Delivering IMS Learning Design

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Delivering IMS Learning Design
Activities via Mobile Devices




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NonCommercial License
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license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by
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nc/1.0 or send a letter to Creative Commons, 559 Nathan Abbott
Way, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Demetrios Sampson (sampson@iti.gr)

Kerstin Götze (goetze@lmr.khm.de)

Panayiotis Zervas (pzervas@iti.gr)

Pythagoras Karampiperis (pythk@iti.gr)

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Outline


Introduction to m
-
Learning


Some Definitions


Dimensions of m
-
Learning


Limitations imposed by mobile/wireless technologies


The SMILE m
-
Learning Environment


The SMILE Project


Target Groups in SMILE


Needs of Target Groups in SMILE


The SMILE
PDA Learning Design Player


Desired Characteristics of Mobile Delivery Tools


Characteristics of existing IMS Learning Design Players


Characteristics of SMILE PDA Learning Design Player


Short Live Demo of SMILE PDA Learning Design Player



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Definitions of m
-
Learning


“m
-
learning (mobile learning) is defined as the ability of using
handheld devices

to
access learning resources
” [1]


“Three ways of learning can be considered mobile. Learning is
mobile in terms of
space
; it is mobile in
different areas of
life
; it is mobile
with respect of time
” [2]


“m
-
learning refers to the
use of mobile and handheld IT
devices
, such as PDAs, mobile phones, laptops and tablet PCs,
in
teaching and learning
” [3]

[1]

Kinshuk, Suhonen J., Sutinen E. and Goh T. (2003). "Mobile Technologies in
Support of Distance Learning". Asian Journal of Distance Education, 1 (1), 60
-
68 (ISSN 1347 9008)

[2]

Vavoula G. N. and Sharples M. (2002). “KleOS: A Personal, Mobile,
Knowledge and Learning Organisation System”. In Milrad M. , Hoppe HU and
Kinshuk (Eds), In Proc. of the IEEE International Workshop on Wireless and
Mobile Technologies in Education WMTE 2002, pp 152


156, Los Alimatos, USA

[3]

Wood K. (2003). Introduction to Mobile Learning (M Learning) Available at:
http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?page=65&catid=192&resid=5194&printabl
e=1


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Dimensions of m
-
Learning

Devices

Connectivity

Pedagogy
(Scenarios &
Activities)

Content

mLearning

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Technological Limitations


Device limitations


Small screens limit the amount and type of information that
can be displayed (mobiles and PDAs)


Limited storage capacities (especially mobiles and PDAs)


Connectivity limitations


Bandwidth may degrade with a larger number of users when
using wireless networks


Design considerations


Lack of common platform specifications (eg. Different sized
screens
-

horizontal screens with some handheld computers,
small square screens with mobile phones), difficult to
develop content that will work anywhere

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Some Thoughts about m
-
Learning…


During the last years m
-
learning has
attracted the attention of technology
-
enhanced learning community mainly as a
side effect of the growth of the mobile
communications industry


While the educational added
-
value of m
-
learning is under investigation, technological
efforts are much needed to align m
-
learning
technologies with the current state
-
of
-
the
-
art
in TeL.


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The SMILE Project


SMILE


Supporting Vocational Education and
Training through Mobile Learning Environments



Funded by the European Commission through the
Leonardo de Vinci Programme


Aims to address the urgent need for building a new
generation of vocational training services for the
provision of on
-
demand lifelong learning competence
and skills development, not subject to time and place
restrictions


(http://smile.iti.gr)


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Target Groups in SMILE


mTraining Content Suppliers:

the entity responsible for
designing and developing independent
mTraining Resources

in
the form of "Learning Objects", suitable for mobile delivery



mTraining Activities Suppliers:
the entity responsible for
designing mTraining Activities/Courses as a synthesis of a
number of appropriately selected mTraining Resources based on
a predefined scenario that reflects the training approach of this
particular course.



mTraining Services Providers:

the entity responsible for
designing mTraining Programmes as a synthesis of mTraining
Courses and delivering mTraining services to end users


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The SMILE m
-
Learning Environment

Mobile LOs Metadata
Authoring and
Management Toolkit
Authoring Tool for
Mobile Activities
Mobile LOs Metadata
Authoring and
Management Toolkit
Web Platform for Mobile
VET Services
Mobile
Content Supplier
Mobile
Services Provider
mTraining
Scenarios
Guidelines for
mobile activities
inform
Mobile
Resources
/
Activities
Mobile
Activities Supplier
Metadata
Repository
inform
inform
Guidelines for
mobile Resources
Produce
mobile
resources
Metadata
Tagging of
mobile
resources
Retrieve
/
Use
mobile VET
activities
Search for mobile
activities
Use
mobile
resources
Create
mobile
activities
Metadata
Tagging of
mobile
activities
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Needs of Target Groups in SMILE


mTraining Content Suppliers:

need to convert their existing
eTraining Resources (or create new resources) so as to be
suitable for mobile and wireless delivery



mTraining Activities Suppliers:

need to define training
scenarios populated with appropriately selected mTraining
Resources in order to develop their mTraining Activities/Courses



mTraining Services Providers:

need to have access to
mTraining courses in order to provide mTraining services
(course delivery and support) to their end users

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What is needed in the SMILE m
-
Learning Environment?


Tools to empower the different target
groups in their various capacities


To adopt and possible enhance widely
spread international TeL specifications
(such as IMS Learning Design), so as to
be able to include m
-
learning in large
scale TeL business cases.



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Why Adopting IMS Learning Design?


Our m
-
learning activities will not be isolated form the
rest of our e
-
learning activities and services


Different m
-
learning service providers can deploy
and re
-
use m
-
learning activities from common pools
(like repositories of IMS LD learning activities)


M
-
Learning activities can be inter
-
exchanged
between different m
-
training settings


Appropriate software can be developed to run these
m
-
learning activities via different devices.

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Desired Characteristics of Mobile
Delivery Tools


Limited Internet Connectivity need during the
execution of mobile activities.


Lightweight, so as to be able to be installed
at mobile devices such as PDAs or
Smartphones, with limited storage capacity.


Render the educational content to the display
of the mobile device in use.

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Existing IMS Learning Design Players


Coopercore
(http://coppercore.sourceforge.net/)


Reload Player
(http://www.reload.ac.uk/)


SLED
(http://sled.open.ac.uk/web/tech/index
.jsp)

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Characteristics of Existing IMS
Learning Design Players


Server side players, which means that the user
needs to be connected to the internet during the
entire execution time


If they are running locally to the user’s device, they
need to load a Web Server, which implies the need
for high computational power, extra memory and
storage capacity from the mobile device in use.


They have not been specially designed for delivery
through mobile devices. The educational content can
not be automatically adjusted (rendered) to the size
of the display of the device

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Characteristics of SMILE PDA
Learning Design Player


It is a client
-
side IMS Learning Design Player. This means that,
it does not require the constant connection to the internet when
executing learning activities, since both the player and the
educational content used are stored locally.


The size of the SMILE PDA Learning Design Player is very small
(less than 1 MB), and no third party software components are
needed in order to execute learning activities through mobile
devices.


Renders
HTML
-
based content and flash files. The content can be
scaled up or scaled down according to the size of the device
display.


Supports the enrolment of multiple roles/actors, such as
individual learners, groups of learners, tutors, etc.


Supports asynchronous messaging between different
actors/users.

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Short Live Demo of SMILE PDA
Learning Design Player

1.
Open an m
-
Training Course

2.
Select the indented role for
participating to the m
-
Training Course

3.
Navigate through the m
-
Learning
Activities Structure

4.
Execute Activities and Complete the
Course

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Contact Details

Demetrios Sampson (sampson@iti.gr)


Advanced e
-
Services for the Knowledge Society
Research Unit (ASK)

Informatics and Telematics Institute (ITI)

Center for Research and Technology Hellas
(CERTH)

(http://www.ask4research.info)