College Majors Classwork and Project #1 - TeacherWeb

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Major: Microbiology



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Basic Information

Microbiology is the branch of biology which

deals with the smallest organisms in the world, such
as bacteria, yeasts, algae, and protozoa. These organisms rank among the most helpful and the
most harmful to human life and the environment. Microbiologists work to swing the balance in our
favor.



Mi
crobiologists perform extensive medical research, investigating pathogenic (disease
-
causing)
microorganisms. If you dream of finding the cure for cancer, AIDS, or the common cold, this could
be the major for you. Microbiologists also help protect crops and

purify our drinking water.



An added bonus: through their work with bacteria and yeasts, Microbiology majors can learn how
to make their own beer, cheese, yogurt, wine, bread, and pickles. Many microbiologists are, in
fact, employed by food and beverage
producers to make these very products. Upon graduation,
you could even open your own microbrewery.

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Biochemistry



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Biology


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Neurobiology



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Pharmacology



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Pre
-
Medicine



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Pre
-
Veterinar
y

Medicine


















Major: Mathematics



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Basic Information

Mathematicians have a romance with numbers. They deal with the hard realities of
statistics and
the fragile beauty of complex theorems. Some become actuaries, economists, and
businesspeople, working with concrete concepts. Others become professors, working with almost
poetic abstractions and theories.



In short, there is lots of life
beyond trig class.



Mathematics majors study exactly what you’d expect

lots and lots of math. Some mathematics
programs offer opportunities to combine a degree in mathematics with one in business,
economics, physics, or computer science. As you consider
schools, make sure to check the
available options.

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Accounting


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Actuarial

Science


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Applied

Mathematics



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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Computer

Systems

Analysis



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Physics


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Statistics





















Major: Computer Engineering



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Basic Information

Assuming you haven't been living in a cave or under a rock for the last few decades, you are
probably aware that an amazing computer
revolution has rapidly changed the way much of the
world works. Developments in radio, television, radar, transistors, computers, and robotics have
fundamentally altered human life. The field of Computer Engineering is at the epicenter of this
development.

It encompasses a wide range of topics including operating systems, computer
architecture, computer networks, robotics, artificial intelligence, and computer
-
aided design.



If you major in Computer Engineering, you'll learn all about the hardware and soft
ware aspects of
computer science. You'll gain a solid understanding of circuit theory and electronic circuits, too.
Also, because Computer Engineering is closely linked with Electrical Engineering, the fields are
found in the same department at many univer
sities. Consequently, many undergraduate
programs incorporate most of the core curricula in both electrical engineering and computer
science so graduates will be prepared to work in either field.



Computer Engineering is a difficult major but it's a major

that's in demand. Software engineering
companies, telecommunications firms, designers of digital hardware, and many other business
enterprises hire Computer Engineering majors right out of college and pay them well. Computer
Engineering also makes great p
reparation for medical school, business school, and law school
(particularly if you want to specialize in patent law).

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Applied

Mathematics



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Architectural

Engineering


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Chemical

Engineering


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Civil

Engineering


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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Electrical

Engineering



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Industrial

Engineering



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Mathematics


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Mechanical

Engineering


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Nuclear

Engineering


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Petroleum

Engineering



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Physics


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Statistics









Major: Nursing



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Basic Information

Nursing is a diverse and rewarding discipline that combines compassion with sophisticated health
technology. Nurses
evaluate, diagnose, and treat health problems. They help people meet basic
health needs, adapt to physical changes, recover from illness, and die with dignity. You knew all
that. The profession offers a variety of employment and career opportunities. Nurse
s are
employed in clinics, hospitals, schools, corporations, the military, and in private practice. Of
course, you probably knew that, too. You may not know that job prospects in nursing are, in a
word, awesome. “Bursting at the seams” doesn’t adequately d
escribe the current magnitude of
the need for nurses.


The bachelor of science in Nursing is the basic professional degree in nursing and it provides the
foundation for graduate study (which you can pursue if you want to, but is by no means required
for jo
b security). If you major in Nursing, you'll take traditional science and liberal arts courses as
a first
-
year student and probably begin clinical rotations at hospitals and other health care
facilities during the second semester of your sophomore year. In

practice, what that means is
you'll start working at a hospital doing the kinds of things that nurses do. You'll receive patient
reports, treat patients, and administer everything from medications to endotracheal suction
procedures
-

the whole nine yards.

In the course of your college career, you'll receive a
substantial amount of practical, hands
-
on training.


One of the important things to know about the field of Nursing is that there is a national
standardized test involved. All would
-
be nurses are requ
ired by law to take the National
Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX) after graduating from an
accredited nursing program before they can be officially registered.


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Biochemistry



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Biology


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Biopsychology


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Cell

Biology



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Chemistry


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Chiropractic


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Circulation

Technology


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Dietetics


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Health

Ad
ministration


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Human

Development


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Medical

Technology


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Occupational

Therapy


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Pharmacology



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Pharmacy



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Major: Chemistry



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Basic Information

The word chemistry conjures up images of
a mad scientist hunched over a table full of beakers
and tubes, concocting potions to change metal into gold or people into animals. That's

al
chemy,
silly. The chemist, with his white lab coat and wild hair, is difficult to define and yet endowed with
seem
ingly mystical powers to change the physical structure of the world.



Often referred to as the central science, chemistry examines the composition, structure,
properties, and reactions of matter, the stuff of the universe. It looks at the way the material

world
--
petroleum, a tree, your hand
--
is arranged. What are the properties that make water? What
do we need to sustain life? How do two chemicals react with each other? These are some of the
basic questions a chemistry major tries to answer.


The skills yo
u will learn as a chemistry major will be applicable to any number of fields, ranging
from pharmaceuticals to biotechnology to environmentalism. You will gain a greater
understanding as to how the physical world operates, and what we can do to improve and
advance the way we live and work.

Related Majors

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Astronomy


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Astrophysics


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Atmospheric

Science


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Biochemistry



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Biology


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Biopsychology


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Cell

Biology



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Dietetics


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Economics


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Entomology



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Environmental

Science


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Forestry



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Genetics



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Geology


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Marine

Science


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Mathematics


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Microbiology



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Molecular

Genetics



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Neurobiology



Major: Economics



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Basic Information

Quick quiz: Suppose several producers of Your Favorite Product suddenly go

out of business,
causing a serious shortage of Your Favorite Product. Nonetheless, everyone still wants to buy the
same amount of it. What will happen to the price of Your Favorite Product?



If you predicted a price increase, you may have a knack for Eco
nomics: the study of the
production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.



More broadly, Economics is the study of how individuals, businesses, governments, and societies
choose to spend their time and money, and otherwise allocate their r
esources. Even more
broadly, Economics is the study of choices. When the federal government decides to allocate a
certain part of national budget to military spending and another part to funding for the arts, that
decision and its consequences is Economics
. Similarly, when you decide to buy a CD instead of a
fancy new shirt (or watch Nick at Night instead of MTV, or take the bus instead of your car) that's
Economics, too.


Knowledge of Economics is an invaluable component of any liberal arts education, not
to mention
an indispensable tool for making sense of the intricacies of the modern world. It is also excellent
preparation for a future in business, as well as for graduate studies in law, public policy, and
international studies.

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Accounting


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Agricultural

Economics


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Applied

Mathematics



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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Entrepreneurship



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Hi
story


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International

Business



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International

Relations


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Political

Science


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Public

Policy

Analysis



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Statistics













Major: History



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Basic Information

No matter how thrilling (or dull) your high school history classes have been, we can pretty much
guarantee that history courses in

college will be a lot more exciting, if only because you won't
have to memorize a bunch of names and dates. No, there will be few matching quizzes in
college
-
level history courses. Instead, you'll pursue the silk trade from Beijing to Baghdad,
analyze the

Civil Rights movement and the New Left in 1960s, discuss the writings of American
conservatives from the Founders to the New Right, or delve into the changing roles of class and
gender in 19th
-
century France.


In addition to becoming good readers, writers
, and communicators, History majors become
experts at distinguishing patterns in information. What they really study is change: why change
occurs at particular times in particular places, why other things stay the same, and how
individuals and groups deal
with change.


For a slew of excellent reasons, the History major has endured and History departments remain
large in spite of pressures on students to concentrate on more practical job training. For starters,
History is simply interesting. We're not saying

other majors are boring, but History deals with
actual people and factual events. Everything has a history
-

nations, wars, ethnic groups,
sexuality, jazz, gambling, postage stamps, you name it. One real plus about majoring in History is
that you can stay

engrossed in the subject matter long after you graduate.


On a broader scale, knowledge of history is important. As the philosopher George Santayana
observed, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. If anything holds
the key to und
erstanding warfare, famine, and social crises, it's the analysis and understanding of
history. It's not a recitation of facts. It's the sum total of the human experience
-

a dramatic, never
-
ending, entirely uncensored adventure."


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American

Studies


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Anthropology


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Archeology



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Architectural

History


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Art

History


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Asian
-
American

Studies



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Biblical

Studies


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Classics


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East

Asian

Studies



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East

European

Studies


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Geography


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Major: Political Science



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Basic Information

In a nutshell, Political Science is the academic study of politics and government. In one sense, it
is an ancient discipline.
It remains central to any classical study of the liberal arts, firmly grounded
as it is in the work of Plato and Aristotle. In another sense, because it often deals with current
events and sophisticated statistical analysis, Political Science is a cutting
-
edge area of study.
Whether you are analyzing voting patterns in a presidential campaign, the Israeli parliament, or
the pros and cons of different systems of government, Political Science is timely, fascinating, and
perpetually changing.


Like any liberal

arts major, Political Science makes no claims to be a pre
-
professional program. It
certainly doesn't exist to teach disconnected facts about politics. Instead, Political Science majors
develop excellent critical thinking and communication skills and, more

broadly, an understanding
of history and culture. Even more broadly, Political Science tackles those Big, Serious, Heavy,
Eternal Questions. What is the best way to reconcile individual desires and community needs? Is
it possible to have both freedom and
equality? Authority and justice? Etc.


If you major in Political Science, you'll study everything from revolutions to political parties to
voting behavior to public policy. You are also likely to explore the political issues inherent to
different regions o
f the world, like the Middle East, East Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe.

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Anthropology


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Archeology



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Architectural

History


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Asian
-
American

Studies



Save

Biblical

Studies


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East

Asian

Studies



Save

East

European

Studies


Save

Geography


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International

Relations


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Islamic

Studies



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Jewish

Studies


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Medieval

and

Renaissance

Studies



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Middle

Eastern

Studies


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Philosophy


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Public

Policy

Analysis



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Religious

Studies


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Slavic

Languages

and

Literatures



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Major: Anthropology



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Basic Information

Anthropology is the broad study of humans and human cultures throughout the world and
throughout history and prehistory. It's part

natural science, part social science, and part
humanistic study. If you major in Anthropology, you'll compare and contrast biological, social, and
cultural similarities and differences among humans and human societies. The topics you'll
encounter are pret
ty much infinite. In one semester, you may study Neanderthals, politics in tribal
New Guinea, chimpanzee language, Native American pottery, or kinship and religion in Sub
-
Saharan Africa, or poverty in the large urban centers of the United States.


The fiel
d of Anthropology is conventionally divided into four sub
-
fields: (1) archaeology, (2)
biological anthropology, (3) linguistic anthropology, and (4) cultural anthropology. Archaeology
deals primarily with the prehistoric origins of humankind. Biological an
thropology includes the
study of human and primate evolution as well as skeletal biology and genetics. Linguistic
anthropology concentrates on the history of language and its relation to culture. Cultural
anthropology deals with the functions of human soci
eties all over the world.



A degree in Anthropology can prepare you for graduate work (of course) and a number of
professional activities in the fields of international affairs, medicine, environmental protection,
social service, education, and historic p
reservation.

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African

Studies


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African
-
American

Studies



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American

Studies


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Ancient

Studies



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Arabic



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Archeology



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Art

History


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Asian
-
American

Studies



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Chinese



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Classics


Save

Comparative

Literature



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Criminology


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East

Asian

Studies



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East

European

Studies


Save

Economics


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English


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English

Literature


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French


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Geography


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German



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Hebrew


Save

Historic

Preservation



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History


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International

Studies



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Islamic

Studies



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Italian


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Japanese



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Jewish

Studies


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Latin

American

Studies



Save

Linguistics



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Medieval

and

Renaissance

Studies



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Middle

East
ern

Studies


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Modern

Greek



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Music

History



Save

Peace

Studies


Save

Philosophy


Save

Political

Science


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Portuguese



Save

Psychology


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Public

Policy

Analysis



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Religious

Studies


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Russian


Save

Slavic

Languages

and

Literatures



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Sociology


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South

Asian

Studies


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Southeast

Asia

Studies



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Spanish



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Urban

Studies


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Major: Chemical Engineering



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Basic Information

Run
-
of
-
the
-
mill chemists develop new compounds and determine the structures and properties of
things that already exist. You knew that. Chemical
Engineering is different from and more
complicated than chemistry because it emphasizes the commercial applications of chemical
reactions; it involves harnessing chemical reactions to produce things people want. It's a very
broad field that overlaps consid
erably with other branches of engineering, chemistry, and
biochemistry.


If you major in Chemical Engineering, you'll learn how to reorganize the structure of molecules
and how to design chemical processes through which chemicals, petroleum, foods, and
pha
rmaceuticals can undergo. You'll learn how to build and operate industrial plants where raw
materials are chemically altered. You'll learn how to keep the environment safe from potential
pollution and hazardous waste, too.



Chemical Engineering is not an
easy major (at all), but if you can make it through to graduation
day, you'll be in demand. Paper mills, manufacturers of fertilizers, pharmaceutical companies,
plastics makers, and tons of other kinds of firms will be looking for just your expertise, and
they'll
pay you pretty handsomely for it. You should also know that, traditionally, more Chemical
Engineering majors obtain master's and doctoral degrees than students in almost any other
engineering field, and that this major makes for a wonderful steppin
g stone to both law and
medicine.

Related Majors

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Aerospace

Engineering


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Applied

Mathematics



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Astronomy


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Astrophysics


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Atmospheric

Science


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Biochemistry



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Biology


Save

Biopsychology


Save

Cell

Biology



Save

Chemistry


Save

Civil

Engineering


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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Computer

Engineering


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Electrical

Engineering



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Environmental

Science


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Genetics



Major: Neuroscience



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Basic Information

Ever wonder

how our minds work? A major in Neuroscience might put you on a path to answering
that question. Neuroscience, according to Kenyon College, is “the study of brain
-
behavior
relationships in order to understand the roles they play in regulating both animal a
nd human
behavior.” A relatively new field of study, Neuroscience combines the fields of biology,
psychology, chemistry, engineering, and others to come to a more specific understanding of how
brain structures influence behavior. As a Neuroscience major, y
ou’ll learn about the evolution of
the brain, cellular neuroscience, and genetics. You’ll learn about consciousness and what affects
it. You’ll learn about the nervous system, and what factors might enhance or destroy it. You’ll
study various types of both

normal and abnormal behavior. And then you’ll put them together and
see how the brain and nervous system are themselves factors in why we act the way we do.



Much of your Neuroscience coursework will require research and laboratory work. You might
study
the electrical activity of nerve cells, or evaluate the effects of drugs on behavior; there are
any number of directions your research may lead you.



You can apply your Neuroscience major to any number of fields

medicine, research, and
psychology are only

a few of the options. Let your own vision and passion for the brain lead you.

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Biochemistry



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Biology


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Biopsychology


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Cell

Biology



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Chemistry


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Child

Development


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Clinical

Psychology



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Developmental

Psychology



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Experimental

Psychology



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Microbiology



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Neurobiology



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Nursing


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Pre
-
Medicine



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Pre
-
Veterinary

Medicine


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Psychology


Major: Psychology



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Basic Information

Psychology is the study of the way humans and animals interact and respond to their
environment. The manner in which they do is ca
lled behavior.



Psychology combines humanities and science. Psychologists try to discover why certain people
react to certain aspects of society and the world at large in a certain way, and from those
reactions, they try to deduce something about the biol
ogy of our brains and the way the
environment influences us. Sound complicated? It is, but it's also a profoundly fascinating major.
If you major in Psychology, you'll look for the essence of why people are the way they are, from
their personality type to
their sexual orientation. Within this broad framework, Psychology majors
focus on such features of the human mind as learning, cognition, intelligence, motivation,
emotion, perception, personality, mental disorders, and the ways in which our individual
pre
ferences are inherited from our parents or shaped by our environment.


With a strong background in research and the scientific method, a Psychology major pursues a
field of study that seeks to educate, communicate, and resolve many of the problems surround
ing
human behavior.

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American

Studies


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Anthropology


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Chemistry


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Communication

Disorders


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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Criminology


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East

Asian

Studies



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Education


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Education


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English


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German



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History


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Human

Development


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Linguistics



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Mathematics


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Philosophy


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Religious

Studies


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Major: Education



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Basic Information

As an Education major, you’ll learn the skills you need to become an effective
and inspirational
teacher

someone who has the ability to influence young children and teenagers in life
-
changing
ways. A teacher’s job is all
-
important in our faster and faster
-
paced society because the
knowledge each student needs is constantly evolving.
For example, more of an exception than a
rule a decade ago, computers are very much a part of today’s classroom. At a time when schools
are being blamed for poor test scores and problem children, good teachers are needed more than
ever. If you are creative
, dedicated, enthusiastic, and compassionate, schools need you.



Although much of your coursework will be general Education material, most states require you to
choose a specific grade level you’d like to teach. Choices usually include some variation of e
arly
childhood education (preschool), primary education (kindergarten through eighth grade),
secondary education (ninth through twelfth grade), and special education. Your student teaching
experience, in which you spend a semester or more in a sponsoring c
lassroom, will be in the field
of your choice.

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Education



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Child

Care


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Child

Development


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Developmental

Psychology



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Education

Administration


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Education

of

t
he

Deaf



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Educational

Psychology



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Physical

Education



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Teacher

Education



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Teaching

English

as

a

Second

Language















Major: Biochemistry



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Basic Information

Do you love chemistry? Do you go all soft and squishy in your biology class? Do you wish you
could somehow take them both at once?

(Are you out of your mind?) Well, you can if you major in
Biochemistry.



Biochemistry majors study the chemistry of living things

the molecular compounds, substances,
and physiology that make them tick. You can think of it as teeny biology. Biochemists s
tudy the
minute, discrete characteristics of every organism and biological process. You’ll be the envy of
pre
-
med majors everywhere because since you’ll probably like it, you will actually understand
organic chemistry. This major is also good preparation i
f you are considering medical school as a
possibility.



Remember that most college science classes require extensive lab time. Be prepared to do more
bonding with your lab partner than with your roommate or significant other. (Unless, of course,
your lab
partner is your roommate or significant other.)

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Major: Journalism



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Basic Information

Journalism is a hands
-
on, professionally oriented major that involves
gathering, interpreting,
distilling, and reporting information to audiences through a variety of media. Journalism majors
learn about every conceivable kind of Journalism (including magazine, newspaper, online
journalism, photojournalism, broadcast journal
ism, and public relations).


That's not all, though. In addition to specialized training in writing, editing, and reporting,
Journalism requires a working knowledge of history, culture, and current events. You'll more than
likely be required to take a broa
d range of courses that runs the gamut from statistics to the hard
sciences to economics to history. There will also be a lot of lofty talk about professional ethics
and civic responsibility as well
-

and you can bet you'll be tested on it. To top it all o
ff, you'll
probably work on the university newspaper or radio station, or perhaps complete an internship
with a magazine or a mass media conglomerate.


We know it goes without saying but you'll also have to write an awful lot of articles if you decide to
m
ake Journalism your major. This is true even if you ultimately want to work in radio or television.
If you don't enjoy writing, you probably won't like Journalism very much. Finally, take note: at
universities with elite Journalism programs, time
-
consuming

weed
-
out courses abound and you
must be formally accepted into the Journalism program, which can be ridiculously difficult and
competitive.

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American

Studies


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Communication

Disorders


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Counseling



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English


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Film


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History


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Mass

Communication



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Psychology


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Radio

and

Television


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Speech

Pathology



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Technical

Writing



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Visual

Communication










Major: Public Relations



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Basic Information

You’re always into what’s new and now, you’ve got a knack for
organization and a flair for writing,
and people always listen to what you have to say. If you’re all that, with a soft spot for glitz and
glamour, welcome to the fast
-
paced, results
-
driven, done
-
yesterday world of PR.

According to Kent State University, p
ublic relations is “the strategic management of
communication and relationships between organizations and their key publics.” In other words,
public relations specialists control how organizations and their products or services are perceived
by the public

and in turn, what image their paying clients (the organizations) portray. As a public
relations major, you’ll learn about all the written, verbal, and visual elements that go into effective
public relations. You’ll be prepped on how to write a press releas
e and how to handle media
attention on your client’s behalf. Your studies may also include forays into publishing newsletters,
designing effective promotional ads, newswriting, broadcast media, and videography. Once you
have a grasp on these basics, you’ll

learn how to use them effectively to drive sales for your client
and earn favor in the public eye. Knowing when to communicate what is essential in public
relations. You’ll learn how to develop your information and messages, and how to make sure that
info
rmation is portrayed in the best possible way to your targeted audience. The best PR pros will
also know a little about event planning, product launches, public speaking, and damage control.

Public relations is in many ways an interdisciplinary major, and
you’ll study elements from many
other fields, including psychology, philosophy, languages, business, art, and many others. You’ll
learn how to analyze public opinion and various research studies in order to determine what the
public relations needs are for

a certain organization. Problem solving and strategic planning
abilities go a long way in the field, so hone them now. Oh, and there are ethical issues too, when
it comes to “influencing” public opinion

you’ll want to maintain ethical business practices f
or the
sake of your PR firm and your firm’s loyal clients.

Many programs require students to participate in an internship, which is a great way to see the
world of PR from the inside, and some programs require students to choose a concentration,
often in t
he business field. Be sure to research exactly what’s required as you determine what
program is best for you.

Related Majors

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Advertising


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Business

Communica
tions


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Communications

Studies/Speech

Communication

and

Rhetoric


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Fashion

Merchandising


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Journalism


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Marketing


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Mass

Communi
cation



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Political

Communication


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Radio

and

Television




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Major: Advertising




Basic Information

What with the gazillions of television channels, radio stations, Internet sites, and periodicals out
there, there's certainly no lack of
media in the world. And, as everybody knows, the driving force
behind nearly all media is ads. If you major in Advertising, you'll become something of an expert
in advertising principles, copywriting and layout, media campaigns, and media economics. You'll

also hone your writing, presentation, and problem
-
solving skills.


You'll become a pretty good psychologist, too. You'll learn how and why people make decisions
and how to influence those decisions. Behind all the glitz and the cool slogans, Advertising i
s
really about understanding what motivates people to buy a product, or use a service, or support a
cause.


Advertising is an overwhelmingly project
-
oriented major. You'll spend enormous chunks of time
looking at ads, talking about them, and criticizing th
em. (By the way, and this stands to reason, if
you don't like to talk about ads already, you probably shouldn't make them your life.) However,
you'll mostly learn about Advertising by doing Advertising. You'll develop concepts and portfolios.
You'll swamp
yourself in market research (maybe even for real firms). You'll create sales
presentations and come up with irresistible jingles designed to motivate your target audience.
Most importantly, you'll have internships. They are utterly indispensable. When recr
uiters come to
campus, or employers are eyeballing you for that Big First Job, they'll be a lot more interested in
you if you have a few internships under your belt.



After graduation, most Advertising majors go to work for traditional Advertising agencie
s, media
conglomerates, or marketing firms.

Related Majors

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American

Studies


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Art



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Economics


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English


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Film


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Journalism


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Marketing


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Mass

Communication



Save

Political

Science


Save

Psychology


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Radio

and

Television


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Theatre


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Visual

Communication





Major: Marketing



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Basic Information

Between us, Marketing is the art
and the science of getting people to buy stuff. More formally, it is
the study of how to determine consumer needs and translate those needs into products and
services and selling them locally, nationally, and globally. Either way, Marketing is a practical,

career
-
oriented, and solidly pre
-
professional major that requires analytical skills, logic and
creativity.



If you decide to major in Marketing, you'll learn about the distribution of goods and services,
consumer behavior, pricing policies, channels of r
etail and wholesale distribution, advertising,
sales, research, and management. Other topics you are likely to encounter include market
segmentation and targeting, effective customer service, new product development, and logistics.


Upon graduation, most M
arketing majors usually find jobs in consulting, market research, and
advertising. If you want to work in the Marketing department, though, you should expect to start in
sales where you can really get to know a company's products and its customers. In fact
, starting
in sales is frequently the best (and sometimes the only) way to ultimately get one of those
coveted (not to mention high
-
paying, low stress) jobs in the Marketing department.


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Communication

Disorders


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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Counseling



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Creative

Writing


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Economics


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English


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Film


Save

Journalism


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Mass

Communication



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Philosophy


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Political

Science


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Psychology


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Radio

and

Television


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Sociology


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Speech

Pathology



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Technical

Writing



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Visual

Communication




Majo
r: English



Save


Basic Information

English programs focus on literature, language, and writing, and an English major provides the
opportunity to
encounter a wide array of absorbing works of fiction, poetry, and non
-
fiction from
around the world and throughout history. A few years of analyzing the works of the greatest
minds and imaginations that human civilization has produced will almost assuredly

sharpen your
critical, emotional, creative, and moral faculties. With any luck, a little greatness may rub off on
you as well.


An English major accords the unique opportunity to engage with different societies, different eras,
and, come to think of it, d
ifferent societies from different eras. It enables you to share the
experiences of others, to feel what was felt by people in earlier eras, distant lands, entirely other
patterns of life, and to juxtapose those feelings with your own. The study of literatu
re also
beautifully and powerfully conveys the enduring questions about the human condition, and
-

occasionally, if you look especially hard
-

sheds light on the answers to those questions.



With an English degree, you can certainly become a starving auth
or. Or, you can become an
affluent one. Just ask Toni Morrison or Amy Tan. You can also become a legendary football
coach
-

like Joe Paterno; a Supreme Court justice
-

like Clarence Thomas; or a governor
-

like
Mario Cuomo. These and many other people used

a degree in English as a springboard to a
successful career.


A working knowledge of literature is an invaluable component of any liberal arts education. It is
tremendous preparation for a future in law (or any professional training that requires interpre
ting
written material), journalism, publishing, graduate studies, and just about anything else.

Related Majors

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African
-
American

Studies



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Art

History


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Classics


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Creative

Writing


Sa
ve

Film


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French


Save

German



Save

Hebrew


Save

Journalism


Save

Latin

American

Studies



Save

Radio

and

Television


Save

Slavic

Languages

and

Literatures



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Technical

Writing



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Theology




Major: Philosophy



Save


Basic
Information

Philosophy majors like the big questions. Why are we here? How should one act? What is man's
true nature? They like to read difficult books by writers like Plato, Kant, Nietzsche, Hegel, and
Kierkegaard.



Seriously, Philosophy majors are critical thinkers who leave no stone unturned, no thought
unexplored. They pick up where Socrates left off, trying to figure out what it means to be human
by asking hard questions (e.g., “Why believe in God? And for that ma
tter, why not?”) and doing
their best to answer them clearly and logically. Everything, and we do mean

everything
, falls into
their realm of inquiry.



Philosophy involves more than thinking in abstract terms, for underlying the major is a set of
critical
and analytical tools that will help you to intellectually engage the world around you.
Philosophy majors learn how to construct nearly airtight rational and logical argument, present
their thoughts convincingly, and think and respond to difficult questions

and situations from
various perspectives. As a major you will study Philosophy in all of its different forms, from logic,
to ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and the history of Philosophy. Oh, and by the time you
graduate, you'll be able to argue circle
s around your friends.

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Studies


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American

Studies


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Anthropology


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Art



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Art

History


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Classics


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Comparative

Literature



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Creative

Writing


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East

Asian

Studies



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East

European

Studies


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English


Save

French


Save

German



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Hebrew


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History


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Major: Urban Planning



Save


Basic Information

In New York it’s knowing how to cram three people into a one
-
bedroom apartment that costs
$2,500 a month and still be able to tell yourself, “it’s worth it.” In Chicago it’s knowing how to
actually get from your house to your car in the winter without the
loss of any extremities.


Every city in America has it’s own feel, style, and culture. The point of the Urban Planning major
is to get beyond all of that by looking at the way our cities are designed, constructed, and
planned. Urban Planning majors study t
he socio
-
economic factors and conditions behind housing
projects in the city while also studying the effect of public transportation in suburban areas. It’s
both an analytical and quantitative approach, one that combines policy, statistics, a sense of
hist
ory, and a lot more.



Urban planners help us look at the ways we can improve our neighborhoods, preserving some of
the past while keeping an eye open for future improvements. So whether you want to help plan
the next Central Park in Peoria, Illinois, or d
esign a way to unclog freeway congestion in Los
Angeles, the Urban Planning major will give you the tools you need to literally change the face of
the American landscape.

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Studies


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Archeology



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Architectural

History


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Architecture


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Civil

Engineering


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Economics


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Environmental

Science


Save

Political

Science


Save

Public

Administration



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Public

Policy

Analysis



Save

Sociology


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Statistics



Save

Surveying



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Urban

Studies







Major: Environmental Science



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Basic Information

The Environmental Science major combines study in biology, chemistry, physics, and
mathematics, exploring the relationships
between these areas to acquire a greater understanding
of how our environment works as a whole. Unlike the Environmental Engineering major, the
Environmental Science major concentrates on general scientific principles and analysis, rather
than design and a
pplication. Bottom line: it’s a whole lot of science.



This is a great time to get involved in environmental work. As concern for the environment
increases, Environmental Science majors will be in increasing demand. Environmental Science
majors work as
policy writers and consultants, developers, conservationists, educators, and
ecologists.

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Biology


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Forestry



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Geology


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Horticulture


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International

Agriculture


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Plant

Pathology


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Soil

Science


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Sustainable

Resource

Management



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Wildlife

Management



















Major: Architecture



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Basic Information

Architects are concerned with nothing less than the form of the physical environment and its
effect on people's lives.
Architecture is equal parts art and science, and it encompasses
technical, social, aesthetic, and ethical concerns.



If you major in Architecture, your first year will be crucial. Freshman year will lay the foundation
for the rest of your education, and i
t will be intense, to say the least. The focus of the first year is
to train you to understand the conceptual, spatial, and abstract qualities of Architecture. You'll
learn how to communicate ideas graphically through drawings and models, and how to assess

and research architectural questions. You'll also learn a bit about architectural history and theory.
You'll take some pretty heavy doses of math, too. Mostly, though, you'll spend tremendous
amounts of time agonizing over minuscule details in studio
-

al
one, in small groups, and one
-
on
-
one with faculty members (Architecture professors are some of the most dedicated around).
You'll also observe more advanced students while they work.


If you make it through your daunting first year, you'll be well on your
way to one of two degrees in
Architecture. The Bachelor of Architecture requires a bare minimum of five years of study (expect
to spend six). The Master of Architecture requires a minimum of three years of study following an
unrelated bachelor's degree or
two years following a four
-
year, pre
-
professional Architecture
program. There are about 110 schools across the fruited plain that offer accredited professional
programs in Architecture, and you need to graduate from one of these programs in order to
become

a licensed architect.



It can be pretty difficult to actually get into the school of Architecture at most universities, by the
way. You'll need to submit a convincing portfolio of creative work and a personal statement.


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Ceramics



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Drawing


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Industrial

Design



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Interior

Architecture



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Interior

Design


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Landscape

Architec
ture



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Mathematics


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Naval

Architecture


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Physics


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Sculpture



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Urban

Planning


Major: Art History



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Basic Information

Abstract Expressionism or Post Impressionism? Surrealism or Dadaism?

What's the difference?
In addition to knowing answers to questions such as these, art history majors study both the
history and aesthetic ideology that goes into a work of visual art. Whether it's painting,
photography, architecture, film, sculpture, or m
ulti
-
media projects, art historians are responsible
for helping us to interpret work in these media.


Part historian, part cultural critic, Art History majors help define a work of art by placing it into its
proper historical context. They examine the laye
rs of influences that go into the making of a piece
of art, including the social, political, and personal forces underlying an artist's development. With
each new artistic movement, with each new artist, comes a new way of seeing and interpreting
the world
. Through the art historian's critical lens, our own ability to share in the artist's insight
and vision is enhanced.


As an Art History major you will also have the opportunity to cultivate your knowledge of a foreign
language, related liberal arts majors
, and, if you're interested, explore your own artistic
inclinations through studio art courses.

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Studies


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African
-
American

Studies



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American

History


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American

Studies


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Ancient

Studies



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Anthropology


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Architectural

History


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Architecture


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Art



Save

Art

Education



Save

Asian
-
American

Studies



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Ceramics



Save

Classics


Save

Comparative

L
iterature



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Dance



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Drawing


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East

Asian

Studies



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East

European

Studies


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Major: Physics



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Basic Information

In a nutshell, the sum of Physics is a continually evolving mathematical model of the natural
world. Physics majors study the exac
t, fundamental laws of nature. They study the structure of all
sizes and kinds of materials and particles
-

the very universe itself. They also seek to understand
and define the properties of energy, temperature, distance, and time, and they try to describ
e all
of these things through mathematical equations. It's mind
-
blowing stuff, and what follows from
Physics labs is cutting
-
edge technology. The transistor, the laser, MRI medical systems, and
superconductors are just a few of the things for which physici
sts are responsible.



If you major in Physics, you'll study a remarkably broad range of natural phenomena
-

everything
from submicroscopic elementary matter to black holes to the endless reaches of the galaxy. You'll
carry out and read about tons of
experiments and you'll do more complicated math than most
mortals would ever want to shake a stick at. Yours will be the quest for the underlying logic and
the theoretical structure that unifies and explains all the different phenomena of the universe. It'
s
a dirty job, but somebody's got to do it.

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Aerospace

En
gineering


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Architectural

Engineering


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Astronomy


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Astrophysics


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Atmospheric

Science


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Biochemistry



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Biology


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Cell

Biology



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Chemical

Engineering


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Chemistry


Save

Civil

Engineering


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Computer

and

Information

Science


Save

Computer

Engin
eering


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Electrical

Engineering



Save

Genetics



Save

Industrial

Engineering



Save

Mechanical

Engineering


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Microbiology



Save

Major: Geology



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Basic Information

If you’re fascinated by how the environment affects us and vice versa, or if you’re concerned
about maintaining clean water and a healthy environment, Geology might be the major for you.
As a Geology major, you’ll learn how and why the Earth has evolved. Y
ou’ll study natural and
artificial environmental processes and learn how those processes should be improved. You’ll
study the history of the earth and see how humans have brought about change for better or for
worse. Geologists are concerned with the entir
e physical makeup of the earth, and many
specializations are available within the major. Mineralogists study the formation and structures of
minerals while glaciologists study ice. Paleontologists are concerned with what fossils can tell us
about our histo
ry while economic geologists search for valuable minerals like crystallized carbon.
Other areas to study include the formation of the Earth’s crust, the continents, planets, chemical
elements of rocks, and water. No matter what your concentration, you’ll b
e learning how all
aspects of the earth relate to each other

and to us.

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Archeology



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Biology


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Chemistry


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Environmental

Science


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Geography


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Geological

Engineering



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Marine

Science


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Ocean

Engineering



Save

Petroleum

Engineering



























Major: Geography



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Basic Information

Do you get sucked into maps, or have an interest in the weather or the environment that your
friends don't share? If so, Geography

may be a field to explore. There's more to Geography than
locating state capitals and identifying mountain ranges. Geographers predict the weather and
analyze environmental changes; they deal with issues of population such as where population is
greatest
and why, and how populations change and have changed. If you have an interest in
foreign affairs, many geographers focus on specific parts of the world such as Europe or Africa.


Human Geography and Physical Geography are two main branches of this field, a
nd both offer
many opportunities for interesting study. According to the Association of American Geographers,
Human Geography deals with the spatial aspects of human existence: where we live and work,
how we use space
-
basically how we create our worlds. Ph
ysical Geographers, on the other hand,
focus more on the land and climate.



Geography majors usually become familiar with Geographic Information Systems, so be prepared
for a lot of science, math, and computer work.


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History


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Archeology



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Ecology


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Forestry



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History


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Natural

Resources

Conservation



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Soil

Science


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Statistics



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Urban

Planning


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Urban

Studies




















Major: Sociology



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Basic Information

Sociology is the scientific study of groups of humans. It is the study of collective human behavior
and the social forces that influence
collective human behavior. Sociologists seek to discover the
broad patterns of interaction of social life that influence individual behaviors.



If you major in Sociology, you'll learn about how groups, organizations, and societies are
structured. You'll s
tudy crime and violence, sex and gender, families, health and illness, work and
leisure, ethnic relations, religions and cultures, social classes, and communities and cities. You'll
study the rules that different groups of people have for living together,
and the principles upon
which groups of people are organized. You'll find out how these rules are created, how they are
sustained, how they are broken, and how they give meaning to the lives of individuals.

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-
American

Studies



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American

Studies


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Anthropology


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Art

History


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Asian
-
American

Studies



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Counseling



Save

Criminology


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English


Save

History


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International

Relations


Save

Jewish

Studies


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Linguistics



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Philosophy


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Political

Science


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Psychology


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Public

Policy

Analysis



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Religious

Studies


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Urban

Studies


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Women's

Studies








Major: Finance



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Basic Information

Finance is a very professionally oriented major designed to prepare you for
a career in financial
management, which is the art and science of managing money or, if you like, the way people,
institutions, markets, and countries generate and transfer wealth. It's a good major and potentially
a very lucrative one because, these days,

everybody
-

small businesses, monolithic corporations,
charities, and governments
-

needs effective financial management.



If you major in Finance, you'll study things like commercial and investment banking, forecasting
and budgeting, and asset and liabi
lity management. You'll learn more than you may ever want to
know about money, stocks and bonds, and how markets function. You'll learn how to determine
what fraction of a firm's assets (or your own assets) to put into different kinds of investment
vehicle
s in order to obtain the highest return for a justifiable level of risk. When you graduate, all
those baffling indexes at the back of the Wall Street Journal will make sense to you.



Upon graduation, your career can take many paths (naturally), but most F
inance majors find jobs
in the finance departments of firms; with banks, mutual funds, and other kinds of financial
institutions; or in government or some kind of charitable organization. Some schools offer
specialized areas of concentration within the Fin
ance major as well
-

in insurance and real estate
for example.

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Applied

Mathematics



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Business

Communications


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Computer

and

Information

Science


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Computer

Systems

Analysis



Save

Data

Processing


Save

Entrepreneurship



Save

Hospitality


Save

Human

Resources

Management



Save

Industrial

Management



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International

Business



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Logistics

Management


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M
anagerial

Economics


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Marketing


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Public

Administration



Save

Name:_____________________________________

Date:_______________________________________

Period:_____________________________________


“COLLEGE MAJORS”

WORKSHEET


DIRECTIONS: WORK WITH YOUR PARTNER ON THIS WORKSHEET. EACH OF YOU
WILL GET A SHEET OF PAPER WITH A MAJOR ON IT. READ THE SHEET AND THEN
DISCUSS/FILL OUT THIS WORKSHEET BASED ON THIS INFORMATION.


Your major:_____________________________________
______________________________________________

What are 3 related majors?
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

What is this major about?
__________________________________________________________
_______________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Write at least 2 thing
s about this major that you like:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Write at least 2 things about this major that you dislike:

______________________________
___________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Your partner’s major:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

What are 3 related majors?
______
___________________________________________________________________________________________

What is this major about?
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________
________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Write at least 2 things about this major that you like:
______________________________________________
___________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________
______________________________________________________________________________________

Write at least 2 things about this major that you dislike:

_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________
____________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
______________________


Project Assignment #1



DUE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
th
.

1.

Go to
http://homeworktips.about.com/library/maj/bl_majors_q
uiz.htm

and complete the “What College Major Will
Match Your Personality” Quiz.

2.

Print the results out and circle three majors that interest
you

the most
.

3.

Go to P
rinceton Review’s Majors Search:
http://www
.princetonreview.com/majors.aspx
. Look up
your three majors.

4.

Focusing on your previous knowledge and the
knowledge you acquired from your research, write a
summary of which major you would choose and why
you would choose it in comparison to the other major
s.
For example, “history would be better suited for me
because it is more heavily focused on reading rather
then the math skills required for a mechanical
engineering major.” Talk about why the other two
majors are not as well suited for your personality t
ype.
You must make references to the Princeton Review
website!

-
If writing on college
-
ruled paper, assignment must be 1
to 1 ½ pages long

-
If writing of wide
-
ruled paper, assignment must by 1 ½
to 2 pages long.

-
If typing in 12
-
size Times New Roman and
double
-
spaced, then assignment must be 1 to 1 ½ pages long.


For an alternative assignment, see Ms. Boyd