Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology 70: Genetic Engineering ...

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10 Δεκ 2012 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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M
olecular,
C
ell and
D
evelopmental Biology 70
:
Genetic Engineering and Society

Professor Bob

Goldberg

Syllabus


Week One

(Lessons on the Age of DNA)


Video

Presentations

Class Introduction


Lecture 1:
We Live in the Age of DNA!


Lecture 2:
The Age of DNA:
Genetic Engineering
-

Anything New? (Pt. 1)


Lecture 3:
The Age of DNA: Genetic Engineering
-

Anything New? (Pt. 2)


Guest Lecture

& Interview
: Professor Channapatna Prakash, Tuskegee
University,
Genetically Engineered Crops for the Developing World


Readings



Textboo
k
: Chapters 1, 3.1, & 3.2






Quiz

1


T
opics: Lecture
s

1,

2
,
&
3
; Guest Lecture; Text Reading


Lab



What Does DNA Look Like?



Discussion



Introduction,
Review of
Lectures 1, 2 and 3; Oral Assessment of Quiz 1



Week Two


(Lessons on What Are Genes and
How Do They Work
?)


Video Presentations

Lecture 4:
What Are Genes
&

How Do They Work? (Pt. 1



Evidence For DNA As the Genetic Material
)



Lecture 5:
What Are Genes
&

How Do They Work? (Pt. 2



DNA Structure
& the Anatomy of
Genes
)


Lecture 6:

What Are Genes & How Do They Work (Pt. 3



Gene
Replication
, PCR, & Programming Traits
)


Readings


T
extbook: Chapters 2, 3.3, &
3.4 (
PCR
-
pgs 72
-
74)





Article:
Rosalind Franklin’s Legacy


Chapter From Genetics Textbook:
Mendelian

Genetics & Human Pedigrees


Film



Race for the Double Helix


Quiz

2



Topics: Lecture
s

4
,
5
,

& 6; Text

R
eading





Discussion

Review of
Lectures 4, 5 & 6
,

Discussion of the Race for the Double Helix;
Oral Assessment of Quiz 2;
Theme
d Discussion
: Crop
Genetic Engineering

Reading for Discussion
: Textbook Chapters 6 & 13.2 (pgs 326
-
328)







New York Times

Article:

Labeling

GMO

Controversy
, May, 2012



Week Three

(Lesson
s

on the Nuts & Bolts of Genetic Engineering


A Case Study From Gene to
Drug)


Video Presentations

Lecture
7
:
The
Nuts & Bolts of Genetic Engineering


Factor VIII Story


Guest Lecture

& Interview
:
Professor Bob

Wayne
, UCLA:
Hunting for
Canine Ancestors and Engineering Modern Dogs









Readings

Textbook: Chapters 3.1, 3.2, 3.3,
3.4 (pgs 74
-
84)
,

5.3 (pgs 133
-
135)
,

& 11.1
(pgs 26
4
-
270)





Scientific American Article:
The Molecular Genetics of Hemophilia
, by
Richard Lawn & Gordon Vehar, Scientific American,
January, 1986


Lab



Sizing DNA & Bacterial “Cloning” Experiment


Film



Extraordinary Measures


Quiz 3



Topics: Lecture 7; Guest Lecture; Text
book

& Article

Reading





Discussion


Mid
-
Term Oral Assessment of Quizzes 1, 2, & 3


Week Four

(Lessons on the Human Genome & Human Genetic Engineering)


Video Presentations

Lecture 8:
Your Personal Genome and Tracing Your Ancestry





Lecture 9: Delivered by Professor John Harada, UC Davis
-




Human Genetic Engineering and Gene Therapy





Interview: Professor John Harada





Guest Lecture

& Interview
:
Harry Klann
, Los Angeles Police Department
-

DNA



Forensics and the Law






Readings


Textbook: Chapters
3.5, 8, 11.1,

&
11.3


Film



Convict
ion





Quiz

4



Topics: Lectures 8 & 9; Guest Lecture
;

Text Reading





Discussion

Review of
Lectures 7, 8, & 9; Oral
Assessment of Quiz 4
, Themed
Discussion:
DNA Testing and the Law


Reading for Discussion


Textbook Chapter 8


Week Five

(Lessons on Stem Cells, In Vitro Fertilization, & Testing For Genetic Diseases)


Video Presentations

Guest Lecture &

Interview: Dr. Pei Yun Lee, UCLA:
Stem Cell Science &
Politics



Guest Lecture & Interview: Dr. Michele Evans, Pacific Fertility Center,
Glendale, CA:
In Vitro Fertilization and Testing for Genetic Disease
s


Readings


Textbook: Chapters 11.4 & 13.2 (pgs
330
-
333)


Quiz

5



Topics:
Guest Lectures

&
Text

R
eading


Lab Report


Due Sunday at
6 pm






Discussion

Review of
Guest Lectures
,
Oral Assessment of Quiz 5;
Themed Discussion:
Animal Genetic Engineering and Cloning


Discussion

Reading


Textbook Chapters

7 & 11.4



Week Six

(Science & the Law)


Video Presentations

Lecture 10
:
Science and the Constitution: Regulating Science and GMOs





Lecture 11:
Science and

t
he Constitution: Who Owns Your G
enes?





Class Ending





Reading
s


Textbook
Chapters 12 & 13





Scientific American Article:
Owning the Stuff of Life
, by Gary Stix, February,
2006


Final Exam


Topics:
L
ectures,
Guest Lectures
,
R
eadings, and
A
rticles





Discussion


Oral
Assessment
Part
of Final Exam


ELEMENTS OF THE CLASS


Textbook
& Reading
Material


There is one required textbook for this course:
Introduction to Biotechnology
, 3rd edition

(2012)
,
by William J. Theiman and Michael A. Palladino. This textbook is available in hard copy or as an
electronic book.


You can purchase the hard copy

f
rom the UCLA campus bookstore.
Visit this link to find the
textbooks required for all your classes by entering your last name and nine digit UCLA ID number:


http://www.uclaestor
e.com/ucla/textbook_student.asp?ref=ucla
.
You can buy your book at this
link, or if you prefer, you can purchase them at campus bookstore.

Alternatively y
ou can purchase
the eTextbook

version

through CourseSmart at the following URL:

http://www.coursesmart.com/introduction
-
to
-
biotechnology
-
third
-
edition/william
-
j
-
thieman
-
michael
-
a
-
palladino/dp/9780
321814814


The eTextbook costs ~50% less than the printed
version.

You can also

access additional resources related to the textbook at

http://www.pearsonhighered.com/biotechnolog
y
.


There will also be several articles from popular sources (e.g., Scientific American, New York
Times) posted throughout the
session

that will complement, and extend, the topics covered each
week.


Interactive Lecture Questions


All of my ten
lectures

are interspersed
with interactive questions that
require a response before you
will be able
to view
the next segment of the lecture.

You will be

graded
on your
effort in
responding to these
questions
,

as w
ell as the thoughtfulness of your answers.


Eac
h of my lecture’s interactive responses will count 20,000 points, and all of your responses will
count 200,000 points, or 20% of your total grade.



Quizzes


You will

have

five quizzes


one each week from Week

One

through Week
Five
.
Quizzes

are
due
by
6

pm

on Wednesday

on each week
.

Quizzes
will be

comprised of
~
10

questions

that will
measure comprehension of material, understanding of key experiments, critical thinking, and
impact of genetic engineering and science on society.


Each quiz will count 5
0,
000 points in addition to extra
-
credit bonus points that will be
given on a
quiz by quiz basis, and all of the quizzes will count

250,000 points, or

25%
,

towards your final
grade.


Live Online Discussions


The two
-
hour
live discussions

are
MANDATORY
,

will contain ten students
, and are taught by the
teaching assistants. I will also join the
di
s
cussions

from time to time throughout the
session
.
This
online discussion format is

“revolutionary” for online teaching, and
has
been designed to make the
onli
ne experience as interactive as possible


allowing student
-
student and student
-
teacher
interactions in real time on the topics covered in the course.
Online discussions

will be taught
using the Socratic Method of “question and answer.”


As such, each of
you need to be highly
prepared for the
discussions

as the TAs will ask each of you questions on the topics covered each
week. This is a novel way of teaching discussion sections, and my intent is to maximize your
learning experience and make the class as
interactive and “personal” as possible using the online
approach. The process will be new to you in the first week or so. Give it a chance and, trust me,
you will learn a lot and it works!


Your participation in the
online

discussions will be assessed, a
nd will count 200,000 points, or
20%, towards your final grade (50,000 points each for four
discussion sessions

excluding the oral
mid
-
term and final oral exam).


Live
Quiz
Review


In each
discussion section

a block of time will be set aside for assessing whether you understand
the concepts covered in each question of the quiz. Several students each week will be called
o
n
randomly and asked to explain their quiz question answers. Throughout the
session
, eac
h of you
will be called on at least once or twice to provide a cogent, thoughtful answer to your quiz
questions.
This activity

will help prepare you for your oral mid
-
term exam on the quizzes as well
as for the oral portion of the final exam.
Your answer
s will be part of the overall grade given for
your discussion participation.


Lab Report


You will write a
short
lab report on the experiments shown in Weeks
One

and
Three
. Guidelines
for this report will be posted
during week 3 and the report will be due during Week
Four
. The lab
report will count 50,000 points, or 5% of your total grade.


Mid
-
Term Oral Exam


There will be a mid
-
term oral exam covering the material on quizzes 1

through
3 during the
live
discussio
ns

for Week
Three
. This oral exam will be similar

in format
to the oral assessments that
you will participate in during Weeks
One

and
Two
. Each of you will be asked to answer one quiz
question orally that
will be picked
at

random by your TA.
The Mid
-
Ter
m Oral Exam will count
50,000 points, or 5% of your grade.


Final Exam


The final has two parts
:

(1) a written exam similar in format to the quizzes

and (2) and oral portion
similar to the oral quiz assessments and mid
-
term oral exam. The written portion of the final exam
will count 200,000 points, or 20%
o
f your final grade, and the oral portion will count 50,000
points, or 5% of your final grade.



The Final Exam is due at 6 pm on Wednesday, September 12 during the sixth week of the class.
The Oral Portion of the Final Exam will be given during your last
live discussion

in Week 6


Thursday, Friday, and Saturday


depending upon when your schedule
d
Discussion Section

time
is.




COURSE GRADING


You will be able to earn
ONE MILLION regular points

and a number of
BONUS POINTS

during the
session
.

Your grade for this
session

will be based on 1,000,000 points
, although you have the potential for earning
more than 1,000,000 points.
The following guidelines will be used to assign grades:



A

(>90%),
B

(80
-
89%),
C

(70
-
79%),
D

(60
-
69%),
F

(<60%). Your grade will be assigned using the following
formula:

% Tot
al Points = [(
Regular points + Bonus points)]

X [100]


[(1,000,000)]


Division of Regular Points


Total Points

Percent of
Final
Grade

Interactive Lecture Questions

200,000

20%

Weekly Quizzes

250,000

25%

Live Discussion

Participation

200,000

20%

Mid
-
Term Oral Exam

50,000

5%

Lab Report

50,000

5%

Final Exam (Written & Oral)

250,000

25%

TOTAL POINTS

1,000,000

100%



OFFICE HOURS


Professor Bob Goldberg

On Campus
: Tuesday 1:00


2:00 pm,
4121

Terasaki Life Sciences
Building
,

or by
appointment contact Jennifer Kwan (kwanj@ucla.edu).


Online
: Tuesday 6:00


8:00 pm


Teaching Assistants

(Online)


Elaine Chiu: Monday 8:00


9:00 pm


Lauren Daoust: Tuesday
5
:00


6
:00 pm


Reece Fenning:
Tuesday
9:00


10:00

pm


Eden Malo
ney: Wednesday 3:00


4:00 pm