Riverdale Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair - Weber State ...

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Abstract

Dr. Patti Cost

was approached by Lua
nn Farr about the possibility of Weber State
s
tudents organizing a Riverdale City Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair. Seven students
came together to plan and implement the fair.
We wanted to increase the residents’
knowledge of health and preparedness
in order to help them become a more prepared,
healthier community
. Health fairs encourage participation in activities which will increase
knowledge.
We
applied for the Hall Endowme
nt for Community Outreach Funding, which we
were
given
, to help cover the cost
.
We compiled and reviewed epidemiological data specific to
Riverdale to look at the community’s needs. From there, we developed a mission statement
and
philosophy. Goals and
objectives were established to direct us in our intervention.
We
surveyed a sample of the population to better understand what the community would want to
see at a health fair. In the latter half of February 2009, we secured vendors to participate.
Flye
rs were distributed throughout the community in businesses and churches. Advertisements
appeared in the
two local publications
. Two weeks before the date of the fair, we sent
reminder letters to the vendors which included a map and directions to the Comm
unity Center.
One week before the fair, we contacted the vendors by phone. During the fair, the vendors
filled out a survey to provide feedback. Community participants were encour
aged to fill out an
exit survey

as well.
W
e sent a thank you letter
to pa
rticipants
the following week.
Over 750
community members attended the fair.

Acknowledgments



We would like to take this opportunity to thank those who helped us and those who
participated in the fair. Their efforts helped enable us in achieving a
successful fair. We believe
it would not have been attainable nor successful without the support and help we received
from those around us.


First, we would like to thank Luann Farr, a local Riverdale Resident, for asking us to
participate in implementing
the Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair. She started with a
great foundation from previous years and allowed us to build upon it. She was also willing to
help us throughout the entire process. Her efforts to help us put everything together were
greatly
appreciated.


We would also like to express a special thank you to our professor, Dr. Patti Cost. Her
expertise and guidance greatly influenced the success of our project. We are grateful for her
willingness to step in and lend a hand when we needed it an
d for her words of encouragement.
We truly appreciate all

she d
id to help us succeed.


Also, we wish to take this opportunity to extend our appreciation to the Community
Involvement Center for agreeing to fund the fair. Without their great generosity, ou
r fair would
not have been possible. We express our appreciation for not only helping us, but also for all
that they do to help improve the surrounding communities of Weber State University.

We also had many businesses throughout Riverdale and the surrou
nding communities
agree to help with marketing and donations. We would like to thank them for giving of their
time and resources to help provide the residents of Riverdale with the knowledge and tools
they need to make healthier lifestyle changes and emer
gency preparedness choices.

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Acknowledgements……………………………………………………………………………………………………………


CHAPTER ONE

Introduction


Background………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Ethical C
oncerns……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…

Statement of the Problem…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Need for the Intervention…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Research Design……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…

Population
Sample……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...

Data Collection…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………

Data Analysis……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..………..

Assumptions……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Limitations………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………..…

Delimitations……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………

Definition of Terms…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Summary……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


CHAPTER TWO

Review of Literature


Introducti
on……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Topic Research……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..….

Qualitative Research………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Defined…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Theoretical Traditions………………………………
……………………………………………………..……..

Quantitative Research………………………………………………………………………………………………..………


Defined………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Theoretical Traditions……………………………………………………………………………………..…

Data Collection Methods…………………………………………………………………………………
……………….…


Survey…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Focus Groups…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Analysis of Qualitative Research…………………………………………………………………………….………….


Reliability and Validity……………………………………………………………………………………..…….

Analysis
of Quantitative Research…………………………………………………………………………….………


Reliability and Validity…………………………………………………………………………………………..

Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


CHAPTER THREE

Goals and Objectives for the Intervention


Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Mission Statement…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Program Philosophy………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………

Program Goals………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…


Program Goal…………
………………………………………………………………………………………..……


Program Objectives………………………………………………………………………………………….……


Learning Objectives………………………………………………………………………………………….…..


Behavioral Objectives………………………………………………………………………………………..….


Environmental Objectives……………………………………………
………………………………………..


Administrative Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………..


Awareness Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………


Knowledge Objectives…………………………………………………………………………………………..


Attitude Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………….


Ski
ll Development Objectives………………………………………………………………………..……..


Risk
-
Reduction Objectives…………………………………………………………………………………..


CHAPTER FOUR

Methods


Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……

Program Planning Model…………………………………………………………………………………………
….…..

Historical Perspective…………………………………………………………………………………………..

Rationale……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…

Application……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Timeline…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Grant and Donation
Money………………………………………………………………………………………………

Survey
s……………..
……………………………………………………………………………………………………..………

Population and Sampling………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Population…………………………………………………………………………………………………..……..


Sampling………………………………………………………………………………
………………………..….

Expert Panel Review……………………………………………………………………………………………….……..

SMOG Readability Test…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Data Collection………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……..

Data Analysis…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……………..


CHAPTER FIVE

Results


Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Survey Overview……………….……………………………………………………………………………………….….

Participants Demographics……………………………………………………………………………………………


Data Analysis…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...


Resident Survey…………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Participant Survey………………………………………………………………………………………………...


Vendor Survey……………………………………………………………………………………………………...

Summary………………….


CHAPTE
R SIX

Summary, Discussion, Conclusions, and Recommendations


Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Summary of the Intervention………………………………………………………………………………………

Conclusions…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……

Recommendations for Future F
airs………………………………………………………………………….……

Summary……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


REFERENCES
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


APPENDICIES


Appendix A…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Flyer………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix B…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Grant Proposal…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix C…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Resident Survey…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix D……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Contact Communication Sheet…………………………………………………………………………..

Appendix E…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Contact List………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Appendix F……………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………..


Confirmation Letter…………………………………………………………………………………….………

Appendix G…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Riverdale City Newsletter……………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix H……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
.


Volunteer Sign Up Sheet………………………………………………………………………………………..

Appendix I………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Participant Exit Survey……………………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix J…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….....


Vendor Survey…………
……………………………………………………………………………………………

Appendix K……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Thank You Letter…………………………………………………………………………………………………..




CHAPTER 1


Introduction


The purpose of our project was to raise awareness of health and emergency
preparedness and provide knowledge and skills to the community on dealing with these issues.
We collaborated with Riverdale City and Ms. Luann Farr to plan, implement, and evaluate
this
fair. We developed and pilot tested a survey to determine the needs of the community and we
surveyed a representative sample of the community. During this same time we applied for and
received grant money from the Hall Endowment for Community Outrea
ch Fund in the amount
of $675.00. Early March we started marketing the fair through newspapers, newsletters,
churches, and flyers. The fair was held on March 26, 2009. The American Red Cross sponsored
a blood drive from 3
-
8 p.m. and the fair was open fr
om 5
-
8 p.m. We conducted an outcome
evaluation by asking participants to complete a short survey as they left. We analyzed the data
for this final report to see if we accomplished our goals and objectives. Although we cannot
evaluate the success of many

of the goals and objectives, we still determined based on this data
that the health and emergency preparedness fair was a huge success. All but one person who
took part in the outcome evaluation survey stated that they would attend the health and
emergen
cy preparedness fair again next year. Each vendor stated that they would participate
again if another health fair was held. There was well over 750 participants.
This chapter
discusses the population of Riverdale, their health status, ethical concerns,
need for the
intervention, and assumptions, limitations, and delimitations to the Riverdale Health and
Emergency Preparedness Fair.



Background


To better understand the Riverdale community and the residents’ needs
epidemiological data relative to the pop
ulation in general and health status was collected. The
information was retrieved from Utah’s Indicator
-
Based Information System website & City Data.
Comparison data related to health status was also retrieved from the Healthy People 2010
website.

Popu
lation overview as of July 2007

T
otal population:

7,976

Males:

3,961 (49.7%)

F
emales:

4,015 (50.3%)

Median resident age:

29.4 years


Estimated median household income:


$52,583

Estimated median house or condo value:


$166,771


Races in Riverdale:

White Non
-
Hispanic

88.7%

Hispanic


6.4%

Other race

2.3%

Two or more races

2.0%

Black

1.5%

American Indian

1.0%


Land area:


4.44 square miles

Population density:


1798 people per square mile


For population 25 years and over in Riverdale:

High school

or higher:

86.0%

Bachelor's degree or higher:

13.8%

Graduate or professional degree:

4.2%

Unemployed:

5.0%


Mean travel time to work:


19.1 minutes


For population 15 years and over in Riverdale city:

Never married:

23.8%

Now married:

59.0%

Separated:

2.2%

Widowed:

3.9%

Divorced:

11.1%


278 residents are foreign born
:

Latin America:

2.3%


Asia:


0.7%

Europe:

0.6%


Household Information:

Average household size:


2.7 people

Percentage of family households:


72.9%

Percentage of households with unmarried partners:

4.2%


Likely homosexual households

(counted as self
-
reported same
-
sex unmarried
-
partner
households):

Lesbian couples:

0.2% of all households

Gay men:

0.2% of all households


Poverty:

Residents with income below the poverty level in 2007:

8.8%

Residents with income below 50%

of the poverty level in 2007:

1.9%


Voting rates in the 2004 Presidential Election:

Republican:

70%

Democrat:

27%

Other:

2%


Hospitals/medical centers near Riv
erdale:

Ogden Regional Medical Center (about 3 miles; Ogden, UT)

McKay
-
Dee Hospital (about 5 miles; Ogden, UT)

Davis Hospital and Medical Center (about 9 miles; Layton, UT)


Airports certified for carrier operations nearest to Riverdale:

Ogden
-
Hinckley
(about 1 mile; Ogden, UT)

Hill Air Force Base (about 5 miles; Ogden, UT)

Salt Lake City International (about 28 miles; Salt Lake City, UT)


Colleges/universities with over 2000 students nearest to Riverdale:

Weber State University (about 5 miles; Ogden,
UT; Full
-
time enrollment: 12,112)


Private high school in Riverdale:

Christian Heritage School

(Students: 361; Grades: PreK
-

12)


(City
-
Data, 2008)


Riverdale Businesses:


AUTO DEALERS




FURNITURE / CARPET


AUTO OUTFITTERS



AMERICARPETS

1



APPLE MOUNTAIN FLOORING SUPPLIES

KEN GARFF MOTOR HONDA



FLOOR STORE

KEN GARFF MOTOR NISSAN



CARPET GIANT

KEN GARFF OF OGDEN



CROWN ELITE

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHRYSLER



FOUR SISTERS FURN & CUSTOM FRAME

SATURN OF
RIVERDALE



JOHN PARAS FURNITURE

TONY DIVINO TOYOTA



INTELLI
-
BED

WASATCH FRONT




PIANO GALLERY

AUTO

PARTS & SERVICE



PIER 1 IMPORTS

AUTO BODY SUPPLY



PINE FACTORY

AUTO TRIM DESIGN OF NORTHERN UTAH



R C WILLEY



BOYDS IMPORT AUTO PARTS



SUPREME SLEEP CENTER

CRABTREE AUTO CO




TILE FOR LESS

DIAMOND GLASS




THE SLEEP SHOP

GLASS DOCTOR



UINTAH GAS FIREPLACES

PEP BOYS
AUTOMOTIVE SUPERCENTER



WILSON'S FLOOR COVERINGS

RHINO LININGS OF NORTHERN UTAH



GIFTS / CRAFT / HOBBY

RON'S AUTOMOTIVE



COOKIES BY DESIGN


BOAT DEALERS



THE EXPERIENCE

PETERSEN MARINE



HANCOCK FABRICS

CAR RENTAL



MICHAELS

ENTERPRISE RENT
-
A
-
CAR



HAIR / NAIL / TANNING SALONS

HERTZ RENT
-
A
-
CAR



BECRAFT THERAPEUTICS

CELLULAR PHONES



CAL NAILS

AT&T WIRELESS



EMBELLISH SALON

MILLENNIUM WIRELESS



FIVE STATE BEAUTY SUPPLY

RHINO WIRELESS



HAIR HAVEN

T
-
MOBILE



L A NAILS

TIME TO TALK WIRELESS



NEW RAGE HAIR DESIGN

VOICE STREAM



PERMANENT SOLUTION
STYLE SALON

VERIZON WIRELESS



PROGRESSIVE IMAGE HAIRSTYLE

CHILD CARE



SUPERCUTS

TEDDY BEAR DAY CARE



SALLY BEAUTY COMPANY

STEP BY STEP PRE
-
SCHOOL & DAY CARE



SMART STYLE


CLOTHING / SHOES



TIP & TAN

TUX & TAILS



URBAN TRENDZ

CUSTOM THREAD &
DESIGN



HOME IMPROVEMENT

GALLERY BY LYNETTE



THE HOME DEPOT

BABIES R US




HORIZON PAINT

ROSS DRESS FOR LESS



LOWES

RED WING SHOES



TEMCO WINDOWS

CONSTRUCTION

CONTRACTORS
-

SUPPLIERS



WALLPAPER WAREHOUSE

ALL
-
STAR CONSTRUCTION INC




INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES

DEE COX ROOFING & CONSTRUCTION



A
-
1 DRIVING SCHOOL

CLEMENTS CONSTRUCTION



CURVES FOR WOMEN

DENNY'S SERVICE COMPANY



JENNY CRAIG WEIGHT LOSS CENTER

FALK CONSTRUCTION



UTAH MOTORCYCLE ASSOCIATION

GARDNER & CARLISLE INC



INSURANCE SERVICES

HALES COMMUNICATIONS



AMERICAN FAMILY INSURANCE
-

Matthew
Holbrook

HOMESTEAD CUSTOM CABINETS



FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP

JAKES EXCAVATING & CONSTRUCTION



KEYES INSURANCE SERVICES

KEN SHOCK CONSTRUCTION



A
LLSTATE

-

CHAD E. CHARLESWORTH

LIFESTYLE KITCHENS



MILNE INSURANCE AGENCY

LYNN D STEPHENS CONSTRUCTION



STATE FARM INSURANCE

PARADIGM
COMMUNICATIONS



LODGING

PRECISION BUILDING & DESIGN



Motel 6

PREFERRED ALUMINUM & REMODELING



MOBILE HOME PARKS

R KIRT NELSON CONSTRUCTION



LESLEY'S MOBILE HOME PARK

RAINGUTTER SPECIALISTS



RIVERDALE MOBILE ESTATES

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RAYNOR DOORS



RIVERVIEW MOBILE ESTATES

SCOTT'S HOME CONSTRUCTION


RIVERSIDE VILLAGE

STONEHENGE CONSTRUCTION



MOTORCYCLE DEALERS

T
-
CON HOMES



CAREYS MOTORCYCLE CENTER

CONVENIENCE STORES

GAS STATIONS



HARLEY DAVIDSON OF NORTHRN UTAH

CONOCO




MOVING & STORAGE

SINCLAIR REGENCY EXPRESS



LESLEY'S R V STORAGE

SAM'S CLUB FUELING STATION



REDMAN VAN & STORAGE CO

LIGHTHOUSE CHEVRON



STOR
-
N
-
LOCK

DEPARTMENT / FOOD
STORES



MUSIC STORES

DESERET BOOK COMPANY



BERT MURDOCK MUSIC

GOOD EARTH



GUITAR CENTER

FYE



MUSIC VILLAGE

SAM'S CLUB



OFFICE SUPPLY

SEAGULL BOOK & TAPE



OFFICE MAX

SHOPKO



STAPLES THE OFFICE SUPERSTORE

SUPER TARGET



OPTICAL CENTERS

WAL
-
MART SUPERCENTER



PEARLE VISION

ELECTRONICS / COMPUTERS



SUPER TARGET OPTICAL

BEST BUY



PETS

CIRCUIT CITY



DOGGIE DEN

EBC COMPUTERS



PETCO

HI FI HOME ELECTRONICS



PETSMART

HI TECH MARKETING



PHOTOGRAPHY

PC LAPTOPS



AMERICAN STUDIOS

PRO COMPUTER



AVANTE'
PHOTOGRAPHY

R K WHOLESALERS



LIFETOUCH PORTRAIT STUDIO

SMART COMMUNICATIONS



ROBERTS PHOTOGRAPHY

SUNPOWER INC



PRINTING / SIGNS

TECHNOVATION DESIGN



QUALITY QUICK PRINT

ENTERTAINMENT / RECREATION



EXCLUSIVE PRINTING CO INC

SCHNEITERS RIVERSIDE GOLF CLUB



PDQ SIGNS & GRAPHICS

CLASSIC WATERSLDES



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

MOTOR VU DRIVE IN



AMMEX TRUCKING

NICKELCADE



AUDIBEL HEARING CENTERS


FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS



AVATAR

ABC INSTANT CASH



BECRAFT THERAPEUTICS

AMERICA FIRST CREDIT UNION



THE BOYER CO

AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCE



CALPRO

ASSOCIATED TITLE
INSURANCE



COMBE GARBAGE REMOVAL

CASH AMERICA INC OF UTAH



CORNERSTONE CHIROPRACTIC

CHECK CITY



CUMMINS
-
ALLISON

CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES



FEDERAL EXPRESS CORPORATION

EASY MONEY



GILSON ENGINEERING

HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION



GIRL SCOUTS OF NORTHEREN UTAH

MAJOR MORTGAGE



GREAT BASIN ENGINEERING

MORTGAGE SOLUTION



L
-
3 COMMUNICATIONS

NORTH STAR MORTGAGE CORP



NORTHERN UTAH SECURITY

NATIONWIDE
BUDGET FINANCE



SANDERS BRINE SHRIMP CO

US BANK



STONEY BROOKE ASSISTED LIVING CENTER

USA CASH SERVICES



TOTAL CHIROPRATIC

WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK



TRULY NOLEN
PEST CONTROL

WEBER RIVER FINANCING



UINTAH BASIN SECURITY

WADDELL & REED INC



WESTAFF

WELLS FARGO BANK



YARD BARBER

FLORAL / PLANTS



REAL ESTATE

GIBBYS
GREENHOUSE



CENTURY 21 ADAIR REALTORS

PLANT CONNECTION



SPECIALITY STORES

FOOD AND BEVERAGE



AD GIFTS

ARBY'S



CHAMPION MEATS

APPLEBEE'S



DYNA PRO

BEST BURGER



THE UPS STORE

BURGER KING



SAFE FACTORY OUTLET

CARL'S JR



ZURCHER'S DISCOUNT PARTY & WEDDING


CHILI'S SOUTHWEST GRILL



SPORTING GOODS

DEL TACO



ANGLERS INN

GREEK ISLANDS BROILER



CANYON SPORTS


HONEY BAKED HAM



SPORT
S AUTHORITY

HOGI YOGI



PRO GOLF

IHOP



SAVON SPORTING GOODS

JAMBA JUICE



SKI MANIA

JOHNNYS DAIRY



SPORTSMAN'S WAREHOUSE

LUCKY BUFFET




LASALSA




LATTE DA DELIGHTS




OLIVE GARDEN ITALIAN RESTAURANT




PASTA BROTH




MCDONALDS




RIVERDALE

DINNER & BINGO




THE RUBY RIVER




SUBWAY




SUPER SUBS




SOUPER SALAD



TGI FRIDAY'S



ZUPPANINIS ITALIAN DELI




(Riverdale City Business Directory, 2008)


Health Status Data



To better understand Riverdale’s health status, we compared the city’s epidemiological
data to the Healthy People 2010 goals. This comparison data helped identify which health
areas the residents needed to improve and on which we could focus. The areas t
hat do not
meet those goals are bolded, and to provide contrast we have stated the Healthy People 2010
goals (HP2010).

Percentage of people who lack health insurance coverage:


7.9%

(HP2010:
0%)

Percentage reporting cost as a barrier:




7.6%

(HP2010:
7%)

Cancer death rate:







142.4
a

Lung cancer deaths:







33
a

Breast cancer deaths:







14.2
a

Colorectal cancer deaths:






15.3
a


(HP2010: 13.9)

Percentage with doctor
-
diagnosed diabetes:



5.7%

Adolescent 15
-
19 years birth rates:






43

b

H
eart disease death rates:






225
a


(HP2010: 166)

Stroke deaths:







43.5
a


Percentage with doctor
-
diagnosed hypertension:



27.3%


(HP2010: 16%)

Percentage with doctor
-
diagnosed hypercholesterolemia:


28.9%


(HP2010: 17%)

Deaths of infants under 1
year age:





7.7

c


(HP2010: 4.5)

Suicide rate:








25

d

(HP2010: 5)

Percentage obese adults:






26.7%


(HP2010: 15%)

Percentage eating 2 or more fruits per day:




27.7%


(HP2010: 75%)

Percent
age eating 3 or more vegetables
per day:



16.1%


(HP2010: 50%)

Percentage getting recommended physical activity:


57.6%

Unintentional injury deaths:






30.5

d

(HP2010: 17.5)


a
(deaths per 100,000 population)


b
(pregnancies per 1,000)


c
(per 1,000 live births)


d
(per 100,000 population)


(Utah
Department of Health [UDOH], 2009; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
[USDHHS], 2000)



Ethical Concerns


It is important to consider ethics when developing a program or intervention because
the creator’s values and beliefs can obscure the steps
in developing the intervention. The
result would not be beneficial for the intended population. For the purpose of this study we
identified one ethical concern. The concern was not to blame or label the participants for their
lifestyles or health proble
ms. Instead, we wanted to empower them to make a healthy lifestyle
change

(Coughlin, 2006).

Statement of the Problem


In the United States there are many prevalent health problems. A lot of these problems
are preventable and should be considered high priority, especially as many individuals do not
have access to affordable health insurance. Some of these problems can be

prevented by
lifestyle change and include but are not limited to heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and cancer.
Education and raising awareness on these healthy lifestyle changes can be very beneficial in
fighting against health disparities. Lifestyle ch
anges can be made when knowledge is obtained.
Therefore, a Health Fair is an optimal way to reach out to the members of Riverdale and its
surrounding communities.

A Health Fair works because it is completely voluntary. This means that individuals who
p
articipate actually want to make a change. They are taking the first step to change by coming
to the fair. Another reason why a Health Fair works is because it is free. This aspect is
important in today’s tough economic times. Many individuals cannot a
fford health insurance or
do not have adequate health insurance. We provided free blood pressure, glucose, and
cholesterol checks in one location without the pressure of going to a doctor’s office. These
health screenings are important in early detection

of disease development which can greatly
affect the outcome of the disease.

With the tough economic times it is more important than ever to be prepared. That is
one reason why emergency preparedness is such an important aspect to the health fair as well.

Knowledge about natural disasters is another aspect to emergency preparedness. Riverdale is
located close to a fault line, and knowledge about what to do in an earthquake and following an
earthquake is necessary.

Need for the Intervention


A health fair

is an ideal place to provide information to the public about healthy choices.
It allows individuals to interact with others, ask questions, and participate in demonstrations
which will increase their knowledge about health related issues. Residents of R
iverdale have a
significantly higher rate of deaths due to heart disease and unintentional injury. The
percentage of individuals diagnosed with high blood pressure and high cholesterol in Riverdale
is higher than the Healthy People 2010 goals. Just over
one quarter of the population is obese.
A low percentage of the population eats the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables
(UDOH, 2009; USDHHS, 2000).

Our intent was to impact the Riverdale community by educating them on healthy
lifestyle practices

and by providing them with free health services, such as cholesterol & blood
pressure screenings. We intended to increase the residents’ knowledge on being financially
prepared by providing a finance seminar. Other emergency preparedness areas addressed

included information on food storage and earthquakes. We did not have a pre
-
established
budget from Riverdale City to carry out the intervention, so we
applied for the Hall Endowment
for Community Outreach Funding. We developed a budget using the grant
money.

Research Design


Research design is how you plan to collect the information regarding the target
population. Resources, such as time and money, are important to identify when making this
decision. There are two primary methods: quantitative data
and qualitative data. Quantitative
data results in statistics that can be analyzed through various programs. Qualitative data is
language, not numbers. The researcher must interpret the individual’s attitude and thoughts
from the words they use. Quite
often this happens in focus groups where participants are
asked open
-
ended questions instead of yes or no questions (Hodges & Videto, 2005).

Quantitative data specific to Riverdale was collected, as well as comparative data from
the Healthy People 2010 w
ebsite. Through surveys additional quantitative data was collected.
One qualitative question was asked at the end of the survey.

Population Sample


Our target population for this intervention was Riverdale City. Our sample consisted of
Riverdale residents and the surrounding communities. We conducted random sample surveys
at local businesses in order to assess the needs of the community. In addition
to surveying at
businesses, our contact, Luann Farr, volunteered to disseminate some surveys through the
neighborhood.

Data Collection


The random sample surveys will consist of seven yes/no questions and one qualitative
question that allowed them to pro
vide input for the program that we may have overlooked.
After the survey was developed we compiled the results.

Data Analysis


The quantitative and qualitative data was analyzed. Our analysis included the use of
graphs and statistics in order to evaluate

the data collected from the surveys. The main
program utilized was Excel, using its spreadsheet and graph functions. We focused the
program on the survey results in order to implement effective measures that helped meet our
program goals.

Assumptions


A
n assumption is something believed to be true even when we have not proven it to be
true (Pyrczak & Bruce, 2000).


The following assumptions were determined in this intervention.


1.

Survey participants will provide accurate and honest feedback based on their

current
health education level.


2.

Participants in both the survey and the Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair have a
basic knowledge of health promotion and healthy lifestyle practices.



Limitations


According to Pyrczak and Bruce (2000), “a limitatio
n is a weakness or handicap that
potentially limits the validity of the results” (p. 57).


The following limitations were determined in this intervention.


1.

Belief that an individual who may be overweight or in poor health is unhealthy, when
they may
actually be “healthy” in other aspects, such as social, mental, etc.


2.

The perception that individuals deemed unhealthy by us “need” our help or some type
of intervention.


3.

Our attitude that everyone should be “onboard” with our program in order to make a
c
hange.

Delimitations


“A delimitation is a boundary to which the study was deliberately confined” (Pyrczak &
Bruce, 2000, p. 57).


The following delimitations were determined in this intervention.


1.

We only surveyed Riverdale residents and surrounding commu
nity members.


2.

We conducted the surveys and analyzed the data.


Definition of Terms


For the purpose of this intervention the following terms are defined:


1.

Health fair:

an event intended to provide health information and basic health screenings
to a commun
ity or group of people.


2.

Hypercholesterolemia:

high level of cholesterol in the blood.


3.

Hypertension:

high blood pressure.


Summary



In order for the Riverdale Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair to be effective we
first came to comprehend the community’s needs by collecting epidemiological data,
comparing Healthy People 2010 goals with the health status of Riverdale city, and conduc
ting a
pilot tested survey in the community. It was also important to look at and consider the ethical
concerns, assumptions, limitations, and delimitations of this intervention. By doing this the
Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair will be specific t
o Riverdale’s needs.


C
HAPTER

TWO

Introduction

In this chapter we will discuss different types of research. These include; qualitative,
quantitative, and data collection methods. We also analyze qualitative and quantitative
research by researching the

reliability and validity of them both. Each type of research is
defined and the theoretical traditions are explained so that it can be used on a specific topic. In
our case we are using these research methods for the Riverdale Health and Emergency
Prepar
edness Fair.

Topic Research

Chapter Two is based on research for the Riverdale Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair, in
this fair the focus was encouraging good health and proper safety through preparation and
prevention. The research that is involved i
n chapter two explains how each method works and
how it is applicable.

Qualitative Research


Qualitative Research is collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data by observing what
people do and say. Whereas quantitative research refers to counts and mea
sures of things,
qualitative research refers to the meanings, concepts, definitions, characteristics, metaphors,
symbols, and descriptions of things. This type of research is much more subjective than
quantitative research and uses very different methods o
f collecting information, mainly
individual, in
-
depth interviews and focus groups. The nature of this type of research is
exploratory and open
-
ended. Small numbers of people are interviewed in
-
depth and/or a
relatively small number of focus groups are cond
ucted. Basically quantitative research seeks
explanatory laws; qualitative research aims at in
-
depth description. Qualitative research
measures what it assumes to be a static reality in hopes of developing universal laws. It is an
exploration of what is as
sumed to be a dynamic reality. It does not claim that what is
discovered in the process is universal, and thus, replicable.

These are some characteristics of qualitative research.

Purpose
: Understanding
-

Seeks to understand people’s interpretations.

Real
ity
: Dynamic
-

Reality changes with changes in people’s perceptions.

Viewpoint
: Insider
-

Reality is what people perceive it to be.

Values
: Value bound
-

Values will have an impact and should be understood and taken into
account when conducting and reporti
ng research.

Focus
: Holistic
-

A total or complete picture is sought.

Orientation
: Discovery
-

Theories and hypotheses are evolved from data as collected.

Data
: Subjective
-

Data are perceptions of the people in the environment.

Instrumentation
: Human
-

The human person is the primary collection instrument.

Conditions
: Naturalistic
-

Investigations are conducted under natural conditions.

Results
: Valid
-

The focus is on design and procedures to gain "real," "rich," and "deep" data.
(Key. J. 1997)


Quantit
ative Research


Defined

Quantitative Research is collecting and analyzing data that is empirical and numerical. In
this type of research, the aim is to define the relationship between an independent variable and
a dependent or outcome variable in a population. Quantitative resear
ch can be descriptive
where subjects are measured once or experimental where subjects are measured before and
after. Descriptive studies establish only associations between variables. An experiment
establishes causality.

Theoretical Traditions

Quantitativ
e research is all about quantifying relationships between variables. Types of
variables can include things like weight, performance, time, and treatment. Variables can be
measured on a sample of subjects, which can include tissue, cells, animals, or humans
.

Data Collection Methods


Survey



Surveys produce data through written responses to a standard set of questions. The
data collected from surveys can either be quantitative or qualitative, which depends on the
nature of the questions asked. The advantage
s of conducting surveys are that they are quick
and easy to administer and can also be given to large numbers of people at once. Ways they
can be administered are by paper and pencil, over the telephone, through the mail, or by e
-
mail
or Web pages.


It is

a good idea to adapt and use existing surveys and questionnaires that were used
previously to measure the same concept that you are trying to collect data on. Searching
professional literature to find surveys that were used or developed will help you meas
ure those
same concepts you need information from. Once you have found a survey that may work, look
to see how closely the group it was used on matches the group you would like to use it on.
Things to be considered are age, literacy level, language, cultur
e, and other characteristics that
might affect the target group’s responses. Another area to be considered is the reliability and
validity, as well as previous results from the survey to see if it would be useful for your
research. A pilot test can help de
termine whether a survey is acceptable or not, and whether it
can be completed in a timely manner.


When using surveys, it is important to plan ahead of time how confidentiality will be
ensured for participants. These decisions must be communicated to the

respondents and
respected by the data collectors and analyzers.

Focus Groups



A focus group interview or discussion is a qualitative approach to learning about the
audience you intend to target. Focus groups are used frequently as part of the program
pl
anning process. For this project the students in our class served as a focus group. The
members of the group participated in developing a survey. Participants in focus groups are
usually alike in one or more ways, such as geographical location, age, gend
er, sociocultural
orientation, risk status, or health problem characteristics. Participants can either be randomly
selected or recruited. Respondent’s information should be kept confidential, and they should
remain anonymous or use only first names.


Focu
s groups should be conducted by a moderator who is assisted by an observer. The
moderator will ask the questions and stimulate discussion. This should be prepared in advance
using an outline of questions or topics. The observer’s job is to record non
-
verba
l responses to
questions asked and take notes of any other observations he or she makes that is not apparent
through an audio or videotape. Transcriptions are made of the discussion and put together with
notes made during and after the interviews. This way
, analysts can interpret the responses to
establish trends, recommendations, opinions, and feelings of the group with regard to the
questions asked. It is a good idea to conduct several focus groups that consist of
representatives of different subgroups in

a population as part of a needs assessment.

Analysis of Qualitative Research


An analysis of qualitative data is commonly done by an observer’s impression. Observers
will examine the data, form an impression and report their impression. This is done in a
structured form. Often a quantitative form is used in the analysis of qualitative data. Using
these impressions the observers can come to consensus of the analysis.


We were able to use qualitative research in three different surveys. The first survey w
as
for members of the Riverdale community, the concluding question was:

“What types of
booths would you like to see at the Riverdale Health and Safety Fair?” We left this as a ‘fill in
the blank’, where the surveyors were able to write in their own perso
nal thoughts and opinions
of what they felt would be beneficial at the fair.

After the fair we had both participants and vendors take an exit survey. The concluding
question for the participants was:

“What booths would you like to see next year at the
Fair?”
The concluding question on the vendor survey was:

“What would you change about the fair?”
Having each survey conclude with qualitative questions was beneficial to us because they had
the opportunity to suggest something that we may have not noticed

or observed. This will be
beneficial for others that want to implement a similar fair.



Reliability


Reliability is the when an experiment turns up with the same result on repeated trials.
As we got the surveys back it was in our best interest to obser
ve the surveys and see if there
were any similar responses. If there were common responses, those were the areas we
focused on implementing in the fair. The reliability of the exit surveys will provide great input
and suggestions for those interested in
putting together a fair in the future.

Validity


The validity of a research method is also known as how credible or dependable the
method is. If you are using surveys the information should be valid based on your population
that you administered your su
rveys to as well as how honestly the interviewees answered the
surveys.


In our case we found a stack of five out of about 75 surveys that were copied answer by
answer and word for word. We felt that we needed to disregard these surveys because they
wer
e not credible. Getting valid surveys we had to find members of Riverdale willing to take
the survey in order to get answers that applied to the community of Riverdale. We needed a
relatively large survey group in order to get suitable responses for the
residence of Riverdale.

Analysis of Quantitative Research



Quantitative analysis measures behavior by

using mathematical and statistical modeling,
measurement and research. By assigning a numerical

value to variables, quantitative
analysts

try to repl
icate reality mathematically.

For example on the first survey we asked the question: “How important is your health to
you? (On a scale from 1 to 5 with 5 being the highest)” Those taking the survey were able to
convey their response numerically which helpe
d us understand where they stood. Our group
was able to look over the surveys and see what some of the most common responses or
answers were. We needed quantitative answers to understand the needs of the community
and population that we were targeting on
an accurate level that was precise and effective.


At the end of the health fair we had the participants and vendors fill out concluding
surveys. This helped us keep a relative count of those who attended the fair as well as the
rating of how well the h
ealth fair was put together. We asked the vendors a variety of
questions dealing with the overall success of the fair. Through quantitative research we were
able to see our strengths and what we had the most success in as well as the areas were we
could
have improved.

Reliability



Reliability of quantitative research is when the experiment, test or survey you are
conducting has the same continuing outcomes on repeated trials. The numbers that were given
in previous testing continue to be the same with

the same results appearing time and time
again. Steady, consistent results are satisfying for drawing conclusions.


Going through our surveys we were able to see how the community felt our group
preformed in specific areas of the fair. On average, we ha
d a very large majority of the
surveyors answer the same with the exception of only a few. Having these results we felt the
surveys were a reliable indication of how the fair was performed.



Validity



The validity of a quantitative research method is d
etermined on how credible or
dependable the surveys that were given were. The numbers returned on survey must be
truthful for the surveys to be dependable.


We feel that we had a few surveys in the beginning returned to us that were not
credible or valid because they may have been filled out by only one individual. The other
surveys we administered were handed out to participants and vendors, each only receiv
ing one.
These surveys were filled out on site and returned to us as soon as they were done answering
them. We believe that the surveys were concise and the answers were reliable because they
applicable to the fair and how things turned out and the answe
rs did not contradict each
others.

Summary

In conclusion chapter two has describe two main types of research; qualitative and
quantitative. By researching the reliability and validity of our surveys we are better able to
know and understand how to use t
hem both. We have also been able to find the most
effective way of getting precise information from a population. In chapter two each type of
research has been defined and the theoretical traditions were explained so that it can be used
on a specific top
ic. Our research methods were used for the Riverdale Health and Emergency
Preparedness Fair. Our surveys were beneficial to us and will be beneficial to any others who
perform a health and safety fair in the future.



CHAPTER THREE


(Kelly)


CHAPTER FOUR


Introduction

The focus of the Riverdale Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair was to increase the
residents’ knowledge of health and preparedness
in order to help them become a more
prepared, healthier community
. A health fair is a perfect place to pro
vide information to the
public about healthy choices and it allows individuals to interact with others, ask questions, and
participate in demonstrations which will increase their knowledge. Our intent was to impact
the Riverdale community by educating the
m on healthy lifestyle practices and by providing
them with free health services, such as cholesterol & blood pressure screenings. This chapter
discusses the methods used to bring about the fair.

Program Planning Model



To implement the Riverdale Health

and Emergency Preparedness Fair, we decided to
apply the program planning model PATCH, which stands for Planned Approach to Community
Health. PATCH can be used in a variety of health education and health promotion situations.
This model provides a general

structure for needs assessment and program planning, and
provides an evaluation process which emphasizes community involvement, linkages among a
variety of agencies, and services associated with the community.

Historical Perspective



This model was devel
oped by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the
1980s in partnership with state and local health departments and community groups. It has
been used in the past to develop comprehensive health promotion interventions in local and
state hea
lth departments, hospitals, universities, and voluntary agencies. PATCH was developed
with the intention to serve as a tool to improve links both within communities and between
communities and state health departments, universities, and other agencies and
organizations.

PATCH was developed using theoretical assumptions underlying the PRECEDE model, by
information used for community organization and development. It was also created using the
CDC’s tradition of working though state health agencies and in applying health pro
motion and
other disease prevention programs.

Rationale



We chose to implement this model for our project because it matched well with the
objectives we created for our program. It also beautifully combines the principles of community
participation with
the diagnostic steps of applied community
-
level epidemiology, which was
perfect for what we needed to implement our program. The PATCH model is also basic enough
to understand and be easily duplicated by others who wish to use the framework for their
progr
ams that we have created.

Application


The model consists of 5 steps:


1)

Mobilizing the community:

In which we gathered together members of the Riverdale
community by creating an environment in a local building where people could learn
about health and emer
gency preparedness.

2)

Collecting and organizing data:
Where we gathered epidemiological data pertaining
specifically to Riverdale City and its residents, developing and collecting surveys
regarding what the community would like to see at a health and emergen
cy
preparedness fair.

3)

Choosing health priorities and target groups:
In which we deciphered the target
populations for Riverdale City (mainly families of all ages) and what their requirements
were regarding their specific health needs and what they wanted t
o know about
emergency preparedness.

4)

Choosing and conducting interventions:
We then decided how we would best meet the
needs of the Riverdale community and developed specific interventions to meet those
needs.

5)

Conducting evaluations:
After the fair, we ev
aluated its success through evaluations
which were filled out by members of the community who attended the fair, as well as by
vendors who were present and their experience. We also took into consideration our
own conclusions of the fair and what we could
have done to make it better.

There are 6 elements that are critical for successful planning and action which include:

1)

Data collection

2)

Established objectives and standards to help plan and evaluate

3)

Adoptions of multiple strategies in multiple situations

4)

Su
stained monitoring and progress evaluation to fine
-
tune programs

5)

Support of local and national public health agencies

6)

Existence of a core of community support and participation

Timeline

January



Dr. Patti Cost was approached by LuAnn Farr about a Riverdale
City Health and
Emergency Preparedness Fair



Seven students from the HLTH 4150 class came together as a group to help put
together the fair with the help of Dr. Patti Cost

February



Applied for grant from Hall Endowment Community Outreach Fund in the amount
of
$675.00



Community description of Riverdale City



Perform a needs assessment



Pilot test survey and make revisions as needed



Received grant money from Hall Endowment for $675.00



Secure vendors

March



Send out flyers and advertisements



Reminder letter for t
he vendors



Secured food for the vendors (Jason’s Deli)



Reminder call for the vendors one week prior to the fair



Health Fair on March 26, 2009



Perform outcome evaluation as people are leaving the fair



Send out thank you cards to the vendors



Grant and

Donation Money


For the sake of making the Riverdale Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair the best
fair possible it was necessary to have to funds for everything needed. In February we applied
for a grant from the Hall Endowment Community Outreach Fund

in the amount of $675.00.
The breakdown for the budget was as follows.

Budget Rationale and Narrative


Printing/Advertising
:

$200.00

Copies for flyers, surveys,









pens/pencils, poster boards.

Food/Water:



$300.00

Sandwiches and water bottles for








the vendors.

Vendor Needs:


$100.00

Table clothes, name tags and








banners.

Stamps:


$45.00


Confirmation and thank you









letters.

Miscellaneous
:

$30.00


Supplies and unforeseen expenses.


Total
:



$6
75.00


We also asked many local businesses for donations. Many of the vendors donated raffle
prizes and there were a few businesses that donated other things as well. Sam’s Club donated
a couple of raffle prizes including a $25 gif
t card, as well as plates and silverware for the food.
Costco donated raffle prizes, bottled water, and cookies for the vendors. Wal
-
Mart, although
not involved in the fair, donated a $75 gift card. Jason’s Deli gave us around half off the price of
thei
r po’boy sandwich trays, including condiments, chips and pickles. These businesses ensured
that we were able to spend the money where we needed it and made for the best fair possible.

Surveys


The
resident

survey
(Appendix C)

was instrumental in providi
ng data about the types of
information the residents wanted to see at the fair. We researched questions that had been
used for similar events and based our questions on them. After determining our questions,
they were reviewed by a panel of our peers. W
e also performed the SMOG test to determine
readability.

We received feedback on the population’s health beliefs and availability. We
incorporated a qualitative question so the participants could respond with their concerns
instead of answering strictly

yes and no questions. Each member of our group was responsible
for going into the community and obtaining ten completed surveys. We made contact through
local places of business as well. Our contact, Luann Farr, was responsible for obtaining 30
complet
e surveys through the churches in the community. The total number of surveys was
100. This may be a small number; however, we only wanted a preliminary sample of
information to get started. Results of the survey appear in Chapter 5.

A
participant exit

s
urvey

(Appendix I)

was collected as the residents left the fair. As with
the first survey, a panel of our peers reviewed the questions. A table and collection box was
placed by the exit door. Our volunteers manned the table and were to ask each particip
ant as
they left to fill out a quick survey. We wanted to get feedback on how well the fair was put
together, the information provided, and other facts. We included four qualitative questions as
well, one of which included suggestions for improvement. O
nly a limited number of
participants actually filled out the exit survey. The results appear in Chapter 5.

We also conducted a survey for the fair vendors

(Appendix J)
to gather information on
their experience. As with the first survey, we based our qu
estions on similar previously
developed questions and adapted them for our needs. They were also reviewed by our peers.
Our mentor, Dr. Cost, personally asked each vendor to fill out the survey. They were to rate
attendance, pre
-
planning, management, fa
cilities, etc. in terms of excellent, fair, or poor. The
last question, qualitative in nature, allowed for other comments or suggestions. Chapter 5
contains the results of the survey.

Population and Sampling

Population

The population involved in the Riverdale Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair was
residents of Riverdale city and the surrounding communities. The population that was sampled
during the first survey process was mainly people at local business, churches,

as well as some
family members from the Riverdale community.

Sampling

In order to acquire appropriate sampling of the community we had to do background research
on Riverdale and the surrounding communities. This included epidemiological data as well as
painting a picture of the community. We also sampled the community with

our first survey in
which we discovered their needs and wants in regards with their health and the fair in general.
By taking the survey out to many different places we were assured that we would acquire a
random sample of views, thoughts, wants and need
s which in turn allows for a broad variety as
well.

Expert Panel Review



In class we examined the population of Riverdale to determine the most effective way
of using surveys as well as how to distribute them. We needed to find out what questions were
most appropriate for the population and how efficiently they could answer them. This included
finding out what booths we wanted to have at the health fair, as well as information that would
be most beneficial to the Riverdale community.


Going through o
ur survey in class we were able to discuss as a group and determine
what we felt would be most beneficial to the Riverdale community. We were able to find out
who and what our resources were and cater it to the needs of the Riverdale population. From
the
re the surveys helped us decide on the booths we wanted at the fair. Having each others
advice was very beneficial. This way we were able to go through our survey together and build
off of the ideas of one another. Critiquing what we had come up with an
d revising old into new
was essential to be able to narrow our ideas down and determine what was truly needed for
our population.

SMOG Readability Test


SMOG (Simple Measure of Gobbledygook) is a
readability

formula that estimates the
years of education needed to completely understand a piece of writing.

The SMOG test that
we had conducted on our survey questionnaire determined the reading level for the material to
be at a 9
th

grade

reading level with an average of 35 words with three or more syllables.

Data Collection



We collected primary data from Riverdale residents by randomly selecting participants
at local churches and area businesses. Participants answered the survey questio
ns on an
individual basis. The questionnaire was anonymous as it did not ask for the participants’ name
or any other identifying information. We had decided that a sample size of 70 Riverdale
residents was sufficient due to our limited staff, time and reso
urces available. During our expert
panel review, we determined that the survey results were an accurate reflection of the
Riverdale community’s needs.

Data Analysis



Our group reviewed the data collected from the surveys (see Chapter 5) and tailored our
fair to accommodate the valuable input that we had received. We had used spreadsheet and
statistical analysis programs, such as Excel and Minitab, to interpret the data collected from the
surveys. The graphical representations we had created were valuable
in determining the needs
of the Riverdale community.

Summary

The methods discussed in this chapter helped create a fair that was well thought out
each step of the way. By using the PATCH program planning model we were able to hit all the
major points ne
cessary to create the best fair possible. We considered each aspect including
money, surveys, the population, and data collection. Hopefully by using these methods future
classes will be able to continue on in our combined effort of increasing the health

and
emergency preparedness in the community.

CHAPTER FIVE


Introduction



The purpose of our project was to raise awareness of health and emergency
preparedness and provide knowledge and skills to the community on dealing with these issues.
We collaborated with Riverdale City and Ms. Luann Farr to plan, implement, and evaluate
this
fair. We developed and pilot tested a survey to determine the needs of the community and we
surveyed a representative sample of the community. During this same time we applied for and
received grant money from the Hall Endowment for Community Outrea
ch Fund in the amount
of $675.00. Early March we started marketing the fair through newspapers, newsletters,
churches, and flyers. The fair was held on March 26, 2009. The American Red Cross sponsored
a blood drive from 3
-
8 p.m. and the fair was open fr
om 5
-
8 p.m. We conducted an outcome
evaluation by asking participants to complete a short survey as they left. We analyzed the data
for this final report to see if we accomplished our goals and objectives. Although we cannot
evaluate the success of many

of the goals and objectives, we still determined based on this data
that the health and emergency preparedness fair was a huge success. All but one person who
took part in the outcome evaluation survey stated that they would attend the health and
emergen
cy preparedness fair again next year. Each vendor stated that they would participate
again if another health fair was held.


There was well over 750 participants.
This chapter will
focus on survey sites, participant demographics, methods, and data analys
is.

Survey
Overview



With the initial survey (
Appendix C)

we were able to obtain a representative sample of
the Riverdale City Residents with the surveys that we created pr
ior to the fair. We distributed
them to multiple businesses throughout Riverdale
city, along with the help of volunteers from

the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

We were able to collect 74

surveys throughout
this process.

This gave us the opportunity to see what vendors the residents wanted to see at
the fair, if they wo
uld be bringing other family members to the fair, and also see if the
Community Center was a convenient place to hold the fair.


In the foyer, a table was set up where
student volunteers
sat and helped
distribute
satisfaction surveys to those who were in a
ttendance

(Appendix I)
. We asked questions
regarding the number of vendors they visited, the booths they were most interested in, how
they heard about the fair, and what we could have improved on
.
Unfortunately, we only
received 65 participant evaluations
. We believe this is due to the fact that the volunteers, who
were helping us, did not specifically ask each person who came to the fair to

complete

the
survey.


Finally, we created a survey for the vendors (Appendix J).
We had over 50 vendors come
and
participate and we were anxious to see what they liked, how many contacts they made,
how they felt
about the
organizati
on of the fair, and what aspects we could have improved.
This
gave us the opportunity to see what our strong points were, but also things

we could have
improved on. It will also be a guideline for future students who wish to p
lan and implement the
next fair.

Participant Demographics



We wanted to make this a great family event with a positive experience for all
of
those
involved.
W
e spent weeks
marketing the fair

in order to create as much awareness as possible
to the Riverdale City residents and the surrounding areas. One method we used in order to
achieve this was to create hundreds of flyers. We went to
over 40
local businesses

and asked if
they would be willing to help us advertise the fair by hanging the flyer in their building.
Our
community partner, Lua
nn Farr
,

and her committee members placed them in

six

local churches
and ma
de announcements regarding the F
air. Riverdale
has a monthly city newsletter that
each resident receives by mail and we were able to place an article in

that as well.

We
contacted
local papers,
the St
andard Examiner and Big Nickel,

and both agreed to publish and
advertise the fair. Finally, our commu
nity member volunteers took flyers around to each house
in Riverdale City.

Data Analysis


Resident Survey



As discussed in Chapter 4, we had received feedback on the population’s health beliefs
and availability through the use of surveys (
Appendix C).
We

initially approached Riverdale
residents at local businesses and churches during our sampling stage of

the planning process
a
nd asked them to take our eight
question survey. The following paragraphs and graphical
presentations will help explain the resul
ts of the data we collected through our initial survey.

5
4
3
2
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5
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e
s
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o
n
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t
H
o
w

i
m
p
o
r
t
a
n
t

i
s

y
o
u
r

h
e
a
l
t
h

t
o

y
o
u
?
(
O
n

a

s
c
a
l
e

f
r
o
m

1

t
o

5

w
i
t
h

5

b
e
i
n
g

t
h
e

h
i
g
h
e
s
t
)

Figure 1



Our planning committee was interested in the level of personal health concern among
Riverdale residents. The planning committee decided that it would be better to offer survey
participant
s a number scale (from 1 to 5, with 5 bein
g the highest) to indicate their personal
belief as to how important their health is.

The results (Figure 1) indicated an overwhelming
degree of importance among Riverdale residents
with
the majori
ty of the survey
responding
with priority level of 4 or 5.


The second question that we asked in the initial survey was the level of convenience of
our proposed date and time for
the scheduled Health and Emergency Preparedness Fair
.
According to our survey results (Figure
2) and the overall attendance to the event, Riverdale
residents found the event date and time to be
accommodating,
as the majority of survey
participants replied with a “yes.”

Y
E
S
N
O

R
E
S
P
O
N
S
E
N
O
4
0
3
0
2
0
1
0
0
C
o
u
n
t

o
n

T
h
u
r
s
d
a
y
,

M
a
r
c
h

2
6
t
h

f
r
o
m

5
p
m

t
o

8
p
m
?
W
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

a
t
t
e
n
d

a

h
e
a
l
t
h

a
n
d

s
a
f
e
t
y

f
a
i
r

i
n

y
o
u
r

c
o
m
m
u
n
i
t
y

Figure 2



We had also considered which audience we should tailor our event towards by asking
survey participants if they would be
attending with
family. The survey results (Figure 3) were
mixed and didn’t offer a clear
conclusion

for us. After discussing this topic,

we decided that it
would be best to focus the event towards Riverdale residents of all ages by making the event
appealing to everyone. Dr. Cost recommended that we hire a clown for the event
to provide
entertainment for children at the fair.

Y
E
S
N
O

R
E
S
P
O
N
S
E
N
O
2
5
2
0
1
5
1
0
5
0
R
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
u
n
t
W
i
l
l

y
o
u

b
e

a
t
t
e
n
d
i
n
g

w
i
t
h

y
o
u
r

f
a
m
i
l
y

m
e
m
b
e
r
s
?

Figure 3



Luann Farr, the initial event coordinator, had scheduled the American Red Cross to
conduct a blood drive at the Riverdale Community Center two hours prior to the health fair and
would continue throughout the event. We were concerned about the amount of sp
ace needed
for the blood drive and
we
decided to ask survey participants if they were interested in taking
part in the blood drive. Our results (Figure 4) had shown some interest of Riverdale residents
participating
in the
blood drive

but the results were
not a clear indicator.
Due to this,

we felt
that the space initially provided to the American Red Cross
would be
sufficient and there was
no need to find additional space based on these results.

Y
E
S
N
O

R
E
S
P
O
N
S
E
N
O
2
5
2
0
1
5
1
0
5
0
R
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
u
n
t
t
h
e

A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n

R
e
d

C
r
o
s
s

d
u
r
i
n
g

t
h
e

f
a
i
r
?
W
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

b
e

i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
e
d

i
n

d
o
n
a
t
i
n
g

b
l
o
o
d

t
o


Figure 4

N
U
T
R
I
T
I
O
N
E
X
E
R
C
I
S
E
F
I
R
S
T

A
I
D
C
H
O
L
E
S
T
E
R
O
L

T
E
S
T
I
N
G
M
A
S
S
A
G
E
S
T
R
E
S
S

M
A
N
A
G
E
M
E
N
T
C
H
I
L
D

S
A
F
E
T
Y
B
L
O
O
D

P
R
E
S
S
U
R
E

R
E
A
D
I
N
G
S
V
I
S
I
O
N
D
I
A
B
E
T
E
S
T
I
M
E

M
A
N
A
G
E
M
E
N
T
M
E
N
'
S

H
E
A
L
T
H
H
E
A
R
I
N
G

T
E
S
T
I
N
G
D
E
R
M
A
T
O
L
O
G
I
S
T
W
O
M
E
N
'
S

H
E
A
L
T
H
H
E
A
R
T

D
I
S
E
A
S
E
C
H
I
R
O
P
R
A
C
T
O
R
C
A
N
C
E
R
G
Y
M
S

&

H
E
A
L
T
H

C
L
U
B
S
D
E
N
T
A
L

H
Y
G
I
E
N
E
B
L
O
O
D

D
O
N
A
T
I
O
N
P
O
I
S
O
N

C
O
N
T
R
O
L
M
E
N
T
A
L

H
E
A
L
T
H
F
I
R
E

D
E
P
A
R
T
M
E
N
T
D
O
C
T
O
R
P
H
A
R
M
A
C
I
S
T
O
S
T
E
O
P
O
R
O
S
I
S
S
U
B
S
T
A
N
C
E

A
B
U
S
E
P
R
E
N
A
T
A
L

C
A
R
E
B
I
C
Y
C
L
E

S
A
F
E
T
Y
N
U
R
S
E
D
A
I
R
Y

C
O
U
N
C
I
L
T
O
B
A
C
C
O

P
R
E
V
E
N
T
I
O
N
A
S
T
H
M
A
2
5
2
0
1
5
1
0
5
0
R
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
u
n
t
b
e

i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
e
d

i
n

h
a
v
i
n
g

a
t

t
h
e

h
e
a
l
t
h

f
a
i
r
?
W
h
i
c
h

o
f

t
h
e

f
o
l
l
o
w
i
n
g

b
o
o
t
h
s

w
o
u
l
d

y
o
u


Figure 5


Another topic our planning committee
felt was important to have in the survey was to
ask
which type of vendor
the participants would like to see at the fair.

We decided that it would
be best to list numerous vendors that were successful at the Hooper City Health Fair on our
initial survey. Ad
ditionally, we had provided an “other” space on the survey that allowed survey
participants to list any other vendors that they would like to see at the event. However, no
survey participants utilized this additional space. Perhaps this was due to the thor
ough list that
we had provided to them.


Based on the frequency of the data collected from the initial survey (Figure 5), we
decided to focus on obtaining vendors that would cover the following topics: Nutrition,
Exercise, First Aid, Cholesterol Testing,
and Massage. However, we also
recruited v
endors that
would cover the remaining topics in order to offer variety
of information
.



Y
E
S
N
O

R
E
S
P
O
N
S
E
N
O
3
5
3
0
2
5
2
0
1
5
1
0
5
0
R
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
u
n
t
s
e
m
i
n
a
r

o
n

E
m
e
r
g
e
n
c
y

P
r
e
p
a
r
e
d
n
e
s
s

a
t

t
h
e

f
a
i
r
?
W
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

b
e

i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
e
d

i
n

a
t
t
e
n
d
i
n
g

a

b
r
i
e
f

Figure 6


Luann Farr had also asked us have to educational seminars during the fair. She wanted
us to schedule a Financial
Management and an Emergency Preparedness Seminar. We were
provided with the names and contact information for the two gentlemen, Larry Stay and Zak
Baker, that had been requested to teach both seminars. Our committee thought it might be
beneficial to plan

and create our own seminar on either Stress Management or Nutrition.

Based on our initial survey results (Figures 6, 7 and 8) and the limited amount of space
available, we had decided to offer only the Financial Management and Emergency
Preparedness semi
nars to the health fair participants.

Unfortunately, our Emergency
Preparedness Seminar by Zak Baker was cancelled due to inclement weather. There were many
disappointed about this cancelation but luckily, our Financial Seminar turned out to be a great
su
ccess according to those in attendance.


Y
E
S
N
O

R
E
S
P
O
N
S
E
N
O
2
5
2
0
1
5
1
0
5
0
R
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
u
n
t

s
e
m
i
n
a
r

o
n

F
i
n
a
n
c
i
a
l

M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t

a
t

t
h
e

f
a
i
r
?
W
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

b
e

i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
e
d

i
n

a
t
t
e
n
d
i
n
g

a

b
r
i
e
f

Figure 7

Y
E
S
N
O

R
E
S
P
O
N
S
E
N
O
4
0
3
0
2
0
1
0
0
R
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
u
n
t
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t

o
r

N
u
t
r
i
t
i
o
n

S
e
m
i
n
a
r
?
W
o
u
l
d

y
o
u

b
e

i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
e
d

i
n

a

S
t
r
e
s
s


Figure 8


Participant
Survey



As participants exited the fair, we asked them to fill out a brief survey

(Appendix
I
)

regarding the outcome of the fair
.

We wanted to evaluate what
marketing strategy

worked
best, what vendors people enjoyed the most, and how we could improve the next fair.
Unfortunately, we did not receive as much feedback as we had hoped for. We asked a few
Weber State Universi
ty students who had volunteered

to help us

distribute th
em to
participants as they left the fair.

Since it was not their project, they did not take much initiative
to make it happe
n. As a result,

only people who saw the surveys and wanted to answer the
questions actually

completed them
. Below are the results

of the survey.


Total Number of Exit Surveys: 74


1.


Would you attend the health and emergency preparedness fair again next year?


_72_
Yes

_1_
No


_1_

No Response


2.

For the next fair, is a weekend better for you than a weeknight?


_18_
Yes

_50_
No

_4_
Either

_2_

No Response


3.

How did you hear about the fair?

_33

Church


_15
Paper (Standard, Water Bill, Newsletter, Riverdale News)


_17

Family/Friends


_4_

No Response

_
5
_ Other


4.

What did you enjoy most about the health and emergency preparedness
fair?

a.

Free Samples

b.

Free Testing

c.

Financial Seminar

d.

Fire Station

e.

Free Massages

f.

Food Storage

g.

CERT

h.

Physical Fitness

i.

Questar Gas

j.

Dental Clinic


5.

What booths would you like to have at the fair that were not?

a.

Secondary Heat Sources

b.

Water Purification

c.

More Food
Storage Items

d.

Child Care

e.

Policemen

f.

Pediatricians

g.

Yoga

h.

Railroad Safety

i.

Coast Guard

j.

Sell Food

k.

Kid Stuff

l.

Electric & Fuel Storage

m.

Bone Density Test

n.

More Emergency Preparedness

o.

Dietician Cooking Demonstrations/Cookbook

p.

Rocky Mountain Power


6.

Please offer suggest
ions on how you would improve the fair?

a.

Longer Hours

b.

Home Financial Class Scheduled Later

c.

Limit the Same Types

d.

Food Storage/Healthy Eating

e.

Sell Food/Free Food

f.

More Publicity