of emotion and intense fear to the
point of paranoia


Recognize that a student in this state may be
dangerous to self or others


Call Campus Police (2222) before you see the student
so they can be in the area in case you need them


Alert someone else near you that you are seeing a
student and may need assistance



Speak to the student in a direct and concrete manner
regarding your plan for getting him/her to a safe
environment

The Aggressive, Angry or
Potentially Violent Student


Assess your level of safety


Call 911 or Campus Police at
2222 if you feel in danger (9911 if on campus)



Remain in an open area with a visible means of escape



Explain to the student the behaviors that are unacceptable


Stay calm and gain control of the situation by
setting limits



Use a time
-
out strategy (that is, ask the
student to reschedule a meeting with you once
he/she has calmed down) if the student
refuses to cooperate and remains aggressive
or agitated



The Depressed or Suicidal
Student


Let the student know you are aware he/she is
feeling down and you would like to provide
support and assistance



Ask the student if he/she has thoughts of suicide



Take the student’s disclosure as a serious plea for
help



Express care and concern and assure the student
that you will help him/her reach a professional


Distance Education



If any of the situations discussed here are expressed by
your online students, the same communication skills
apply.




The referral information, however, changes. Mental
Health counseling is not available over the phone to
students.



You could ask the student if they have ever seen a
counselor and suggest he/she call that person


You could look online for resources in the student’s
geographical area and refer them

Recommendations



Do not become involved with a student beyond your level of
expertise or comfort



Do not ignore comments such as, “I won’t be a problem much longer”



Do not become anxious or overwhelmed yourself



Do not minimize the seriousness of the student’s behavior



Do not become defensive or get into an argument or shouting match



Do not convey judgment or criticism



Do not act hostile or punitive



Do not make assumptions

Referring a Student For
Professional Help


WHEN TO REFER


Student remains distressed following repeated attempts by
you and others to be
helpful



Student becomes increasingly isolated, unkempt, irritable
or
disconnected



Student’s academic or social performance
deteriorates



Student behavior reflects increased hopelessness or
helplessness



You are doing on
-
going counseling rather than advising


How to Refer


Speak to student in direct concerned straightforward
manner



Be caring but firm in recommending counseling. Be clear about
reasons
concerned



Be knowledgeable in advance about services and procedures of
SHS
Counseling or
other campus
agencies



Suggest student make an appointment and provide phone number
for
referral



Remind student that counseling is
free and
confidential



You may need to be more active in assisting student in making
appointment, or walk them to
Student Health Services

Student Health Services

The Student Health Services provides high
-
quality, cost
-
effective health care and
mental health counseling with an emphasis on health education and wellness
initiatives to promote and enhance student success
.


Hours :


University Campus Clinic & Counseling

Monday
-
Friday 8:00a
-

5:00p 2
nd

Floor Petro Hall



City College

Clinic: Mon, 1p
-
4:30p; Wed, 9a
-

12p; Tue & Thu, 11p
-

2p
Tech Bldg.
2
nd

Floor

Counseling: Mon, 9a
-
4p; Wed 9a
-
12 noon; Thu, 8a
-

11a


Phone:


University Campus: (406
)
657
-
2153


City
College Phone: (406) 247
-
3027


www.msubillings.edu/studenthealth




Campus Police


For emergencies dial extension
2222



For Billings Police emergencies and medical
emergencies dial
911 (9911 if on campus)



Sign up for
MSUB alerts



http://www.msubillings.edu/msubalert
/



www.msubillings.edu/police/



TRIO and SOS


Provides academic support and individualized assistance to first generation,
low income or students with
disabilities



Services include:


Peer mentoring, study groups/tutors, access to cultural

events, workshops, financial information, counseling and

referral, midterm evaluations, newsletters, assistance in

graduation preparation, return to learn and SOS activity


club



Student Opportunity
Services/TRIO

Library, LI
141



Phone:
(406) 657
-
2162

Fax:
(406) 657
-
1667

Office Hours
: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
M
-
F



www.msubillings.edu/sos/



ASC


Academic Support Center


Offers classes in reading, developmental math and
developmental
reading



Tutoring for math, writing, reading, science, psychology
and foreign
languages



Services are
FREE
(prepaid in tuition
)



University
ASC
front
desk
657
-
1641



City College
ASC
front
desk
247
-
3022



www.msubillings.edu/asc/



DSS


Disability Support Services


Works with issues related to physical access and issues related to course
content



Accessible
technology



4 testing
rooms



DSS does
not

offer tutoring, mental health counseling, financial assistance,
personal care attendants or mobility
equipment



DSS cannot by law contact a student but you can
refer



College of Education Room 135

657
-
2161



City College Room
A008
247
-
3029



www.msubillings.edu/dss/



Managing Student Requests &
Situations

Some Key Components


Location



Safety



Thorough
Assessment



Problem Solving


Referral



Clear Communication


Avoid
Judgment



Boundaries &
Competence



Active Listening &
Validation



Supports/Consultation



TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF
!


Unconfirmed Diagnosis


“I think I’m bipolar.”


“I’m pretty sure I have ADHD
.”


“I have test anxiety.”




Think about student welfare


Take them seriously


refer them for diagnosis & treatment


Win
-
win


Let them know about DSS & other supportive programs


Refusal to Work with Medical/

Mental Health




They don’t understand me.”


“They say I’m faking it.”




Any accommodation should go through some path
(e.g., SHS, DSS, etc
.)



Acknowledge & validate
fears/concerns



Encourage referral


Excessive Requests


“Can I do a special study session with you instead of
the TA?”



“Will you change my grade for the last exam? My
bipolar was really acting up that day.”



“My social anxiety is really bad. Can I skip the
required presentation for this class?”


Excessive Requests (Continued)


Here are some
UN
reasonable accommodations
:



Anything that poses a threat to health/safety of
others



Substantial change in essential element of curriculum
(e.g., dropping presentation requirement for speech
course
)



Altering course objectives (e.g., waiving the writing
element of a course
)



Undue financial/administrative burden to institution


For Additional Assistance


Student Health Services Mental Health Counselors

657
-
2153


Linda Crummett


Judy Silverman


Amber McDermott (
also in
Dept

of Rehab & Human Services)


Kim Waldmann



Department of Psychology

657
-
2242 or 657
-
2250 (direct #)


Marie
Schaaf

Gallagher

Resources


Helping Students in Distress
--
A Faculty and Staff Guide for Assisting Students in Need


University of Maryland Counseling Center


http://
www.cte.umd.edu/HSID.pdf



Reaching Out Resources for Responding to Students in Distress


Boise
State
University Health and Recreation Counseling Services


http://
healthservices.boisestate.edu/resources/materials/reachingOutHandbook.pdf



Student in Distress and Sexual Harassment: A Guide for Faculty and Staff


MSU Billings


http://
www.msubillings.edu/VCSA/PDF/GuideforFacStaff
-
StudentBehavior.pdf



National Alliance on Mental Illness web
-
based survey

August
-
November 2011 N=765
http://
www.nami.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Find_Support/NAMI_on_Campus1/NAM
I_Survey_on_College_Students/collegereport.pdf










Discussion:



Other
Student Requests/Situations?