DMD_IT4Bus0809 - IST studies

fortunabrontideInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

13 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

95 εμφανίσεις


University of

Hertfordshire








Module Guide
(or Module Handbook)






















INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR
BUSINESS


2008
-
2009

Seme
ster A


Franchise Business School (FBS)


Lecturer: Panagiotis K. Kalampokas, ScD



IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
2

of 8



University of Hertfordshire

The Business School



Module Guide
(or Module Handbook)





INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR BUSINESS


CREDITS:


LEVEL:





The module leader
:




Contact details
:










Office Hours: to be announced


Day and time of Lectures: Wednesday 11:00
-

13:00


Thursday 11:00
-

13:00



Thursday 20:00


22:00


Room:











WEEKLY MODE


Panagiotis K. Kalampokas, ScD



IST STUDIES, 72 Pireos Str., 183 46 Athens, Greece


Tel.: 210
-
4822222


E
-
mail: p.kalabokas@ist.edu.gr




IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
3

of 8

IST Studies
-

UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE




Module Title


Information Technology for Business


Academic Year


2008
-

2009


Semester



A



module leader


Panagiotis K. Kalampokas,
ScD

p.kalabokas@ist
.edu.gr



Contents of guide









1.

Module code

2.

Module Title in full


Information Technology for Business

3.

Credit points








15

4.

Level









1

5.

Department

6.

Contact Details:

Name: Dr.
Panagiotis Kalampokas

Office Hours: Monday 13:00
-

14:00





Room:
Academic Staff Office





Telephone extension: 235





E mail address:
p.kalabokas@ist.edu.gr



7.

Module pre and co requisites




None


8.

Module aims







The aims of this module are to enable students to . . .


-

have a good basic understanding of a range of computer and
communications technology concepts and issues, the fundamentals of
hardware and software, and its capabilities and limits;


-

learn the most important standardization organizations (ISO etc),


-

stan
dard models (ISO/OSI etc),


-

protocols (TCP/IP, Bluetooth, FTP, HTTP, SNMP, POP3, IMAP4, IEEE
802.11 etc),


-

learn the fact that models specify "what" while protocols specify "how",


-

learn the most important operating systems,


IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
4

of 8

-

database management system
s,


-

third
-
generation programming languages (java, C, C+ +, Perl etc),


-

learn what object
-
oriented programming is,


-

what applets and java servlets are,


-

component
-
based programming (Enterprise JavaBeans etc),


-

markup languages (HTML, XML),


-

informatio
n
-
system architectures (client/ server, three
-
tier),


-

web services,


-

software
-
development methods,


-

transactional and decision
-
support information systems,


-

expert systems,


-

relational databases and SQL (the fourth
-
generation structured query
language
),


-

OLAP (on
-
line analytical processing) systems,


-

software development tools,


-

computer and information
-
system security,


-

PKI (private key infrastructure),


-

cryptography,


-

smart
-
phone forensics,


-

project management etc;


-

have practical hands
-
on exp
erience of using the technology;


-

learn how the technology can be used to tackle specific tasks, problems,
and information requirements.


IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
5

of 8

9.

Module Intended Learning outcomes



What is a learning outcome?


You will note below that this module handbook specif
ies ‘learning outcomes’
for this module. A learning outcome characterises what it is that you are
expected to have learned at the end of the module, if you have successfully
completed it. You will note that the learning outcomes are specified in terms
of w
hat knowledge/ understanding and skills you will have acquired. This will
then tell you beforehand, what the module aims to teach you and what it is
that you need to learn in order succeed.


Knowledge and understanding


Successful students will typically h
ave a knowledge and understanding of:



1.

a range of information processing and communications technology
aspects, concepts and issues, appropriate for an organisational or
business context;

2.

the capabilities and limits of the technology, how it is suited to
certain
tasks, and how computer
-
based systems can meet the information
requirements of organisations;

3.

how to use a number of current, commercial software packages to
carry out a variety of tasks;

4.

how to use different types of computer and network hardwa
re, plus
peripheral equipment;

5.

how to input, process, store, retrieve and communicate data and
information;

6.

how to create and run simple programs;

7.

how to access and make full use of the Internet;

8.

how to approach and tackle tasks or problems that are suit
ed to IT
-
based solutions or techniques.




Skills and attributes


Successful students will typically be able to:


1.

identify where and how IT can be used to tackle particular tasks or problems
posed, in a business or organisational sphere, and thus describe

the nature
and availability of such computer and communications systems;

2.

carry out a range of basic operations using several different kinds of
computers, networks and peripheral equipment;

3.

input, process, store, retrieve and communicate data and informat
ion;

4.

use current commercial application software running on typical PC or
networked
-
based platforms;

5.

solve practical problems and utilize techniques that require hands
-
on use of
such systems.


IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
6

of 8

10.

Module

content


Weekly programme to include:


Lecture

Topics

L
audon & Laudon

Chapters

1

Introduction to the Course: details of its structure and
content. Uses of business information technology.
Information technology history.

Handouts.

2

The Internet. HTML, URL, TCP/IP, Web browsers,
designing Web pages.

8

3

Lau
don Companion Website.


4

Computer Hardware: bits, bytes, motherboard, CPU,
RAM, ROM, input devices, monitors, scanners,
printers.
Computer Architecture.
Management Issues.

6

5

Software: general purpose, applications and systems
software, operating syste
ms, programming languages,
graphical user interfaces.
Managing Software assets
.

7

6

Storing and retrieving information: hard disks,
diskettes, magnetic tapes, CD
-
ROMS, other disks.

Software aspects of information storage and retrieval:
File organisation.

6

7

Introduction to Databases.
Managing Data Resources.

7

8

Convergence and Connectivity, Communications
channels, Network topologies, Local area networks:
Client/server and peer
-
to
-
peer, Wide area networks.

8

9

Data Protection and Data Security.

10

10

Standardization organizations and the most important
international standards for information
-
technology
models and protocols.


11

Information Systems: Decision Support Systems, Data
Warehouses, Management Information Systems,
Expert Systems. Developing B
usiness Information
Systems.

1&2

12

Computers in Society: Today and Tomorrow.

Current and future trends. Emerging technologies. e
-
commerce.
Knowledge Management.

5 & 4




IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
7

of 8



Prescribed


Textbook



Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Fir
m
,
Laudon, K. and Laudon, J., Prentice Hall, 10th

Edition (2007).


Handouts



distributed in class and/or secretariat.


You are expected to have read the entire corresponding chapters of the book by the
end of the course.



Recommended


1. Haag & Cumming
s, "Management Information Systems for the Information Age",
McGraw
-
Hill, 7th Edition, 2008.


2. Baltzan, Phillips & Haag, "Business
-
Driven Technology", McGraw
-

Hill, 3rd Edition,
2009.


3. Turban, Aronson, Liang & Sharda, "Decision Support and Business In
telligence
Systems", Pearson, 8th Edition, 2007.


4. Curtis & Cobham, "Business Information Systems: Analysis, Design and Practice",
Prentice Hall, 5th Edition, 2005.


5. Bocij, Greasley & Hickie, "Business Information Systems: Technology,
Development and
Management", Prentice Hall, 4th Edition, 2008.


6. Grover, MacDonald & Vander Veer, "Microsoft Office 2007: The Missing Manual",

Poque Press/O'Reilly, 2007.


7. Bonnie Biafore, "Microsoft Project 2007: The Missing Manual", Pogue
Press/O'Reilly, 2007.



11.

Ass
essment

details:


Coursework 40%.
You will be assigned a topic and asked to:


-

Find references from textbooks and the Internet

-

Present your topic in front of the class (approx. 10 transparencies or Power
Point slides), covering its important aspects.

-

Write

an up to 10
-
page text (MS Word) covering extensively your topic



Date for submission of coursework
Week 12


Examination 60%.
A
2 hour unseen multiple
-
choice exam at end of semester.


NB. Full details of both coursework projects will be provided in the
practical
workshop sessions.


IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
8

of 8

On the last week of the semester and before the last class, you will hand in to the
lecturer your report, presented in a MS Word printout with the necessary figures,
tables etc. embedded. The report is meant to be a stand
-
alon
e document without any
references to other files. All features of a good report (formatting, proper language

English
-
, figure and table captions, table of contents, chapter headers, appropriate
front page, numbering of pages) are expected and assessed.

A
dditionally, on the last week of the semester you will present in class your
assignment, using a 10
-
minute MS PowerPoint presentation (up to 10 slides). The
presentation will be assessed in both your oral and written (slides) skills.


The lecturer will fol
low your progress throughout the semester, in order to
identify your weak points and help you, as well as assess you for your final
grade of coursework.



12.

Matrix detailing Intended Learning outcomes




Knowledge and Understanding


Skills and Attributes



1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

2

3

4

5


Coursework


































Ex慭楮慴楯n






































13.

Notes


(a)

Feedback from coursework assignments will be normally provided using
the Business School Assignment Assessment Form' which w
ill provide
details of the strengths, weaknesses, grading rationale and points for
improvement regarding your submitted work.


(b)

UHBS reserves the right to use electronic means to identify plagiarism.


(c)

APPENDICES include


i.

Expectations of the University for s
tudents on taught programmes

ii.

Assessment Criteria

iii.

Assessment of presentations


(d)

All aspects of the Module are potentially examinable. The information
given in this Module Guide is believed correct, but Faculty reserves the
right, at its discretion, and for a
ny reason, to make changes to the Guide
without prior notice.







IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
9

of 8

Expectations of the University for students on taught programmes


In order to get the best from your studies and achieve your goals, the Business
School expect you:




to behave in an accep
table, respectful and considerate manner to fellow
students, administrators and academic staff




to realise that being a full time student is equivalent to having a full
-
time job
requiring at least 35 hours per week self study in preparation for workshops,
seminars, lectures and assessments




to attend and participate in lectures, tutorials, workshops and other timetabled
classes




to be punctual in attending classes




to turn off mobile phones prior to entering class




to complete and hand in all assignments by

the appropriate deadline




to provide responsible feedback on your learning experience as requested




to ensure you do not breach the University Regulations with regard to cheating,
plagiarism and ethical issues




to comply with any University and external r
egulations affecting your studies


IST Studies


University of Hertfordshire

fortunabrontide_7c37de31
-
34e4
-
4f65
-
900c
-
87febcc3857a.doc
2007
-
2008 Page
10

of 8


Assessment Criteria


I. A1, A2, A3

70 & upward
. Thorough understanding of key concepts/theory/topic. Relevant and
effective use of material. Evidence of a wide reading and critical understanding.
Independence of thoug
ht. Well structured, fluent argument. Excellent synthesis of
material, including integration of the different contributions made by individual group
members. Evidence of thorough planning, organisation and co
-
ordination.


II.i. B1, B2, B3

60
-
69.

A good,
if imperfect, grasp of the material and its implications. Identifies the
focus of the question. Knowledge and clear understanding of contrasting viewpoints.
A case well argued and convincingly presented. Good synthesis of material, including
integration of

the different contributions made by individual group members.
Evidence of good planning, organisation and co
-
ordination.


II.ii. C1, C2, C3

50
-
59
. A reasonable grasp of the material. A general ability to present relevant
argument but might contain some
irrelevant material. Some coherent argument but
weaknesses in overall structure and clarity. Fair synthesis of material, including
integration of the different contributions made by individual group members. Would
have benefited from better planning and or
ganisation.


III. D1, D2 , D3

40
-
49.

A basic grasp of the material, marred by either poor discriminative ability, an
element of conceptual naïveté, or both. Tendency to unsubstantiated
statements/assertions. Shallow interpretation. May contain significan
t errors of fact or
theory. Some understanding of class material, but little or no further reading. Little
evidence of independent thought. Poorly structured and presented, with little
coherent argument. Poor synthesis of material, including integration of

the different
contributions made by individual group members. Little evidence of planning,
organisation and co
-
ordination.


Unclassified

36
-
39.

Despite evidence of some effort, the work indicates inadequate
understanding: substantial failure to grasp the

material. Contains more than one
gross error of significant fact or interpretation. Poor synthesis of material, poor
integration of the different contributions made by individual group members. Very
little evidence of planning, organisation and co
-
ordinat
ion.


Fail

1
-
35.

Does not satisfy the minimum requirements for the exercise in question. Little
understanding even of class material. No structure. Does not address the topic. No
synthesis of material, lack of integration of different contributions made by

individual
group members. No evidence of good planning, organisation and co
-
ordination.