The Dynamics of Housing and Health: Results from Longitudinal ...

fearfuljewelerΠολεοδομικά Έργα

16 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

70 εμφανίσεις

The Dynamics of Housing and 
Health: Results from Longitudinal 
Studies in the UK
David Pevalin, PhD
School of Health and Human Sciences
University of Essex, UK
Presentation for the Australian Health Inequities Programme, Adelaide
27th
April 2010
A long‐standing concern….
•Early social reformers. 
–Edwin Chadwick.
•19th
century writers. 
–Charles Dickens. 
–Fredrich Engels.
•Early 20th
century slum clearances
•After WW1 –‘Homes fit for Heroes’
•1930s –surge in council house building and 
rent subsidies.
House in Wortley Street. Two up, one down. Living‐room 12 ft. 
by 10 ft. Sink and copper [cooking pot] in the living‐room, coal 
hole under stairs. Sink worn almost flat and constantly 
overflowing. Walls not too sound. Penny in slot, gas‐light. House 
very dark and gas‐light estimated at 4d. a day. Upstairs rooms 
are really one large room partitioned into two. Walls very bad –
wall of back room cracked right through. Window‐frames 
coming to pieces and have to be stuffed with wood. Rain comes 
through in several places. Sewer runs under the house and 
stinks in the summer but Corporation “says they can’t do nowt.”
Six people in house, two adults and four children, the eldest 
aged fifteen. Youngest but one attending hospital –tuberculosis 
suspected. House infested by bugs. Rent 5s. 3d., including rates.
George Orwell, Road to Wigan Pier, pp.54‐55, 1937.
Salthouse Lane, Hull. circa 1950.
Grosvenor Street, Hull. 1965.
Contemporary housing clearance ‐Pathfinder
The pathfinder scheme has been 
responsible for the demolition of 
more than 16,000 homes, yet 
has created only 3,700 new 
homes.
The streets of boarded‐up houses commonly 
seen in photographs used to illustrate the 
problem never represented the reality of all of 
the neighbourhoods included within the nine 
Pathfinders or the many other market renewal 
initiatives (Cameron 2006)
Essentially this has involved a shift of emphasis 
from the problem of low housing demand, 
expressed in high levels of vacancy and 
abandonment and falling values, to an argument 
that the housing stock needs to be modernised to 
remove what is seen as outmoded in quality, 
design and tenure(Cameron 2006, my emphasis)
Recent context
•Black (1980)
•Council housing –right to buy
•Acheson (1998)
•Housing conditions surveys
•Joseph Rowntree Foundation:
–At the beginning of the 21st century, we still have a 
great deal of housing which
 
belongs to the century 
before last in
 
terms of the conditions it
 
provides to
 
its 
occupants.
–In 1996, some 1,455,000 occupied dwellings in the UK 
were either unfit for human habitation or below 
the
 
Scottish tolerable standard.
 
This represented about 
6% or one in 16 dwellings in the UK…
Revell & Leather (2000)
Revell & Leather (2000)
Central heating
•Blane’s “Inverse housing law”–worst housing in the 
harshest climate
•Aylin et al (2001) estimate 40,000 excess winter deaths 
(1995/6) mostly due to lack of central heating
•Improvements in children with asthma (Somerville et 
al 2000)
•Improvements in general symptomatic health in 
children (Hopton & Hunt 1996)
•Scotland Central Heating Program –reductions in first 
diagnosis of CHD and high blood pressure and positive 
effect of SF‐36 scores (Walker et al 2008)
Cohort studies
•Boyd Orr cohort. Childhood housing 
conditions and adult mortality (Dedman et al 
2001). Not a major determinant of adult 
mortality and their effect is indistinguishable 
from the general effects of social deprivation
•NCDS –1958 birth cohort (Marsh et al 2000). 
Found a “dose response”for the number of 
housing deprivation conditions and risk of 
disability or severe ill‐health in young 
adulthood (up to 33 years old)
•Scotland’s Housing and Regeneration Project 
(SHARP) quasi‐experimental study with follow up 
and mixed methods. No statistical evidence of 
improvement in health but recent qualitative 
evidence of increased satisfaction with housing 
but questions about loss of community.
•Thomson et al (2001) –systematic review of 
housing intervention studies concluded that most 
evidence was from weak studies and it was 
“impossible to specify the nature and size of any 
health gains.”
Series of papers from a British Academy 
funded project –The Dynamics of Unhealthy 
Housing.
•Taylor, Pevalin & Todd (2007) The psychological costs 
of unsustainable housing commitments. Psychological 
Medicine.
•Pevalin (2009) Housing repossessions, evictions and 
common mental illness in the UK: results from a 
household panel study. Journal of Epidemiology and 
Community Health.
•Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008) The dynamics of 
unhealthy housing in the UK: a panel data analysis. 
Housing Studies.
The British Household Panel Survey
•Began in September 1991
•National sample of England, Wales and 
Scotland
•5,000 households/10,000 interviewed 
adults 16+ (approx.)
•Residential population of Great Britain
•Annual face‐to‐face interview  
BHPS main
1991
2008
ECHP
Scotland booster
Wales booster
NI booster
1997
2001
1999
1994
Youth Panel (11-15 year olds)
2001
2009
UKHL
S
2010
Individual Respondents –Wave 11 (2001)
BHPS main8936
BHPS youth1413
ECHP ‐Scotland701 
ECHP ‐England & Wales 657 
ECHP ‐NI 165
Wales new sample 2449 
Scotland new sample 2501 
N.I. new sample 3458 
Total cases20280
UK Household Longitudinal Study (UK HLS)
•Started in 2009
•Target sample size of 40,000 households/100,000 individuals at 
wave 1
•Ethnic minority boost sample of over 3,000 households 
•Incorporation of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) 
sample interviews from all household members, aged 10 and 
above in Wave 2 (2010)
•Topic coverage relevant to a wide range of disciplines and policy 
fields 
•Links to supplementary data, such as neighbourhood 
information and administrative data sources 
•Collection of health indicators and biomarkers 
•A platform for the collection of qualitative data 
•An Innovation Panelfor methodological research
The psychological costs of unsustainable housing 
commitments (Taylor, Pevalin & Todd, 2007)
•Housing payment problems and payment arrears. 
Outcome GHQ.
•BHPS data 1991‐2003 so can look at longer and 
short‐term effects.
•Male head of households: 
–Payment problems negatively impact on mental health and recently
starting being in arrears has an additional effect. Size of effects are 
similar to those for losing a job or marital breakdown.
•Female head of households:
–Longer term payment problems and longer term of being in arrears
negatively impact mental health. Effects similar in size to those for 
general financial hardship but are additive to.
Proportion of those experiencing repossession or eviction with 
common mental illness
Housing repossession is associated with an increased risk of common mental 
illness (adjusted odds ratio 1.61,95% confidence interval 1.10to 2.36) 
whereas eviction from rented property shows no increased risk (0.97,0.76to 
1.20) (Pevalin, 2009)
Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008)
Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008)
Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008)
Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008)
Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008)
None of these effects are ‘symmetrical’, in that the indicator for an increase of x
produces an effect equal but opposite to that of the indicator for a decrease in x.
For men’s health it is important to concentrate on stopping the deterioration of 
their housing and, for the older men, deterioration in their environment.
Pevalin, Taylor & Todd (2008)
Only one of these effects is ‘symmetrical’.
Improvements in women’s mental well‐being come from reductions in 
environmental issues and, for older women, reductions in housingproblems. 
Physical health is strongly influenced by housing problems but, for older women, 
stopping deterioration of their environment is beneficial.