Program Review - Marshall University

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1




Program Review




B.A. in Elementary Education











College of Education and Human Services







October 2010








MARSHALL UNIVERSITY





2

Program Review

Marshall University



Date: _____
October 1
, 20
10
_______________


Program: ___
B.A. in
Elementary Education
__________

Degree and Title


Date of Last Review: ________
2005
_______
___________________

Recommendation

Marshall University is obligated to recommend continuance or discontinuance of a program and to
provide a brief rationale for the re
commendation
.



Recommendation


Code(#):

1.

Continuation of the program at the current level of activity; or


2.

Continuation of the program with corrective action (for example, reducing the range of optional tracks or
merging programs); or


3.

Identification of the program for further development (Please be specific; identify areas and provide a
rationale in your request); or


4.

Continuation of the program at the current level of activity, with the designation as a program of
excellence (See Se
ries 11 Statement from the Policy Commission); or


5.

Discontinuation of the program (Procedures outlined in HEPC Administrative Bulletin 23).


Rationale for Recommendation
: (Deans, please submit the rationale as a separate document. Beyond
the College
level, any office that disagrees with the previous recommendation must submit a separate
rationale and append it to this document with appropriate signature.)



___
1
______

__
_
P
aula

Lucas
_
_________________________
____
______


10
-
1
-
10
_______

Recommendation:

Signature of person preparing the report:




Date:


_________

_________________________________________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of Program Chair:






Date:


___
1
____


___
R. B. Bookwalter
______________________________________


_
10
-
15
-
10
_______

Recommendation:

Signature of Academic Dean:







Date:


________


__________________________________________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of Chair, Academic Planning Committee: (Baccalaureate pgms only)

Date:


________


_________________________________________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of President, Faculty Senate/ Chair, Graduate Council:


Date:


________


_________________________________________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs:

Date:



_______


__________________________________________________


______________


Recommendation:

Signature of the President:






Date:


________


______________________________
___________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of Chair, Board of Governors:





Date:


3

College/School Dean’s Recommendation


Deans, please indicate your recommendation and submit the rationale.


Recommendation:

#1 Continuation of the prog
ram at the current level


Rationale:



The Bachelor of Arts degree program in Elementary Education is a healthy,
productive program serving a compelling need in West Virginia and the surrounding
region. The mission of the program is to prepare professiona
l educators for careers in
the public schools, promoting excellence in teaching and learning. In many ways the
College of Education is the cornerstone of MarshallUniversity. It is the oldest academic
unit in the University, having been founded in 1867.
The University’s roots as a
teacher’s college bear fruit in the current work of the college. Elementary Education
provides the foundation for lifelong learning. It is essential that prospective elementary
educators enter the public schools with knowledge

and skills that will promote learning
and motivation in their students. The conceptual framework around which the
Elementary Education program is organized is “Preparing the Educator as Critical
Thinker.”



The curriculum for the program is rigorous and well
-
rounded. Beyond the
general education courses required of all MarshallUniversity students, Elementary
Education students take mathematics, reading/language arts, science, art, music, and
physical educati
on. They complete multiple teaching methods courses as well as
courses in special education to prepare them to work with students who have special
needs. The program is nationally accredited by NCATE based on a set of 10 standards
assessing content knowl
edge, human development and learning, diverse learners,
instructional strategies, learning environment, communication, planning, assessment,
reflective teaching and professional relationships. The national accreditation of the
program’s outcomes is reinfo
rced by the consistent assessment results showing that
over 90 percent of candidates achieve the program’s target outcomes.



Enrollment in the program over the past five years has been steady with over 500
program majors per year. Those numbers are likel
y to increase in the near future for
two reasons. First, the overall increase in freshman enrollment at MarshallUniversity
over the past two academic years provides a larger pool of students for the College.
Second, there is an increasing need for teache
rs in West Virginia and nationwide.
Projections indicate that there will be an increasing demand for certified mathematics,
science, and special education teachers for at least the next five years. Teachers in all
certification areas are needed in West V
irginia and a number of nearby states, including
Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.



The Elementary Education program plays a vital part in Marshall University's
mission, promoting the preservation, discovery, synthesis and disseminatio
n of
knowledge. Through teaching, scholarship, and service, the program faculty serve

4

every element of this mission. Through the placement of advanced students in local
schools as student teachers, the program expands that mission into the public schools
.
Through professional development programs delivered to 12 schools in 3 counties, the
program expands the mission across the state. The plans to expand professional
development partnerships and strengthen program requirements will improve the
program's
ability to accomplish its mission.



There are several issues that should be addressed in the Elementary Education
program. As the program is expanding its special education course requirements, they
have lost two faculty positions in special education.
Filling these vacant positions with
full
-
time tenure
-
track faculty is important to continued delivery of a high quality teacher
preparation program. There is a need to improve student outcomes in general science,
as Praxis scores in most sections of the t
est exceed the national average, while our
students' scores on the general science section lags behind the national average.
Finally, there is a significant need to upgrade the facilities. The program is housed in
the oldest academic building on campus.

Two
-
thirds of the teaching rooms in the
building are on the basement level, which floods several times a year in heavy rains.



On the whole the Elementary Education program is producing outstanding results
with the resources and support available to them
. I recommend continuation of the
program at its current level.






_
R. B. Bookwalter
______________________


10/15/2010
_____________________

Signature of the Dean


Date





















5

MARSHALL UNIVERSITY

PROGRAM REVIEW


I.

CONSISTENCY WITH UNIVERSITY MISSION


The B.A. in Elementary Education is a strong, viable degree program that is part of the
mission of Marshall University. The mission is to provide “innovative undergraduate and
gradua
te education that contributes to the development of society and the individual.
The University actively facilitates learning through the preservation, discovery,
synthesis, and dissemination of knowledge” (
2010

2011 Marshall University
Undergraduate Catal
og
). The preparation of teachers is a high calling that will assist in
accomplishing all aspects of the university mission.


The professional education unit’s mission is aligned with the mission of the College and
the university linking with the universit
y’s mission to be an exemplar of excellence in
teaching and learning with highest priority on providing outstanding undergraduate and
graduate education. The conceptual framework, “Preparing the Educator as Critical
Thinker,” not only is the foundation for

teacher preparation but is a goal for all programs
at the university.


The Elementary Education K
-
6 program is related to the arts and sciences programs
because pre
-
service teachers take many courses in other departments. The program
liaisons for other d
epartments have an active role in the discussion of teacher
preparation. It is indeed the entire university that educates a teacher. Outreach for the
program occurs with the many activities and assignments that are conducted in schools.
Mutual support a
nd concern from all stakeholders originate from the deep desire to
improve education for all P
-
12 students.


The mission of the COEHS is to prepare exemplary educators and human services
professionals. This mission is accomplished through developing a cult
ure that embraces
change, new ideas, and values innovation with continuous assessment that leads to
informed growth and development.

The mission and philosophical beliefs of the School
of Education align to the college vision goals through the mission of preparing teachers
and other school personnel. Intrinsic to the unit mission is to assure the integrity of the
curriculum, field expe
riences, and clinical practice through the maintenance of rigorous
standards and high expectations for candidate learning and performance. Other
philosophical beliefs of the School include the conceptual framework of critical thinking
for all education ma
jors. The unit also believes in assisting faculty in attaining the
highest possible faculty development both through unit sessions and personal
involvement in professional organizations and conferences. The School of Education
aligns all programs to nati
onal standards that measure content knowledge, content and
professional pedagogy, and dispositions. The professional education unit is accredited
by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).


The B.A. in Elementary Education

adheres to national standards. The Marshall
University Elementary Education K
-
6 program was one of the first programs in the

6

United States to be accredited by the Association for Childhood Education International
(ACEI)

under the new performance standard
s for elementary majors. The program was
accredited in 2001 and was invited by NCATE to present the program and its
accreditation folio at a national conference in Washington, D.C. T
he
ACEI is the
Elementary Education K
-
6
program’s specialized profession
al association (SPA). This
SPA is a member of the NCATE organization, and the ACEI standards require
graduates to know, understand, and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and
research related to development of children and young adolescents to
construct
learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of
knowledge, and motivation. The early education program, the special education
program, and the middle childhood area were also accredited by their specialized
p
rofessional associations.



II. ACCREDITATION INFORMATION


A.

Ac
creditation is a process for assessing and enhancing academic and
educational quality through peer review. Accreditation informs the public
that the accredited college or university
operates at a high level of
educational quality and integrity. NCATE

(National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education)

accreditation is the process by which
a professional education unit is recognized by the profession as meeting
national standards

for the content and operation of the unit. The NCATE
agreement for West Virginia is among the Higher Education Policy
Commission, the West Virginia Department of Education, and NCATE.




The School of Education

and the Graduate School of Education and
Pr
ofessional Development, known as the Professional Education Unit, are
accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher
Education. NCATE is a national organization under the auspices of the
United States Department of Education. The NCA
TE mission is to study
and accredit schools, colleges, and departments of education that prepare
teachers and other school personnel. NCATE is composed of 35 member
organizations that assist in a thorough application of standards
-
based
review.



B.

The C
ollege of Education and Human Services hosted an NCATE
continuing accreditation team visit in fall 2004

(see Attachment 1


p
p
.

86
-
88

of this report).



C.

The Professional Education Unit was granted full continuing accreditation
by the NCATE Unit Acc
reditation Board in spring 2005.



D.

NCATE’s report to the University (see Attachment

2



p
p
.

89
-
91)

of this



report
).



7


E.

The Unit Accreditation Board noted three areas of improvement. Only two
programs with specialized professional associations were
not recognized
by the associations. The report noted that the programs should seek
recognition. The programs, School Psychology and Physical Education,
submitted rejoinders, responses with evidence of meeting standards, to
the SPAs on September 15, 2005.

The third area for improvement was
the need for the College of Education and Human Development to hire a
full
-
time dean. Dr. Rosalyn Anstine Templeton became Executive Dean
on July 1, 2005, so that area of improvement has been removed.



F.

The NCATE Institutional Report
can be found in the NCATE room (JH
214)
. The link to the report is
http://www.marshall.edu/coehs/NCATE/doc1.pdf.


III.

PROGRAM STATEMENT ON ADEQUACY, VIABILITY, NECESSITY AND
CONSISTENCY WITH UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE MISSION


A.

ADEQUACY


1.

Curriculum
:

Curriculum for the Elementary Education K
-
6
program in the College of Education and Human Services contains
courses that align with the standards of the Association of
Childhood Education International. Elementary education major
s
take courses in general education, in teaching specialization, and in
professional education. They study many subjects in order to be
well
-
rounded in knowledge for elementary curricula. Elementary
education majors take 12 hours of mathematics and mathe
matics
methods and 12 hours of reading/language arts and methods. They
are prepared to teach music, art, and physical education if
necessary. The majors also take methods courses in science and
social studies. Courses are listed in Appendix I: Courses for

Elementary Education.



2.

Faculty
:

Faculty are highly qualified to teach in the College of
Education and Human Services. Of
25
faculty members

in the
School of Education
,
88
%

(22 out of 25)

have doctoral degrees,
56
%

(14 out of 25)

have attained the st
atus of professor, and
76
%
(19 out of 25)
are tenured faculty. On candidate evaluation forms,
faculty score very high, especially in possession of current and
adequate knowledge of the subject, communication, relevant
assignments, and understanding of cou
rse topics. Over the past
5

years, faculty have made
nearly 190

national, state, or local
presentations; published
approximately 20
documents including
books, book chapters, journal articles, etc.; and brought
approximately
$

4.5
million dollars in grant
awards to the College.
No data sheets are included for graduate assistants because no
graduate assistants teach School of Education courses.


8


3.

Students
:

The Elementary Education Program is part of the
professional education unit accredited by the National Council for
the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).





a.

Entrance Standards
:

Entrance requirements for
admittance to teacher education are c
ontained in the

following chart.

There are three levels during the
educational program where candidates are assessed. The
first level

(ADMI 4)

is the admittance to teacher education,
the second level

(ADMI 5)

is admittance to junior methods,
and the thir
d level

(ADMI 6)

is admittance to student
teaching. The
following chart
gives each level and each
requirement for progress through the program.




ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM



Initial Program Transition Points

Admission to Initial Teacher Education
Programs*

(ADMI 4)

A. 2.7 Grade Point Average (GPA) Overall and Marshall

B. Pre
-
Professional Skills Test (PPST: Reading, Writing, Mathematics)

C. 21 Act Composite Score

D. EDF 218/270 (Performance Task: Case Study)

E. 24 Marshall credit hours (12 hours for

transfer students)


*Alternative Admissions Policy

20 or less ACT composite score & 2.71 or higher GPA will admit student to
Teacher Education

2.5 to 2.69 GPA and 22 or higher ACT composite score will admit student to
Teacher Education

(Other Admission
to Initial Teacher Education Programs requirements must be
met.)


















9

PROGRESS THROUGH THE PROGRAM

Admission to Methods and Level II Clinical

(ADMI 5)

A. Admitted to Teacher Education

B. 2.7 GPA Overall, Marshall, Specialization, Professional
Education

C. EDF 319 (Performance Task: Research Critique)

D. 12 hours of professional education courses (9 hours for 9
-
12 majors)

E. Performance tasks that align with the 12 (or 9) hours of professional education
courses


Admission to Student Teaching, Le
vel III Clinical

(ADMI 6)

A. 2.7 GPA Overall, Marshall, Specialization, Professional Education

B. Completion of professional education courses with the exception of EDF 475
(Performance C. Task: Belief Statement about Teaching and Learning)

D. Completion o
f at least 90% of specialization courses

E. Successful completion of all performance tasks except EDF 475

F. All specialization courses and professional education courses with grade of C or
better


Graduation

A. 2.7 GPA Overall, Marshall, Specialization, P
rofessional Education

B. All specialization courses and professional education courses with a grade of C or
better

C. All program requirements completed including performance tasks

D. Student teaching evaluation

E. Portfolio assessment

F. Oral capstone ass
essment




PROGRAM COMPLETERS: RECOMMENDATION FOR CERTIFICATION

Praxis II: Content Test(s)
AND
Principles of Learning and Teaching







b.

Entrance Abilities
:

Students entering the School of
Education with the anticipation of being elementary
teachers
have average/above average ACT/SAT scores (average
ACT score of 20 and SAT scores of 450) and a GPA of 3.0
or better. (
Scores for the ACT
/SAT and
the GPA
for
incoming freshmen are found in Appendix III.) These
entrance scores show that the studen
ts have high abilities
and should be very successful in the School of Education.





c.

Exit Abilities
:

Education students must pass the Praxis I
I

content test and the Principles of Learning

and Teaching
(PLT)
K
-
6 in order to be recommended for certification.
COEHS students score right at (slightly above or below) the
national mean on the Praxis II and the PLT. Praxis II, PLT,
and exit GPA’s can be found in Appendix IV (A, B, and C).



10


4.


Resources
:





a
.


Financial
:

The unit budget is sufficient to allow the unit to
properly prepare teachers and related P
-
12 school personnel. The
budget also is supportive of the unit mission, including faculty
functions of teaching and advising, research and scholarship,

university service, and community service. The budget figure for
the professional education unit
is roughly $3.4 million a year. This
includes salaries for all faculty and staff, as well as costs to run the
college. The School of Education gets about 4
9% (1,675,000) of
the total funds
. It is the largest school in the College of Educatio
and Human Services, so the funds are distributed as such.
These
figures represent state appropriated dollars that reflect budge
reductions that have largely been offse
t by increases in student
tuition and fees.


The College of Education and Human Services’ average budget
for
the past academic years is $3.4 million

which compares favorably
with other colleges at Marshall University. The COEHS receives
extra funding from

third
-
party contracts, grant resources,
technology resources, and private gift resources. The teacher
education program is funded by the College. Equipment is
budgeted at the university, college, and school level with most of
the funding occurring at the

university level. Other funding sources
include revenue from the Testing Center located in Morrow Library
(PPST and GRE tests) and from grants. The incomes from the
grants typically assist with the purchase of equipment and not
toward salaries. The col
lege also obtains some money from third
party contracts with local school systems and from the annual
Alumni Drive.


Education is an integral part of the College. If the education
degrees did not exist, the College would not exist. The large
number of ed
ucation students sustains not only the College of
Education and Human Services but also the College of Liberal Arts
and the College of Science. Majors in elementary and secondary
education take content courses in the other colleges on campus.
Without the

education degrees, most of the university campus
would suffer reductions in faculty, staff, and courses.




b.

Facilities
:

Jenkins Hall is known as the education building
on the Marshall campus; however, students in elementary
and secondary education take courses in other colleges
across the campus. There are t
wo

computer/electronic
classrooms, two distance education classro
oms, and 11
traditional classrooms in Jenkins Hall. The 11 traditional

11

classrooms are
equipped with a computer station and
projector, a Document camera (ELMO), and a SmartBoard
.
Faculty/student meetings can also occur in the Dean’s
Conference Room, Jenkin
s Hall 219, which has poly
-
com
capabilities. The distance education classrooms permit real
time teaching experiences to occur for off
-
site locations.
Jenkins Hall also has a Learning Resource Center (LRC)
which houses one of the computer labs. The LRC is

used by
students and faculty for media supplies, art supplies, lesson
plans, portfolios, bulletin boards, and check
-
out multi
-
media
resources.



The library has 9 holdings that are specific for elementary
and secondary education, 53 holdings specific to

Educational Foundations and technology, and 7 holding
s

specific to Special Education. All 69 hold
ing
s are pertinent
to elementary students.




5.

Assessment Information





a.

Summary:

The student learning outcomes are based on the
ten standards for Tea
cher Certification. These ten standards
are used to make up the assessment forms for all school
-
based clinical experiences (Levels I, II, and III).
The
learning outcomes are assessed by scores on the Praxis I
(PPST), Praxis II Content test and PLT
(Principles of
Learning and Teaching), STC (Standards for Teacher
Certification) evaluation form, and required performance
tasks. The assessments are measured by the WV
Department of Education cut scores and scores of
distinguished, proficient, and basic
on the STC evaluation
forms. Students must score a grade of C or better on
performance tasks to pass the class associated with it.







b.

Other Learning and Service Activities:

The Standards for
Teacher Certification that guide the elementary education
program are standards that are based on national
organizational standards, state department of education
standards, and institutional standards. The standards
originated from facu
lty using the following standards as
guides: the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher
Education (NCATE), the National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards (NBPTS), the Association of Childhood
Education International (ACEI), the Interstat
e New Teacher
Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC), the West

12

Virginia Department of Education professional teaching
standards, and institutional standards from faculty expertise,
practice, and research.


In order to be an accredited professional edu
cation unit, the
College of Education and Human Services must show
competency in these national standards. The unit aligns the
standards, plans the courses and assignments, sets up field
and clinical experiences, and chooses testing based on the
need to s
how a highly qualified program. This work
manifests itself in the Standards for Teacher Certification
evaluation forms and rubrics that ac
company the forms.
Appendix V: Assessment Summary

indicates actions that
have occurred during the past five years t
o strengthen the
elementary education program based on assessment data
from national, state, and local agencies.






c.

Plans for Program Improvement:

Assessment data go
through

a process that allows input and approval from all
stakeholders involved in
teacher preparation. The
assessment system for the professional education unit is
demonstrated in the NCATE Institutio
nal Report beginning
on page 45
. Data are collected from courses, Banner, field
and clinical experiences and entered on a unit database.

Database reports are given to various College committees
including the School of Education Leadership Team and the
College of Education and Human Services Undergraduate
Program Curriculum Committee. Dissemination of the data
to education faculty and art
s and sciences faculty results in
suggestions that are approved by the committees; by the
Executive Dean of the College; by the advisory committee of
the unit, the Educational Personnel Preparation Advisory
Committee (EPPAC); by the various committees of t
he
university; and finally, if necessary, the Faculty Senate.






d.

Graduate and Employer Satisfaction:

Periodically

a
survey is sent to all principals and personnel officers in
school districts in the state of West Virginia. Survey
questions mirror
the STC, and results show satisfaction with
graduates in the

elementary education program. The
majority

of the respondents

find the professional education
unit graduates to be either distinguished or proficient in
practice in public schools. Each year at

the Educator Expo,
recruiters are asked to complete a survey regarding the
preparation of the pre
-
service teachers who are interviewed.

13

The majority
of the recruiters find the teachers well
-
prepared.






e.

Five years of summary reports from the Marshal
l University
Office of Assessment for elementary education are attached
to this report
. (See attachment 3: Program Review
Assessments


p
p
.

92
-
99

of this report.)




6.

Previous Reviews
:


T
he previous program review for elementary
education occurred in
200
5
.
The BA in Elementary Education
received recommendations of “Program of Excellence” in the
Spring 2006.





In the last program review, the areas that were mentioned as
weaknesses that we as a college were going to address included
the addition of a

second special education course. We did do that
and now all students in the program must take an additional special
education course (CISP 422


Differentiated Instruction). We also
mentioned that we would like to conduct surveys for pre
-
service
teacher
s to get their input on preparation. We do give surveys out
to our student teachers during seminars to see what their thoughts
are about the program and how we can improve it. We’ve also had
sessions with all students during Assessment Day in the spring
to
discuss what issues they feel need addressed in the college (i.e.,
too much overlap in courses, etc.). The expansion of professional
development schools was an issue that we thought needed to be
addressed and we have increased the number of professiona
l
development school and are still looking to add more. We also
mentioned that we would like to start conversations about creating
an area of emphasis in K
-
6 for math or science. We have had
conversations about that and are still in the discussion stages
. We
haven’t done this, but are continuing to talk about how this might
happen.



7.

Strengths/Weaknesses
:
Strengths for the program include
alignment to national, state, and institutional standards; strong
assessment system that monitors pre
-
service
teacher progress
throughout the program; high standards that assure highly qualified
teachers; over 700 hours in public school classrooms; the
Partnership Schools Project that involves all partners in teacher
preparation (the unit was commended by the NCAT
E team for
collaborative activities (see BOE Team Report

Summary

at
http://www.marshall.edu/coehs/NCATE/doc2.pdf
); systemic review
and analysis of data collection; expertise of faculty and their
involvement in all areas of the program; NCATE accreditation
;
specialty professional association accreditation (ACEI); and strong

14

leadership from the executive dean, the associate dean for
academic programs, the chair of the school of education, and the
coordinator for elementary/secondary education.


Weaknesses mi
ght really be called areas for improvement. Review
and analysis of data will always yield questions for discussion.
Discussions with collaborative partners bring questions for
discussion. Future plans include discussion of creating an area of
emphasis w
ithin the Elementary Education K
-
6 program such as
mathematics or science, addition of a second special education
course at the request of the WVDE, continued surveys for the pre
-
service teachers to get their input on preparation
, and better ways
to keep i
n contact with our recent graduates
. Future plans include
expansion of professional development schools in order to have as
many pre
-
service teachers do field and clinical experiences in
professional development schools as possible.




B.

Viability
:


1.

Articulation Agreements
:

The College of Education and Human
Services has an articulation agreement with Southern West Virginia
Community and Technical College. The agreement is a 2 plus 2
program in Elementary Education K
-
6 with Southern. This
relation
ship began many years ago, and at one time Southern was
a branch campus for Marshall University. The 2 plus 2 program
means that approximately one half of the courses for the program
can be taken at Southern and will count as part of the courses
required
for elementary education when students transfer. The
other Marshall courses will be delivered on the Southern campus
by Marshall faculty either by distance learning or by faculty traveling
to that location. The 2 plus 2 program
began

in spring 2006.



2
.


Off
-
Campus

C
lasses
:

Approximately half of the Elementary

Education K
-
6 courses are delivered off
-
campus. The ones that
were delivered in the past five years were delivered on the

WV
Southern Community College (WVSCC) campus at Williamson and
the

Mid
-
Ohi
o Valley Marshall University Campus at Point Pleasant.
Appendix
V
I
:

Program Course Enrollment shows the courses that
are offered off
-
campus
.



3.

Online Courses:

Very few required Elementary Education K
-
6
courses are offered online. There are two math c
ontent courses
(CI 101 and CI 201) in the teaching specialization that are offered
online. The Assessment class (EDF 435) is offered online. The
students are able to take a few other courses online from the

15

general education core. Due to the clinical ho
urs and nature of
many of the education courses, face
-
to
-
face settings work best.



4
.

Service Courses
:

The Elementary Education K
-
6 program
contains three courses that are service courses for other programs
in Marshall University. The courses are SOS 207 Problems of a
Multicultural Society, EDF 218 Child to Adolescent Development in
Schools, and EDF 319 A
pplications of Learning Theory. The
campus students who attend the courses include service
certifications outside the School of Education such as Speech
Language Pathology, nursing, counseling, and athletic training.
These students are part of the classe
s offered to education majors.
Enrollment for those classes
is

found in Appendix V
I.



5
.


Program Course Enrollment
:

Elementary Education K
-
6
students take courses in educational foundations (EDF), curriculum
and instruction (CI), and social studies (SOS) in the College of
Education and Human Services. Other courses are taught by arts
and sciences. All courses in the p
rogram are required; there are no
elective courses. EDF, CI, and SOS courses are taught each
semester and during summer sessions. Classes are rarely
cancelled due to low enrollment. Appendix V
I
: Program Course
Enrollment indicates
the number of courses
and enrollment in each
of the courses over the past five years.




6
.

Program Enrollment
:

Appendix V
I
I: Program Enrollment displays
data for Elementary Education K
-
6. The Elementary Education K
-
6
has always been a high demand, robust program with high
retention and highly qualified students. The five year data
presented in this appendix show the number of students and
graduates in this program.

During the past five years, the COEHS
has admitted an average of
106

students a year. Out of those
students
, approximately
87
% of them

continue through the program
and graduate.



7
.

Enrollment Projections
:

Probably the most important trend that
will influence Elementary Education K
-
6 over the next few years is
the recent
research indicating 40% of the teachi
ng force will retire
in the next few years.

Elementary Education K
-
6 will continue to be
a high demand area for college students.


Enrollment projections are difficult to predict. In the state of West
Virginia, there is a shortage of special education, m
athematics, and
science majors. These three certification areas are also in great
demand nationally. The demand for special education,
mathematics, and science teachers will increase over the next five

16

years. Presently, there is a demand for teachers in

all certification
areas in the states of Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, New York, and Delaware. The current
teacher population is nearing the retirement age and the demand
for teachers, in all certification areas, w
ill increase.


Since the demand for teachers will increase, the enrollment of
students in the teacher education program will also increase. The
National Education Association estimates the need for 2.2 million
teachers over the next decade. In the midst

of a sluggish economy
“education” is a true growth industry. There was an 8% increase in
the need for new public teachers between school years 2003
-
04
and 2004
-
05. Clark County School District in Nevada (Las Vegas)
is planning for an increase of 13,600.0
0 new students for next year
over the previous year. The district is planning to open 14 new
schools to accommodate the swelling school population and
inducted over 2000 new teachers into the system. It is a good time
to be going into the education profe
ssion.


Another trend that makes enrollment projection difficult is the
alternative certification trend in which teachers often have “short
cuts” to certification especially if their area is a critical need area.
While the classrooms will be full of teach
ing majors, teacher
preparation programs will also be offering alternative ways of
becoming certified. The College of Education and Human Services
has had a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) for a number of years.
This program allows graduates with majors

in arts and sciences to
earn both a master’s degree and teaching certification.


The enrollment for the Eleme
ntary Education K
-
6 program should

not decrease in the coming years and will, in fact, increase if the
retirement figures are correct.

Over the past five years enrollment
figures for elementary education have fluctuated, and the figures
indicated a declining enrollment over the past two years. Several
reasons account for this.
According to the U.S. Department of
Labor, job opportunities
for teachers over the next 10 years will
vary from good to excellent, depending on the locality, grade level,
and subject taught. Elementary school growth is slow at the
moment with shortages of teachers

occurring

in secondary area
s
.
Enrollment in the el
ementary education program reflects this
national trend
.



Another reason for
the decrease in

enrollment in elementary
education is the rigorous standards adopted by

the program. Many
variables have gone into this rigor including the increase from 2.5
G
PA requirement to 2.7 GPA for Marshall courses, overall courses,

17

general education courses, teaching specialization courses, and
professional education courses; the requirement of successful
completion of all parts of the PPST prior to admission to teacher

education;
the requirement of grades no lower than C in teaching
and education courses;
and the increase in field and clinical hours
.
However, the College believes the changes in requirements are
essential for two reasons. P
-
12 children need more and mo
re
knowledge, beginning in the pre
-
kindergarten

years. Graduates of
an elementary education program must have this knowledge. Also
the more rigorous standards of the program lead to a higher
retention rate and an increase in the graduation rates.


Stude
nts tend to want to teach in their local areas. West Virginia
students know that the shortages in teaching fields are secondary
in nature, not elementary. Faculty advising is assisting the students
in understanding the job placement market.



C.

Necessity



1.

Advisory Committee
:

The professional education unit has an
advisory committee known as the Educational Personnel
Preparation Advisory Committee (EPPAC). The EPPAC is a
mandated committee from the West Virginia Department of
Education and
is contained in the WVDE’s Policy 5100: Approval of
Educational Personnel Preparation Programs. The EPPAC has
members
representing

education, arts and sciences, community,
public schools, and students. The committee meets each semester
to hear and commen
t on changes, additions, and future plans for
educational endeavors at both the undergraduate and graduate
levels. Information in the

NCATE Institu
tional Report begins on
page 52
.



2.

Graduates
:

Providing information on job placement for education
graduates is very difficult. States do not provide information on the
educational background of teachers. The professional education
unit relies on the alumni association
,
surveys sent by the univers
ity
,
and faculty members and current students who may keep in contact
with former graduates
.
Separate s
urveys are not sent from the
COEHS
but there are
a series of questions that appear on the
university survey for data collection. These data yield input

on how
students view important areas of their program.


The COEHS knows that graduates are employed in West Virginia
and in many other states. Salary levels differ from state to state and
often from rural to urban

schools
. Average salaries run from
$3
7
,
5
00

(South Dakota)

to $6
6
,000

(California)
. The average

18

salary in West Virginia

is $
44,000

and ranks
44
th

in the nation.
Often the College hears from the graduates; often the College
works in a master’s level capacity with graduates. The Educator
Expo hel
d by the Career Center in the spring attracts recruiters
from various states in the East and in the South. Calls come
almost daily from school districts in West Virginia and in other
states asking about graduates. Our graduates are highly thought of
and
in high demand. A report is given to the WVDE each year, but
most of the locations for the graduates are unknown. The College
is fortunate to know about a third of the graduates. Of the
graduates in elementary education that
were

located,
approximately 8
3
% of the teachers are either teaching or substit
ute
teaching. The remaining teachers

are in graduate school or in
another line of work.



3.

Job Placement
:

Because the College of Education and Human
Services is constantly asked for the job placement of its graduates,
many avenues have been explored. The most successful venture
was
using the data collected from Alumni Services. Additional
information was a
dded to that by asking current faculty and
students for their input as to what they knew about our graduates.
This data show
s

approximately
35
% of the graduates

were
employed in field and another 1% employed in a related

field.
Approximately 14% were
acc
epted to graduate school and about
61% were unaccounted for.



The College of Education and Human Services would find it most
helpful if more information were available from the university
assessment office, the alumni affairs office, and the West Virg
inia
Department of Education.



IV.

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT



(if
applicable
)


Not applicable.





19

Appendix I

Required/Elective Course Work in the
Program



Degree Program:


Elementary Education K
-
6




Person responsible for the report:

Dr. Paula Lucas



Courses Required in Major

(By Course Number and Title)

Total

Required

Hours

Elective Credit Required by the Major
(By Course Number and Title)

Elective

Hours

Related Fields Courses Required

Total
Related

Hours

CI 101 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I


CI 201 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II


CI 301
Mathematics Methods for
Elementary Teachers


CI 321 Early Childhood Curriculum &
Methods including Field Experience


CI 342 Literature and Language Arts


CI 343 Developmental Reading


CI 360 Social Studies Methods in Elementary
Schools


CI 442 Instructiona
l & Classroom
Management: Elementary Education


CI 446 Individual Assessment & Prescription
Language Instruction


CI 447 Integrated Reading/Language Arts:
Elementary Education


3



3



3



3



3


3


3



3



3



3



No Electives


ART 335 Art Education: 2D&3D
Media & Methods


GEO 317 World Geography
Problems


HS 122 First Aid for
Children and
Infants


HST 103 The World Since 1850


HST 230 American History to 1877


HST 231 American History since
1877


HST 440 West Virginia History


MUS 342 Music in the Elementary
Classroom


PE 305 Health & Physical Education
in Early Childhood
Programs


SOS 207 Problems of a Multicultural
Society


BSC 105 Introduction to Biology

3



3



1



3


3


3



3


3



3



3



4


20

CI 471 Clinical Experience II


CI 448 Science Methods: Elementary
Education inc
luding Field Experience


CI
405/410

Student Teaching


CISP 421 Children with Exceptionalities


CISP 422 Differentiated Instruction


EDF 218 Child to Adolescent Development
in Schools


EDF 270 Clinical Experience I


EDF 319 Applications of Learning Theory


EDF 435 Classroom Assessment


EDF 475 Schools in a Diverse Society

0


3



12


3


3


3



0


3


3


3

PS 109 General Physical Science


PS 109L General Physical Science
Laboratory


PS 110 General Physical Science


PS110L General Physical Science
Laboratory



3


1



3


1



Professional society that may have influenced the program offering and/or requirements:


Elementary Education K
-
6 is recognized by the Association of Childhood Education International (ACEI), a member
organization of the National Council
for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).








21

Appendix II

Faculty
Data Sheet

(Information or the period of this review)


Name:
_____Mindy Allenger______________________________________


Rank: ___
Asst. Professor
__________

Status (check one): Full
-
time__
x
___

Part
-
time_____

Adjunct_____

Current MU Faculty: Yes__
x
____


No_____

Highest Degree Earned: ___
MA
________________________________________

Date Degree Received: _

_
May
2
004
_

Conferred by: ____
Marshall University
_______________________________________________________________________

Area of Specialization: ____
Re
ading and Elementary Education
____________________________________________________

Professional Registration/Licensure: ____
WV K
-
8 & Reading Specialist
____________

Agency: _____
WV Dept of Ed
_____


Years non
-
teaching experience




___
0
______

Years of emplo
yment other than Marshall



___
13
_____

Years of employment at Marshall




___
3
______

Years of employment in higher education



___
3
______

Years in service at Marshall during this period of review


___
3
______


List courses you taught during the final two ye
ars of this review. If you participated in a team
-
taught course, indicate each of them
and what percentage of the course you taught. For each course include the year and semester taught (summer through spring),
course number, course title and enrollment.


Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

Spring 2009

CIRG 637

Literacy Assessment

14

Spring 2009

CIRG 644

Literacy in the Content Areas

17

Spring 2009

CIRG 653

Literacy Acquisition

18

Summer 2009

CIRG 654

Aligning Assessment with Instruction

16

Summer 2009

CIRG 643

Teaching Struggling Readers Practicum

18

Fall 2009

CIRG 623

Literacy Facilitator Practicum

18

Fall 2009

CIRG 636

Developmental Reading

17

Fall 2009

CI 342

Literacy and Language Arts

25

Spring 2010

CIRG 644

Literacy in the
Content Areas

16

Spring 2010

CIRG 637

Literacy Assessment

14

Spring 2010

CIRG 653

Literacy Acquisition

10

Spring 2010

CIRG 613

Children’s Literature



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A汩gn楮i Assess浥mt w楴h fnstruction



pu浭er OMNM

Cfo䜠SQP

呥qch楮i
ptrugg汩ng oeaders mract楣um




1.

I
f your degree is not in your area of current assignment, please explain.



NA


2.

Activities that have enhanced your teaching and or research.


Attended the Fall Marshall Teaching Conference 2009 sponsored by the Advan
cement of Teaching and Learning


Attended the Doctorate Seminar sponsored by MU Graduate College twice each year during 2007, 2008, and 2009


Currently working on Doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction with 6 hours for each semester. Will complete course work



in Spring 2010 and then begin dissertation.


Attended the WV Reading Association Conference in Charleston, WV, November 2008.


Atten
ded the Higher Education Reading Symposium Spring and Fall of 2007, 2008, and 2009.


3.

Discipline
-
related books/papers published (provide a full citation).


Review of Best Practices in Literacy Instruction edited by L. Gambrell, L. Morrow, and M. Pressley
. This book review was


A
ccepted

and printed in “The Reading Professor? In the Winter 2008, Vol. 30 #2 edition in collaboration with Dr. Terrence


Stange, Cheryl

Jeffers, and Yvonne Skoretz.



4.

Papers presented at state, regional, national, or
international conferences.

Using Pictograms to Scaffold Narrative Writing
. May 14, 2007. Co
-
authored and co
-
presented with Drs. Barbara O’Byrne


and Francis Simone at the International Reading Association Annual Conference in Toronto, Canada.


Presentat
ion at the October 17, 2009 Doc Seminar on
Synchronous Communications

with Dr. Karen Mitchell and Dr.



Edna Meisel.


Presentation and paper has been successfully submitted for consideration at the March 2010 in ACRES national



Conference on
Analysis of

student success at a model elementary school in south West Virginia.


Presented at the WV Reading Association Conference in November 2009 on
Response to Intervention: A perspective



from Reading, Special Education, and the Classroom Teacher.


Presented

on November 2, 2009 at the WV Higher Education Reading Symposium on
Connecting with our reading



students.

Presented for the Lincoln County Reading Academy, August 2009, on
Fluency: The bridge to comprehension
.

Presented for the Lincoln County Reading

Academy, July 2010, on
What works to improve writing?

Presented at the WV Reading Association Conference in November 2008 on
Improving Writing Skills through the


Required English/Grammar Text
.





22

5.

Professional development activities, including professional organizations to which you belong and state,


regional, national, and international conferences attended. List any panels on which you chaired or participated.


List any offices you hold in
professional organizations.



International Reading Association (member)



6.

Externally funded research grants and contracts you received.



Ongoing research with National Writing Project in Elementary Schools through LSRI.


7.

Awards/honors (including in
vitations to speak in your area of expertise) or special recognition.



EPPAC


discussed the Pilot Projects,
Second Life and WIMBA
, at the Fall 2009 Educational Personnel Preparation Advisory

Committee (EPPAC) meeting regarding our Reading Department’s pr
ogress with technology to improve

C
ommunication

and course delivery.


8.

Community service as defined in the
Greenbook
.




Served on the Harless Model School Reading and Language Arts Team that is working to develop a K
-
8 scope and



sequence that

embraces 21
st

Century Learning Skills.


Volunteer at various WV counties in the Read
-
A
-
Loud WV Program by reading to children in the elementary grades.





































23

Appendix II

Faculty Data Sheet

(Information for the period of this
review)



Name:___________
Robert Angel
_______________ ____Rank:___
Professor
_____________________


Status (Check one): Full
-
time__
X
___ Part
-
time_____
Adjunct_____

Current MU Faculty:
X
__yes ___no


Highest Degree Earned: __.________
PH.D._______________
_
Date Degree Received:___ _
DEC 77
____________


Conferred by:____ ____
University of Arizona
_________________________________________________


Area of Specialization ____
Special Education
________________________


Professional Registration/Licensure__________
_________________________________

Agency:
______ _________________


Years non
-
teaching experience




________

Years of employment other than Marshall



___
3
___

Years of employment at Marshall




___
34

Years of employment in higher education



___
35
__

Years in service at Marshall during this period of review


___
5
____


List courses you taught during the final two years of this review. If you participated in a team
-
taught course, indicate each of them
and what percentage of the course you taught. For e
ach course include the year and semester taught, course number, course title
and enrollment. (Expand the table as necessary)


Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

Fa/08

CISP 320

Survey of Exceptional Children 1

21

Fa/08

CISP 420

Survey of
Exceptional Children II

17

Fa/08

CISP 429

Intro to Physical Handicaps

9

Fa/08

CISP 520

Intro to Exceptional Children

31

Fa/08

CISP 529

Intro to Physical Handicaps

17

Fa/08

CISP 585

Independent Study

7

Fa/08

CISP 661

Intro to Preschool Special
Education

13

Fa/08

UNI 101

New Student Seminar

17

Sp/09

CISP 320

Survey of Exceptional Children 1

14

Sp/09

CISP 420

Survey of Exceptional Children II

14

Sp/09

CISP 520

Introduction to Exceptional Children

36

Sp/09

CISP 585

Independent Study

5

Sp/09

CISP 629

Seminar in special Education

17

Sm/09

CISP 666

Curriculum and Methods in Preschool Special Education

18

Sm/09

CISP 585

Independent Study

1

Sm/09

CISP 462

SD:Inclusion Preschool

15

Sm/09

CISP 562

SD:Inclusion Preschool

9

Fa/09

CISP 320

Survey
of Exceptional Children 1

23

Fa/09

CISP 429

Intro to Physical Handicaps

8

Fa/09

CISP 529

Intro to Physical Handicaps

15

Fa/09

CISP 585

Independent Study

5

Fa/09

CISP 661

Intro to Preschool Special Education

15

Fa/09

UNI 101

New Student Seminar

18

Sp/10

CISP 320

Survey of Exceptional Children 1

29

Sp/10

CISP 520

Introduction to Exceptional Children

25

Sp/10

CISP 585

Independent Study

1

Sp/10

CISP 607

Math Strategies Exceptional Children

15

Sp/10

CISP 629

Seminar in Special Education

28



1.

If
your degree is not in your area of current assignment, please explain.



NA


2

Activities that have enhanced your teaching and or research.




During the summer of 2004, I taught four classes that were part of our Pre
-
School Summer Institute.



Part of a team that developed a new undergraduate program that combines certifications in Birth
-
Four with pre
-
School



Special Needs.



Four doctoral dissertation committees.



Seminar each semester for the Special Education undergraduates on how to prepare for

the praxis exams.



Seminar each semester for Special Education student teachers on professionalism.



Organized and taught in the 12
th

annual Marshall university Preschool Summer Institute.


24



Professional Development Team project involving several area
schools.



Coordinated the Comprehensive Examination for all Special Education Master’s students.



3

Discipline
-
related books/papers published (provide a full citation).


4

Papers presented at state, regional, national, or international conferences
.




Teache
r Education Division (CEC) Conference, “Creating Opportunities: A Collaborative Training Model”,
Savannah, Georgia, October 2002.


5

Professional development activities, including professional organizations to which you belong and state,
regional, national
, and international conferences

attended. List any panels on which you chaired or participated. List
any offices you hold in professional organizations.




Council for Exceptional Children



Teacher Education Division



Division on Early Childhood



Division on Ph
ysical Disabilities



Partnership School Conference held I Charleston on June 15, 2004.



Council for Exceptional Children, New Orleans, April 2004



West Virginia Department of Education on State Improvement Grants on 9/30/04.



Huntington High School

Inclusion a
nd Co
-
Teaching



Geneva Kent Elementary

Inclusion



Huntington High School

Team Development



Huntington High School

Inclusion Policies



Spring Valley High School

Upcoming Changes in Inclusion



Geneva Kent Elementary

Special Education and Diversity



Cabell
-
Midland
High School

Inclusion and Co
-
Teaching



Cabell County Board Office

Involving Parents



Barboursville Middle School

Teaming and Inclusion



Spring Hill Elementary School on the importance of parent involvement on October 13 and 14, 2004



Evaluator for Cabell Count
y Schools for the Family Connection 2002
-
2003 school year.



Council for Exceptional Children’s International Conference in Seattle, April 2003.



Phi Delta Kappa (PDK)



National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)



Representative to the High
er Education Consortium of the Governor’s Cabinet on Children and Youth



Representative to the Cabell County Early Childhood council



West Virginia Department of Education PIECES sub
-
committee



Attended NCATE Meeting on Continuing Accreditation and Beyond, Wa
shington, D.C.



Personnel Committee (Chair)



Teacher Education Standards Committee



Scholarship Committee (Chair)



Dean’s Search Committee


6

Externally funded research grants and contracts you received.




$60,000 grant from the West Virginia Department of
Education to conduct Summer Institutes at Marshall and at
Shepherd University



Received grants totaling $23,000 from the West Virginia Department of Education to work with early childhood
professionals and para
-
professionals during the Summer



Received fundi
ng from Southwest Community Action Council to teach a course for Head Start



Teachers and paraprofessionals.


7

Awards/honors (including invitations to speak in your area of expertise) or special recognition.


8

Community service as defined in the
Greenb
ook
.




Class “Parents Forever” for parents who are getting a divorce or making changes in a prior custody agreement.



A member of the Tadpole Team in Cabell County.



Member of the Head Start Education Advisory Committee for the Southwestern Community Action C
ouncil.



Marjorie Sisk Memorial Scholarship committee.

o

Cabell County Early Childhood Council



Member, Cabell County Family Resource Network



Member, Cabell
-
Wayne Educare Training Committee









25

Appendix II

Faculty Data Sheet

(for the period of this review)



Name:_________
Arneson, Neil_
____________________Rank:______
Professor_
_________________



Status (Check one):


Full
-
time__
x
___ Part
-
time_____


Adjunct
_____Current MU Faculty:


_
x
__yes


___no



Highest Degree Earned: EdD__.________________________Date Deg
ree Received:__May 19, 1991_ _____________



Conferred by:__University of Virginia__ _______________________________________________________



Area of Specialization _Social Studies Education___________________________



Professional Registration/Licensure
___________________________________________


Agency:
_______________________



Years non
-
teaching experience___2____

Years of employment other than Marshall_____4__

Years of employment at Marshall____24__

Years of employment in higher education__28____

Years in service at Marshall during this period of review____7___





List courses you taught during the final two years of this review.


If you participated in a team
-
taught course, indicate each of them
and what percentage of the course you taught.


For
each course include the year and semester taught, course number, course title
and enrollment.


(Expand the table as necessary)



Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

SP/05

CI 360


201

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

30

SP/05

CI 360


202

ELEM SOCIA
L STUDIES METHODS

27

SP/05

CI 415


201

INTEG METH & MAT: SEC EDU

8

SP/05

SOS 404


201

SENIOR SEMINAR

14

SM/05

CI 360 301

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

17

SM/05

EDF 319 301

APPL OF LEARNING THEORY

21

FA/04

CI 360


101

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

22

FA/04

CI 360


102

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

26

FA/04

CI 415


101

INTEG METH & MAT: SEC EDU

12

FA/04

SOS 404


101

SENIOR SEMINAR

14

SP/04

CI 360


201

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

30

SP/04

CI 360


202

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

2

SP/04

CI 415


201

INTEG METH & MAT: SEC EDU

14

SP/04

SOS 404


201

SENIOR SEMINAR

17

SM/04

CI 360 301

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

15

SM/04

EDF 475


501

SCHOOLS IN DIVERSE SOCIETY

16

FA/03

CI 360


101

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS

27

FA/03

CI 360


102

ELEM SOCIAL STUDIES
METHODS

27

FA/03

CI 415


101

INTEG METH & MAT: SEC EDU

9

FA/03

SOS 404


101

SENIOR SEMINAR

21

SP/03

CI 449


203

INST & CLASSROOM MGT

22

SP/03

CI 482


201

SPECIAL TOPICS

13

SP/03

EDF 319 202

APPL OF LEARNING THEORY

30

SP/03

SOS 404 201

SENIOR SEMINAR

25






1

If your degree is not in your area of current assignment, please explain.

NA





2

Activities that have enhanced your teaching and or research.

Workshop on NCATE portfolio for Social Studies on August 23, 2003


26

Judged proposals for NASDAQ
award

Tampa, FL, September 18
-
19, 2003

Instructional Technology in the SOS 404 courses



3

Discipline
-
related books/papers published (provide a full citation).

“Teaching the Myth of Lassiez
-
Faire in 19
th

Century America.”
Journal for Economic Education
. Fa
ll 2001 or Spring 2002.

“When America Almost Went Bankrupt
-
Deficit Spending and Financing the War of 1812.” An article commissioned by the
Federal Reserve System for a special publication on teaching nontraditional topics in US history.

4

Papers presented
at state, regional, national, or international conferences.

Presented session at Concord College workshop for the State Geographic Alliance, June 18

National meeting of Executive Directors of State Councils for Economic Education, Washington, DC, May 14
-
17

National Symposium for the Stock Market Game, Philadelphia, PA, June 7
-
10

Presentation at West Virginia Council for the Social Studies annual meeting on using computer simulation in the


classroom




5

Professional development activities, including profes
sional organizations to which you belong and state, regional, national,

and international conferences attended. List any panels on which you chaired or participated. List any offices you hold in

professional organizations.

Phi Delta Kappa, National Counci
l for the Social Studies

Tenure and Promotion Committee 2003
-
2004

Program Committee 2004
-
2005

Economic Education, Judged teaching units for NASDAQ teaching award, Richmond, VA, September 25
-
26, 2002

Economic Education, national meeting of Exec. Dir of Econ
omic Ed Wahsington, DC, March 13
-
15, 2003

Economic Educations, advised Treasurer’s Office on financial education, Charleston, WV, June 25, 2003

Workshop for writing NCATE social studies report, Fairmont State

Workshop for writing NCATE social studies
report, Marshall University

Executive Director, West Virginia Council for Economic Education

General Education Committee

Promotion and Tenure Committee

National Meeting of Executive Directors of State Councils for Economic Education. Washington, DC, May 13
-
14

West Virginia Council for the Social Studies annual meeting Pipestem, WV, Mar. 1
-
2, 2002

Attended IMPACT meetings

Economic Education

Served on committee writing performance expectations for new state standardized test



6

Externally funded research gra
nts and contracts you received.

Grant from Securities Industries Foundation for running the Stock Market Gamein WV
--
$2,500



7

Awards/honors (including invitations to speak in your area of expertise) or special recognition.



8

Community service as define
d in the
Greenbook
.

Judged at the Kanawha County Social Studies Fair and the West Virginia State Social Studies Fair

State textbook adoption committee for social studies textbooks

Church council at St. Paul Lutheran Church

Member of the board of directors
of the Marshall University Campus Christian Center
























27

Appendix II

Faculty Data Sheet

(Information for the period of this review)



Name:___________
Melinda Beth Backus______________
Rank:______
Associate Professor__________________


Status

(Check one): Full
-
time___
X
__ Part
-
time_____ Adjunct_____

Current MU Faculty: _
X
__yes ___no


Highest Degree Earned: ____
Ed.D______________________
Date Degree Received:_____
December 2005
___________


Conferred by:____________
Marshall University
_______________________________________________________


Area of Specialization:_________
Curriculum & Instruction/Literacy
____________________________________________________


Professional Registration/Licensure____
K
-
8, Multi
-
Subj, Reading K
-
12, C&
I_______
____________________


Years non
-
teaching experience




___
0
_____

Years of employment other than Marshall



___
11
____

Years of employment at Marshall




10 full
-
time/2 part
-
time

Years of employment in higher education



___
10
_____

Years in service at Marsha
ll during this period of review


___
10
_____


List courses you taught during the final two years of this review. If you participated in a team
-
taught course, indicate each of them
and what percentage of the course you taught. For each course include the y
ear and semester taught, course number, course title
and enrollment. (Expand the table as necessary)


Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

Fall 2008

CI 342 (2 sections)

Lit & Lang Arts Methods

44

Fall 2008

CI 343

Intro Tch Read: ECE & MCE

15

Fall 2008

CI 446

Individ Assess Reading Ed

15

Spring 2009

CI 342 (2 sections)

Lit & lang Arts Methods

48

Spring 2009

CI 343

Intro Tch Read: ECE & MCE

24

Spring 2009

CI 446

Individ Assess Reading Ed

24

Fall 2009

CI 342 (2 sections)

Lit & Lang Arts
Methods

42

Fall 2009

CI 343

Intro Tch Read: ECE & MCE

25

Fall 2009

CI 446

Individ Assess Reading Ed

26

Spring 2010

CI 342 (2 sections)

Lit & Lang Arts Methods

50

Spring 2010

CI 343

Intro Tch Read: ECE & MCE

25

Spring 2010

CI 446

Individ Assess
Reading Ed

24


1.
If your degree is not in your area of current assignment, please explain
. n/a

2.
Activities that have enhanced your teaching and or research.

Aha Process, Inc. (2008). Strategies for today’s teacher candidates: Applications of the Work of Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.
Materials developed in collaboration with Professors from West Virginia colleges, universities, and the West Virginia
Department of Educat
ion and the Arts. (creation of
Module 6

Strategies and application)

Backus, M
. (2003
-
2007). Integrated reading and language arts methods. Creation of course packet for CI 447/CI471

Development of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) courses for CI 447, CI 3
43, CI 446

SCORES competition: Advertising Children’s Literature, 2008
-
Present

UNI 101 instructor: 2005
-
2007

3

Discipline
-
related books/papers published (provide a full citation
). n/a

4

Papers presented at state, regional, national, or international confer
ences.

Refereed Works Presented:

Backus, M
., Pauley, R., & Heaton, L. (2006). Quality Staff Development Experiences: What Teachers Think. Presentation at the


annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association (EERA). Clearwater, FL.

Sottile, J., Brozik, D., &
Backus, M
. (2006). Ethical Behavior among College Students: Seven Years Latter. Presentation at the


annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association (EERA). Clearwater, FL.

Isaacs, T., Murphy, R., &
Backus, M
. (20
06). What impact do gender and content area specializations have on the classroom


management factors considered to

be of greatest concern to secondary pre
-
service teacher candidates? Presentation at


the annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Researc
h Association (EERA). Clearwater, FL.

Refereed Work accepted for presentation:

Sottile, J.,
Backus, M
., O’Connor, K., & Watts, K. (2009). Human development through professional learning communities. Paper


accepted for

Presentation at the annual conferenc
e of the Eastern Educational Research Association. Savannah, GA,


February 2010.

Sottile, J
., Backus, M.,

Watts, K., Cockrille, D., & Blevins, D. (2008). Teacher math achievement through Project MATH and teacher


professional

development. Paper accepted
for presentation at the annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Research


Association. Sarasota, Fl, February

25


38, 2009.

Sottile, J.,
Backus, M
., & Lucas, P. (2007). Student math and science achievement/development through teacher professional


development. Paper accepted for presentation at the annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association.


Hilton Head, SC, February 2008.


Sottile, J.,
Backus, M.
, Dozier, J., & Watts, K. (2007). The effectiveness of RESA
-
II: Professional dev
elopment on teacher success.


Paper accepted

for presentation at the 6th annual Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, HI,


28

January 5


8, 2008.

Sottile, J.,
Backus, M
., Lucas, P., Watts, K., & Blevins, D. (2007). Student math and scienc
e achievement: Development through


teacher professional

development. Paper accepted for presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Educational


Research Association (EERA). Hilton Head, SC, February 20

23, 2008.

Watson, G., Sottile, J., &
Backus,

M
. (2007). Myth busting: Determining if students really cheat more on web
-
based assessments.


Paper accepted for presentation at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE). San Antonio,


TX.

Sotille, J.,
Backus, M
., Lucas, P., &

Cockrille, D. (2005). The role of teacher development in math achievement. Paper accepted for


presentation at the annual

meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association (EERA). Hilton Head, SC.

State Work Presented:

Backus, M
. &

Lucas, P. (2010). Concept attainment and critical thinking. Presentation at the WVCTM annual conference:


Mathematical Getaway
. Flatwoods, WV

Backus, M
., & Lucas, P. (2009). Websites for classroom use: Ones to use and ones to Avoid. Presentation at the W
VCTM annual


conference:
Math Mania
. Flatwoods, WV.

Backus, M
., & Lucas, P. (2008). Using Bloom’s taxonomy to teach math. Presentation at the WVCTM annual conference:
Math and


Technology
. Flatwoods, WV.

Lucas, P., &
Backus, M
. (2007). Give me a chance.

Presentation at the WVCTM annual conference:
Math and Technology
.


Flatwoods, WV.

Higher Education/State Work Presented:

Backus, M.,
Allenger, M., & Jeffers, C.

(2009). PRAXIS I reading support. Presentation at Reading Higher Education Symposium.


Stone
wall Resort, 2010.

Aha Process, Inc. (2008). Strategies for today’s teacher candidates: Applications of the work of Ruby Payne, Ph.D. Presenter
for


Module 6. Salem University,

November, 2008.

Backus, M
. (2008). 21
st

century professional development: A framework for understanding poverty by Ruby Payne. Co
-
presenter,


Marshall University

Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, September 2008.

Backus, M.

(2007). Intensive writing components in an ele
mentary education methods course. Presentation at Reading Higher


Education Symposium sponsored by the West Virginia Department of Education and June Harless Center for Rural


Education, Stonewall Resort, WV, April 16, 2007.

5

Professional development a
ctivities, including professional organizations to which you belong and state,
regional, national, and international conferences attended. List any panels on which you chaired or participated.
List any offices you hold in professional organizations.



Phi De
lta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, WVCTM, WVRA

2010



West Virginia Professional Development Schools Conference, Flatwoods, WV

2005


Present


Monthy professional development in collaboration with Geneva Kent Elementary School faculty

2008
-

Present

Technology work
shops

2009


Intel Teach Program: Thinking with technology course

2007


Cabell County Reading Council: Susan May, guest speaker/ Higher Education and Ruby Payne: Integrating



Poverty into Higher Education Curriculum/ Higher Education Reading Symposium/ P
resenter: Intensive Writing



for K
-
3 teacher candidates/
Participation in West Virginia Reading Educators Interest Council, Bi
-
Annual



Meeting/ Participation in "A Framework for Understanding Poverty at the Higher Education


Level", Sponsored



by the

WVDE/ Participation in June Harless Demonstration Site's "Introduction to the new reading series"/
WAC

workshop: Portfolio Development/WAC Portfolio submission workshops/ Cabell County Reading Council:

D
ebbie Dadey, children’s author

2006


Writing Across the Curriculum/ A Framework for Understanding Poverty: Trainer Certification/ Reading Higher



Education Symposium

2005


Strategies for High Achievement in Teaching/ Literacy/Reading Dog Program/ WV Reading Association



Saturday Seminar/
Teacher Work Place workshop/ River Deep training session/ Reinventing Education
-



Teacher Education

6

Externally funded research grants and contracts you received