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INDIGENOUS
EDUCATION


CURRICULUM SUPPORT


2009







1


This document is the property of the Lutheran
Schools Association SA, NT &
WA

and

may

be adapted
for personal use provided the source is acknowledged.



2


Contents

Page

Content

2

Content

3

Indigenous Education Plan

5

Melbourne Declaration on Educational goals for Young Australians

5

Curriculum


Indigenous Studies

6



South Australian

7



Northern Territory

8



Western Australia

1
1

Curriculum


Indigenous perspectives

1
1



Aims

1
1



Key Elements

1
1



Planning Reflection

1
2

General Information

1
2



Terminology

1
5



Sensitive Issues

1
5



Spirituality and culture

1
6



Indigenous identity

1
6



Indigenous community involvement

1
6



The Dreaming

1
9

Curriculum planning ideas

1
9



R


7 Sequential Curriculum

20



Two year cycle

20



Example of a Study

2
1

Important Indigenous events

2
2

Examples of Indigenous Perspectives across the Curriculum

2
2



Society and Environment

2
3



The Arts

2
3



English

2
3



Design and Technology

2
3



Health and Physical Education

2
4



Maths

2
4



Science

2
4



Christian Studies

2
4



LOTE

2
5

PYP


Trans
-
1.
disciplinary themes

2
6

Methodologies

2
6

Primary and
Secondary sources

2
7

Resources


On line

3
5

Excursions

3
7

Primary Resources

3
8

Purchasing Resources



3


INDIGENOUS EDUCATION PLAN 2009


2012

PURPOSE:

This plan identifies the priorities for Indigenous Education in Lutheran Schools of SA, NT and WA.

o

It
provides a framework for schools to establish effective inclusive practices based on the
principles of Christ’s Ministry of Reconciliation (2 Corinthians 5:14


20) ………. And He has
committed to us the message of reconciliation. Verse 19

o

It acknowledges the

need to improve the participation of Indigenous Australian people through
inclusive practices, embracing diversity as an essential part of God’s creation

o

It promotes the active role of schools in nurturing and supporting the development of each
person’s p
otential. Lutheran schools value and encourage genuine, equal partnerships with
parents, care
-
givers and families of Indigenous Australian students

PRIORITY AREAS

1.

Lutheran schooling promotes equitable outcomes for Indigenous Australian students

This means
that:



Students have the opportunity to excel and reach their highest potential



Students have the opportunity to achieve personal excellence



Schools have the responsibility to facilitate equitable outcomes

o

Resourcing will be provided to strive towards
achieving
equitable

outcomes
.


2.

Indigenous Australian students become successful learners

This means that:



Students will be provided with the tools and opportunities for achievement



Schools will address measured gaps in learning outcomes

o

Reduce the gap in r
eading, writing, numeracy and technology

o

Reduce the gap in Year 12 attainment

o

Construct pathways for employment for Indigenous students

o

Support successful transition from school to further work and/or
study

o

Excel by International standards
.


3.

Indigenous
Australian students become confident and creative individuals

This means that:



Schools strive to provide quality schooling that is free from discrimination based
on cultural ethnicity



Students have opportunities for self
-
expression across a range of media



Schools promote lifelong learning qualities



Schools will provide structures that would enable the development of
leadership skills

o

Promote social inclusion

o

Enable students to have a sense of optimism about their
lives and their futures



4


o

Enable students to
develop personal values and attributes as set
down in LEA lifelong qualities

(identity, living in community and
contributing to community by being a searcher and learner and
listener and communicator)
.


4.

The equitable rights of Indigenous Australians are ac
knowledged by Lutheran Schools

This means that:



Schools promote partnerships with Indigenous families



Schools promote the active participation of Indigenous people in all levels of
decision
-
making



Schools have a pro
-
active approach to Indigenous employment

o

Partnerships with local communities on all aspects of the
schooling process are developed

o

We acknowledge the contribution Indigenous people make
through employment in Lutheran Schools
.


5.

All students are active and informed citizens

This means that:



All st
udents are taught Indigenous Australian cultures and perspectives



Schools acknowledge that Australian history begins with Indigenous history



Schools will be advocates for community values including love, justice,
compassion, forgiveness, service, courage,
humility, hope, quality and
appreciation

o

Local cultural knowledge and experience of Indigenous
Australian communities is foundational for learning about
Indigenous cultures

o

Acknowledgement of individual identity

o

Acknowledgement and promotion of Indigenous
Australian
languages (this may include the teaching of language)

o

Schools acknowledge the traditional ownership of land at
appropriate occasions

o

Promote Reconciliation by acknowledging, understanding and
valuing the contributions of Indigenous Australian pe
ople
.

The following statements are identified as underlying principles:



Indigenous Australian students feel safe in their learning environment and know themsel
ves to
be loved children of God



Lutheran Schools value and respect Indigenous Australian people
as Indigenous custodians and
acknowledge their contributions to Australia’s her
itage, past, present and future



An Indigenous Australian is a person of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent who
identifies as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander an
d is accepted as such by the community in
which he/she lives.





5


M
ELBOURNE DECLARATION ON EDUCATIONAL GOALS FOR YOUNG AUSTRALIANS

As a nation Australia values the central role of education in building a democratic, equitable and just
society


a society th
at is prosperous, cohesive and culturally diverse, and that values Australia’s
Indigenous cultures as a key part of the nation’s present and future. (Preamble)

Goal 1: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence.

Ensure that the learning outcom
es of Indigenous students improve to match those of other students.

Goal 2: All young Australians become successful learners, confident and creative individuals, and active
and informed citizen
s
.


As active and informed citizens ……

U
nderstand and
acknowledge the value of Indigenous cultures and
possess the knowledge, skills and understanding to contribute to and benefit from, reconciliation
between Indigenous and non Indigenous Australians
.

INDIGENOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM

Indigenous studies can be ta
ught:


Through discrete units of work focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their lands,
histories, cultures and/or issues, emphasing both traditional and contemporary views. These units of
work are usually embedded in Society and Env
ironment but because of their holistic nature, can achieve
outcomes across the curriculum.

Through Indigenous perspectives which are relevant Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander perspectives,
which may be able to be woven through units of work across all
nine learning areas, for example,
including the study of Indigenous writers in English, the use of data relating to Indigenous Australians in
Maths, and looking at Indigenous contributions to music, painting and dance in the Arts.

Both approaches are compl
ementary and should be used. Learners need comprehensive understanding
achieved through Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies to appreciate Australia’s unique cultural
heritage and to understand the importance of perspectives in other units of stu
dy.”

(SACSA Framework)











Indigenous
Studies

Perspectives Across the Curriculum



6


SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM
-

SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT

SACSA OUTCOMES: Societies and Cultures

Standard 1 Outcomes

1.7

Understands that, although all people are
unique, they also have characteristics in common, and
contribute in a variety of ways to their local and wider communities.

1.8


Listens to and retells local Aboriginal stories and stories from cultures other than their own, and
explains their relevance fo
r Australians.

1.9

Demonstrates a capability to see and value points of view other than their own.

Standard 2 Outcomes

2.7

Describes the diversity of practices, customs and traditions of groups and communities.

2.8

Describes the diversity amongst Aborigin
al and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their cultures,
past and present, and moves for Reconciliation.

2.9

Participates in and shares cultural experiences and events in the wider community, and analyses
values embedded in them.

Standard 3 Outcomes

3.7

Considers factors which contribute to personal and group identity and social cohesion, and
valuing cultural diversity within and outside Australia.

3.8


Learns from rural and urban Aboriginal peoples and other minorities about their histories and
present d
ay experiences, and acts to counter prejudice.

3.9

Demonstrates responsible and respectful participation in group discussion and, in a team, plans
and negotiates social action to enhance human rights in community contexts.

Standard 4 Outcomes

4.7

Investig
ates and analyses the causes of disharmony or conflict in Australia’s multicultural
society, and suggests strategies for peaceful resolution of disputes.

4.8

Demonstrates critical understanding of their own cultural practices in comparison to the
historie
s, cultures and present day experiences of rural and urban Aboriginal groups, and acts
for Reconciliation.

4.9

Researches and engages with others to enhance ethical behavior in relation to the human rights
of individuals and groups, within and across group
s, cultures or countries.

Standard 5 Outcomes

5.7

Critically examines through research, and justifies
personal views

on, particular social, political
and economic beliefs, concepts, policies and practices.

5.8

Identifies and analyses complex social, cultu
ral and environmental issues and strategies,
including self
-
management and land protection, that are important to local and other Aboriginal
peoples today.

5.9

Analyses and demonstrates critical understanding of prejudice as a social construction, and acts

to counter discrimination through individual knowledge, attitudes and actions.



7


NORTHERN TERRITORY CURRICULUM
-

SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT

NT CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK: Social Systems and Structures

Band 1
Strands

1.1 Time, Continuity and Change


Compare and
contrast significant events and relationships between
own family and those of wider social contact.

1.2
Indigenous Studies

-

Identify local Indigenous groups and explain the significance of local Indigenous
cultural practices for Indigenous and non
-
Indigen
ous Australians.

1.3 Civics, Governance and Social Justice



Participate in and reflect on a range of group decision
-
making processes and explain how individual and group
behavior affects

the rights of others.

1.4 Values, Beliefs and Cultural Diversity



D
escribe the customs, lifestyles and rituals of a range of
cultural groups within their community and compare similarities.

1.5 Enterprise



Examine ways the local community facilitates the meeting of needs and wants.

Band 2
Strands

2.1 Time, Continuity and

Change


Research past events to evaluate why change occurs and their
impact on the community.

2.2 Indigenous Studies



Describe the diversity among Indigenous people and their traditional and
contemporary cultures.

2.3 Civics, Governance and Social
Justice



Make informed decisions and choices about immediate local
issues and define social justice and it’s relevance to societies.

2.4 Values, Beliefs and Cultural Diversity



Identify the diverse processes used to pass on cultural
customs and other val
ue based information within familiar social groups.

2.5 Enterprise



Compare shared interests and common needs that link individuals to form groups and
communities.

Band 3
Strands

3.1 Time, Continuity and Change


Investigate the past and how events have
impacted on individuals
and groups.

3.2 Indigenous Studies



Explain what they have learned about the core beliefs of urban and non
-
urban
Indigenous peoples and apply the principl
es of R
econciliation to take action to counter prejudice.

3.3 Civics, Governa
nce and Social Justice



Research and describe features, such as decision making, of
familiar political and law systems and analyse how choices, opportunities and conflict affect people’s life
chances.

3.4 Values, Beliefs and Cultural Diversity



Describe
key elements of culture in groups and communities,
how individuals learn and share their culture and the impact of differing values upon individuals and
societies.





8


Band 4 Strands

4.1 Time, Continuity and Change


Analyse significant ideas, people and mov
ements that have shaped
societies.

4.2 Indigenous Studies



Analyse their own cultural
practices in

comparison to the histories and current
experiences of all Indigenous groups a
nd actively contribute towards R
econciliation.

4.3 Civics, Governance and Soci
al Justice



Explain the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens on the
existing structure of Australia’s political and legal systems, and their formation; evaluate how these
structures protect the rights of individuals and societies.

4.4 Values, Be
liefs and Cultural Diversity



Research and describe the diverse interpretations and
reactions of individuals/groups to the impact of major events in Australia and how this cultural diversity
contributes to the identity of a society.


Band 5 Strands

5.1 Ti
me, Continuity and Change


Analyse how past forces and events have shaped contemporary
communities.

5.2 Indigenous Studies



Analyse and evaluate complex culturally based social, environmental and
political issues that are presently significant to Indigen
ous peoples.

5.3 Civics, Governance and Social Justice



Critically evaluate a range of political and legal systems, their
policies, and how these impact on citizens; analyse the moral/ethical codes of organi
s
ations that
promote and protect human rights.

5
.4 Values, Beliefs and Cultural Diversity



Critically evaluate the cultural and social structures, values
and beliefs of communities and groups that impact and influence behavior, attitudes and actions.

Beyond Band 5 Strands

5+
.
1 Time, Continuity and Cha
nge


Analyse and critically evaluate how the context of historical
movements and events change; influences and impacts on national and global interpretations of history.

5+
.
2 Indigenous Studies



Analyse and describe the inter
-
relationships between Indige
nous
kinship/relationships and the land/environment, and compare and contrast this with other cultural
world views, in collaboration with Indigenous people.

5+
.
3 Civics, Governance and Social Justice



Critically evaluate how political and legal systems impact on
civic actions and the implications for those who attempt political and legal reform; analyse and interpret
the moral and ethical codes of organi
s
ations, individuals and societies in terms of
social justice.

5+
.4

Values, Beliefs and Cultural Diversity



Define and advocate a focused culturally inclusive point
-
of
-
view with an awareness of the complexities involved in the process of attitudinal and behavioural
change within society.



WESTERN AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM
-

SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN K
-
10 OVERVIEW: CULTURE

K/P


-

T
hat everyone belongs to a place
.



-

That families and personal experiences reflect cultural diversity
.



9


Year 1


-

That different culture
s

express
and satisfy their needs in different ways
.

-

To recogni
s
e that all people and cultures have a particular concept of family
.

Year 2


-

T
hat there are changing roles and relationships within families
.



-

That roles and responsibilities vary among cultural
groups within Australia
.



-

To develop understandings of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures
.



-

That people use stories to shape values and behavior
.

Year 3


-

T
o recogni
s
e that the forms of cultural expression vary among groups
.



-

That be
longing to a group influences and individual’
s attitudes, values and beliefs
.

-

That cultural groups reflect their heritage through symbols
.

-

Stories are used by groups to reinforce their identity
.



-

To recognis
e the symbols of nations such as Australia
.

Year 4


-

The characteristics of groups to which an individual belongs
.

-

That group behavior is guided by written and unwritten rules
.

-
To develop deeper understandings of Australian and neighbouring countries’ cultural
groups
.

Year 5


-

T
hat belonging

to cultural groups involves particular roles, responsibilities and forms of
cultural expression
.

-

How the shared values, beliefs and practices of a cultural group promote cohesion
amongst its members
.

-
The development of Australian identity through
stories and images
.


Year 6


-

T
hat there are different cultural groups in Australian society
.

-

That cultural groups express their culture through their actions, the production of
artefacts
and their

beliefs and values
.

-

That individuals learn the
values, beliefs, practices and rules of a culture from a range
of influences
.

-

The ways in which the practices of cultural groups promote cohesion and continuity
.

Year 7

-

The factors that influence the similarities and differences between cultural groups

in
Australia
.

-

That Australian society is made up of a range of different Indigenous and non
-
Indigenous cultural groups, each of which has its own values, beliefs and practices
.

-

How the culture of a group is influenced by its values, beliefs and practi
ces
.



10


-

That cultural groups have a range of formal and informal practices that are used to
regulate and control members’ behaviour
.

-

That culture is not static and is continually evolving
.

Year 8


-

There are different types of world views and belief syst
ems
.

-

Practices and beliefs of cultural groups can be forces for both continuity and change
.

-

National identity can be shaped and expressed by people, events and ideas
.

-

The role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in building the Australian

national identity

was marginalis
ed in the past
.

Year 9


-

Australia is a pluralist society which includes influences from a range of ethnic groups
.

-

Forces for cohesion share ideas
.

-

World views and values of a society are reflected

in the political and

legal system
.

-

Conflict between and within groups can be the result of different perspectives on
individual rights and responsibilities
.

-

National identity has been constructed as a result of interaction between groups from
within Australian society and

from other societies
.

-

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity has been influenced by their pursuit of
citizenship rights including representation
.

Year 10


-

Some groups within a culture have more influence than others
.

-

Ideas that have influenc
ed cultural practices and change include universal human
rights, social justice, global citizenship and sustainable societies
.

-

National identity is influenced by family, cultural and natural heritage and histories
that change over time
.

-

Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander identity influences contemporary Australian
society and identity
.





11


INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

AIMS
:



To build in all students an appreciation and celebration of the contributions of both traditional
and contemporar
y Indigenous cultures and perspectives



To learn about the diversity of Indigenous people in Australia



To develop respect for different cultural values and beliefs



To raise consciousness, as a matter of justice of the significant issues affecting Indigenous

people including land rights, Stolen Generation, racism, poverty



To develop skills to recognise prejudice and racism and the ability to counter them



To develop the understanding of Reconciliation as an ongoing process in bringing about justice
and equity
for Indigenous people



To consider an Indigenous perspective on our history



So that our Indigenous students see themselves in the curriculum
.


KEY ELEMENTS
:




Relationship with the Land/Sea



Indigenous Spirituality


Dreaming Stories



Indigenous cultures



The d
iversity of Indigenous peoples



Indigenous perspectives on History



Traditional and contemporary lifestyles



Differences between rural and urban lifestyles



Indigenous people and the issues they face



Human Rights: Racism, Prejudice, Stereotyping



Reconciliation
.


PLANNING REFLECTION




Are there Indigenous perspectives and resources which can be included in this learning
program?



Are there meaningful ways to acknowledge and celebrate the presence of Indigenous people
past and present?



How doe
s this
learning program recognis
e and critique the positioning of Indigenous people,
both historically and in the present day?



Is there an Indigenous voice in this learning program?



Do these activities contribute to Reconciliation?



How can I create support struct
ures to enhance the learning for Indigenous students with
learning needs?



How does the learning program represent and value the prior learning and culture of Indigenous
learners?



Does this program enable my students to develop a deeper understanding and ap
preciation of
Indigenous peoples, their histories, cultures, perspectives and/or Spirituality?






12


GENERAL INFORMATION


TERMINOLOGY


Aboriginal/Aborigine

An ‘Aboriginal person’ or an ‘Aborigine’ is a person who:



Is a member of the Aboriginal race of
Australia



Identifies as an Aboriginal person



Is accepted by the Aboriginal community as an Aboriginal person
.


Recommended usage/issues for consideration



Although it is grammatically correct, beware when using the term ‘Aborigine(s)


as it has
negative connotations with many Aboriginal people. The use of ‘Aboriginal person’ or
‘Aboriginal people’ can be used as an alternative.



Please note that the preference in South Australia is for the use of ‘Aboriginal person’.



Always capitalise
the ‘A’ in ‘Aboriginal’ as you would in ‘Australian’, ‘English’ or ‘Chinese’. The
word ‘aboriginal’ with a lowercase ‘a’ refers to an Indigenous person from any part of the world.



‘Aboriginal’ should be used as an adjective, e.g. ‘Aboriginal person’ but

please note that many
Aboriginal people will describe themselves as ‘Aboriginal’.



Never abbreviate the term ‘Aboriginal’ as this is offensive.



Remember when preparing student notes that refer to Australian history that the use of the
word ‘Australian(s)


includes Aboriginal people(s). For example ‘Most non
-
Aboriginal Australians
continue to see Aboriginal people …’ not ‘Most Australians continue to see Aboriginal people …’.
This infers that Aboriginal people are not Australians, which is incorrect.


Abor
iginal people(s)

‘Aboriginal people’ is a collective name for the original people of Australia and their descendants, and
does not emphasise the diversity of languages, cultural practices and spiritual beliefs. By adding an ‘s’ to
‘people’, you are emphas
ising this diversity.


Recommended usage/issues for consideration

If you wish to emphasise the fact that Aboriginal people are Australians, consider the use of ‘Aboriginal
Australian(s)’ instead of ‘Aboriginal people’.


First people/First Australians

‘Firs
t people’ or ‘First Australians’ are collective names for the original people of Australia and their
descendants, and are used to emphasise that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people lived on this
con
tinent prior to European colonis
ation. Both term
s are acceptable.


Indigenous people(s)

An Indigenous person is a person originating or characteri
s
ing a particular region or country (The
Macquarie Dictionary).


Recommended usage/issues for consideration

Commonwealth documents generally capitali
s
e
‘Indigenous’ as they refer specifically to Australian
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Lutheran Schools Association of SA, NT & WA capitali
s
e ‘Indigenous’ when referring to Australian
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Be aware
that some Aboriginal people feel that the term ‘Indigenous’ is not specific and feel that the
term diminishes their Aboriginality. If in doubt consult with the local Aboriginal community
.






13


Torres Strait Islander/person

A Torres Strait Islander or a Torr
es Strait Islander person is a person/descendant from the Torres Strait
Islands which are located to the north of mainland Australia.


Recommended usage



Always capitali
s
e ‘Torres Strait Islander’
.



Never abbreviate the term ‘Torres Strait Islander’ as this
is considered offensive
.


Nunga, Anangu, Koori and other terms

These names are derived from Aboriginal languages and are the names used by Aboriginal people in
specific areas when referring to themselves.

Nunga


is usually used by Aboriginal people in Sou
th Australia.

Anangu


is usually used by Aboriginal people in

the

centre of

Australia

below Alice Springs
.

Noongar


is usually used by Aboriginal people in south
-
west Western Australia.

Yolngu


is usually used by Aboriginal people in Northern Territory
(north
-
east Arnhem Land).

Murri


is usually used by Aboriginal people in north
-
west NSW and Queensland.

Koori


is
usually used

by Aboriginal people in parts of NSW and Victoria.

Goori


is usually used by Aboriginal people in northern NSW coastal regions
.


Recommended usage

Always check with the local Aboriginal community about using this type of terminology. There are many
Aboriginal language groups within the above
-
mentioned areas and the use of such terms can be
restrictive.


Elder

The traditional
meaning of an Aboriginal Elder is someone who has gained recognition within their
community as a custodian of knowledge and lore, and who has permission to disclose cultural
knowledge and beliefs. Recognised Elders are highly respected people within Abori
ginal communities.
In some instances, Aboriginal people above a certain age will refer to themselves as Elders. However, it
is important to understand that in traditional Aboriginal culture, age alone does not necessarily mean
that one is a recogni
s
ed El
der.


Recommended usage

The use of Elder (upper case) is generally acceptable, but it is important to be aware of the differences
in meaning outlined above.

When negotiating with Aboriginal communities, ensure that recogni
s
ed Elders are involved. This may

occur indirectly


for example, a recogni
s
ed Aboriginal community controlled body such as Aboriginal
health,

may be willing to negotiate with Elders on your behalf
.


Aboriginal cultures

Avoid making generali
s
ations about Aboriginal cultures. Acknowledge
that there are both similarities in
and differences between Aboriginal cultures throughout Australia.


Issues for consideration

Be aware of the changing natures of Aboriginal society and its ability to adapt.


Country

‘Country’ is a term used to describe a

culturally defined area of land associated with a particular,
culturally distinct group of people or nation. For example Murray Bridge is Ngarrindjeri country.


Recommended usage

Use ‘country’ to refer to a particular, culturally defined area of land, su
ch as ‘Pitjantjatjara country’ or
‘Peramangk country’.



14


Nation

‘Nation’ refers to a culturally distinct group of people associated with a particular, culturally defined
area of land or country. Each nation has boundaries that cannot be changed, and languag
e is tied to
that nation and its country.

The Aboriginal Australia map produced by Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Studies shows the Aboriginal nations.


Recommended usage

Use ‘nation’ to refer to a culturally distinct Aborigi
nal Group and its as
sociated country. For example t
he
Buandig nation is located around Mt Gambier.

Be aware that the boundaries of some Aboriginal nations (
e.g.

Pitjantjatjara) cross over state
boundaries.


Tribe

A ‘tribe’ refers to a culturally
distinct group of people, associated with a particular, culturally defined
area of land or country with adherence to the same leaders.


Issues for consideration

Be aware that ‘tribe’ has a specific meaning derived from non
-
Aboriginal societies, and therefo
re is not
necessarily applicable to Aboriginal culture. Some Aboriginal people use the term and such usage
should be respected. The majority of Aboriginal people prefer the word ‘tribe’ not to be used as it
incorrectly describes Aboriginal traditional li
fe and does not describe modern life styles.

Use the term

traditional


rather than

tribal


in reference to Indigenous groups, and group, community,
nation, rather than

tribe

.


Culture

‘Culture’ consists of ‘accepted and traditionally patterned ways of
behaving’. It is a ‘common
understanding shared by the members of a group or community. It includes land, beliefs and
spirituality, language, ways of living and working, artistic expression, relationships and identity

.


Issues for consideration

Be aware

that traditionally, and
until today Aboriginal cultures
are many and varied (
i.e.

there is no one
homogenous Aboriginal culture).

Be aware that like all cultures, Aboriginal cultures have evolved over time, and that modern Aboriginal
cultures are therefor
e different from traditional Aboriginal cultures.

It is important that there be an awareness and understanding of the local Aboriginal culture.



TERMS NOT TO BE USED

The following terminology is inappropriate or dated, and MUST BE AVOIDED
AT ALL TIMES AS
IT IS
OFFENSIVE, they are considered racist, offensive and divisive.

Native
,
Mixed
-
blood
,
Half
-
caste
,
Quarter
-
caste
,
Full
-
blood
,
Part
-
Aboriginal
,
25%, 50% Aboriginal



Clearly, the following terms are also extremely offensive and should never be used:

C
oloured
,
primitive
,
nigger
,
lubra
,
gin
,
abo
,

s
avage
,
coconut
,
darky
,
blacks





15


SENSITIVE ISSUES



When teaching about the Dreaming, involve Aboriginal people and use resources developed by
or with Aboriginal people. Use terms preferred by Aboriginal people, for example, the Dreaming
instead of myths, fables or legends. There are some aspects of the Dre
aming and Aboriginal
culture which are secret and sacred and are therefore inappropriate for school learning.



Do not use the terms primitive, Stone Age or simple. Despite the antiquity of Aboriginal culture,
Aboriginal people are modern and not primitive

people. Their culture, language, music and
social structure are highly complex with numerous local variations. The apparent simplicity of
their lifestyles hides immensely detailed knowledge of the environment linked to finely
developed local bodies of t
echnological skills. Best to consider Aboriginal culture as different or
alternative. It can be described as complex, stable, law abiding and conservative of the
environment.



Use only recommended resources.



Walkabout has become a derogatory term, inferr
ing that Aboriginal people wandered around
aimlessly. Each group had its own clearly defined territory with a well established seasonal or
religious movement schedule.



Seek accurate information i.e. don’t include didgeridoos for SA. Be selective about th
e
resources you use and be aware that some resources in circulation contain material which is
inappropriate and offensive to some Indigenous people.



Avoid talking about sacred and secret ceremonies i.e. circumcision, tjuringas, bullroarers,
kadatja. It is

offensive to many traditional people to teach about or show pictures of these. Out
of respect for these groups, do not discuss them with students.



Art


Concentric circles and concentric squares are sacred symbols in the Pitjantjatjara
c
ulture.
Do not b
ody paint, face painting only. The body painting design of a person is his or her
personal possession, even if dead, and is sacred. Similar to a signature, it should be thought of
as copyright. Do not use the colour red in symbolic paintings, but is alri
ght to use in modern
paintings i.e. Aboriginal Flag.



For some Aboriginal students from remote communities, it is not part of their culture to
maintain eye contact during a conversation. This does not mean that they are disinterested,
rude or inattentive.



Teachers need to be aware that some Indigenous students in their class may feel embarrassed
or shamed when singled out or asked questions pertaining to their culture.



In studying Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ heritage and experience, issue
s may be
raised which provoke strong feelings of guilt or anger among students. When such issues are
raised they need to be handled with sensitivity and within the context of Reconciliation.


SPIRITUALITY AND CULTURE



The Dreaming is the most appropriate word to use to describe the spirituality, stories and
history of Aboriginal peoples.



When teaching about Indigenous culture, talk about traditional and contemporary culture.



There is great diversity among Indigenous c
ommunities throughout Australia. There is diversity
in lifestyle, history, culture and language and in the degree to which traditional culture is
maintained and nurtured in the context of today’s society. This diversity should be
acknowledged when talkin
g about Indigenous people. Their is no single Indigenous viewpoint
on any issue.



Acknowledge that pre
-
coloni
s
ation there were 600+ language groups living in Australia. Each
language group had their own country, stories, languages or dialects and traditio
ns.



Visit
http://www.reconciliationsa.org.au/learn%20map.html

to download a map of Aboriginal
Australia or to find information on purchasing it in poster form.





16


Indigenous identity




Indig
enous identity and culture continues to develop through time, in response to both
‘internal’ and ‘external’ changes.



Internal changes are those concerning beliefs, perceptions and values.



External changes are those to do with climate, environment,
nutrition, and encounters with
‘others’. The most significant encounter with ‘others’ came through colonisation. Colonisation
forced the biggest changes in Aboriginal culture ever, these changes have been profound.



A large proportion of Aboriginal people

living in cities find themselves there because of the
colonising policies and practices from the past. Policies of genocide, separation of families,
integration into white society. Such people have been removed from their familial and cultural
homes, an
d thus their familial and cultural identities have been largely amputated.



Others have come to the cities voluntarily, in search of employment and more adequate social
services. A survival stratagem.



Most self
-
identifying Aboriginal people share the genet
ic characteristics of many ethnic groups,
but they are Aboriginal.


INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY INVOLVMENT




It is important to involve Indigenous people in Indigenous Studies. Most, however, are not
teachers and require your support and involvement when working
with your students. Positive
contact with Indigenous people will help to counter the many negative stereotypes to which
students may have been exposed and help to further develop mutual respect and
understanding.



It is important to consult closely with In
digenous people, or cultural instructors, prior to a visit
so that expectations are clearly defined and understood by all parties involved. Negotiation
regarding a fee for service needs to take place prior to the visit.


THE DREAMING



Adapted from Cathol
ic Education, South Australia, Indigenous Education Handbook 2009




From an early age, storytelling plays a vital role in education children.



As children grow into young adults, more of the history and culture is revealed. Adults then take
responsibility f
or passing on the stores to the following generations. In this way, the stories of
the Dreaming have been handed down over thousands of years.



Students need to have an understanding of the environment where the story is set. Use a map
to show where the s
tory is set in relation to their school. Discuss flora, fauna, landforms and
climate.



Explain that the story is a very important story to the people of the particular community and
that it is told by the elders to the children for a special reason.



Discus
s the symbolism used and lessons learned from the stories. The Aboriginal children learn
about their environment e.g. the animals, tracking, food sources, habitat, nests, behavior, life
cycles and the feeding of the young.



They learn the rules for living
in their community, valuable life lessons about right and wrong,
sharing and mutual respect.



The importance of knowledge of family, extended and nuclear, is emphasi
s
ed through the
Dreaming, as are strict laws relating to marriage and kinship.



They also lea
rn about the spiritual beliefs of their people.



As the source of all life and the resting place of the spirits who created life and moulded the
landscape, the land is sacred and to be tended and revered.



The Dreaming beliefs are passed on through story
-
tel
ling and ceremony.



Dreaming stories can be
dramati
s
ed,

illustrated and/or retold.



17


THE TJUKURPA

The Dreaming comes from the land and is as diverse as the many language groups of our people in Australia. It
tells of the ancient, ancestral Beings who formed
the land. It deals with how we live our lives now. It involves
secret business. This is what Anangu people say about the Dreaming:

The most profound and essential aspect of Anangu culture is called Tjukurpa. The words ‘Dreaming’ or
‘Dreamtime’ are inad
equate translations of this word. Tjukurpa does not refer to Dreaming in a conventional
western sense of things imagined in sleep. Nor is it merely a collection of enchanting stories, like Aesop’s fables. It
does not refer only to a past long gone.

Tjuk
urpa

is existence itself, in the past, present and future. It is also the explanation of existence and it is the law
which governs behavior.

Tjukurpa

is expressed in two facts of existence. It is the land


creek, hills,
clay pans
,
rock holes
, soaks,
mountains
and other natural features. It is people


their actions of hunting, marrying, ceremony and daily life. The Tjukurpa
has always been. Not only does it refer to the time of creation of all things, it is still unfolding, alongside present
events
, and it is being re
-
created and celebrated by Anangu today.

Anangu say that their country was made during the Tjukurpa. This was a time when beings travelled across the
land in the form of humans, plants and animals, performing remarkable feats of creati
on and destruction.

The Tjukurpa gives Anangu today a charter for living, drawn from the actions of the beings themselves. Although
the Tjukurpa creatures had fantastic powers, their greatness was curiously tempered with ordinary human
strengths and weakn
esses. They lusted and fought; and lied and loved, with cunning and recklessness.

From these stories of deeds and misdeeds Anangu continued to learn the proper way of being in the world and of
living with each other. They learn such things as restriction
s on the use of land and its resources, the rules of
marriage, what is public and what is secret knowledge, the proper way of gaining knowledge and teaching it and
the responsibilities of people toward each other.

The Tjukurpa creatures are travelers. The
ir paths (iwara) pass over, under and upon the land. Sites along these
paths are often named and treated as especially important. Anangu recount these journeys in stories and songs.
The travelling stories link these sites to places and people sometimes h
undreds of kilometres away.

By living on their land and learning the Tjukurpa, Anangu understand the connection between people, places and
the Tjukurpa. For a person to become a socially responsible human being, he or she must learn the named tracks,
plac
es and songs of his or her Tjukurpa. By doing so Anangu become emotionally attached to the place where they
were born, even though they may not live all their life in that place. The knowledge of songs and paths tells
Anangu where they are and where they

are going without maps and compasses. It tells them what the desert and
mountains can be expected to offer by way of water and resources.

Bonds between Anangu and land can never be broken while a person lives, regardless of the clothes that Anangu
wear,
the processed foods they eat or the motor cars that they own.
The link between the time of the Tjukurpa
and daily life remains even at death, for it is then that Anangu become part of the Tjukurpa itself, part of their own
creation. As far as Anangu are c
oncerned there is no question that the Tjukurpa, and hence the land, must be
cared for and protected. The sites of the Tjukurpa cannot simply be rebuilt or moved to some other place like a
church or a shrine, because these sites were not created by ordina
ry people.

Protection of the Tjukurpa and the land is more than a concern that the stories and songs of how things came to
be are not forgotten. For Anangu it is the protection of the essential nature of all things and of a unique way of
being.



From Min
yma Tjuta Tjunguringkula Kunpuringanyi






18


THE
DREAMING








This diagram shows the relationships between the three main elements of the Dreaming


















This diagram is adapted from An Introduction to Aboriginal Societies by Bill Edwards (1988, p13). The
circle
represents the inter
-
connectedness of all things and highlights the variety of aspects of culture
and environment that can be focused upon when studying stories from the Dreaming.

Environment

Social Structure

Moral Code

THE
DREAMING

Technology

Animals

Relationships

Astronomy

Art

Territory/Land

Behaviour

Songs

Language

Plants

Food

Spirituality



19


CURRICULUM IDEAS

FOR INDIGENOUS STUDIES

R


7 Sequential Curriculum

Receptio
n
-
Ngarrindjeri People: Lifestyles



Focus


‘Thukeri’ Dreaming Story

Year 1
-

Dreaming Stories about Birds



Focus


‘Urrakurli, Wakarla and Wildu’ Dreaming Story

Year 2


The Pitjantjatjara People: Lifestyles



Focus


Using the Environment

Year 3


A
Comparative

Study: Anangu/
Ngarrindjeri People



Focus


Diversity of Technology, Reconciliation

Year 4


Celebrations: Past and Present



Focus


Traditional/
Contemporary



Different yearly calendars

Year 5


The Kaurna People



Focus


Lifestyles Then and Now.
Historical Perspectives, Arts, Technology, Reconciliation

Year 6


Outstanding Indigenous Australians



Focus


David Unaipon, Achievements despite obstacles



Racism/P
rejudice



Symbol Art

Year 7


Torres Strait Islander Studies



Focus
-

A Comparative Study (Tor
res Strait Islander / Aboriginal
) Importance

of Land, Sea.
Contemporary Issues



Reconciliation





20


Two Year Cycle

for Indigenous Studies

Odd


R/1



Dreaming Stories about Sea

Celebrations

Racism


2

Technology and Art




3/4

Celebrations


Food Gathering


5/6

The Kaurna People


Outstanding Indigenous Australians


7


A Comparative Study


Even

R/1


The Adnyamathanha People


The Boandik People


Celebrations


2


The Kaurna People


Stories of Racism


3/4

The Ngarrindjeri People


Social Justice


5/6


Torres Strait Islander Studies


C
ountering Racism


7


Contemporary Issues


Poetry



EXAMPLE OF A STUDY


















The Ngadjuri People
Then and Now

Relationship with
the environment

Effects of
colonisation

Dreaming
Stories

Homes

Place Names

Seasonal Food
trails

Early maps and
photographs of the
area

Influential People

Technology

Pre
-
European
settlement

Arts: traditional,
contemporary



21


IMPORTANT INDIGENOUS EVENTS

Apology to the Stolen Generations
: 13 February (Term 1)

On this day in 2008, Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, on behalf of the Australian Parliament, offered a broad
apology to all Aboriginal people and the Stolen Generations, for their

prof
ound grief, suffering and loss’.

National Day of Healing

(‘Sorry Day’): 26 M
ay (Term 2)

The Bringing Them Home Report recommended that a National Sorry Day be held each year on the 26
May “to commemorate the history of forcible removals and its effects.” The anniversary of Sorry ‘Day
which is called Journey of Healing in South Aus
tralia, has special significance to Indigenous people.

National Reconciliation Week
: 27 May


3 June (Term 2)

Each year National Reconciliation Week celebrates the rich culture and history of the first Australians.
Reconciliation is indeed all our story a
nd we will all be richer for acknowledging the past and embracing
the future.

NAIDOC Week
: 6


13 July (School holidays)

NAIDOC celebrates the survival of Indigenous culture and the Indigenous contribution to modern
Australia. Taking part in NAIDOC Week i
s a great way to celebrate Indigenous culture and build bridges
between Indigenous and non
-
Indigenous Australians. As NAIDOC Week often falls in school holidays,
many schools celebrate Aboriginal culture in Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Week.

Aboriginal
Cultural Awareness Week
: First week in September, beginning on a Monday (Term 3)

This week is an opportunity to celebrate Indigenous culture.





22


Examples
of Indigenous

Perspectives
across Learning Areas


Society and Environment




Appreciate the achievements

of Indigenous

cultures in Australian society
.



Develop an understanding of the structures of Indigenous socie
ties
.



Explore the diverse and complex nature of the cultures, languages, values, beliefs and kinsh
ip
systems of Indigenous groups
.



Examine the intr
insically spiritual nature of Indigenous peoples’ relat
ionships with their
environment
.



Develop an understanding of Indigenous viewpoints on all stages of Australian history
, including
pre
-
contact history
.



Consider archaeological evidence of Indigenous use

of local ar
eas and investigate place names



Find out about Indigenous peoples and careers in community management, politics, law,
religion, culture teaching, tourism, business, natural resource management, mining, land care,
government, archaeology, anthro
pology, surveying, site r
ecording, fisheries and farming
.



Keep positive
.


Place, Space and Environment
:



Indigenous land management



Connection to the land/sea



Sacred or significant sites



Indigenous use of fire



Seasonal trails



Traditional and contemporary
shelters



Impact of environmental issues e.g. mining



Diversity of environments, land rights



Survival skills, food sources



Indigenous plants, gardens
.


Time, Continuity and Change
:



Traditional Indigenous games



Lifestyles of urban and rural/remote people



Traditional and contemporary lifestyles



Indigenous perspective on history



Impact of European settlement



Indigenous involvement in wars



Aspects of culture, then and now



Family structures and roles



Celebrations, past and present



Timelines
.


Social Systems
:



Needs of Indigenous people, then and now



Indigenous societies and their rules



Impact of government legislation



History of Reconciliation movement



Indigenous workers, entertainers



Access to goods and services



Racism and prejudice



The Apology
.





23


The
Arts



Stu
dents can explore the link between traditional Indigenous art and the Dreaming
.



Primary students may look at Aboriginal art from different groups and focus on the use of
symbols to tell a story


develop their own symbols to tell their story through modern

dance,
visual art, drama, song or media
.



Incorporating Indigenous arts including dance, drama, music, media, film, de
sign and visual arts
.



Consider social issues relevant to Indigenous peop
le as a stimulus for creativity
.




Interact creatively wi
th Indigen
ous community members
.




Appreciate that art forms vary among language groups and that there is diversity amongst
individ
ual artists and their art forms
.




Understand the link between traditional Indigenous art and the Dreaming, i.e. story, particular
environment and its features, human behaviou
r and spiritual beliefs and law
.




View Moorditj CD Rom to find out about Indige
nous people in Arts
.




Research websites containing information
about Indigenous people in Arts



Indigenous
m
usicians,
s
ongwriters and
dancers
:
Archie Roach
,
Ruby Hunter
,
Tiddas
,
Donna
Atkins
,
Blekbala Mujik
,
Kev Carmody
,
Yothu Yindi
.



English



Most Indigenous texts can be used as the bas
is for an English ‘novel study’
.



Students could investigate the life stories of some Indigenous people
, well known and ‘ordinary’
people and discuss their experiences and struggles


athletes, academics, artists and leaders
.



Examine Indigenous wr
iting and writers
.




Use Indigenous issues and experiences from a wide range of sources, using al
l genres as
stimuli
for writing
.




Explore the oral traditions of Indigenous people
and their role in cultural life
.




Research how Australian writers have dealt
with Indigenous issues
.




Research contemporary

Indigenous communication media
.




Examine Indigenous mass medi
a publications and broadcasting
.



Critically analyse text from the perspective of racism usi
ng the book ‘Countering Racism’
.


Design and Technology



Flags and design
.



Recogni
s
e the important technological innovations of Indigenous peoples in both tradit
ional

and
contemporary cultures
.




Examine the processes of design and use of technology in Indigenous cultures (for example,
boomerang,
woomera,
spears a
nd string making)
.




Examine the aesthetic and functional use of everyday natural source material by Indigeno
us
peopl
e (for example, ochre and bark)
.





Health and P.E.



Students may investigate Indigenous games for children and use them as warm up activities for
sports

units or as a stand alone unit
.



Students could gather a collection of restaurant
menus

and anal
yse them


deconstruct
together
.



Then, research ‘bush tucker’ and design a restaurant menu or 3 course meal based on findings


make and eat/share with others?



Investigate the ‘Australian Indigenous Health Info Net’. Look at the health ca
re issues

for
particular groups
.



Critically analyse the impact of the last 200 years of Australian History on health of Aboriginal
peoples through disease, violence
, removal from land
.



Recognise the essential relationship between the emotional well being of Indigen
ous people and

their strong links to the land
.




Examine the impact of European contact on the health and w
ell being of Indigenous peoples
.




24




Study the preparation of Australian bush foods and medicines, their nutritional value and their
emerging place in th
e Australian diet
.




Explore the important contribution Indigenous people have made to Australian sport.



Mathematics



Classify patterns used in posters, paintings and story maps which use a traditional Aboriginal
form/technique
.



Graphing


a variety of sta
tistics with an Indigenous theme using the Australian Burea
u of
Statistics for information
.



Critically analyse statistical information about Indigenous people.




Investigate different mathematical concepts (addition, subtraction, percentages, predictions,
ratios, graphing, hypothesising) using Aboriginal peoples as a focus for information collection
.



Explore the nature

of Indigenous counting systems
.




Work with Indigenous professionals who use m
athematics in their professions
.




Explore cyclic time
.




Explore

symbols

and patterns in Indigenous ar
t.




Mathematics should be viewe
d as problem solving in context
.


Science



Students can pursue a ‘web quest’ on Aboriginal use of native plants
.



Plant an Indigenous Garden
.



Allow students to find out about alternative
ways of knowing about the world
.




Investigate the holistic approach of Indigenous p
eople towards their environment
.




Ex
amine the physics of boomerangs
.




Researc
h methods used to prepare
foods
.



Learn about Indigenous people working as scientists and in
other careers related t
o science and
Aboriginal cultures
.



Research traditional knowledge of Indigenous people of astronomy, seasonal changes, plant
uses for foods and medicine, protection of species through totems, sustainable use of resources
and the impo
rtance of all this k
nowledge for Australia’s future
.



Christian Studies



Indigenous spirituality


beliefs
.




Art forms, symbolism, colour
.




Dreaming stories


lessons learned, value systems
.



Reading
Creation stories
.



Religious significance of the land


sa
cred places
.



Stewardship / Ecology / Sustainability
.



Understanding of
Identity
.



Human Rights


racism, stereotyping, prejudice
.



Contemporary social justice and ethical issues
.



Indigenous social justice heroes
.



Traditional and contemporary Indigenous
celebrations, festivals
.



Reconciliation


Sorry Day
.




Christian ethics


The Apology
.


LOTE



Make comparisons between the socio
-
cultural aspects of their language of study and those of
Australian indigenous languages.




Examine the linguistic origins of
words and make comparisons between languages
.



Examine the multiculturalism of Australia pre
-
coloni
s
ation.



Look at the Indigenous map of Australia and discuss the variety of language groups.



Christian ethics


The Apology
.




25


PYP


Trans
-
disciplinary themes


WHO WE ARE
:



Identity



Indigenous cultures



Dreaming stories



Indigenous flags



Similarities and differences
.


WHERE WE ARE IN PLACE AND TIME
:



Understanding Indigenous cultures, looking at the map of Indigenous nations



Housing



Stolen Generation



Stories of
individuals



Influence of settlement, ‘invasion’ of Australia



Changes to Indigenous culture, 30,000years


200+ years
.


HOW WE EXPRESS OURSELVES
:



Indigenous artists



Indigenous musicians



Creating artwork in the style of Indigenous artists



Indigenous stories



Using Moorditj DVD



Indigenous toys and games
.


HOW THE WORLD WORKS
:



Indigenous perspectives on planets



Indigenous perspectives on seasons



Indigenous perspectives on science



Indigenous perspectives on technology



Looking at inventors



The energy of a spear
thrower (woomera)



The physics of a boomerang
.


HOW WE ORGANISE OURSELVES
:



NAIDOC



Reconciliation



Stolen Generation



Aboriginal trade routes



Contact history



Traditional games



Indigenous athletes
.



HOW WE SHARE THE PLANET
:



Freshwater, Indigenous perspectives



Indigenous Food



Indigenous Medicine



Caring for the environment



Totemic responsibility



Oceans from an Indigenous perspective
.





26


Methodologies for
Indigenous Studies Units and/
or Perspectives


Consider




An integrated approach acros
s l
earning areas
.




Developing knowledge, skills, values and actions
.




Posing an essential question
:

o

The student becomes the investigator

o

Takes students beyond ‘fact
-
based’ stages

o

Suitable for all levels of ability
.




Enhancing higher order thinking skills
:

o

Bloom’s Taxonomy of

Thinking

o

Gardiner’s Multiple Intelligences

o

Six Thinking Hats
.




Implementing a range of ways of learning
.


USING PRIMARY OR SECONDARY RESOURCES


Involve Indigenous people in the curriculum
:




Telling Dreaming stories



Telling their life stories



Artists



Music
ians



Dancers



Indigenous Organisations
e.g.

Health, Native Title



Visit Cultural centres



Art Galleries



Invite cultural guides



Dreaming trails



Food trails



Zoos, Wildlife Parks



Museums
.





27


RESOURCES


ONLINE RESOURCES


Library protocols
-

http://www.cdu.edu.au/library/protocol.html

Pedagogy
-

http://ab
-
ed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/


Art
-


Gordon Bennett
http://www.schubertcontemporary.com.au/Contemporary/Links/bennett_gordon.htm

http://www.schubertcontemporary.com.au/Contemporary/Links/bennett_gordon.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/arts/sunmorn/stories/s1108576.htm

http://www.adelaidereview.com.au/archives/2004_06/visualarts_story6.shtml

http://www.shermangalleries.
com.au/artists/inartists/artist_profile.asp?artist=bennettg

Julie Dowling

http://www.artplace.com.au/exhibsprevious/Julie_Dowling.html

http://www.artseeninwa.com/dowling2.html

http://images.google.com.au/imgres?imgurl=http://www.ssfa.com.au/images/gallery/thumbs/8020
552709.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.ssfa.com.au/exhibitions/3/&h=130&w=90&sz=10&tbnid=v7FD6
8Jf
-
gUJ:&tbnh=85&tbnw=58&hl=en&start=41&prev=/images%3Fq%3Djulie%2Bdowling%26star

http://www.artnet.com/artist/424003441/julie
-
dowling.html

http://www.artplace.com.au/exhibsprevious/Warridah
-
Dowling.html

http://www.netsvictoria.org/placesthatna
meus/dowling.html

http://www.postnewspapers.com.au/20000617/impressions/exhibitions.shtml

Art sites

http:/
/www.ikuntji.com.au/Aboutus/aboutus.htm

http://www.aboriginalart.com.au/gallery/gallery.html

http://www.aboriginalartonline.co
m/index.php

http://www.aboriginalimagination.com.au/

http://www.dacou.com.au/index.html

http://www.gar
ma.telstra.com/

Albert Namatjira
-

http://www.artistsfootsteps.com/

http://www.kaltjitiarts.com.au/

http://www.dreamtime.auz.net/default.asp?PageID=1

National Gallery
-

http://www.nga.gov.au/ATSIArt/Index.cfm

Children’s Activity Kit (in
cluding flag activities)
http://srs.snaicc.asn.au/_uploads/nwslt/00315.pdf


Dance

Torres Strait Islander
-

http://www.abc.n
et.au/arts/artok/craft/s197254.htm

http://www.garma.telstra.com/

http://www.tjapukai.com.au/

http://www.bangarra.com.au/


Film

The Tracker
-

http://www.petercoadart.com.au/PAGE8.HTML

Ten canoes
-

http://www.tencanoes.com.au/tencanoes/



28


Rabbit Proof Fence
-

http://www.det.wa.edu.au/education/abled/apac/lessons/pdfs/apac114.pdf

Music

http://www.buumal.com.au/

http://archive.amol.org.au/discovernet/tales/didjeridu.asp

http://www.indig.com/

http://www.wadidge.com.au/didgeridoo
-
news/james
-
webb
-
wadumbah.html


Visual Arts

http://www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/indigenous/art/

http://www.aboriginalart.com.au/gallery/gallery_intro.html

http://archive.agda.com.au/dm/projects/Whatd.html

http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/

http://www.pictureaustralia.org/trails/index.html

http://www.tandanya.com.au/


Australian Indigenous Languages

http://www.dnathan.com/VL/austLang.htm

http://burarra.questacon.edu.au/home.html

http://www.ethnologue.com/country_index.asp

http://usmob.com.au/

http://www.alrrc.nsw.gov.au/

http:
//www.tesol.org.au/esl/

http://www.fatsil.org.au/

http://www.ngapartji.org/


Design and Technology

http://www.bushmechanics.co
m/

http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/

http://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/learning/

http://www.cdu.edu.au/centres/ik/ikhome.html


English

http://www.enhancetv.com.au/shop/home.php?cat=351

How the Robin stole fire
-

http://www.readinga
-
z.com/newfiles/levels/r/robinfirer.html

Aboriginal studies for literature students
-

http
://www.geocities.com/Athens/Oracle/3211/nosugar.html

The Koori History Museum
-

http://www.kooriweb.org/foley/images/history/toons/toonsdx.html


Technology

Fire
-

http://www.nma.gov.au/libraries/attachments/schools/resources/fire_in_australia/fire_in_australia
_part_four/files
/8296/fire_colour%20p4.pdf

How a boomerang works
-

http://members.iinet.net.au/~rangs/howaboomworks.htm

Health and Physical Education

Food

Bush tucker
-

http://www.dreamtime.auz.net/



29


http://www.outbackspirit.com.au/

http://www.waru.org/resources/healthytucker/index.php

Sport

http://www.ausport.gov.au/participating/indigenous

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/racial_discrimination/vo
ices/index.html


H
ealth

http://www.crcah.org.au/

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/social_justice/health/index.html


Maths

Australian bureau

of statistics
-

http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/D3310116.NSF/85255e31005a1918852556c2005508d8/b90afb
92257078c9ca2
568bf000185df!OpenDocument

http://www1.aiatsis.gov.au/exhibitions/ethnomathmatics/ethno_hm.htm

http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/


Christian Studies

Images of Jesus

http://www.nativespirit.com.au/australianart/introduction.html

Christ in the desert
-

http://www.companysj.com/v144/desert.html


Prayers

http://www.socialjustice.catholic.org.au/content/spirituality.html

http://www.socialjustice.catholic.org.au/content/spirituality/new_liturgy_resources_available.pdf


Spirituality

http://w
ww.cathcomm.org/aboriginalCM/LaPerouse/RCartist.htm

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani/themes/theme8.htm

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Stories
-
of
-
the
-
Dreaming

http://www.aboriginal
-
art.com/journey.html

http://www.loreoftheland.com.au/

http://www.fraynework.com.au/story/

http://www.aboriginalart.com.au/culture/dreamtime.html

http://www.earthsong.org.au/journal/_doc/01_earthsong_journal.pdf

http://www.ozspirit.info/2006/138b.html


Racism

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/education/index.html

http://www.harmony.gov.au/

http://www.multi
culturalaustralia.edu.au/

http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/

http://www.understandingrace.org/

http://www.pbs.org/race/000_General/000_00
-
Home.htm

http://www.tolerance.kataweb.it/eng/index.html

http://www.tolerance.org/pt/index.html



30




Reconciliation

http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/wattle/abstuds/index.htm#Top

http://giftofpresence.slq.qld.gov.au/html/exhibit.htm

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/social_justice/index.html

http://www.abc.net.au/missionvoices/default.htm

Reconciliation Australia
-

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/orgs/car/

Michael Long
-

http://www.thelongwalk.com.au/



History

http://www.roebourne.wa.gov.au/historyaboriginal.htm

Kakadu
-

http://mypage.direct.ca/k/kenbinns/index.html

Adelaide
-

http://www.fusion.com.au/duryea/html/pano.html

Street names
-

http://users.chariot.net.au/~hitek/holdfastdatabase/SThome.htm

Archive map of Adelaide
-

http://archivemaps.com/mapco/aust.htm


ANZAC

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/anzacday

Japanese bombing raid
-

http://home.st.net.au/~dunn/horn01.htm

http://www.ulladulla.info/history/war/aboriginal.html

Defending Australia
-

http://home.st.net.au/~dunn/atsi/defendaustralia.htm

ANZAC story
-

http://www.anzacs.net/AnzacStory.htm

http://www.australiansatwar.com.au/

Black Magic
-

h
ttp://www.diggerhistory.info/pages
-
aboriginal/black
-
magic.htm


The Corringie Settlement Aborigines
http://www.wilja.asn.au/index.htm

http://www.diggerhistory.info/00
-
pages
-
top
-
level/master
-
index.htm

Indigenous soldiers
-

http://www.fortunecity.com/meltingpot/statuepark/620/index.html

Indigenous soldiers
-

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages
-
aboriginal/0
-
cat
-
index
-
indigenous.htm


http:
//home.st.net.au/~dunn/japsland/land11.htm

National archives
-

http://naa12.naa.gov.au/login.htm

Pilbara regiment
-

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages
-
army
-
today/state
-
regts/pilbara.htm

RSL
-

http://www.rsl.org.au/

Torres Strait Light Infantry Battalion
-

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/other/IndigLRes/car/2000/15/wtpage58.htm


General

History

Koori History
-

http://www.kooriweb.org/foley/indexb.html

Adelaide Actualities
-

http://home.iprimus.com.au/jaspot/

Documenting

a democracy

-

http://www.foundingdocs.gov.au/

Encounter
-

http://www.slsa.sa.go
v.au/encounter/

Mura Gadi
-

http://www.nla.gov.au/servlet/muragadi?srp=3

The National Centre for History Education
-

http://www.hyperhistory.org/

Stat
e Records NSW
-

http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/





31


Communication

-

Media

Australian Newspapers online
-

http://www.nla.gov.au/npapers/

Screen Australia
-

http://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/learning/

Koori Mail
-

http://www.koorimail.com/

Vibe Home page
-

http://www.vibe.
com.au/

Welcome to Indigenous Australians
-

http://www.indig.com/


Fauna

Lost fauna of Adelaide
-

http://www.samuseum.sa.gov.au/lostfauna/fauna1.htm

Un
ique Australian animals
-

http://australian
-
animals.net/

The Australian Arid lands Botanic Gardens
-

http://www.australian
-
aridlands
-
botanic
-
garden.org/index.htm


Flora

District council of Mt Barker
-

http://www.dcmtbarker.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=222

Urban forest biodiversity project
-

http://www.backyards4wildlife.com.au/


Geography

Australian maps
-

http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/austmaps/

Geoscience Australia
-

http://www.ga.gov.au/

Global environment and outdoor education council


free lessons
-

http://www.geoec.org/lessons/

Indigenous weather

information

-

http://www.bom.gov.au/iwk/climate_culture/index.shtml

Archival Maps
-

http://archivemaps.com/mapco/aust.htm

Archival maps of Adelaide
-

http://archivemaps.com/mapco/adel1840/adelaide.htm

Australia’s heritage
-

http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/index.html

Maps
-

http://www.petersmap.com/table.html

River Murray Charts
-

http://www.rivermurraycharts.com.au/index.html

Aboriginal mapping centres
-

http://www.nativemaps.org/map_gallery.html#FNMaps


Indigenous Australia

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice
-

http://www.hreoc.gov.au/social_justice/index.html

The First Australians
-

http://www.bigvolcano.com.au/human/origsetl.htm

Action for Aboriginal rights
-

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aar/

Australian ethnologue
-

http://www.ethnologue.com/

European network for Indigenous Australian rights
-

http://www
.eniar.org/info/background6.html

European network for Indigenous Australian rights
-

http://www.eniar.org/

Face the Facts
-

http://www.hum
anrights.gov.au/racial_discrimination/face_facts/

Tracing Indigenous Queensland history
-

http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/info/ind/footprints

Indigenous Australians
-

http://www.indigenousaustralia.info/index.php

Arabunna people
-

http://www.come.to/lakeeyre

National Indigenous Times
-

http://www.nit.com.au/default.aspx

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Educational web site
-

http://www.natsiew.edu.au/site/home.aspx

Tasmanian Aboriginal people
-

http://www.tasmanianaboriginal.com.au/liapootah/liapootah.htm

Us Mob
-

http://www.abc.net.au/usmob/



32


Yarra Healing
-

http://www.yarrahealing.melb.catholic.edu.au/home.html

Indigenous stories
-

http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/

Kakadu, seasons, fire stick burning

-

http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/publications/kakadu/pubs/visitor
-
guide.pdf

Larrakia Nation
-

http://www.larrakia.com/

Nyungar

people
-

http://www.cscr.murdoch.edu.au/_docs/ncslitreview.pdf


Indigenous International

Cultural survival
-

http://www.cultu
ralsurvival.org/home


Indigenous studies portal
-

http://iportal.usask.ca/

Aboriginal languages
-

http://www.dnathan.com/VL/austLang.htm

Sydney history
-

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani/main.html

Koori Education
-

http://www.vaeai.org.au/index.html

Mapoon
-

http://www.mapoon.com/

Yothu Yindi
-

http://www.yothuyindi.com/

http://burarra.questacon.edu.au/home.html


A
nangu

A
nangu multimedia and web projects
-

http://www.rightside.com.au/Indigenous_Web_Multimedia.php

Uluru
-

http://culture.gov.au/articles/rocksandmountains/

Wa
ru
-

http://waru.org/



Indigenous schools

Community schools
-

http://www.aics.wa.edu.au/content/introduction.shtm

Pipalyatjara
A
nangu school
-

http://www.pipalyatjara.sa.edu.au/index.htm#choice


Individuals

Athletes
-

http://www.abc.net.au/news/olympics/athletes/default.htm

Rosalie Kunuth
-
Monks
-

http://www.australianbiography.gov.au/subjects/kunothmonks/interview1.html

Australian

biography
-

http://www.australianbiography.gov.au/

http://www.ciolek.com/WWWVL
-
Aboriginal.html


Kaurna

City of Holdfast Bay
-

http://www.holdfast.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?a=9


http://kaurna.tripod.com/

Kudnarto
-

http://kudnarto.tripod.com/


Torre
s Strait Islanders

Christine Anu
-

http://www.christineanu.com.au/

Dance and masks
-

http://www.abc.net.au/arts/artok/craft/s197254.htm

Histo
ry
-

http://www.jcu.edu.au/aff/history/articles/mullins.htm




33


Aboriginal Studies

-

http://hsc.csu.edu.au/ab_studies/rights/global/social_justice_global/sjwelcome.response.front.htm
#Indigenous%20Australian%20Case%20Study

The Torres Strait Islands
-

http://www.janeresture.com/torres_strait/

The church on Torres Strait
-

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~frgraeme/ACCA/P5SI.htm

Thursday Isl
ands
-

http://www2.eis.net.au/~nqtds/fnq/2ptb10.html

http://www.australianbiography.gov.au/


Land rights

Native Title and Reconciliation
-

http://www.antar.org.au/

Sea Rights
-

http://www.nntt.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx

Treaty documents
-

http://www.treaty.murdoch.edu.au/conference%20documents.htm

WIK
-

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aar/wik.htm


Referendum

1967 Refer
endum
-

http://www.library.uq.edu.au/law/LawDiversityWeek07.pdf


Stolen Generation

http://reconcilia
ction.org.au/nsw/education
-
kit/stolen
-
generations/


Tourism

http://www.aboriginalaustraliatravel.com/home.cfm

http://www.aboriginaltourismvictoria.com.au/

http://www.tourism.australia.com/Marketing.asp?lang=EN&sub=0291&al=362


Water

River Murray
-

http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/murray/

Fishing
-

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1104964.htm


Work

Stolen Wages
-

http://www.aph.gov.au/senate/committee/legcon_ctte/completed_inquiries/2004
-
07/stolen_wages/index.htm


Science

Astronomy

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~mmichie/astronomy.htm

http://www.questacon.edu.au/starlab/aboriginal_astronomy.html

http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/AboriginalAstronomy/

http://www.darksparklers.com/index.html

http://library.thinkquest.org/C005462/index2.html


Canoes

http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/pictoria/a/1/7/doc/a17078.shtml

http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/murray/content/aboriginalAustralians/missions/prg1258_2_2351.htm

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkages/IntegratedUnits/aboriginal/tech_learn05.html

Ngurunderi
-

http://www.samuseu
m.sa.gov.au/page/default.asp?site=1&page=ON_Multimedia



34



Environment

Aboriginal trail
-

http://www.anbg.gov.au/anbg/aboriginal
-
trail.html

Aboriginal plant trail
-

http://oac.schools.sa.edu.au/outreach/oes/botanic/discov.htm

Plants
-

http://www.australianplantssa.asn.au/

Indigenous plants
-

http://www.sasta.asn.au/qualityscience/primaryyears/MountzCover.html

Birds
-

http://www.birdsaustralia.com.au/

Caring for c
ountry
-

http://www.nlc.org.au/html/care_menu.html

Seasons
-

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~herring/seasons.htm

Seasons
-

http://www.abc.net.au/science/features/indigenous/default.htm

Resin
-

http://www.abc.net.au/quantum/s188496.htm#transcrip
t

Bush foods
-

http://www.bushtucker.com.au/

Bush foods and medicine
-

http://asgap.org.au/APOL10/jun98
-
6.html


Science
-

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~mmichie/network.html

Living Knowledge
-

http://livingknowledge.anu.edu.au/

Western Science and Aboriginal people
-

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani/themes/theme9.htm


Gardens

http://science.uniserve.edu.au/school/quests/nativeplan
ts.html

http://www.desertknowledge.com.au/

http://users.chariot.net.au/~fosg/gorge/flora.htm#wildflowers

http://www.floraforfauna.com.au/links.asp?id=82

plant germination with fire
-

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s73587.htm

seed propagation
-

http://asgap.org.au/seed.html


Medicine

http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/

http://www.bri.net.au/medicine.html

http://www.insects.org/ced1/aust_abor.html



Additional support

AIATSIS
-

http://www.aiatsis.gov.au/home

Dare to Lead
-

http://www.daretolead.edu.au

Dare to Lead, SA region
-

http://ww3.daretolead.edu.au/servlet/Web?s=169694&p=RA__SA

National Indigenous Publishing
-

http://www.iad.edu.au/press/iadpresshome.htm

Australian Youth papers
-

http://www.thesource.gov.au/ausyouth/publications.htm

Curriculum links
-

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkag
es/IntegratedUnits/aboriginal/aboriginal.htm

After year 12
-

http://www.year12whatnext.gov.au/

What works
-

http://www.whatworks.edu.au/using.htm






35


SOU
TH AUSTRALIAN
EXCURSIONS


TANDANYA (The National Aboriginal Cultural Institute)
,

PHONE: 8224 3200


The Education Officer negotiates programs with teachers. Activities include storytelling, music and
workshops on anti
-
racism, land rights, contemporary
Aboriginal art and historical perspectives.


ADELAIDE ZOO
, PHONE: 8267 2434


Offers a variety of services and Indigenous content can be negotiated.


BOTANIC GARDENS
, PHONE: 8222 9344


The Education Officer can provide programs for students and support for
teachers regarding the
Tappi Mai plant food trail. There are self
-
guided trails for students.


THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM
, PHONE: 8207 7429


The Aboriginal Cultures Gallery is a collection, study display and interpretation of Australia’s
Aboriginal cultu
res.

Education Officers will discuss how to develop the work you are doing. They will provide an
overview of the exhibition, use examples in a ‘hands on’ approach and discuss the role of the
Museum.


ART GALLERY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA
, PHONE 8207 7070

The E
ducation Officer can organize a tour of the gallery with an Indigenous focus.


TAUONDI COLLEGE
, PHONE 8240 0300


Guides are available for:



Plant and food trails at Morialta Falls (Kaurna Seasonal Trail) and the Botanic Gardens



The Aboriginal Culture Galler
y at the SA Museum, The Adelaide Zoo and Cleland Wildlife
Park



Cultural activities of storytelling, drama and basket weaving



Artefacts and the diversity of Aboriginal culture



Aboriginal Art and the Dreaming


WALKING TRAILS (self guided)




KAURNA MEYUNNA,
KAURNA YERTA TAMPENDI


Walking the Torrens and Adelaide city
(Recognising Kaurna people and Kaurna Land). A Walking Trail Guide can be bought for
approximately $8 from the Adelaide Festival Centre Shop, Tandanya and the bookshops at
the Art Gallery, Muse
um and Migration Museum.



Journey of Healing


A walk from the Old Adelaide Goal to Victoria Square (focus
Reconciliation.



Tappa Mai Trail


Botanic Gardens


learn how Aboriginal people used native plants for bush
foods, medicine, shelter, clothing and art
efacts.



CAMP SITES


ARBURY PARK OUTDOOR SCHOOL
, PHONE 8339 3237

Departmental environmental education personnel run a variety of Indigenous programs and
have full dormitory style camping facilities.



36



CAMP COORONG
, PHONE 8575 1557

Full program;



Cultural
activities


food and medicine trail, Ngarrindjeri history, weaving, cooking,
environmental changes etc



Aboriginal Studies


WILDERNESS LODGE, HACKS POINT
, PHONE 8575 6001

Nature Trails and canoe trips available. Bush foods


CAMP ALDINGA

ACTIVE EDUCATION


David and Robyn Ellis, PHONE:
8522 6329

Indigenous program designed for students.


IGA WARTA, ADNYAMATHANHA CULTURE CAMP

(Flinders Ranges), PHONE 8648 3737

Painting and story sites, flora and fauna, bush medicine, bush tucker, music as w
ell as
Adnyamathanha interpretation of the environment, culture and family.


ABORIGINAL CULTURAL TOURS


ADJAHDURA LAND

(Yorke Peninsula),

PHONE 8632 6521


FIELD TRIPS FOR TEACHERS



Ngarrindjeri Tungar Ruwald Cultural Field Trip



Adnyamathanha yarta nakunth
a

Contact Adele Pring on 8343 6528


WESTERN AUSTRALIAN EXCURSIONS


BALQA MIA, ABORIGINAL HERITAGE UNIT,

Yanchep National Park, Phone 08 9561 1004


FREMANTLE ABORIGINAL HERITAGE WALKING TOUR
,

Fremantle, Contact 08 93340564


WA GOULD LEAGUE INC, HERDSMAN
LAKE WILDLIFE CENTRE
,

www.wagouldleague.com.au/bookings.htm

Wide range of Indigenous excursions


ECOEDUCATION


PERTH HILLS NATIONAL PARKS CENTRE

Contact 08 9295 6149


ART GALLERY OF WESTERN AUST
RALIA



Indigenous Art, contact 08 9492 6644


WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM



INDIGENOUS CULTURES, contact 08 9427 2792


NORTHERN TERRITORY EXCURSIONS


MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY


ABORIGINAL DARWIN, A GUIDE TO EXPLORING IMPORTANT SITES OF

THE PAST AND PRESENT,
author

Toni Bauman, use this book to develop excursions around Darwin.


KAKADU NATIONAL PARK

-

http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/kakadu/




37


LITCHFIELD NATIONAL PARK

-

http://www.litchfieldnationalpark.com/


ALICE SPRINGS CULTURAL PRE
CINT
, ARALUEN CENTRE


ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIA CULTURAL CENTRE
, 80 Todd St, Alice Springs, 08 8952 3408


ALICE SPRINGS DESERT PARK
, Larapinta Drive, 08 8951 8788


ART GALLERIES

with an Indigenous focus are found throughout the Northern Territory


PRIMARY
SOURCES


It’s important to use primary sources wherever possible. The following sources provide
excellent opportunities for students to gain valuable insights and deepen their understanding of
Indigenous societies and cultural heritage


South Australiana
Database of the State Library

To find images visit
http://www.catalog.slsa.sa.gov.au:1084/search/X

. Depending on your area
of study, type in keywords like Millicent, Boandik, Adelaide, Adelai
de people ….. and select from
the pull
-
down boxes. Many Aboriginal images are blocked, but others are available to give
children an idea of what the area looked like many years ago.


SA Memory

SA Memory focuses on the South Australian experience


what ma
kes South Australia different.
Developed by the State Library of South Australia, this multimedia website highlights South
Australia’s people, places, issues and events from the colony’s beginnings to now.

Manuscripts, photographs, art works, architectura
l plans, posters, newspaper articles, printed
ephemera, maps and sound recordings


you’ll find a wide range of archival and published
items, building a rich picture of the state’s culture and heritage.

http://www.samemory.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm


Scootle

This award winning technology tool has been developed to support access to TLF content.
Scootle provides access to more than 8,165 items of digital curriculum content from The
Learning Federatio
n. You can find interactive learning objects, images, audio files and movie
clips vio browse
, search

and filter technology. You can create personal lists of
favorite

resources
for quick access. Login access is provided to teachers through their jurisdic
tions. Visit
http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/p/home


Learning Federation

High quality digital learning resources are available free of charge to all Australian and New
Zealand schools. All the materials ha
ve a Copyright Agency Limited exemption, which means
that teachers and students can legally use them for educational purposes. See the Indigenous
resources at
http://www.t
helearningfederation.edu.au/default.asp?=indigenous&s+y


Film Australia Digital Learning

The Digital Resource Finder features video clips from Film Australia’s remarkable archive


one
of the nation’s largest and most historically significant collections. Clips are matched with print
friendly two page resource sheets that include background i
nformation, engaging student
research and classroom activities all written by leading teachers. Visit
http://dl.filmaust.com.au/

and click ‘Indigenous Australia’ to view the range of resources
suitable for Upper
Primary


Secondary students.




38


Australian Screen

Australian Screen presents 2,200 clips from the Australian film and television industry, from its
earliest days to the present. The education collection is designed to help teachers and students
make the mo
st of the wide range of moving image resources on the site. The clips in this
collection are accompanied by teachers’ notes created by specialist curriculum writers. Expert
curators’ notes also provide useful background material. Visit
http://australianscreen.com.au/



PURCHASING RESOURCES




Murphy Sisters, David Flett, 0411 273 740




Tandanya, Retail Shop,
08
8224
3222




Magabala Books, 08 9192 1991 (they will send a catalogue)




Peter Leyden Publishing, 02
9439 8755 (Central Desert Art Kit)




QBD The Bookshop,
Casuarina

Shopping Centre, Darwin

08 8945

7220

WWW.qbd.com.au




Angus and Robertson Online




Absolutely books and cards, Shop 6/48 Marina Boulevard, Cullen Bay, NT,

08 8941 1363




Booktopia.com.au




Red
Kangaroo Books, 79 Todd Mall, Alice Springs, 08 8953 2137




Flags


Available on request, free of charge, from your local Federal Member of
Parliament.




Tape Services Unit, Phone 8241 5615, Fax 8241 5708, Web
http://www.tapeservices.sa.edu.au/

Video dubbing of programs screened on television
is available at a very low cost. The catalogue is online.




PLAIN Video Services

Website:
www.savideoandfilm.plain.sa.gov.au

Accessible through the Public Libraries
system or to registered borrowers.




Indigenous resources
-

http://www.photocards.com.au/koolba
rrdi.html






Christine Reid

Indigenous Education Facilitator

christine.reid@sa.lca.org.au

telephone: 08 8267 8411