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Revised October 31, 2011

Page
1


Beaver Ridge

Elementary

Title I


Schoolwide
Plan Narrative

2011
-

2012


Beaver Ridge Elementary School has developed, revised/updated and will implement a FY 2011
-
2012 Title I
Schoolwide Plan which will clearly demonstrate “conceptual pooling” by the
coordination of all funding
sources. The school’s Title I Program through its SWP Plan and SWP Budget will be identified as a “single
cost objective” evidenced through supporting documentation. Reference: Non
-
Regulatory Guidance, Title I
Fiscal Issues,
Revised February 2008, Sections E
-
2 and E
-
18, Pages 50, 51, and 64.


School
wide Planning Component
1
:
A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school.


Introduction


Beaver Ridge Elementary School sits placidly near a grassy ridge and along a creek
which at one time was
populated with beavers. The Welch family home was located on this site, which they purchased in 1925.

The school, which is located at 1978 Beaver Ruin Road in Norcross, is quite different from the old Beaver

Ruin School which served t
he community in 1896 with a faculty of two. Today’s Beaver Ridge Elementary
opened in August of 1979. The first principal was Gary Fairley, who was formerly the principal at Norcross
Elementary School. He opened the school with a staff of 37 certified prof
essionals

and 18 support personnel.
The school’s enrollment for grades kindergarten through fifth grade was 764 students. At the time of its
construction, this $1.3 million facility relieved four overcrowded schools in Gwinnett County. Norcross
Elementary
provided Beaver Ridge with 50 percent of its students. Other students were received from Lilburn
Elementary, Rockbridge Elementary and B.B. Harris Elementary.


Th
e student body chose the beaver as the school mascot and called him Bucky Beaver. Students sel
ected

blue and silver as the school colors.



The daily work at Beaver Ridge Elementary consistently reflects the philosophy that children are the most
valuable resource in our community. The school’s mission, “
to develop lifelong learners achiev
ing academic and personal
excellence
”, exemplifies this philosophy. Through strong leadership and the commitment of faculty, staff,
parents, students, and community, Beaver Ridge Elementary students continue to benefit from a positive, safe,
and engaging s
chool experience.




Mission Statement


"The Mission of the staff, family, and community of Shiloh Elementary is
to develop lifelong learners achieving
academic and personal excellence”
This mission works in
unison
with the mission of Gwinnett County Publ
ic
Schools, "to pursue excellence

in academic knowledge, skills,
and behavior for each student resulting in
measured improvement against local, national, and world
-
class standards."
Beaver Ridge Elementary
believes
that

partnership
s

between

school, family
,
students,
and community
will support students to reach

world
-
class
levels of success in academic knowledge, skills, and character
.






Revised October 31, 2011

Page
2


Non
-
Academic Data


Student Ethnicity


The graph below shows that the majority of our students are Hispanic and as can

be seen in Program Enrollment
data that follows, also speak a language other t
han English at home. This means that our student population has
limited background knowledge and expected developmental vocabulary is not at the level where students would
be ex
pected to be if they were native English speakers.

Many of the research
-
based strategies that support our
Hispanic students are also best practice for all children. Differentiated Instruction, specific vocabulary
development and balanced literacy programs
are just a few of the strategies that Beaver Ridge employs to
ensure the academic growth of all children.




Beaver Ridge

Elementary Program Enrollment


Beaver Ridge

Elementary
’s total enrollment for the 2011
-
2012 school year

is 1239 students.
The graph
below
shows the percentage of students served in the
English Language Learners (ELL)
, Special Education, Early
Intervention

(EIP)
, and Gifted (FOCUS) programs.
It is also notable that
85%

of our students receive Free and
Reduced price lunch while at school
. With the exception of the Gifted Program, students enrolled in these
programs or who receive free or reduced lunch, are considered at risk of not meeting state academic standards.
These programs provide services with targeted interventions beyond those a
vailable to all students. As a
Schoolwide Program, Beaver Ridge is able to provide additional supplemental services to all students,
regardless of program enrollment.


6%

0%

33%

73%

3%

.4%

4%

Ethnicity

Asian/Pacific Islander
Black
Hispanic
Multiracial
Native American
White
Revised October 31, 2011

Page
3




Socio
-
economic Status



The
percent

of students designated as "economically disadvantaged" has
steadily remained at high percentiles.

In
A Framework for Understanding Poverty,
Ruby Payne
writes that there are

two types of poverty,
"situational" or short term, and "generational" long term.

Many in our population are dealing with situational
poverty brought on by our nation's current economic situation while others have been in a position of poverty
for some time.
Situational Poverty is best described when a family goes through some sort of
crisis and their
living conditions and or income has changed with the outcome of becoming low socio
-
economic status. These
types of crisis may be, but not limited to loss of employment, losing a home, serious injury, and a change in the
family make
-
up (di
vorce or separation). Generational Poverty is best equated to a family being born into a
certain economic status, where for more than a generation they have been in the low socio
-
economic bracket.
BRES is made up of both types of poverty level families.

Though we realize this type of statistic does not
dictate the students’ learning potential
, we

do realize that this at times can be a challenge. Many of our
generational

poverty

families are hesitant to volunteer, participate, or join our school in suppo
rting their student.


Academic Data


In developing the Schoolwide Title I Needs Assessment, the Title I committee reviewed the following data:




AYP performance



Historical trends in CRCT performance



Comparisons of BRES performance on the CRCT with GCPS and
the state



Strand data on the CRCT



Fifth Grade Writing



ITBS

AYP

Beaver Ridge ES students have made Adequate Yearly Progress for seven consecutive years. We are pleased
that our school has consistently met the increasingly rigorous Annual Measurable Objectives set by the state of
Georgia. We are very proud to be a Title

I School of Distinction where all students, including those at risk of
not meeting standards, succeed academically.



0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Special Ed
LEP/ELL
Gifted
EIP
Programs 2011
-
12

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
4


Math AYP Data for 2010
-
2011

Mathematics

All students

Asian

Black

Hispanic

White

SWD

ELL

Econ Disadv.

Students in AYP Grade levels

704

29

226

399

31

87

305

643

Fay Students with tests scores

532

22

151

326

21

53

244

490

Group > = Minimum size?

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Basic/DNM

14.10%

0

22.50%

11.70%

10%

37.70%

15.20%

15.10%

Proficient/Meets

52.40%

36.4%

54.3%

53.4%

38.1%

41.5%

55.7%

53.3%

Advance/Exceeds

33.5%

63.6%

23.2%

35.0%

52.4%

20.8%

29.1%

31.6%

Meets + Exceeds

85.9%

100.0%

77.5%

88.3%

90.5%

62.3%

84.8%

84.9%

Meets + Exceeds rate > = 75.7%

Y



Y

Y





Y

Y




Our school has also noted a decline in math scores for the Black and SWD subgroups. The Black subgroup did
not attain the AMO by absolute bar this year. An allowable statistical calculation called a Confidence Interval
was used as a secondary way of meetin
g AYP standards. This means that the students in this subgroup are
dangerously close to not making AYP. This year, an emphasis will be placed on improving the math scores of
students in these 2 subgroups. Some of the strategies we will implement will be a
dditional time on Success
Maker Program every week, Extended Learning Time Programs: Before School and Saturday Math Program,
and CQI.


Reading

/
La
nguage Arts

AYP data for 2010
-
2011

Rea./Larts

All students

Asian

Black

Hispanic

White

SWD

ELL

Econ Disadv.

Students in AYP Grade levels

704

29

226

399

31

87

305

643

Fay Students with tests
scores

531

22

151

326

20

53

244

489

Group > = Minimum size?

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Basic/DNM

7.3%

0.0%

13.2
%

5.4%

0.0%

29.2%

7.2
%

7.5%

Proficient/Meets

63.6%

50.0
%

61.6
%

66.3%

52.5%

51.9%

71.9
%

65.5%

Advance/Exceeds

29.2%

50.0
%

25.2
%

28.4%

47.5%

18.9%

20.9
%

27.0%

Meets + Exceeds

92.7%

100.0
%

86.8
%

94.6%

100.0
%

70.8%

92.8
%

92.5%

Meets + Exceeds rate > =
80%

Y



Y

Y





Y

Y



Research indicates that a child’s reading ability directly impacts a child’s overall well
-
being and academic
success. In comparing our 2011 CRCT
mean
scores to our 2010 CRCT
mean
scores in the area of
reading
, data
indicates that our scores increased by 1.
80% in the All Students
subgroup
.
Even though we
scored above the
Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) in reading, the Students with Disabilities subgroup concerns us

since this
subgroup
, which historically struggles in reading,

is close to t
he student size
for monitoring,
and
must meet the
AMO of 80%.

Finally, when we review
local data in the area

of reading, we find ourselves proficient in
instructing students so the majority of students end the year reading on grade level.


Revised October 31, 2011

Page
5


Beaver Ridge Elementary student
s who are categorized as Black, SWD, or Economically Disadvantaged did not
perform as well as students in other subgroups. In fact, although Beaver Ridge Elementary school did make
AYP for the 2010
-
2011 school year, students in the SWD subgroup did not mee
t reach the Annual Measurable
Objective (AMO). This did not affect our AYP status
because

the SWD subgroup at BRES does not currently
have enough students to count
for AYP
.
It is imperative that we increase achievement

in reading / Language
Arts

for these students, for their own benefit, and should the subgroup meet minimum size requirements to
count for AYP, for the maintenance of our AYP status.
This year, BRES will provide additional support for
students with disabilities

through intervention
s designed to meet their needs. For exampl
e,
we will provide
additional time on Success Maker Program and Extended Learning Time Program: Before School.






Revised October 31, 2011

Page
6


Grade Level Performance on the GPS


Each year,
Beaver Ridge

Elementary students participate in
th
e
Georgia's Criterion Referenced Competency
Test (CRCT). The purpose of the test is to measure each student's level of mastery of the Georgia Performance
Standards.
These standards

are directly linked to
Gwinnett County’s curriculum, the

Academic Knowled
ge and
Skills

(
AKS
)
.


In previous years, the test was administered to students in grades 1
-
5. During the 2010
-
2011 administration, the
CRCT was not offered to students in grades 1 and 2.
Stu
dents in First and Second grade’s academic progress
was

monitor
ed
with

county level benchmark assessments in

Reading, English/Language Arts, and Math.
Students in the third through fifth
were

administered

the CRCT in
the five core curriculum areas.

The
following
data
reflect
s

the historical trends for

reading, math
and science

strands at
each grade level
.



Historical Reading CRCT Strand Data

Strands

Grade
Level

2006
-
2007

2007
-
2008

2008
-
2009

2009
-
2010

2010
-
2011

Diagonally
This
year's
grade

Info & Media

1











2nd
graders



2











3rd graders



3











4th graders



4

75

73

74

73

75

5th graders



5



69

65

65

59

6th graders

















Comprehension

1

77

74

78

75



2nd
graders



2

83

80

85

80



3rd graders



3


69

75

68

68

68

4th graders



4


73

80

74

71

75

5th graders



5


63

73

73

75

70

6th graders













Reading for
Info

1











2nd
graders



2











3rd graders



3

67

64

65

54

53

4th graders



4

75

73

74

73

75

5th graders



5

71

69

65

65

59

6th graders

















Skills & Vocab

1

73

84

84

81



2nd
graders



2

85

86

81

82



3rd graders



3

73

74

72

80

77

4th graders



4

71

76

81

67

72

5th graders



5

61

74

75

64

82

6th graders


















Revised October 31, 2011

Page
7


When analyzing the data, we are able to note a d
ecline in Info
rmation and
Media from grade 4 to grade 5 and in
correlation to that we can see that grade 5

consistently had a low

mean score

in that strand.

In the
Comprehension strand, the mean score declined from SY2007
-
2008 in grade 4, but was consistent across other
grade levels. When looking at groups, we see t
he grade 1 students from SY2008
-
2009, drastically declined
from grade 1 when compared to the mean score from SY2010
-
2011. When reviewing scores from grade 3 in
the area of Reading for Information, we can see that there was a gain with the group of student
s every year. As
a whole grade 4 remained consistent.

In the strand of Skills and Vocabulary, we see a drop from SY2099
-
2010
to SY 2010
-
2011 in grade 5. A closer look at strategies changed that school year will be reviewed and
discussed to ensure that B
eaver Ridge ES continues to see success in this area.









































Revised October 31, 2011

Page
8


Historical Mathematics CRCT Strand Data

Strands

Grade
Level

2006
-
2007

2007
-
2008

2008
-
2009

2009
-
2010

2010
-
2011

Diagonally
This
year's
grade

Algebra

1











2nd
graders



2











3rd graders



3



76

69

73

74

4th graders



4



83

74

82

77

5th graders



5



74

62

81

85

6th graders
















Data Analysis
&

1

76

77

79

80



2nd
graders

Probability

2

79

73

76

71



3rd graders



3



72

74

89

72

4th graders



4



86

81

82

76

5th graders



5



84

77

76

73

6th graders












Geometry

1

70

85

79

85



2nd
graders



2

80

82

81

77



3rd graders



3



60

71

73

72

4th graders



4



67

65

68

73

5th graders



5



77

69

79

82

6th graders













Measurement

1

70

73

74

71



2nd
graders



2

73

76

77

68



3rd graders



3



71

66

67

69

4th graders



4



73

73

72

80

5th graders



5



72

68

72

66

6th graders












Number &

1

70

74

80

78



2nd
graders

Operations

2

76

76

80

70



3rd
graders



3



75

75

73

66

4th graders



4



71

68

66

69

5th graders



5



76

68

72

72

6th graders


Our Historical Mathematics Data shows us that in the area of
Algebra

our fourth graders’ mean score have been
inconsistent. It is good to see that our fifth graders’ mean scores show growth the past two school years. In the
area of Data and Probability it is evident that during the school year

2009
-
2010 grade 3 and 4 sho
w a
decline
.
Grade 4 shows growth in the strand of Measurement, yet grade 5 shows a loss from school year
2009
-
2010 to
2010
-
2011
.

In the Numbers and Operations
a steady decline was noted in grade 3, and when looking at a
specific group, we also note a
loss of growth from gr
ade
3 to gr
ade
4
.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
9



Science CRCT Strand Data

Strands

Grade
Level

2006
-
2007

2007
-
2008

2008
-
2009

2009
-
2010

2010
-
2011

Diagonally
This
year's
grade

Earth

&

3



60

67

69

60

4th graders


Space

4



69

70

68

68

5th graders



5



67

64

61

58

6th graders

















Life

3

63

67

69

71

66

4th graders



4

68

73

67

70

79

5th graders



5

60

73

67

73

72

6th graders

















Physical

3

64

74

71

71

68

4th graders



4

63

68

70

66

69

5th graders



5

60

62

78

71

73

6th graders










In our Science Historical Data we our grades 3
-
5 have been within a ten point range from school year 2006
-
2007 to 2010
-
2011.


1st Grade
District
Level
Benchmark Assessment


Due to the limited funding on the state level, Beaver Ridge Elementary used data from the district
level
benchmark

assessments to monitor

the academic growth of all first g
raders. When comparing the post scores of
Beaver Ridge Elementary students
with

the county level average

s
cores

we determine
d

that Beaver Ridge
Elementary
students scored an

average of 69% in reading

while
Gwinnett County Public Schools’ average

score
was

78
%. We determine
d

that
reading instructional
strategies
such as Reading Recov
ery, ESOL Program
pull
-
out

and
Young Readers Program
in place need to be maintained
.
When we look at the data for
Language Arts,
see

that Beaver Ridge Elementary

scored 7
% less tha
n the county of average of 72
%
.

Finally, in Mathematics
,

Beaver Ri
dge Eleme
ntary’s average was 71
%, which is 5%
less than
the county’s average.
We will

focus on
mathematics AKS that our students show weak areas in. During

Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI), we
look forward to improvements in this area.


2nd Grade District Lev
el Benchmark Assessment


Due to the limited funding on the state level, Beaver Ridge Elementary used data from the district level
benchmark assessments to moni
tor the academic growth of all second g
raders. Average growth was noted in
Second Grade as a who
le in all academic areas tested.
In r
eading
,

Beaver Ridge Elementary
scored at nearly
the same level as the county with an average of 73%, just over 2% less than GCPS.
Language Arts
scores
lagged the farthest behind the county average;
t
he GCPS average

was 80
% versus BRES
’s

scores at 76%.

In
Math
, GCPS’s
post

score

average
was

77%

while

Beaver Ridge El
ementary scored an average of 73
%.
In
Reading we will continue to use our Reading Levels
, and County Benchmark Assessments

to support our
planning for our

students’ growth in the area of reading. Our
students

will continue to participate

in
the ESOL
Program pull
-
out as well as participate in schoolwide the reading incentive program.

In Mathematics our
Revised October 31, 2011

Page
10


second grade students will focus on our weak areas of
AKS, based on County Benchmark Assessments during
CQI.



3rd Grade CRCT


Over the years, performance of third grade students has been
consistent
. Reading performance
was noted

with
an average of
90%

of students meeting or exceeding the

standard.
Average
E
nglish
/
Language Arts scores

for
third g
raders
were about

92%
. In the area of
Math
,

scores
were lower than expected
,

with an average of
76%

of
students meeting or exceeding the standards. Our Black subgroup saw a significant loss in the area of Math.

We might be attributed some of the loss to minimal participation in our Extended Learning Time Program,
therefore not receiving the extra support needed. This school year, we will add a Math Saturday Program in
addition to our Extended Learning Time Prog
ram before school hours. During the both of these Extended
Learning Time Programs, individual invitations both written and via phone calls will be made. For the Saturday
Math Program, we will have attendance rewards. Students will be able to earn incent
ives in hopes this will
motivate all of our students to the program, including our Black subgroup students.


4th Grade CRCT


During the administration of the CRCT, scores

the averages
for Beaver Ridge Elementary fourth g
raders were
as follows: Reading 87%
, Language Arts 90%, Math 82%, Science 84%, and Social Studies 77
%.




5th Grade CRCT


Trends in fifth grade students’ performance over the past six years reflect that students have maintained English
/
Language Arts scores.
For 2011
,

about 96
% of students

met or exceeded the standard. Reading scores
reflected
a slight decrease during 2011, with the exception of the Vocabulary Skills Acquisition which increased 16
%
.

Math scores increased
or
remained steady

in almost all standards.




Fifth Grade Writing
Gateway


Writing

provides students with a creative opportunity to be involved in their learning. Reading and writing are
interconnected. In most cases successful and proficient readers become successful and proficient writers.
Students maximize achievem
ent by understanding and connecting the reading and writing process.


Historical Writing Data

Over the last five years, the majority of
Beaver Ridge Elementary

students have met or exceeded Georgia State
Standards for the Fifth Grade Writing Gateway. Last year
,

the percent of
Beaver Ridge Elementary
students
who scored in the

Does Not Meet
/Level 1

category
was 8%, Meets/Level 2 was 81%,
and
Exceeds/Level 3 was
11
%.
Last year’s fifth grade students had a higher percentage of student
s

scoring in the meets category than
ever before. Additionally, the percentage of students scoring in the does not meet category was lower than the
previous four years. In the excee
ds category,
our score

held steady from the previous year, but we also had three
students who were assessed with perfect scores!

With our success last year on the writing assessment, Beaver
Ridge will continue to focus on developing writers that exceed sta
ndards throu
gh participating in Writing
Workshop, Saturday Writing Boot Camp, Writing Café, and UGA Mock Writing Test.



Revised October 31, 2011

Page
11





ITBS Grade 3: Reading, Language Arts and Mathematics


Iowa Test of Basic Skills


The Iowa Test of Basic Skills is administered to
3
rd

and 5
th

graders each year.
Beaver Ridge Elementary

teachers and administrators use data from this norm referenced assessment
to focus on
students’ needs.

We are
also able to make comparisons between our students and others in the nation
. The
data below

shows that a
disproportionate number of students are scoring below the 50
th

percentile, particularly

in the area
s

of Reading
and Language Arts.

The 50
th

percentile is the statistical average.

As
Beaver Ridge

Elementary moves to close
achievement gaps, we
must study how to overcome these
gaps in achievement

to ensure that each student
achieves at or above his or her potential. We must also continually search for ways to improve the effectiveness
of our practice for all students.
In third grade, a
n average o
f 52% of our students scored in the 26

to
75 percentile
combined in the Language Arts Total. An average of 58% of our students scored within the same percentiles in
the area of Mathematics. In Reading, an average of 55% scored within the same percentiles.

It is imperative
that students performing in the 0
-
25 percentile rank be supported in their achievement in all areas, especially in
reading and Language Arts. We will support these students by focusing o
n

enrichment in vocabulary, this can
be supported wi
th our Word Walls for Reading and Language Arts, at every grade level and in Math
implementing daily CQI focusing on GCPS AKS, which included computation and problem solving.







7.80%

19.60%

18.10%

14.70%

23.10%

81.20%

70.30%

73.80%

71.80%

72.40%

10.90%

10.10%

8.10%

13.50%

4.50%

0.00%
10.00%
20.00%
30.00%
40.00%
50.00%
60.00%
70.00%
80.00%
90.00%
2010-11
2009-10
2088-09
2007-08
2006-07
Historical Writing Grade 5

Does not meet
Meets
Exceeds
0
20
40
60
80
100
0-25
26-50
51-75
76-99
ITBS: 3rd L.A.

2010
-
2011

0
20
40
60
80
100
0-25
26-50
51-75
76-99
ITBS: 3rd M.A.

2010
-
2011

0
20
40
60
80
100
0-25
26-50
51-75
76-99
ITBS: 3rd REA.

2010
-
2011

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
12


ITBS Grade 5
:
Reading, Language Arts and Mathematics


During the 2010
-
2011 school year, the number of student scoring
from
the
26
to
75 percentile
in Language Arts
was 51%, Mat
h was 61%, and Reading was 47%.

As with the third graders, we will focus on increasing student
achievement in LA, math, and reading so

that more students are performing at or above the 50
th

percentile.







Efforts will be put into action to improve scores

for all students

with the implementation of
e
xtended
l
earning
opportunities (
Before

School Program
, Saturday Program
,
CQI, Math Enrichment, Math Specials,
SuccessMaker, and Math Club
) which will focus on remediating
and enriching
those students who were
identified as needing remediation
or enrichment
in Math and Reading.


Attendance 2010
-
2011


At Beaver Ridge Elementary,
the average number of days missed by students ranged from 1
-
5. We believe
students with excellent attendance will achieve at higher levels. Therefore we continue to promote the
importance of student attendance with perfect attendance awards both quarterly

and annually. We also ensure
student and parent accountability by having classroom teachers, counselors, and/or assistant principals contact
parents by phone on the day of a student's absence. On the fifth day of absences communication is made by
both a

phone call and a written, formal letter from the school. As we look to improve student attendance, we
will continue to focus on students who are chronically absent and/or tardy. Teachers, counselors, and
administrators have easy access to our county's G
o
.
Gwinnett

Portal which allows us to quickly identify students
with mounting attendance issues, in addition to communication from teachers and the Attendance Reports
provided by the county office.

Our counselors and staff are aware of the negative effects
of students’ truancy and the connection
of

attendance
infractions with academics and behavior expectations. Our school counselors hold small group meetings with
targeted students as well as have these students participate in an attendance program, encoura
ging students to be
on
-
time and at school each day. Administration receives an email after a third unexcused absence and also
contacts home. Communication is the key to having students at Beaver Ridge at school every day so they have
every opportunity to

progress academically.

Discipline


We believe that students are citizens of Beaver Ridge Elementary and have a right to a safe, positive, and
engaging learning environment. Along with these rights, come responsibilities. Schoolwide rules have been
devel
oped to ensure students’ rights, but it is also the student's responsibility to follow these rules. In addition to
clear rules, our school has implemented rewards and consequences.

Over the last few years, student referrals have decreased significantly alo
ng with the number of students being
referred. As the faculty works to build strong relationships with students and parents, we have no doubt that this
0
20
40
60
80
100
0-25
26-50
51-75
76-99
ITBS: 5th L.A.

2010
-
2011

0
20
40
60
80
100
0-25
26-50
51-75
76-99
ITBS: 5th M.A.

2010
-
2011

0
20
40
60
80
100
0-25
26-50
51-75
76-99
ITBS: 5th REA.

2010
-
2011

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
13


positive trend will continue.
In the school year 2010
-
11, our school concluded the school year with 155
discipline referrals.


Finally, we believe that discipline is essentially a function of the quality of the educational experience being
provided. As student engagement increases, student behavior improves. Therefore, we seek to continually
improve our prac
tice as educators and to focus on providing rigorous and engaging instruction.


Learning Expectations


Gwinnett County Public Schools has a history of holding all schools accountable for the academic success of
their students while providing the flexibili
ty for each school to determine how best to teach children. This is one
of the reasons GCPS is so successful. Beaver Ridge’s Title I Schoolwide Plan is designed to support the Local
School Plan for Improvement (LSPI)

which is directly related to the vision

and mission of GCPS
. This plan
consists of targeted goals based on student achievement results from the previous school year. These goals are
specific and measurable. They are revised and updated to reflect changes that occur in the individual local
scho
ol. Data is used to determine which areas need improvement and to identify specific, measurable, annual
objectives. Schools then determine how to use research
-
based strategies to achieve these goals, using flexibility
as needed. The LSPI development proces
s involves teachers, parents, and community members. This ensures
entire school community has the opportunity to be involved is knowledgeable of the school’s improvement
goals.



Key Objectives: 2011
-
2012 Local School Plans for Improvement


Based on the
data collected and reviewed during the 2010
-
2011 school year, the following objectives will be
implemented based on the needs of Beaver Ridge Elementary School:


1.

By May 2012, Beaver Ridge ES will increase academic performance in Reading and Language Arts
for all students and targeted subgroups in SWD/Special Education and ELL/LEP to meet and or
exceed annual targets through collaborative planning with classroom teachers, targeted interventions,
direct reading instruction (Reader's Workshop, Writer's Worksh
op) and vocabulary development.


2.

By May 2012, Beaver Ridge ES will increase academic performance in Science for all students and
targeted subgroups in SWD/Sped Education and ELL/LEP to meet and/or exceed annual targets
through collaborative planning with c
lassroom teachers, targeted interventions, staff development
and Science Specials.


3.

By May 2012, Beaver Ridge ES will increase academic performance in Math for all students and
targeted subgroups in SWD/Sped Education and African American to meet and/or ex
ceed annual
targets through collaborative planning with classroom teachers, targeted interventions, direct math
instruction (Math Workshop), and vocabulary development.


4.

Beaver Ridge will maintain excellence in attendance rate (97.5% during 2011


2012).


5.

Beaver Ridge Elementary will elevate student achievement by increasing the number of students
scoring Level 3 on the state assessment in Reading/Language Arts and Math while decreasing Level
1 performance.



Revised October 31, 2011

Page
14


6.

Beaver Ridge Elementary will maintain excellence

in test participation for all subgroups (100%
during 2011
-
2012).


7.

Student achievement will be increased through effective parent involvement and effective
communication between home and school.


In preparing for this upcoming school year, we will continu
e to
incorporate

literacy into every
content area
,
provide
additional math time through the use of our school’s CQI time each day, and
add
provide additional

resources that support every academic
content

in our school’s Parent Center. Professional staff d
evelopment
will be
provided in

all academic subject areas. Teachers will attend conferences, workshops, and trainings that
support our local LSPI Goals. Our
Extended Learning Time programs
will support and focus on our students
who
scored at the

Does Not

Meet

level

in last year’s CRCT. Our Writing Round
-
Up will invite all of our Fifth
Graders in order to review writing strategies for the state writing assessment.


Additional interventions include:




Math Class as part of our Specials rotation




Science C
lass for all of our students

during specials




Early Intervention Program (EIP)

for our students who qualify based on
CRCT scores and academic
achievement




Extended Learning Time Program

(ELTP
) before school
in
which we encourage all of our At
-
Risk
students

to participate



A
fter school clubs used as
to increase achievement for all students




Success Maker practice before school hours
offered to all of our students



English for Speakers of Other Languages

(ESOL
)

which is

an instructional program offered to our
students who are learners of the En
glish language



Special Education services offered to our students who qualify for supp
ort that meet the requirements



Gifted Program
which is
called FOCUS that offer
s

academic
chall
enges by extending the Academic
Knowledge and Skills (AKS)



Transition Classes for f
ifth graders who did not pass or meet all requirements for promotion
to fifth
grade



Young Readers Program

which is
a national educational incentive for Latino students in e
lementary
school to read for recreational purposes

(after school program)




Reading Recovery which is a short term reading
intervention program

for our First grad
ers who are
struggling readers



Math focused
Continuous Quality Improvement (
CQI
)instructional m
odel



Writing Round


Up

on Saturdays offered to our f
ifth graders as they prepare for the state writing tes
t



Mosaic of Writing

which is

an event
that

highlights all

of our students’ best writing



Writin
g remediation courses for our fi
fth grade students who

fail
the state writing test the first time



Revised October 31, 2011

Page
15



School wide Planning Component 2
.

Schoolwide reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children to
meet the state’s proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement and use effective m
ethods and
instructional strategies that are based on scientific
based
research.


As mentioned in the LSPI,

Beaver Ridge

Element
ary School will
support the reduced class size model of
instruction to allow teachers to make a stronger academic connection
with their students. Therefore, a portion
of our Title I budget is allocated to reduce class size by adding an additional teacher
(s)

in

the following
grade
levels: Kindergarten,

1
-
3,

and

4
-

5
.

This part of our plan will help ensure individual and differe
ntiated learning
for all students.

Since our regular allocation is $
343,035.00
and due to the level of accountability required, we will fund
additional hours for our bookkeeper. Extra hours will be funded at the time and half rate of the bookkeeper’s
regu
lar hourly rate and will average 2 hours per week.

The Title I budget will fund twenty

additional hours for our Title I Assistant Principal to work

with
the
Leadership Team, which includes the administration and grade level /department leaders. The meetin
g will be
held during the summer break. The Title I AP will use this time to
compile, disaggregate, and analyze

the data

for the SWP Needs Assessment
. The Title I AP will present and guide the team in writing

our s
chool’s
planning for LSPI Goals. In add
ition, the assistant principals will work an additional 16 hours to review each
component of the local Schoolwide Plan, Parent Involvement Practices and all of its documentation, in addition
to the budget and needs assessment of the school. The team will
review the data from the school year and
determine strengths and weaknesses for our school, including all individual subgroups. After the data is
reviewed time will be allotted to brainstorm best practices and strategies that would best support our school

needs.


MATHEMATICS

AND SCIENCE

To e
nsure
Beaver Ridge
’s high achievement on the CRCT
state
assessment, we will continue to do the
following:




Data will be analyzed in math and science to identify strengths and weaknesses through planning
sessions during
common planning time and through release planning sessions.



During award ceremonies the special area teachers will meet to discuss the strengths an
d weaknesses
from the
Benchmarks and discuss how they will integrate the weaknesses into their AKS.



Beaver Ridge
Elementary
will
continue using a

Math/Science Instructional Focus Team to oversee,
guide, and support the improvement efforts in mathematics and science to include the purchase of
additional materials and technolog
y to support direct instructi
on

as funds become available.



O
ur school’s math specialist will

continue

to lead
a mathematics committee
.
The
committee

will

focus

this schoo
l year
on CRCT targeted areas
. The committee will also
assist

with the

creation of
M
ath Night
activities
for
our school
and
host

this
event in

the late fall.
Parents will learn about the
essential AKS

as
well as be able to take home materials to he
lp with
their
children in this area.



Teachers will focus on mathematic
s

during CQI time.



Lab Classrooms at every gra
de level highlight best practices and provide models of instructional
strategies designed to meet the needs of every child. These Lab Classrooms are a good example of the
relationship between professional learning and classroom instruction.



Math and Scie
n
ce materials will be inventoried

and organized into “kits” for teacher check
-
out.
Beaver
Ridge

Elementary will also
continue using our

Math

and
Science

Labs.



Beaver Ridge will continue to add non
-
fiction Science and Math books to our robust book room for

teach
er

checkout. In addition, we will purchase additional books for the media center for student
and/
or
teacher checkout.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
16




T
he “Every Day Counts” calendar will help our students focus on the AKS on a daily basis and

improve
students’

computation skills.





In addition, students
scoring a Level 1 on the CRCT will

participate in EIP classes during the school
day.




Beaver Ridge

Elementary will integrate strategies for struggling
mathematicians

and provide extended
learnin
g times
,
including an Extended
Learning time Program: b
efore
school

format
.



Our school will offer Staff Development/Professional Development to provide teachers with innovative
strategies designed to increase math and science achievement.



Make and Take Parent Workshops will be offered t
o parents to support math and science learning at
home.



Interpretation and t
ranslation services,
including

during regular parent teacher conferences, will

be
offered to inform parents of

their child’s progress in math and science.



Math Core Coach Books wil
l be used in grades 3
-
5.



Succes
s Maker High Stakes management is a program that can assess students on their individual
strengths and weaknesses. After the assessment this program is tailored for each student. This program
supports our students’ and scho
ol’s goals in the academic areas of need.


RE
ADING

To e
nsure
Beaver Ridge
’s high achievement on the CRCT assessment, we will continue to do the following:



Data will be analyzed in
reading

to identify strengths and weaknesses through planning sessions during
common planning time and through release planning sessions.



During award ceremonies the special area teachers will meet to discuss the strengths an
d weaknesses
from the
Benchmarks and d
iscuss how they will integrate the weaknesses into their AKS.



Beaver Ridge

Elementary will implement the integration of ongoing reading and writing opportunities
across all curricular areas
,

to special areas as appropriate, using
a balanced literacy progra
m
. Non
-
fiction leveled texts have been purchased and will be used to support this effort.



Reading Recovery and EIP instructors working with sm
all groups of children will

help to monitor
student progress th
rough guided reading activities and data analysis.



The Push
-
In M
odel will be used with our ESOL students. The ESOL teacher will work with her
students daily in a small group in their classroom.



The continued use of our
Leveled book room

enables teachers to check out classroom sets of
instructionally appropriate
reading materials to u
se in their classrooms.



The teaching of reading is not isolated to the
Literacy B
lock at
Beaver Ridge
. Reading in all content
areas and the utilization of non
-
fiction material to help promote comprehension

developme
nt is also
greatly emphasized.



Literacy N
ight will

continue to be offered in
the
F
all
. T
eachers
will
share re
ading strategies with parents

so they can support their children at home
.



Support
sessions
for parents
will focus on helping with homework, ways to improve reading, and what
to do with successful readers.



I
n addition,

to the

activities mentioned
, Media
/Technology

Night will

continue to be offered
one
time
during the school year
.



Lab Classrooms at every gr
ade level highlight best practices and provide models of instructional
strategies designed to meet the needs of every child. These Lab Classrooms are a good example of the
relationship between professional learning and classroom instruction.



Two Literacy C
oaches will continue to model Reader’s and Writer’s Workshop for teachers who need
assistance.



Both Literacy Coaches will meet weekly with their grade levels to
assist with
analyzing data and
plan
ning

for the following week.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
17




Beaver Ridge
Elementary will in
tegrate strategies for
struggling readers and provide an Extended
L
earnin
g tim
e Program: b
efore

school
formats.



Our school will offer Staff Development/Professional Development to provide teachers with innovative
strategies designed to increase
reading

ach
ievement.



Make and Take Parent Workshops will be offered to parents to support
reading instruction

at home.



Translation services, especially during regular parent teacher conferences, will be offered to i
nform
parents of

their child’s progress in
Reading
.






WRITING

To e
nsure
Beaver Ridges

Elementary School
’s high achievement on the CRCT
state
assessment, we will
continue to do the following:



In order to develop proficient writers, the writing classroom must provide students with daily
opportunities for
practice and experimentation in writing in a safe and nurturing environment.
Therefore, at
Beaver Ridge
, students will be assessed with a writing benchmark
after each writing cycle
.
The writing piece will be graded according to
county and state
rubric
s
.



The 5
th

grade teachers
and literacy coaches
will conduct a
Saturday Writing Boot C
amp

for at
-
risk
students
prior to the fifth grade
writing G
ateway

Assessment
. This
Saturday Writing Boot C
amp

will
cover all genres and
domains
.



Our school will offer Staff
Development/Professional Development to provide teachers with innovative
strategies designed to increase writing achievement.



Interpretation and t
ranslation services,
including during regular Parent
-
Teacher C
onferences, will be
offere
d to inform parents of

their child’s progress in
Writing
.



Beaver Ridge will continue to offer targeted small group writing instruction for fifth grade students
through our Writing Round Up Program. EIP teachers, Focus teachers, and Literacy Coaches will Push
-
In to classrooms t
wice a week, beginning in January to work with groups of students and raise their level
of writing preparation and the 5
th

grade writing test.



Mosaic of Writing will continue to take place in March. Teachers will score students’ writing and
choose classro
om and grade level winners. Students will share and celebrate their winning with their
families.



Beaver Ridge

Elementary will offer a writing rem
ediation course to students who

do not pass the
Georgia
Writing Assessment the first tim
e
.



Writing will contin
ue to be integrated across content areas.


TECHNOLOGY

The use of technology has a lifetime effect on students. Early exposure to these technologies in elementary
school empowers them to become successful students and professional in a technology
-
driven wo
rld. Not only
has technology helped teachers work more effectively and help students to learn more effectively, it has also
helped us a great deal in the area of communication overall. Beaver Ridge’s technology had great
enhancements last year through th
e purchase of new technologies with our Title I funds.

As
Beaver Ridge

continues to utilize enhancements from last year, we will:



Continue to

use equipment such as

LCD projectors
, digital cameras, video cameras, visual presenters,
interactive white boards
, and student response systems
to help guide the instruction of our students.
These types of equipment will help:



S
tudents


of other langua
ges
who are
struggling

to learn the

English language.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
18




G
ain valuable insight of how a student is thinking while takin
g a test.



P
roduce videos and digital images which can be created and incorporated into our various
curriculums
.



Allow students to engage in hands
-
on and interactive learning.


The parents on our Schoolwide committee have seen the positive effects the visual presenters have
had on student achievement.



Revised October 31, 2011

Page
19


Schoolwide

Planning Component 3
:

Instruction by highly qualified teachers.


4
1
% of the teaching staff holds a Bachelor’s
Degree

41
% of the teaching staff holds a Master’s Degree

16
% of the teaching staff holds a Specialist Degree

2
% of the teaching staff holds a Doctorate Degree



OTHE
R CHARACTERISTICS OF BEAVER RIDGE

ELEMENTARY STAFF INCLUDE:



85/89 of our

teachers are Highl
y Qualified



27

teachers

hold an ESOL endorsement



8 teachers

hold a gifted endorsement



9 teachers

hold a R
eading endorsement



7 teachers hold a Special Education endorsement



1 teacher holds a Reading Recovery endorsement



4 teachers hold an Art/Music
endorsement



2 teachers hold a Health/Physical Education endorsement



7

Staff members are CPR Certified



All paraprofessionals hold Georgia Paraprofessional Certificates


Schoolwide Planning Component 3A:

Strategies to attract high
-
quality highly qualified te
achers to high
-
needs
schools.



ACADEMIC BEST PRACTICES

Educational “best practices” have penetrated the traditional classroom. With new information being learned
everyday on how the brain processes information as well as how schools with high poverty an
d high minority
rates can still be high performing schools, Beaver Ridge will continue its professional learning program which
provides new teachers and veteran teachers with the latest teaching methods possible. To achieve this goal, we
will:



Reading,
math and science lab classrooms will be used to show beginning teachers exemplary ways of
incorporating the reading, mathematics, and science curriculum.



Provide our teachers with release days so that professional learning in the area of literacy, mathemat
ics,
ESOL strategies and technology can be delivered. During the release days the literacy coaches, math
coaches, AP’s and AP/TI will be there to assist with discussing data, instructional strategies and student
achievement.



Quality Plus Teaching Strateg
ies training has been provided to every faculty member in our building.
However, it takes several “parts” to deliver this training. For our new teachers, they received part 1
during their New Teacher Institute. To further this training, part 2 (previewi
ng, vocabulary emphasis,
extending and refining lesson, and developing learning units) will be offered during the school year.



It takes an average of 5 years for a teacher to become comfortable and proficient with the craft of
teaching. Since Beaver Ridge

has a high number of new staff members each year, it is imperative to
provide mentoring from seasoned teachers to our new teachers. We feel that with mentor and mentee
activities taking place during the school year and mentor training taking place in the

summer, our
teachers will not only become more prepared for today’s classroom but also feel success in the
classroom thus staying in the teaching profession longer.



Revised October 31, 2011

Page
20




Science is not an area that has been targeted in the past in the elementary arena. Howe
ver, Science
education is quickly becoming an important area of our curriculum to help further advance our society.
Therefore, to help prepare ourselves for the possible requirement of Science achievement on the CRCT,
Beaver Ridge Elementary will:

o

Provide

time for the Science Specialist to meet with grade levels during their planning time to
discuss AKS and Science vocabulary

o

Include the Science Specialist in the staff development rotation


In an effort to attract highly qualified teachers, Beaver Ridge El
ementary School:



Participates in the system level job fair and recruitment opportunities provided by the Department of
Human Resources.



Provides interviews and tours of Beaver Ridge Elementary as requested by prospective teachers.



Provides an on
-
going New
Teacher Induction Program for all new teachers.



Sets aside a specific time each week for members of each grade level to meet as a group for planning
purposes.



Provides on
-
going professional learning in areas of need.



Provides assistance from the administra
tive team, Assistant Principal for Title I, coaches, and lead
classroom teachers at every grade level.
































Revised October 31, 2011

Page
21


Schoolwide Planning Component 4
:

High quality and ongoing professional development for teachers,
principals,
and
paraprofessionals, and if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff.


Beaver Ridge ES administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, and all support staff participate in monthly
staff development. All staff development whether local or at the county level is focused on improving
student achievement, using research based strat
egies including analyzing data, and setting goals for the
school, class, or individual students.


MATHEMATICS

AND SCIENCE



During

preplanning
sessions,
CRCT results were shared w
ith all the teachers. S
trength
s

and weaknesses
were discussed with each grade

level. Teachers will continue to meet regularly to update and adjust the
instructional calendar that highlights essential math AKS; this will promote consistency and provide
flexibility for accelerating students who are beyond a particular skill.



Half
day planning s
ession
s

for teachers

to discuss and reflect on the schoolwide book study and

to work
on

their RBES goals will be offered.

During this
Teaching with Intervention
planning session teachers
will
also meet with the
math coaches to
discuss activ
ity ideas for the
following 9 weeks based on the
previous 9 weeks data

along with the curriculum calendar
.



A profess
ional learning session will

be offered to teachers which will focus on the
effective use of
Guided Math

in the classroom.


Professional
Learning includes
-



Math
-
Science Staff Development


County Level Course



Math Institute
-

Summer County Level Course



Improving Student Achievement at Beaver Ridge Elementary School


Local School Course


READING



During the preplanning sessions
, CRCT resul
ts were shared with all the teachers. Areas of strength
s

and
weaknesses were discussed with ea
ch grade level.

Teachers will continue to meet regularly

with their
literacy coach

to update and adjust the instructional calendar that highlights essential rea
ding AKS; this
will promote consistency and provide flexibility for accelerating students who are beyond a particular
skill.



Half day planning s
ession
s

for teachers to

discuss and reflect on schoolwide book study and to

work on
their RBES goals will

b
e o
ffered. During this planning session teachers will also meet with t
he literacy
coaches to discuss activity ideas for
the following 9 weeks based on the previous 9 weeks data

along
with the curriculum calendar
.



Though
Q
ual
ity Plus Teaching S
trategies are
emphasized in all curriculum areas, the previewing of
essential vocabulary and skills is directly address
ed

by ESOL and EIP teachers “pushing
-
into” the
classroom to help support direct instruction.



Our literacy assistant principal
will help create

profes
sional learning activities that focus on running
records,
word study
, implementing reader’s workshop activities, use of word walls, developing
classroom libraries, and incorporating information learned in book studies.


Professional Learning includes
-



Summer Literacy Institute


County Level Course



Vision 2016


County Level Course



Improving Student Achievement at Beaver Ridge Elementary


Local Level Course




Revised October 31, 2011

Page
22


WRITING



During pre
planning sessions,
local school writing data
results were shared with all
the teachers. Areas
of strength
s

and weaknesses were discussed with each grade level. Teachers will continue to meet
regularly to update and adjust the instructional calendar that highlights essential writing AKS; this will
promote consistency and provid
e flexibility for accelerating students who are beyond a particular skill.



Half day planning session
s for teachers to work on their RBES goals will

be offered.
During this
planning session teachers will also meet w
ith the literacy coaches to discuss activ
ity ideas

for the
following 9 weeks based on the previous 9 weeks data

along with the curriculum calendar
.



Our literacy assistant principal will offer professional learning on topics such as interactive writing and
writer’s workshop.
These workshops focus

on read

aloud
s

and vocabulary development as a means of
improving children’s writing. Also included in these workshops is a discussion of materials to have at
home that encourage children to write
.



TECHNOLOGY

Professional Learning includes
-



Techie Qui
ckie



Local Level Course


BEHAVIOR AND
MORALE

Professional Learning includes
-



Continue with “
The 360 Degree Leader


by John C. Maxwell
-

Local School Course



“7 Steps for Developing a Proactive Schoolwide Discipline Plan” by Geoff Colvin
-

Local School
Course



“50 ways to Improve Student Behavior” by Todd Whitaker
-

Local School Course

Other Professional Learning Opportunities
-



Georgia Compensatory Educational Leadership (GCel) Conference



Summer Leadership Conference
-

held in the summer with the leadership team to support planning for teachers.



Saturday Math Training


for teachers: a professional learning opportunity for teachers grades K
-
5
to learn,
share, and implement research based m
ath strategies.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
23






Schoolwide Planning Component 5
:

Strategies to increase parental involvement
.


PARENT INVOLVEMENT

The importance of creating an atmosphere that welcomes parents as partners in the education of our students
continues to be a primary goal for
Beaver Ridge

Elementary. Research continues to show that when parents
become involved in their children’s educat
ion, these children earn better grades, have better attendance, and
have more positive attitudes than others whose parents are not involved at school.





Revised October 31, 2011

Page
24


Schoolwide Planning Component 6
:

Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from ear
ly
childhood programs, such as Head Start, EvenStart, Early Reading First,
or a state
-
run preschool program, to local elementary school programs.



PreK to Elementary Transitional Plan:

Transition from Pre
-
K to elementary school is important to the succe
ss of the students in our schools.
Transitional programs provide students with the confidence and overall information to succeed at the next
level of their education. The parent involvement meetings will focus on the academic needs for the
upcoming

schoo
l year

as well as provide parents with necessary information about the daily operations of the ne
w
school. The student
summer camps will focus on
instructional and
social emotional aspects of
the
begin
ning
of

school as well as provide activities that would relieve any anxieties the parent or student may be
experiencing before entering their new school.
A transition team is selected to review the parent meeting
activities and to help plan out our summer camp a
ctivities. This team is made up of the principal, the AP in
charge of Kindergarten, the
Assistant Principal for Title I
, the Parent Instructional Support Coord
inator, the
Parent Liaison,
a Kindergarten Teacher
, and a member of the feeder Child Development

Center
.
Activities
are included in the Parent Involvement Action Plan.


Elementary to Middle School Transitional Plan:

Transition
from elementary school to middle school
is

important to the success of the students in our schools.
Transitional programs provide students with the confidence and overall information to succeed at the next
level of their education. The parent involvement meetings will focus on the academic needs

for the
upcoming

school year

as well as provide parents with necessary information about the daily operations of the new
school. The stu
dent
summ
er camps will focus on
remediation and enrichment activities in all four core
academic areas as well as provi
de activities that would relieve any anxieties the student may be experiencing
bef
ore entering their new school.
A transition team is selected to review the parent meeting activities. This
team is made up of the principal, the AP in charge of Fifth grade

and Sixth grade, the
Assistant Principal for
Title I

from both schools, the Parent Instructional Support Coordinators from both schools, the Parent Liaison
from both schools, and a Fifth and Sixth grade

t
eacher.
Activities are included in the Parent Invo
lvement
Action Plan.


Revised October 31, 2011

Page
25


Schoolwide Planning Component 7
:

Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of
academic assessments.


MATHEMATICS

AND SCIENCE



Local schoo
l assessments,
such as

Math/S
cience
benchmark
s

and exemplars,

will

be utilized to help
guide quarterly instruction planning and focus on mathematics problem solving skills. These
assessments will be discussed with teachers as administr
ators conduct quarterly data

sessions.


READING



Local school assessments, like
reading

level
, reading standard, reading comprehension and fluency
,

will
also be utilized to help guide quarterly instruction planning and focus on reading skills.
Literacy
coaches will discuss t
he
se assessments

with teachers

on a quarterly basis.



WRITING



Loca
l school assessments,
like

the
writing benchmark
s,

will

be utilized to help guide quarterly
instruction planning and focus on writing skills.
Literacy coaches will

di
scuss these assessments

with
teachers
on a quarterly basis.


Teacher involvement in
assessment also includes:



During the pre
planning sessions, CRCT results were shared with all the teachers. Areas of strength
s

and
weaknesses were discussed with each gr
ade level.

Teachers will continue to meet regularly to update
and adjust the instructi
onal calendar that highlights essential AKS; this will promote consistency and
provide flexibility for
remediating

or
accelerating students
based on their

needs
.



Half day planning session
s for teachers to work
on
their RBES goals will

be offered.



Asses
sment results are analyzed
by teachers
in order to provide students with the most effective
instruction in the areas of reading, language arts, math, and science.



Test

talks will be conducted with

st
udents in grades 4
-
5 to provide positive feedback

for stu
dents

regarding

their

achievements as well as

suggestions for improvement on our spring CRCT assessment.



Students are organized into flexible skills groups in order to provide the best instructional environment
possible.



Weekly grade level meetings provide

the means for on
-
going discussion among teachers and
administrators to ensure that appropriate and effective instruction is being implemented.



A
Saturday
Writing Boot Camp

will take place for our
at
-
risk
fifth graders prior to the fifth gr
ade
writing gate
way. This Boot Camp

includes Saturday instruction provided by

5
th

grade
teachers and
liter
acy coaches and will cover

all gen
res.



Grades 1
-
5, based on interim data: Benchmark Assessments

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
26


Schoolwide Planning Component 8:

Coordination and integration of
Federal, State, and local services and
programs, including programs supported under No Child Left Behind,
violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs,
Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job
training.



In addition to the coordinating efforts listed throughout our school’s improvement plan; the following programs
are utilized at Beaver Ridge Elementary:




Free and/or Reduced Lunch to Qualify Families



After School Snack Program



School Nurse



Be There Camp
aign



Red Ribbon Week and Drug Free Schools Programs



IE
2

Flexibility Contract



Gwinnett County Public School Staff Development Funds



Gwinnett County Public School’s Staffing Allotments



Early Intervention Program



English to Speakers of Other Languages



Special

Education Programs



Support from the School Resource Officer



School Social Worker



Gifted Program



Title I


The programs listed above provide Beaver Ridge Elementary with the necessary
funds and personnel to give the
students in our school an exceptional edu
cation. Lunch programs, snack programs, Drug Safety prog
rams,
and
the school nurse ensure that the students stay healthy. Through IE
2

Flexibility contract and other Gwinnett
County initiatives, Beaver Ridge Elementary is able to provide a multitude of ac
ademic support for the
students.
Funding from
the Title I Federal Program supports
academic programs that Beaver Ridge is able to o
ffer such
as Extended Learning t
ime
Program
before school
. Finally, campaigns like the Be There Campaign provide
additional

support and guidance to our parents.
















Revised October 31, 2011

Page
27


Schoolwide Planning Component 9
:

Activities to
ensures

that students who experience difficulty mastering the
proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards are
provided with effective, timely, additional assistance.


THE SUCCESSMAKER PROGRAM

This program
is another way in which we measure stu
dent academic progress in the area of mathematics. We
recognize that our students must be empowered with proficient math skills to succeed in the world of
technology; therefore, we realize to accomplish our goal of sustained increases in mathematics achie
vement,
more than drill and practice will be needed. Students need to be able to apply the knowledge they learn and
become problem solvers. Our involvement in the Pearson High Stakes Management Program helped Beaver
Ridge Elementary School continue its c
onsistent monitoring towards achieving positive growth on the CRCT
state assessment. Individual courses were created for students who were recognized as having weaknesses in a
specific mathematical standard.


MATHEMATICS

AND SCIENCE



One reason for our sig
nificant gains in the past
in

mathematics was due to th
e implementation of a Math
Special
.

We saw

a
n increase

in our CRCT scores
this year for the first time in 4 years. Due to this

we
h
ave decided to
continue
the
use of

our
Math Specials. We will also
continue using our
Math Coach as
a
mentor teacher which

enable
s

her to work in the classrooms
and model lessons for

teachers.



T
he fall and winter

extended learning programs (
after
school and

before school
)

tutoring sessions will be
offered for students who may need additional help

in grades 1
-
5.




Terrific Thursdays will be offered for
8
-
10 weeks during the first semester. A variety of enrichment
classes will be used to help enrich students’ higher level th
inking skills.



Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) will be offered to students Grades K
-
5 daily for 30 minutes.


READING



T
he use of SuccessMaker will be emphasized to h
elp with

student
s
’ reading to

improve their
comprehension skills
.



Students with disab
ilities

(MOID)

will
use the Smartboard weekly to increase fine motor skills
.



In the fall and winter

extended learning programs

(
i.e. after school and/or
before school
)
tutoring
sessions will be offered for students who may need additional help

in grades 1
-
5.


WRITING



At
-
risk s
tudent
s

i
n
5
th

grade will
pa
rticipate in
a
Saturday
Writing
Boot Camp

where students learn how
to address each of the four writing
genres. During these

Writing sessions, students also learn how to
improve the writing piece according to the four areas on the rubric: ideas, style, organization, and
conventions. Our final writing piece
will be created in a 5
th

grade “lock
-
in” where

students

will
participat
e in activities whic
h will assist them on the Georgia

5
th

grade writing assessment.


SUMMER SCHOOL

Students who experience difficulty during the school year and receive either a D or a U on their report card in
any of the core academic areas will receive a
n Academic Contract in November. This contract outlines for the
parent the academic knowledge and skills (AKS) that are still in need of improvement as well as interventions
that the school, parents and student should focus on to improve in that area. Th
e contract is updated in
January/February and then a final contract is given in April. If the student has not progressed in their learning,
the final contract outlines the recommendation that the student attend summer school. Since promotion is based
on
performance on state testing, the student's attendance in summer school is only a recommendation.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
28




Schoolwide Planni
ng Component 10
:

Description of how individual student assessment results and
interpretation will be provided to parents
.


Parents
receive individual student test results for all required state assessments and Gwinnett County Public
Schools locally required tests. For state tests, individual student results are sent to the local schools where the
results are given to the parents in h
ard copy with e
xplanations through conferences. Results are sent home

in
the stu
dent folders
, or mailed to the student’s home. Individual student results of the Gwinnett County Public
Schools Gateway Test administered to elementary students are mailed ho
me to parents/guardians.
Interpretations of test results are sent with the student scores. Whenever possible, letters explaining results are
translated in the home language.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
29


Schoolwide Planni
ng Component 11
:

Provisions for the collection and disaggreg
ation of data on the
achievement and assessment results of students.


Disaggregated results for state assessments are provided by the vendor on hard copy. Data used for student
assessment and achievement are collected and disseminated through the Go.Gwinnett Portal to
My Students,
My School, and My D
istrict. Teachers and a
dministrators in local schools view results for both aggregated
school information as well as current classroom and individual student results of students. Teachers and
administrators can also view historical data for their school or class, disaggregated
into subgroups.


Revised October 31, 2011

Page
30


Schoolwide Planni
ng Component 12
:

Provisions for seeking statistically sound results for each category for
which assessment results are disaggregated.


Gwinnett County Public Schools provides the following:



Training for Beaver Ridge

Ele
mentary Test Coordinator and Assistant Principal for Title I on test data
interpretation



Training to administration and
teachers on Elements for benchmark

assessment analysis and My
Students portal for standardized assessment results. This includes disagg
regated data by subgroups and
individualized student results.



Historical data is available to look at trends for up to five years by school and by teacher.



In addition to the provisions that Gwinnett County Public Schools provides, the

Georgia Department

of
Education
presents

our schools with CRCT testing results.


When analyzing our test data we specifically look first at our whole school data and then break it down by
subgroups. As we look at our subgroups we are specifically looking to see if there ar
e any large achievement
gaps in the scores. At Beaver Ridge the only achievement gap prior to 2008 was

our SWD in Math.
As we
analyze this data we look at ways to close the achievement gap and increase studen
t achievement
.

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
31


Schoolwide Planni
ng
Component 13
:

Provisions for public reporting of disaggregated data.


The State Accountability Report is provided to every parent and to interested community members. The report
also includes trends in data and highlights programs schools are implementi
ng to increase student achievement.
The State Accountability Report is also available to parents and the communit
y on the Georgia Department of
E
ducation website.

<

http://www.gadoe.org/ReportingFW.aspx?PageReq=102&StateId=ALL&T=1&FY=2009>


The Gwinnett
C
ounty
Accountability Report, which also serves as the school’s annual report, contains student
and school composite and disaggregated test data. It also includes trends in data and highlights the programs
and ac
hievements at Beaver Ridge

Elementary S
chool
. It is provided to every parent and interested community
members and is avail
able on both the Beaver Ridge

Elementary School website and Gwinnett Coun
ty Public
School website
.


< http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcps
-
mainweb01.nsf/pages/AccountabilityReport
Feedback0~QuickLinks>


Finally, data is provided to

the
public in published articles in the local newspaper.


Revised October 31, 2011

Page
32


Schoolwide Planni
ng Component 14
:

Plan developed during a one year period, unless the LEA (county office),
after considering the recommendation

of its technical assistance
providers, determines that less time is needed to develop and implement
the Schoolwide Program.


Beaver Ridge

Elementary School met
with the Title I Committee
in order to review and revise
the Local School
Plan for Improvement
,

the

Schoolwide P
lan
,
and the Parent Involvement Plan

and the budget
for the 2010

-

2011

school year.
During our meetings, data was reviewed,
and
instructional strategies were ide
ntified
.


Parents were invited to become part of the Title I Committee thr
ough announcements made in weekly school
newsletters. Meeting dates were also publicized in the school newsletters. Once the plan is finalized, it will be
shared with the entire f
aculty as well as with

the parents in our school community.







Revised October 31, 2011

Page
33


Schoolwid
e Planni
ng Component 15
:

Plan developed with the involvement of the community to be served and
individuals who will carry out the plan, including teachers, principals,
other school staff,
and
pupil service personnel, parents, and students (if
secondary
)


The Beaver Ridge

Elementary School Title I Committee includes:


Name

Position

Jose DeJesus

Principal

Nury Crawford

Assistant Principal for Title I

Manuel Echevarria

P
arent
I
nstructional
S
upport
C
oordinator

Maria Salazar

Parent

Santiba Grogan

Parent

David Banda

Parent

Gina Alonso

Parent Liaison

Darlene Council

Kindergarten Teacher

Susana Reyes

1
st

Grade Teacher

Robyn Ancil Thomas

2
nd

Grade Teacher

Maricany Carrero

3
rd

Grade Teacher

Tracy Pelinsky

4
th

Grade Teacher

Denise Hentz

5
th

Grade Teacher

Katherine Dillard

ESOL Teacher

Laura Jackson

Sp
ecial
Ed
ucation

Teacher

Revised October 31, 2011

Page
34


Schoolwide Planning Compo
nent 16
:

Plan available to the LEA (county office), parents, and the public.


A copy of Beaver Ridge

Elementary School’s Schoolwide Plan is available to the LEA at Gwinnett County
Public Schools Instructional Support Center in the office of the Director for Federal and Special Programs.
Complete copies of the Schoolwide Plan are available to parents and

the public in our media center,

principal’s
office, Assistant P
rincipal for Title I office, and the Parent Center. Also, excerpts of pertinent sections of the
plan have been
distributed

directly to parents at various meetings


Revised October 31, 2011

Page
35


Schoolwide Planni
ng Compon
ent 17
:

Plan translated to the extent feasible, into any language that a
significant percentage of the parents of participating students in the
school speak as their primary language.


Appropriate portions of our Title I plan will be translated into Span
ish and any additional primary languages
on
request as is feasible

for

parents to include:

1.

The Parent Involvement Policy

2.

The Action Plan

3.

The Parent Compact


Revised October 31, 2011

Page
36


Schoolwide Planni
ng Component 18
:

Plan is subject to the school improvement provisions of
Section 1116.


This school
wide plan of Beaver Ridge

Elementary is subject to the school improvement provisions of Section
1116.

Section 1116, of the Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, states that schools
must provide Supplement
al Educations Services and School Choice if the school did not make adequate yearly
progress two years in a row.
However, at the end of th
e
2010
-
2011

school year, Beaver Ridge

Elementary
is
seen as a school in good standing from accomplishing the goal of
passing
Adequate

Yearly Progress (AYP)
measures and has been identified as a Title I School of Distinction.