The Internet Sensory System

flangeeasyΚινητά – Ασύρματες Τεχνολογίες

21 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 1 μήνα)

82 εμφανίσεις

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cisco Confidential

Pascal Thubert

1

The Internet Sensory System


Pascal Thubert


IP Technology Center

(
pthubert@cisco.com
)

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

2

Sensors as a service feed

New Knowledge

Improve Productivity

Healthcare

Agricultural

Energy Saving (I2E)

Predictive maintenance

Industrial Automation

Heal
th

Smart Home

Defense

High
-
Confidence Transport
and assets tracking

Intelligent Building

Smart Cities

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

3

Agenda

Sensor
-
based services

Networking sensors

The fringe of the Internet

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

4

Sensor
-
based

services

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

5

Building automation


Today:

Highly fragmented market

Limited to no IP/wireless

Dominated by BACNet (20%MS)

Lacking open infrastructure



Potential services:

Remote Management

Energy savings

Regulation

Security

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

6

Smart cities


Today:

Slowing mesh networks
development

Few applications


video
-
surveillance, municipal info



Potential services:

Automation (watering)

Monitoring (pollution)

Energy/Water savings

Water leak detection

Traffic Regulation

Physical Security

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

7

Home Automation


Today:

Lots of wires

Some powerline

ISP presence (FT)



Potential services

Energy/Water savings

Home security

Home Safety

Remote healthcare

Telemetry / billing

Air quality monitoring

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

8

Power grid


Emerging access technology

PowerLine (Networking) Communications

Broadband PowerLine


Low frequency (<kHz) applications for Utility

Automatic meter reading

Load control

Energy balancing


© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

9


Converged network


Scalable Plug & Play


High Availability


Network virtualization


Open Standards (IPv6)



standard network
abstraction and services




Plant /
building / home
network

Direction

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

10

IP to the Sensors


New services and applications

M2M, remote management


New Markets

Process Control for factories

Control and Automation


for home, building, cities



Larger Core Market

Open standards to the sensor



Lower cost



More connected devices and new applications



A wider Internet


Shaping the future

Internet of things

Think of VoIP as a model…

…but for a great many…

…of tiny devices, everywhere.

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

11

Networking
sensors

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

12

Which Network for the M2M Generation?

Video Surveillance

Factory Sensors

Ubiquitous PnP

Networking

Vehicle to Vehicle

Business Drivers

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

13

No Way to Extend the Internet Model There

The Requirements for M2M


Simple as power plug

Extends the reach and the scale of the

internet inside homes and factories


Safe vs. secured

Not necessarily a trust model in place

Anonymity and innocuousness can suffice

I.e., tit for tat or credit
-
based


Access to local services

DDNS, service discovery


Always reachable

From everywhere as opposed to by

everyone

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

14

What Is Ad
-
Hoc?


Automated

Self
-
forming, self
-
healing, self
-
optimizing

No network architects


On
-
demand

Self centric

Scaling to self needs (usually limited)

Transient

Divergent (in and outs)


But not necessarily

Local (can be a wide area)

Unsecured (this is a policy matter)

Host to host like 802.11

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

15

NCP Generation With:


All transmission groups to L2 peers


All physical units type 4 nodes,


All virtual routes

Router CLI With:


ID, keys.


All links to L2 peers


Routes are discovered


Single ‘GRID’

Router Only Knows “Self” With:


ID, certificates


Peers are discovered


Links are discovered


Routes are discovered


Infinity of self
-
centric networks

A Sense of History

SNA Subarea

IPv4 Routing

IPv6 Ad
-
Hoc

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

16

The fringe

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

17

The Routing Infrastructure Today


The Internet

Fully engineered

Hierarchical, aggregations, ASs,

wire links

Fully distributed states

Shows limits (BGP tables, addr.

depletion)

Reached adult size, mature to aging


Intranets

Same structure as the internet

Yet decoupled from the internet

NAT, socks, proxies

First model for internet extension

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

18

The Emerging Fringe of the Internet


802.11s mesh networks

Fixed ad
-
hoc radio access

Getting pervasive (citywide)


Mobile ad
-
hoc networking

Dynamic and contextual edge

Mobile ad
-
hoc reachability


Network mobility

Mobile global reachability

Wide area ad
-
hoc networks

overlaid on the infrastructure

by route projection

The Fringe
Does Not Leak

into the

Routing Infrastructure

5

6

7

8

C

B

1

3

2

A

4

A’s

Home

B’s

Home

MANET

MESH

NEMO

Fixed Wired
Infrastructure




© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

19

We Might Be at the Eve of Pervasive Networking, a Vision for the
Internet Where Every Person and Every Device Is Connected to the
Network in the Ultimate Realization of Metcalf's Law

Towards Pervasive Networking


A new model to scale the internet with self and

group
-
centric abstractions of the network on
-

demand routing overlaid on the current IP

infrastructure


Self
-
forming, self
-
healing networks, self
-

aware nodes

With no prior knowledge of the transient peers and links in some

tit for tat, anonymous and innocuous cooperation


Always reachable nodes


By the precious few with the relevant needs and rights enjoying

unrestricted mobility over wireless connectivity


Atomic networks with all the necessary

application support

Support merging and splitting dynamically, interconnecting

logical administrative domains within and in between nodes


And more

Integrating:

IPv6

MANET/ROLL

NEMO

Services

Applications

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

20

The golden path


Vision

Sensors and actuators using Internet
technology

That’s Billions of devices in the next 10 years

Innerving the skin if the Internet

Enabling new services and applications


Steps

IPv6 for automation open standards (ISA100.11a)

IPv6 for Low power and lossy networks (6LoWPAN and ROLL)

Apply standards where needed (home, building, power grid)

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

21

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

22

Why IP ?

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

23

New applications pretty much every day … but …

The number of
proprietary

solutions has
exploded
: Z
-
Wave, Xmesh,
SmartMesh/TSMP, … at many layers
(physical, MAC, L3) and most chip vendor
claim to be compatible with their own
standard


Many non
-
interoperable “solutions”
addressing specific problems (“
My
application is specific” syndrome
)



Different
Architectures
,



Different
Protocols


=> Prevents ubiquitous services and applications

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

24


What ?

A Layered architecture => flexible,


Where ?

The End to End design principle,


How ?

Separation of the networks from the
services: IP indifferent to PHY and
applications,


Why ?

The Internet as a platform for
innovation. No central gatekeeper exerting
control over the Internet.

A few key design principles of the Internet

Source: Prepared statement of Vint Cerf
-

Feb ‘07

© 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

25



Sensor networks will be made of a number of links:
802.15.4, Low Power 802.11, Low power Buetooth but
also wired links


The solution MUST support a variety of links (IP)
while understanding the links characteristics (use of
abstraction layer).


IP provide an abstraction layer between the radio
network technologies and the applications and services

A FUNDAMENTAL requirement