2010 - 2011 - Shelby County Schools

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System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010









2010
-

2011


CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN


Title I Schoolwide Plan


Note: Blank copy is available on
www.alsde.edu

, e
-
GAP, Document Library




Federal Programs Director submits required p
lans to LEA system’s e
-
GAP Document Library



NAME OF SCHOOL:

Vincent Elementary School

STREET ADDRESS:

40800 Hwy
25

CITY:

Vincent

STATE:
Alabama

ZIP CODE:

35178

CONTACT:

Beverly Miller

TELEPHONE:

(205) 682
-
7320

E
-
MAIL
:

Bmiller@shelbyed.k12.al.us

Identified for School Improvement? No

Yes

Delay Status

Year 1

or Year 2



*
Submit to LEA for Board approval. Retain the original plan in the LEA.
Submit the plan electronically to your system’s e
-
GAP Document
Library by November 3, 20
10
.


Year 3

or Year 4 or more

Submit to LEA for Board approval. Scan

PAGE ONE and PAGE TWO to indicate si
gnatures
.
Submit the plan and signature pages electronically
to your system’s e
-
GAP Document


Library by November 3, 2009.


Made
AYP?

YES

NO

Made
AMAOs
(EL)?

YES


NO



N/A



Career
Tech
Made
AYP?

YES

NO


N/A





Are all federal resources

(including Titles I, II, III,
IV, V, and VI) used to coordinate and supplement
existing services and not used to provide services
that, in the absence of federal funds, would be
provided by another fund source?


YES

NO



Describe how this plan will be made available to parents and other stakeholders,
such as

through
parent meetings

or on Web sites.

NOTE: The Parental Involvement section of this plan
must

be distributed to all parents.


Parents were engaged in the process by being made aware of disaggregated data that
demonstrated the strengths and weaknesses of
students and suggested areas where
additional work was necessary. A parent representative is present at each school
improvement meeting. The plan will be housed in the principal’s office and will be
available for parents upon request, and available on th
e VES website.

In addition to inclusion on our web site and hard copies available, the Parent Involvement Plan
is distributed to all parents of Title I students through our Title I Parent Information Booklet.


This is given to all parents in September of e
ach year.



*
Board Approval: Yes

No

Board approval received on ___
__________________________, 2010
.



Board Signature:

Superintendent
Signature:




Date:


Federal Programs
Coordinator Signature:




Date:


Principal Signature:




Date:


System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010







System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010






CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION TEAM


This plan was developed/or revised during the following time period (e.g. April, May


September 200_):

August


September 2010



Provide a brief description of the planning process, including how teachers will be involved in decisions regarding the use o
f state academic assessments, and other data sources in order to provide information on and to
improve the achievement of individua
l students and the overall instructional program and how parents were involved with faculty and staff in developing, and impl
ementing the CIP
(Title I, Section 1116(b)(A)(viii):


In September 2010, the school leadership team and parent member reviewed the
current data, disaggregated the standardized assessment data, parent and staff surveys and other local data to determine
effective practices to be implemented. The collaborative input involved the following: successfully mastered components, ar
eas that a
re mastered but still of some concern, and components which have not
been mastered and will be included in the plan. This information was shared with all the staff and was made available to par
ents on September 21, 2010 at our Annual Title I meeting.
All

teachers are on an

Action Team which writes the goals included in the CIP, so all teachers have input.







Instructional


Leadership Team Names

(The Leadership Team must include the principal, faculty
[including ELL resource lead teacher if
applicable], staff,
parents, community stakeholders, and/or students.)

Positions

(Identify position held, e.g., Administration, Faculty, Staff, Grade
Level and/or Subject Area, Parents and Community members.)



Signatures

(Indicates participation in the

development of the CIP)

Beverly Miller

Ruth Palmer

Margaret Battle

Angela Madison

Faith Clark

Sara Askew

Amanda Campbell

Nancy Bullock

Lindsey Tisdale

Joanne Hutto

Principal

Assistant Principal

Reading Coach

Counselor

5
th

Grade Teacher

Kindergarten Teacher

Kindergarten Teacher

3
rd

Grade Teacher

Technology Coordinator/4
th

Grade Teacher

Parent











System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




Part I
-

continued


DIRECTIONS: NEEDS AS
SESSMENT
-

SUMMARY OF DATA
: Indicate data sources used during planning by
identifying strengths and weaknesses or program gaps
. If your school did not review a
particular data source, please write N/A
. School improvement goals should address program gaps (weaknesses) as they relate to student achievement or AYP categories
such

as graduation rate or other academic indicators.
Close attention should be given to the proficiency index
.

Please include all disaggregated subgroups including those with less than forty students
.
Additionally, please report data pertaining to the Respons
e to
Instruction (RtI) framework, include data used to determine the type of support provided to students (i.e.: universal screen
ing results, benchmark testing, progress monitoring, etc.)


Alabama Science Assessment:

Strengths:

83% of students scored proficient on the ASA.

77% of students could compare distances from
the sun to planets in our solar system.



Weaknesses:

Only 41% of students were able to use everyday indicators to identify common

acids and bases.

Only 41% of students were able to describe the relationship of populations within a habitat to


various com
munities and ecosystems.

Stanford 10

Strengths:

In grade 3, 90% of students were proficient in number facts.

In grade 4, 92% of students were proficient in reading vocabulary.

In grade 5, 90% of students were proficient in computation with fractions.


Weaknesses:

In grade 3, 43% of students were not proficient in structural analysis of word

study skills.

In grade 4, 31% of students were not proficient in computation with decimals.

In grade 5, 32% of students were not proficient in both thinking skills
and interpretation.



Briefly describe the process your faculty used to conduct the need
s assessment (analysis of all data).


The CSI Team wrote the school goals based on test data and distributed the goal information to the action team members. The a
ction teams wrote the strategies and presented the goals and strategies to the faculty. The

CSI members will monitor the
implementation of the plan.


Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT): Describe how staffing decisions ensure that highly qualified, well
-
trained teachers provide instruction and how their assignments most effectively address identified

academic needs.

Applications are requested through the

district when openings are available in order to choose only those teachers that are highly qualified. Principals are require
d to have the knowledge of each teacher’s

status and the area the teacher is highly qualified to teach by checking online for Teac
h Alabama or reviewing resumes and applications. All scheduling and assignments are based on this information.


Number and percentage of teachers Non
-
HQT:


0


Number and percentage of Classes
Taught by Non
-
HQT:


0


Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE):

Strengths:



Weaknesses:



Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT):

Strengths:

In grade 5, students scored 88% proficient in math.

In grade 4, students scored 86% proficient in reading.

In grade 3, students scored 86% proficient in math.

Weaknesses:

In grade 5 only 78% of students scored proficient in reading.

In grade 4 only 76% of students scored proficient in math.

In grade 3 only 77% of students scored proficient in reading.

Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS):

Strengths:

In Kindergarten, 94% of students were established in phoneme segmentation.

In grade 1, 92% of students were established in phoneme segmentation.

In grade 2, 74% of

students had an accuracy level of 95% or above in oral reading fluency.

In grade 3, 89% of students had an accuracy level of 95% or above in oral reading fluency.

Weaknesses:

In Kindergarten, 17% of students were at risk in nonsense word recognition.

In
grade 1, 18% were at risk in oral reading fluency.

In grade 2, only 32% of students were low risk in oral reading fluency.

In grade 3, only 32% of students were low risk in oral reading fluency.

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part I
-

Continued:

Alabama
Direct Assessment of Writing (ADAW):

Strengths:

60% of 5
th

grade
students
scored proficient on the ADAW.

50% of 5
th

grade
students
scored 3’s & 4’s in grammar and usage.


Weaknesses:

On writing mechanics 39% of 5
th

grade
students
met or exceeded the stand
ard.

On sentence formation 37% of 5
th

grade
students
met or exceeded the standard.


ACCESS for English Language Learners (ELs):

Strengths:

According to the results of Access for ELLs 2010, students in grades 2
-
5 demonstrated proficiency, 4.8 or higher,
in Listening, Speaking, and Reading.

Weaknesses:

Although students demonstrated growth on Access for ELLs 2010, Writing
proficiency levels co
ntinue to be lower than the other language domains.



Educate

AL or other Professional Evaluation Profile Information:

Strengths:

On
the Educate Alabama evaluation

teachers implemented and integrated
for the most part
Standards 1,

2, 3, and 5.

In using standard 5 to increase student achievement the teachers engaged in weekly PLC’s to share best practices.

Weaknesses:

To familiarize and learn the standards and indicators better and to effectively implement standard
4, indicators 4.9, 4.10.

Addi
tional Data Sources: (e.g., Alabama Alternate Assessment [AAA], School Technology Plan Data)

Strengths

in Technology include
:

1
st

grade increased from 82.49% in 2009 to 83.95% in 2010.




3
rd

grade increased from 75.01% in 2009 to 78.04% in 2010.

Three third grade students took the AAA test. All three students scored proficient or exceeded standards in math. These

s
kills included identifying numbers from 1
-
100 in random order and adding and

subtracting 2 digit numbers with no

regrouping.

Weaknesses
in Technology include
:

4
th

grade dropped from 66.03% in 2009 to 58.23% in 2010.



5
th

grade dropped from 73.86% in 2009 to 52.71% in 2010.

With the AAA Test, only 1 of 3 studnets received any points in the area of Context Clues in
reading.

Local Data (e.g., LEA, school, and grade
-
level assessments, surveys, program
-
specific assessments,
other RT
I data
):

Strengths:

In 3
rd

grade, students who were proficient in total reading went from 59% on test P to 88% on
Test

B; In 5
th

grade
students who were proficient in reading went from 52% on test P to 86% on Test B.

In math, 3
rd

grade students went from 58%
proficient on Test P to

72% on T
est B; Fourth g
rade students
scored
71% on
T
est B, and in fifth grade students went from 61% proficient on test P, to 88% proficient on Test B.



Weaknesses:

Third Grade dropped in proficiency on Test B in reading vocabulary and reading
informational text.

Fourth grade dropped from 90% advanced proficiency in phonics on Test A to 50% on Test B.

In math, third and fourth grades dropped in proficiency from A to
Test B.

Career and Technical Education Program Data Reports:

Strengths:

NA



Weaknesses:

NA







Part I


䍯湴楮略搠n
(CULTURE RELATED DATA):

School Demographic Information related to student discipline (e.g. total office referrals, long
-

and
short
-
term suspensions, expulsions, alternative school placements, School Incidence Report (SIR) data, or student attendance).

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Strengths:

No students were referred to Early Warning Court due to discipline issues.

Implementation of Love and Logic strategie
s throughout the school helped to promote a more positive climate.

Bullying referrals down from 47 to 36

Implementation of the Shelby County Harassment and reporting requirements has been implemented with success.

Weaknesses:

396 discipline referrals for
the 09
-
10 school year

Bullying continues to be a concern both at school and on the bus


School Demographic Information related to drop
-
out information and graduation rate data.

Strengths:

N/A

Weaknesses
:

N/A

School Demographic Information related to
teacher attendance, teacher turnover, or challenges associated with a high percent of new and/or inexperienced faculty.

Strengths:

75% of our classroom teachers have three or more years of teaching experience.

Only two teachers were out for extended
leaves.

Additional teachers were hired for grades 1, 2,

4 & 5 which improved the teacher to student ratio.

Weaknesses

:

25% of our faculty has less than three years of experience.

School Demographic Information related to student attendance, patterns of s
tudent tardiness, early checkouts, late enrollments, high number of transfers, and/or transiency including migratory moves (
if applicable).

Strengths:

Met AYP goal of 93% in attendance.

All referrals to Early Warning Court for attendance were
accepted.

113 students had two or more unexcused absences which is down from 266 the previous year.

Weaknesses

:

High number of students who were tardy regularly.


School Perception Information related to parent perceptions and parent needs including
information about literacy and education levels.

Strengths:

We are continuously analyzing data from parent surveys and holding parenting events to meet these needs.

We are in our second
year of hosting Parent Parties where information is given to support
parents in building better rapport with their child and the
the school.

Weaknesses

:

Lack of parent involvement and support

Difficulty in reaching parents by phone

School Perception Information related to student PRIDE data.

Strengths:

N/A

Weaknesses

:

N/A

School Process Information related to an analysis of existing
curricula

focused on helping English Language Learners (ELLs) work toward attaining proficiency in annual measurable academic objective
s (AMAOs).

Strengths:

A highly qualified teacher

with ESL certification provides inclusion and pull
-
out services using best practices

s
upported by curricula designed for ELL, including Harcourt ELL kit for Tier II as well as On Our Way to

English.

Weaknesses

:

Although curricula designed for ELL is uti
lized it is not available for all grades. Time restraints

inh
ibit instruction
.

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



School Process Information related to an analysis of existing
personnel

focused on helping English Language Learners (ELLs) work toward attaining proficiency in annual measurable academic objective
s (AMAOs).

Strengths:

The teacher provides quality inclusion and pull
-
out services to help ELL students work toward proficien
cy in all

four language domains.


Weaknesses:

Time constraints prohibit teachers from working with students on a daily basis.

We have an ELL teacher
who comes two half days a week to support instruction.

School Process Information uncovered by an
analysis of curriculum alignment, instructional materials, instructional strategies, reform strategies, and/or extended learn
ing opportunities.

Strengths:

The use of Investigations in math training and training in The Leader in Me
. We have two reading coaches and they plan with
explicit reading lessons with each grade level weekly. As a result of training in Investigations our ARMT math scores

increased from 2008
-
2009 to 2009
-
2010 by: 3
rd

grade 19%, 4
th

grade 13% and 5
th

grade 13%
.


Weaknesses:

The inexperience of our teachers in Investigation serves as our greatest weakness

and job


embedded professional development.

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part II
-

GOAL TO ADDRESS ACADEMIC NEEDS


All components to support improving academic achievement
,
INCLUDING
SCHOOL CULTURE AND RtI CONSIDERATIONS
,
should be related to the weaknesses
identified in the data summary.
DUPLICATE PAGES AS NEEDED TO ADDRESS TOP PRIORITIZED GOALS INCLUDING SACS DISTRICT GOALS, IF APPLICABLE
.

Use the SMART Goals format to address area
s of need.


CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT GOAL
#1

(SHOULD ADDRESS IDENTIFIED WEAKNESSES AND GAPS):

To increase the level of all students scoring a Level III or IV on the ARMT in reading by increasing in 3
rd

grade from 77% to 88%; 4
th

grade from 86% to 88%; and 5
th

grade from 78% to 85%. To focus on increasing
the number of
special education

students meeting profiency from 7 to 13.

Data Results on which goal is based:

Reading scores measured on the 10
-
11 ARMT.

ACTION TEAM MEMBERS
:
Sherri Hilley, Morgan Sawyer, K
im Tidwell, Margaret Battle, Sara Askew, Elissa Osbourne, Ashleigh Stewart, Ashley Waldrop, Deb Owsley


COURSES OF STUDY

REFORM STRATEGIES

BENCHMARKS

INTERVENTIONS


RESOURCES

WHICH COURSE OF
STUDY STANDARDS,
AHSGE
STANDARDS/OBJECTIVES,
ELIGIBLE CONTENT, OR
WIDA* STANDARDS ARE
LINKED TO EACH
STRATEGY?

WHAT RESEARCH
-
BASED

STRATEGIES/ACTIONS WILL BE USED

TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACADEMIC
PERFORMANCE?

(Give specific strategies,
not just programs

or program names.)



HOW WILL PROGRESS FOR EACH
AC
TION STEP BE MEASURED?

(
PERFORMANCE DATA, LISTS,
SURVEYS, ETC
)

HOW WILL THE SCHOOL PROVIDE
TIMELY ASSISTANCE IF
STRATEGIES DO NOT CHANGE
PERFORMANCE?

WHAT RESOURCES AND SPECIFIC
EXPENDITURES WILL BE NEEDED
FOR SUCCESSFUL
IMPLEMENTATION?

(Ex: 6 Classroom
Libraries, $.....00)

Use strategies to comprehend
literary/recreational materials
and functional/textual materials.


STRATEGY:

To implement Tier I instruction through
the use of whole and small group lessons.


ACTION STEP
s
:

*Implement the use of CORE read
ing maps

*Implement the use of Toolkit lessons integrated into
Harcourt materials weekly

*Provide prompts for open
-
ended responses

*Think Link Probes based on student needs

*Additional explicit small group lessons b
ased on
student needs using strategies
from Locating and
Correcting Reading Difficulties


*Classroom Assessments

*Teacher Observations

*Lesson Plans

*Running Records

*Benchmark Tests

*Administrative Snapshots

*Partner Walkthroughs

*Phonics Inventory

*Writing Prompts

*Think Link

*Small group ins
truction

*Individual instruction

*Reteaching

concepts

*Extra practice

*Tier II instruction

*Think Link data

*Toolkit

*CORE

*Center activities

*Rigby

*Fountas and Pinnell

*Locating and Correcting Reading
Difficulties

*Leveled Passages

Think Link


STRATEGY:

To implement Tier II instruction
through the use of interventions for struggling readers.


ACTION STEP
s
:

*Harcourt Strategic Intervention

*
Locating and Correcting Reading Difficulties

intervention lessons

*Documentation of Tier II intervention

*Classroom
Assessments

*Teacher Observations

*Lesson Plans

*Running Records

*Benchmark Assessments

*
Documentation

*Administrative Snapshots

*Partner Walkthroughs

*PST

*Additional small group instruction

*Tier III

*Harcourt Strategic Intervention

*Locating and
Correcting Reading
Difficulties

*Rigby

*Fountas and Pinnell

TARGET GRADE LEVEL(S):

3
-
5

TARGET CONTENT AREA(S):
Circle One

Reading Math Science
Other

AHSGE:

Reading Math Science

Social Studies
Language

ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC
INDICATORS:

TARGET STUDENT SUBGROUP(S):

Special Education

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




STRATEGY: To implement Tier III instruction
through the use of explicit intervention lessons using
scientifically based research programs.


ACTION STEPS:

*Implementation of
Read Naturally

which is a small
group and one
-
on
-
one intervention which uses teacher
modeling,
repeated reading
, development of reading
vocabulary, reading assessment and progress
monitoring.

*Implementation of
Passport
an intervention that
targets priority skills such a
s phonemic awareness and
phonics through daily small group and individual
lessons with frequent progress monitoring.

*Implementation of
Orton G
illingham

an explicit
instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics,
vocabulary development and assessment and progr
ess
monitoring using a small group multi
-
sensory
approach.

*Placement Tests

*Teacher Observations

*Number of Students in each program

*Daily Progress Monitoring

*
Documentation

*Administrative Snapshots

*Partner Walkthroughs

*PST

*
Read Naturally

*Passport

*Orton Gillingham


STRATEGY: Working cooperatively with teachers,
the media specialist will help plan and teach lessons
for grades 2
-
5 on study skills needed to meet the
Course of Study requirements for each
grade level.
These skills include:


2
nd

G
rade
-
Vocabulary skills


Genre studies



Alphabetical order


3
rd

Grade
-
Genre studies


The use of text features


4
th

Grade
-
Genre studies


Text features



Research skills including note taking


5
th

Grade
-
Genre Studies


Text features


Using reference materials


ACTION STEPS:

Meet with grade levels to determine skills that need to
be taught. Implement lesson
s during flex scheduling in
library.

*Lesson Plans

*Student Work

*Teacher Orientation

*Extra Practice

*Media Resources






System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




Part II
-

GOAL TO ADDRESS ACADEMIC NEEDS


All components to support improving academic achievement
,
INCLUDING SCHOOL CULTURE AND
RtI CONSIDERATIONS
,
should be related to the weaknesses
identified in the data summary.

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT GOAL
#2

(SHOULD ADDRESS IDENTIFIED WEAKNESSES AND GAPS):

To increase the number of student
s

meeting or exceeding baseline proficiency on the ma
th portion of the
ARMT in 3
rd

grade from 86% to 88%; in 4
th

grade from 76% to 83%; and in 5
th

grade from 88% to 89%. To focus on increasing
the number of
special education
meeting profiency
from

8 to 10
.


Data Results on which goal is based:

Math scores based on 10
-
11 ARMT

ACTION TEAM MEMBERS
:
Nancy Bullock, Ashliegh Johnson, Michelle Kelley, Jill Gates, Deana Floyd, Katherine Alexander, Ruth Palmer, Amy Martin, Paul
a Tolbert


COURSES OF STUDY

REFORM STRATEGIES

BENCHMARKS

INTERVENTIONS


RESOURCES

WHICH COURSE OF STUDY
STANDARDS, AHSGE
STANDARDS/OBJECTIVES,
ELIGIBLE CONTENT, OR
WIDA* STANDARDS ARE
LINKED TO EACH STRATEGY?

WHAT RESEARCH
-
BASED

STRATEGIES/ACTIONS
WILL BE USED

TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACADEMIC
PERFORMANCE?

(Give spe
cific strategies,
not just programs

or program names.)


HOW WILL PROGRESS FOR EACH ACTION
STEP BE MEASURED?

(
PERFORMANCE DATA, LISTS, SURVEYS,
ETC
)

HOW WILL THE SCHOOL PROVIDE
TIMELY ASSISTANCE IF STRATEGIES
DO NOT CHANGE PERFORMANCE?

WHAT RESOURCES AND
SPECIFIC
EXPENDITURES WILL BE NEEDED FOR
SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION?

(Ex: 6 Classroom Libraries, $.....00)

*3
rd

grade: Divide whole
numbers; Measurement

*4
th

grade: Using ordered pairs;
Measurement

*5
th

grade: Identifying numbers
less than 0; Measurement


STRATEGY:

To implement explicit, intensive
instruction in Tier I through the use of whole and small
group inst
ruction using the Balanced Math
Plan.


ACTION STEPs:


*Daily Math Reviews

*Develop CFA’s in PLC’s

*Implement math journals and daily data

*Follow

curriculum map for Investigations

*Using AMSTI lessons
from

Investigations

*Practice open
-
ended responses for ARMT item specs

*Daily use of Fastt Math in Grades 2
-
5

*CFA’s

*Think Link

*
Documentation

*Teacher
-
made tests

*9 week assessments (K
-
1)

*Administrative snapshots

*Partner Walkthroughs

*Fastt

Math documentation


*Tier II Small group

*Reteaching of non
-
proficient standards

*Think Link probes for practice and
assessment

*PST

*Investigations Material

*Fastt

Math

*Think Link

*County math revie
w and pacing guides


STRATEGY:

Implement explicit, intensive instruction
through Tier II small groups.


ACTION STEPs:


*Students in 2
-
5
th

grades will receive intervention based
on the daily math review if they did not score at least an
80
%.


Practice problems will be based on standards covered in
Direct Math reviews using Best Practices in math as
provided through Investigations and Do the Math.

*Stu
dents in all grades will be given a screening
assessment (2
-
5 Think Link; K
-
1 CFA’s)

*Implement anecdotal notes to document student
progress in intervention.

*CFA’s

*Think Link

*
Documentation

*Teacher
-
made tests

*9 week assessments (K
-
1)

*Administrative snapshots

*Partner Walkthroughs

*Fastt

Math documentation



*Tier II Small group

*Reteaching of non
-
proficient standards

*Think Link probes for practice and
assessment

*PST

*Investigations Material

*Fastt

Math

*Think Link

*County math review and pacing guides

TARGET GRADE LEVEL(S):

K
-
5

TARGET CONTENT AREA(S): Circle
One

Reading

Math Science Other

AHSGE:

Reading Math Science Social Studies
Language

ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC
INDICATORS:

TARGET STUDENT SUBGROUP(S):

Special Edu
ca
tion

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




STRATEGY: Implement explicit, intensive instruction
through a
scientifically based research program for
special education students.


ACTION STEPS:

*Implement V

Math

-

an explicit program which involves
math practice
in small group and one
-
on
-
one involving
print materials, online technology, and assessment for
needs.

*V

Math


*V

Math





























System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part II
-

GOAL TO ADDRESS ACADEMIC NEEDS


All components to support improving academic achievement
,
INCLUDING SCHOOL CULTURE AND RtI CONSIDERATIONS
,
should be related to the weaknesses
identified in the data summary.
DUPLICATE PAGES AS NEEDED TO ADDRESS TOP PRIORITIZED GOALS INCLUDING SACS DISTRICT GOALS, IF APPLICABLE
.

Use the SMART Goals format to address areas of need.


CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT GOAL
#3
(SHOULD ADDRESS IDENTIFIED WEAKNESSES AND GAPS):

To increase the number of students scoring proficient on the ASA from 83% to 85%.


Data Results on which goal is based:

10
-
11 Alabama Science Assessment results

ACTION TEAM M
EMBERS
:
Faith Clark, Ginger Trawick, Sharee Winslett, Renea drake, Steve McClendon, Catherine Kirkland, Brook Veasey


COURSES OF STUDY

REFORM STRATEGIES

BENCHMARKS

INTERVENTIONS


RESOURCES

WHICH COURSE OF STUDY
STANDARDS, AHSGE
STANDARDS/OBJECTIVES,
ELIGIBLE CONTENT, OR
WIDA* STANDARDS ARE
LINKED TO EACH
STRATEGY?

WHAT RESEARCH
-
BASED

STRATEGIES/ACTIONS WILL BE USED

TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACADEMIC
PERFORMANCE?

(Give specific strategies,
not just programs

or program names.)


HOW WILL

PROGRESS FOR EACH
ACTION STEP BE MEASURED?

(
PERFORMANCE DATA, LISTS, SURVEYS,
ETC
)

HOW WILL THE SCHOOL PROVIDE
TIMELY ASSISTANCE IF
STRATEGIES DO NOT CHANGE
PERFORMANCE?

WHAT RESOURCES AND SPECIFIC
EXPENDITURES WILL BE NEEDED FOR
SUCCESSFUL
IMPLEMENTATION?

(Ex: 6 Classroom Libraries, $.....00)

Identified standards will be
addressed


STRATEGY:

Create and conduct quarterly grade level
PLC meetings to plan for science instruction.


ACTION STEPs:

*Discuss ASA test results and identify content
standards
assessed that correlate to grade level standards.

*Plan instructional strategies to address identified
standards.

*Implement hands
-
on science activities to teach science
standards.

*Use Alabama Power science kits when appropriate.

*Grade level PL
C documentation

*Instructional activities for identified standards

*Lesson Plans

Provide one
-
on
-
one help with students as
needed.

Teachers will accommodate for the
varying needs of students.

*Grade level PLC documentation forms

*ASA content standards asses
sed in 5
th

grade

*Grade level pacing guides

*Instructional science materials

*Instructional activities form

*Alabama Power science kits


STRATEGY:

The media specialist will instruct and
guide students
in grades 2
-
5
through the science
research process.


ACTION STEPs:

*Meet with grade level PLC’s to identify research
topics.

*Plan instructional strategies to address identified
topics.

*Use library resources and technology to implement
research strategies.

*Grade level PLC documentation

*Instructional
activities for identified standards

*Lesson Plans

N/A

*Grade level PLC documentation form

*Instruction research plan form

*Library Resources

TARGET GRADE LEVEL(S):

K
-
5

TARGET CONTENT AREA(S):
Circle One

Reading Math Science
Other

AHSGE:

Reading
Math Science Social Studies
Language

ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC
INDICATORS:

TARGET STUDENT SUBGROUP(S):

All students

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part III
-

GOAL TO ADDRESS

ANNUAL MEASURABLE ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES (AMAOs)

AND
ENGLISH PROFICIENCY NEEDS


Note: Refer to the EL
L

Data Compilation as part of the needs
assessment in forming goals.
If any ELL student did not make AMAOs complete this page.

E
NGLISH PROFICIENCY GOAL (SHOULD ADDRESS IDENTIFIED WEAKNESSES AND GAPS):

To increase the writing proficiency level by .50 on the Access for ELLs for the 2010


2011 school year.

Data on which goal is based:

WIDA Access for ELLs

ACTION TEAM MEMBERS:
Marcel Bailey, Beverly Miller


WIDA ENGLISH LANGUAGE
PROFICIENCY ST
ANDARDS

REFORM STRATEGIES

BENCHMARKS

INTERVENTIONS


RESOURCES

WHICH WIDA* ENGLISH
LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY
STANDARDS OR DOMAINS
ARE LINKED TO EACH
STRATEGY?

WHAT RESEARCH
-
BASED

STRATEGIES/ACTIONS WILL BE USED

TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACADEMIC
PERFORMANCE?

(Give
specific strategies
,
not just programs

or program names.)


HOW WILL PROGRESS FOR EACH ACTION
STEP BE MEASURED?

(
PERFORMANCE DATA, LISTS, SURVEYS,
ETC
)

HOW WILL THE SCHOOL PROVIDE
TIMELY ASSISTANCE IF STRATEGIES DO
NOT CHANGE PERFORMANCE?

WHAT RESOURCES A
ND SPECIFIC
EXPENDITURES WILL BE NEEDED
FOR SUCCESSFUL
IMPLEMENTATION?

(Ex: 6 Classroom Libraries, $.....00)

WIDA STANDARDS: 1,2,3,4,5

ELLs communicate in English
through writing for social and
instructional purposes and in the
content areas of Language
Arts,
Mathematics, Science, and Social
Studies.

STRATEGY:

Teacher will use graphic
organizers and shared/guided writing techniques
to improve students writing proficiency.


ACTION STEP
: The ESL teacher will work with
students twice a week using inclusion a
nd pull
-
out services. “On Our Way to English” and
“Harcourt Storytown ELL Support Kits” will be
utilized to write about reading and the content
areas. Sample items from “Access for ELLs”
will also be utilized to improve writing
proficiency. Students wil
l have opportunities to
revise/edit writing products 1:1 with ESL
teacher.

*
Writing samples will be collected 9
/
10, 1/10, 5/10.

*Increase ESL pull
-
out time.

*Provide additional explicit writing instruction.


N/A

*WIDA
-

World
-
Class Instructional Design
and Assessment; the consortium to which Alabama and a number of other states belong.


TARGET GRADE LEVEL(S):

3
-

5

TARGET ELP LANGUAGE DOMAIN(S):

Circle all that apply. Reading Writing L
istening Speaking Comprehension

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part IV
-

STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS SCHOOL SAFETY, CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT/DISCIPLINE, RtI FRAMEWORK AND BUILDING SUPPORTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONM
ENTS


Strategies developed
to address improving school safety, classroom management /discipline, and building supportive learning environments should be

related to the weaknesses or program gaps identified in the data summary (e.g., parental/community
involv
ement, teacher collaboration, student/teacher motivation). The LEA and school must develop a timeline for multiple reviews o
f continuous improvement efforts.


ACTION TEAM MEMBERS
:
Beverly Miller, Ruth Palmer, Angela Madison, Sara Askew, Angela Mitchell,
Lindsay Tisdale, Tamela Patrick, Margaret Battle, Nancy Bulluck, Angela Nardecchia, Patti Edwards, Amanda
Campbell, Faith Clark, Selena Spates, Carmen Perry, Breana Dorough, Rick Powell, Cedrick McCrimon, Cynthia Lee, Diane Henders
on

CULTURE


(REFER TO
CULTURAL DATA IN
NEEDS ASSESSMENT)


REFORM STRATEGIES

BENCHMARKS

INTERVENTIONS


RESOURCES

WHAT CHALLENGES RELATED TO
SCHOOL, SAFETY, CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT/DISCIPLINE,
RtI
FRAMEWORK AND SUPPORTIVE
LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS HAVE
BEEN IDENTIFIED THROUGH THE
REVIEW OF SCHOOL
DEMOGRAPHIC, PERCEPTION, AND
PROCESS DATA?

WHAT RESEARCH
-
BASED

STRATEGIES/ACTIONS WILL BE
USED

TO IMPROVE CULTURAL BARRIERS IMPACTING STUDENT
ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE?

(Give specific strategies,

not just programs

or program names.)


HOW WILL PROGRESS FOR EACH
ACTION STEP BE MEASURED?

(
PERFORMANCE DATA, LISTS, SURVEYS,
ETC
)

HOW WILL THE SCHOOL PROVIDE TIMELY
ADJUSTMENT IF STRATEGIES DO NOT CHANGE
PERFORMANCE?

WHAT RESOURCES AND SPECIFIC
EXPENDITURES WILL BE NEEDED FOR
SUCCESSFUL IMPLE
MENTATION?

(Ex: Teacher Incentives,Title II $.....00, Supplies
for Mentors/Mentees, etc)



AT
-
RISK RATIONALE:

Based on our 64% free and
reduced lunch population, these
students may be considered at
-
risk.

STRATEGY

-

(GOAL)
:

*Provide extra academic
support for at
-
risk students.

*Provide basic need support for at
-
risk students.



ACTION STEP
S:

*Homework club will be provided by the counselor for at
-
risk
students

*Fastt Math (2


R gr慤敳e N
st

grade beginning 3
rd

nine weeks)

*Tier 3 remediation will b
e provided using a scientifically
-
based program

*PST teacher referrals, team process, and follow up

*To utilize the Shelby County Needy School Children Fund
(SCNSCF) and the homeless program when needed

*5
th

grade Tuesday Math Club

*Homework Club
Documentation

*Analyzation of Fastt Math data by
teachers

*Reading intervention data and lesson
plans

*PST documentation

*SCNSCF documentation

*School counselor and reading coach will aide in
gathering additional support resources

*Differentiation in lesso
n plans

*Counseling and guidance program

*SCNSCF

*Shelby County Homeless Program

CHARACTER EDUCATION
RATIONALE:

Based on Shelby County NSSE
survey results for the last two
years, 2008


2009, and 2009


2010, all stakeholders reported
bullying problems

within our
school district

STRATEGY
-

(GOAL)
:

To develop and implement a school
-
wide character education
program that will reduce the percentage of bullying incidents
at Vincent Elementary and contribute to the overall
improvement of bullying concerns wit
hin Shelby County
Schools.



ACTION STEPS:

*All certified teachers and paraprofessionals will complete
“Leader in Me” professional development training program
based on Stephen R Covey’s “7 Habits of Highly Effective
People”

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System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



school
-
wide
character

education program.


SURVEY RATIONALE:

Based on the VNES School
Culture & Climate survey, 33%
of teachers feel that students do
not have input/voice in their
school.


STRATEGY
-

(GOAL)
:

Give students a voice/input in the school and raise the
percentage

of teachers feeling students input is valued by
13%.



ACTION STEPS:

*Form a student/teacher committee

*Student involvement in creating 2010
-
2011 yearbook

*Student
-
led school assemblies

*Documentation from discipline
meetings

*Notes from Student/Teacher
Committee meetings

CSI leadership team will meet with SGA students
to brainstorm ideas

*Student leaders

WELLNESS RATIONALE:

To implement a student
-
centered “Wellness Wednesday”
program in which students
specifically focus on achieving
set physical goals.


RATIONALE:

We want students to not only be
fully aware of state and national
physical goals, but also learn to
set personal

physical goals and
take steps to achieve them.

STRATEGY
-

(GOAL)
:

*The physical education teachers will help each grade level
set appropriate, but challenging, physical goals, and will help
monitor progress and growth.



ACTION STEPS:

*The students will
be made aware of state and national
physical goals appropriate to their age division.

*The students will practice on “Wellness Wednesdays”
during P.E. to ensure they are taking steps in meeting their
goals.

*The physical education teachers will
assess the
students three times per year:
once at the beginning of the school year,
then again in December and May, and
will chart personal growth.

N/A

Charts/graphs to record student Gains

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




Part V
-

Additional
Components To

Be Addressed to Satisfy Federal Requirements


1. Teacher Mentoring: Describe teacher mentoring activities. For example, are new or inexperienced teachers given support
from an assigned master teacher and what does that support look like? (Section 111
6)


The Alabama State Department of Education (SDE) has initiated a Teacher Mentoring (ATM) Program that Vincent Elementary Schoo
l has implemented along with other area schools. The overarching goal for our program is to
improve teaching practice. The pro
gram is designed to provide ongoin
g support for novice teachers.
Each new teacher is assigned a maste
r teacher who is matched, to
the extent practicable, by subject, grade, and proximity. The
mentor and new teache
r are required to meet weekly.
Meetings ar
e documented on a contact log, which reflects the date, length of the meeting, and the focus. Additionally, we have built in

time for classroom observations, both for
the mentor to observe the new teacher and for the new
teacher to observe the mentor.
The

mentoring program also includes training for both mentors and new teachers. Information is provided to mentors on how to wor
k with new
teachers as well as several training sessions for new teachers throughout the year including new teacher orientation, c
lassroom management and discipline, and effective instructional practices.

2. Budget: Describe the coordination of all federal, state, and local programs, including career and technical education.
(Note: NCLB Section 1116 requires that each year
Title

I schools identified for improvement

must reserve
the equivalent of 10% of the school
-
level allocation made available to the school under Section 1113 specifically for
professional development

opportunities for teachers. Budgets should

reflect this set
-
a
side.)



There are several monetary sources that are integrated and coordinated into the financial management and instructional planni
ng of Vincent Elementary. The following is a comprehensive list of fund sources, with an explanation of
their usage:



The State of Alabama School Foundation Program: The State of Alabama funds the BASIC programming in terms of teacher units ba
sed on student enrollment. For the 2010
-
2011 school year th
e state is funding (35
)
thirty
-
five
units, plus fringe b
enefits, ELL, an
d t
extbooks.



Title I


Part A (Federal): This money is used to SUPPLEMENT regular funded programming. For the 2010
-
2011 school year, Title I monies are being used to fund a reading coach, part
-
time technology aide, and three
classroom teachers. In addit
ion, the funds will be used to purchase various materials/instructional supplies. This budget totals $370,585.00 and is spent

in addition to state/local monies.



Title II


Part A (Federal):

This money will be used for hiring an additional teacher to allow
for improvements in student/teacher ratios and to enhance academic instruction and response to interventions for at
-
risk students
.

Any excess monies may be used for professional development opportunities.
The Professional Development activities must be i
n addition to Professional Development activities paid for out of state/local funds. The Title II
b
udget for
Vincent Elementary for
2010
-
2011 is $52,982.05
.



Title III


English Language Learners (ELL) (Federal): This money may only be used to provide supp
lemental activities to ELL students. A summer program is provided for all ELL students within our school system.


3. Transition: Describe strategies to assist students in transitioning from previous school to the current school and/or fr
om the current
school to the next school, including, for example, how preschool children might be prepared
for entry into kindergarten or how eighth grade students are prepared for high school.


Vincent Elementary School realizes that students need support emotionally
and academically during periods of transition from early childhood programs to elementary school and from the curr
ent school to the next school.
The following are
transition activities offered:



Kindergarten pre
-
registration is offered in the spring at whic
h time students and parents may meet teachers and possibly discuss any special needs that the student may have.

P
re
-
reg
istr
ation is offered during the day and

at night to
accommodate parents’ schedules.



Students attending Headstart may visit Vincent Ele
mentary School for a school tour during the spring of the year preceding their advancement to Kindergarten.



Headstart students eat breakfast and lunch at Vincent Elementary School.



“Meet the Teacher” and “Parent Night” is held for all grades at the
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.



One Preschool class of 18 students visits Kindergarten classrooms at the end of the school year.



Fifth grade students visit Vincent Middle/High Scho
ol during the spring. They tour the school which includes visiting sixth grade classes, meeting sixth grade teachers and lear
nin
g about the courses.



When a student transfers to Vincent Elementary School, he/she is given a tour of the school by the school c
ounselor or school representative and introduced to the teacher(s).



The guidance counselor at Vincent Elementary School will provide two sessions of whole group guidance lesson pertaining to th
e transition from elementary school to middle school for our fi
fth grade students.

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



4. Highly Qualified Teachers: Describe the qualifications of teachers in the school with regard to their being highly quali
fied and what strategies the school, with the support of the LEA, uses to attract

and retain highly qualified
teachers.


There are various fund sources used to sustain the excellent educational program we have at our school. Listed below is a re
presentative sample of funding sources:

1.
State Foundation Program



The State of Alabama provides funding for teaching and administrative units. Although waivering of units is allowed, no unit
s are waivered
from

a Title I school to another location.

2.
Local revenue from the district



Local district funds pay for the ThinkLink assessment for grades 3


5. An early childhood and elementary program area specialist are provided to aid instruction in all Shelby County elementary

schools,
including Title I schools.

3.
Title I



These fu
nds are used to supplement state and local funds. See the attached budget for a detailed explanation of how these funds will

be used for the 2010
-
2011 school year.

4.
Title III



Summer programs extend the learning opportunity for EL students. All EL st
udents are invited to participate in this enriching experience. Professional development is also provided through these fund
s.

5.
Title II



Title II funds are used to support class size reduction units in elementary and middle grades in addition to stat
e provided units, reimbursement for the PRAXIS test for teachers to achieve highly qualified status, National Board
certification support and substitutes for schools not making AYP.


Each year Title I funds are set aside to assist teachers at Title I schoo
ls in becoming highly qualified.


Although schools only hire highly qualified teachers, as of NCLB stipulations from 2003, a small amount is still set aside fo
r any
emergency situation that may arise.

Each year, federal funds are set aside to aid teachers

in becoming highly qualified.


Title II funds provide assistance to teachers in schools that are not served by Title I.


Reimbursement for the PRAXIS
exam, as well as study materials and tutoring, are available to help recruit/retain highly qualified teac
hers.



5. Assessments and Teacher Involvement: Describe how teachers in the school meet to collaborate regarding the use of academi
c assessments to provide information on and improve the achievement of individual students and the
overall instructional p
rogram.


Vincent Elementary teachers are involved in the decisions regarding the use of state academic assessments. Teachers will adm
inister assessments to determine if students have mastered objectives taught. These
assessments are used to determine if further i
nstruction can continue or if remedial activities need to be implemented. Teacher input is considered at different levels of

assessment results. The following are various ways
that teachers make decisions that guide instruction:



The faculty collaborati
vely studies the disaggregated data and results of the state assessments.



Problem Solving Team members evaluate data collected on referred students to determine if there are any indicators that would

warrant more in depth testing or referral for special se
rvices.



Grade level and subject area data meetings are held to adjust instructional procedures and strategies based on the progress m
onitoring data.



Vertical team meetings help identify any instructional gaps or overlaps that may occur in grades K
-
5.



Weekl
y PLC meetings are held by each grade level to provide time for teams of teachers to collectively and collaboratively plan, w
rite CFAs, and analyze student work.



Teacher input is included in our CSI meetings by grade level representatives.



System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



6. Special Populations: Describe procedures used for each group of Migrant, English Learners, Economically Disadvantaged, S
pecial Education, Neglected and/or

Delinquent, and Homeless students.


All students at Vincent Elementary School, including those identified as limited
-
English proficient, homeless, economically disadvantaged, and neglected/delinquent, have access to all services and programs
available, including
free/reduced
lunch, Title I s
ervices, ELL services, Special Education services, At Risk, and counseling services. Also, Vincent Elementary School uses the

Department of Human Resources, the Department of Mental Health, and various
community resources to provide students with necessary

school supplies, food, clothing and shelter.


All homeless and limited
-
English proficient students must have equal access to the same free appropriate public education, including public preschool
education provided to other children and youth. All homele
ss and limited
-
English proficient students are provided with the opportunity to meet the same challenging state content and state student pe
rformance standards to which all students are held without being stigmatized or isolated.


The ELL coordinator and

the counselor, who acts as the ELL liaison, assist in identifying limited
-
English proficient students upon enrollment. Each new student receives a Home Language Survey used to determine eligibility
for
limited
-
English proficient testing. Students qualif
y for testing if the survey indicates that a language other than English is used by the student or at the student’s home. Al
l eligible students are tested with the WIDA Access
Placement Test (W
-
APT) to determine if a student is eligible to receive service
s through the English Language Learner (ELL) program. Parents or guardians have the right to waive ELL services. If the par
ents or guardians agree
for the student to receive services, an English Language Learner (ELL) committee convenes to determine appr
opriate services and placement for each individual student. The ELL committee consists of the ELL teacher, parents or
guardians of the student, the student’s teacher, the school counselor, an interpreter, and/or school administrator. A variet
y of service
s to all ELL students is provided, such as content area tutoring, pull
-
out ELL,
and
pull
-
out for
individual support. Parents are provided the opportunity to receive all updates and important school documents in English and
/or their home language. The ELL
committee reviews each student’s progress annually. If the student
scores proficient on the WIDA Access test and is performing on grade level (determined by grades, teacher recommendations, an
d results of reading standardized tests), the student becomes e
ligible to exit the ELL program and will
be monitored for two years to ensure success.


Vincent Elementary School provides special education services and uses appropriate procedures in accordance with federal and
Alabama State laws and regulations. The Sc
hool Psychometrist tracks referrals and notices to parents
concerning eligibility meetings. The evaluation is conducted to determine if the student is eligible for special education s
ervices. An Individualized Education Plan (IEP) team convenes to determ
ine the eligibility for special
education services. The IEP team develops the Individualized Education Plan based on the results of the evaluations, the con
cerns of the parents, and the academic, developmental, and functional needs of the child. To the
m
aximum extent appropriate, special education students are educated with children who are not disabled. Special education cla
sses will occur only when the nature of severity of the disability is such that education in the general
education classroom, inclu
ding the use of supplementary aids and services, cannot be successfully achieved. Vincent Elementary School provides two res
ource classrooms for students identified with needs requiring more
specialized instruction and/or behavioral interventions. Vince
nt Elementary School ensures that children with disabilities have access to a variety of educational programs and services av
ailable to non
-
disabled children, including
art, music, ELL, and physical education. In addition, special education students are p
rovided with an equal opportunity to participate in all extracurricular activities available to non
-
disabled students.


School counselors, registrars, and classroom teachers are responsible for identifying homeless students upon enrollment and p
rovid
ing them with support. The school uses Alabama State Department of Education and federal
regulations and definitions to identify homeless students. Vincent Elementary School is contacted by the Department of Human

Resources, Social Services, LEA Attendan
ce Officer, or parent to initialize identification of homeless
students. The Shelby County Homeless Education Program aids in the identification and eligibility of students who are consid
ered homeless. The counseling office and school administrator ident
ify possible services. If further
intervention is needed, the local school will contact the district office for possible funding or other needs. Homeless stud
ents have access to all services and programs available to the rest of the students, including f
ree lunch, Title I,
ELL, Special Education, and At
-
Risk. Vincent Elementary School uses Title I and supplementary community resources to provide homeless students with necessa
ry school supplies, clothes, and other items of necessity.
Economically disadva
ntaged students are identified through the application for free and reduced lunch. Students with low family income will be i
dentified as economically disadvantaged students and will be eligible to receive free
or reduced breakfast and lunch during the sch
ool day. Such students will have equal access to all programs and services available. Homeless students and students on

free/reduced lunch can access Shelby County Needy School Children’s Fund. Services provided through this fund are: doctor vis
its, den
tal visits, vision screening/glasses, counseling and medication.


Migrant students are identified via the Employment Survey and an interview with the family. These students are assured equal

access to all resources, programs, and activities in the school
. School personnel will review student
records and performance. In the event that the student is failing or at risk of failing, the student will receive all necess
ary interventions and additional academic supports to assist in addressing the student’s ac
ademic, social, and
physical needs.


Shelby
County serves neglected and delin
quent students through Title I, Part A and Title I, Part D funds.



7. Special Populations (as listed in the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act 2006, Section
3): Describe procedures used for each group of individuals with disabilities; individuals from economically disadvantaged
families, including foster children; individuals preparing for non
-
traditional fields; single parents, including single pregnant women
; displaced homemakers; and individuals with limited English proficiency.
(N/A for Elementary
Schools)

N/A

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



8. Extended Learning Opportunities: Describe how the school provides opportunities for the most academically needy
students to receive support and reinforcement of academic skills beyond the regular school day.


Students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced achievement standards will be provided timely, effect
ive and additional instructional
assistance. This will be accomplished by:



Summer Camp for our ELL population is offered annually at various locations throughout the county. Transportation is provide
d as needed to maximize attendance and give students the opportunity to network with othe
r ELL children
and ESL teachers within our district. ELL summer camp activities give our students a head start on the upcoming school year
for academic and social/emotional growth and development.



Math Team meets weekly, immediately after school, to provi
de foundational math skills for upper grade students with deficits in mathematical concepts.



After school tutoring as needed.



Parent conferences, scheduled before and after school hours, give parents of at
-
risk children more opportunities to stay involved
with the academic needs of their child and to receive additional support for school success.



Student Book Club meets weekly after school in order to stimulate a love and interest in reading.









System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part VI

School Parental Involvement Plan as required by Section 1118 of NCLB

[Note: This section of the CIP (Part VI) must be distributed to Parents]:



A. Parental Involvement: Describe how the school will convene an annual meeting to inform parents
of the school’s participation in Title I and explain Title I requirements, including the 1% set
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At the beginning of each year, Vincent Elementary School

invites parents and stakeholders to attend our annual Title I meeting to ensure that parents understand all information relat
ed to the partnership between the federal government, the state
educational agency, and the local school district. At that time,
the 1% set
-
aside for parent involvement is thoroughly explained and parents are encouraged to become actively involved on our Title I Co
mmittee. Information is disseminated to
all stakeholders:



Title I Program Parent Information Bulletin



Continuous Improv
ement Plan



An explanation of the school’s curriculum and the state’s content standards



Title I parent meeting to explain our Title I program, participation, its services, and parents’ rights is held twice (once i
n the AM and once in the PM) before the date

of September 30
th



Parental Involvement Section of the Continuous Improvement Plan



School
-
parent compacts



Parent survey



Statewide Parenting Day (which includes informative parent sessions)



The Parent Center
-
Library



Four Parent Parties held throughout the s
chool year



Grandparent’s Day



ETA

Literary & Math Night for grades K, 1
st

and 2
nd




2 Book Fairs



Periodic Parenting Workshops/Education based on results of Parent Needs Assessments and surveys


B. Parental Involvement: Describe: 1. How

there will be a flexible number and format of parent meetings offered; 2) How parents will be involved in the planning, revi
ew and improvement of the Title I Program (Note: State the
school’s process for how
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Vincent Elementary School hosts meetings in the AM and PM

to accommodate parents’ schedules.
Mee
tings are provided to address the Title I program, Math readiness, literacy, parental involvement and parenting skills. The
Parent Advisory
Committee meets bi
-
annually to revise, evaluate and implement any necessary changes to the Parent Involvement Plan.

The committee has representative
s from each grade. Parents are

involved on the Title I Committee to give
input on the
school’s program. Parents are also surveyed yearly to gather input.
This year, funds are being used to host monthly Parent Parties, s
upplemental math materials, and to support the Parent Library.



System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



C. Parental Involvement: Describe how the school provides parents of participating children timely information in a uniform
format and, to the extent
practicable in a language they can understand, about programs under Title I,
a description and explanation of the curriculum in use, forms of academic assessments, and achievement expectations used, and
, if requested by parents, opportunities for regular m
eetings to formulate suggestions and participate
as appropriate in decisions related to the education of their children.


Each year, Vincent Elementary School

brings in its CSI team to review, evaluate, and revise its Continuous Improvement Plan. In May, the School
-
wide Advisory Council will meet to review, evaluate and revise its school
-
wide plan.


The
Parents on the committee serve as l
iai
sons and represent a
ll parents of Vincent Elementary School. The notice also states that after the plan is finalized and approved, if a parent fi
nds the plan to be unsatisfactory, they have the right to submit
their concerns in writing to the school, and the school will submi
t their concerns to the central office at the same time that the school
-
wide plan is submitted.

Vincent Elementary School provides parents information in a timely manner in multiple formats. All students receive daily/wee
kly folders or binders in which inf
ormation is sent to parents on a consistent basis. Parent compacts, lunch menus,
newsletters, and the Code of Conduct are sent
in the Native L
anguage to Spanish speaking students. Agendas are provided to students in 3
rd
-
5
th

grades in order to clearly communicate assignments and announcements. Newsletters are provided
by each teacher to clearly communicate all aspects of the school program in order to keep parents informed. Progress reports
are sent home as well in order to
communicate academic progress to parents. Our Continuous Improvement Plan is
linked to our website so parents can easily access our yearly goals and better understand the improvement process.
Through the Title I parenting handbook, parents are given an e
xtensive view of parenting within our school and our district.
Details of the curriculum are shared through newsletters, the Annual Meeting of Title I Parents, Parent/Teacher Conferences,
and Parenting Day workshops and classroom visits
.

Parents may also
request a conference at any time and every
effort is made to accommodate their schedule.


D. Parental Involvement: Describe how parents, the school staff, and students share responsibility for improved student acad
emic achievement for participating stude
nts (How the School
-
Parent Compact is jointly developed with
Title I parents; how it is used, reviewed, and updated).

Compacts are evaluated and revised in May by the Parent Advisory Committee.
All parents will
receive a copy of the new compact, which wil
l be discussed
at our Annual Title I orientation meeting
. Parents

will be asked to sign the
compacts signifying their commitment to working in partnership with the school and their child in ensuring that their child i
s successful in school
.
The compacts w
ill be discussed with teachers at faculty meetings. Each teacher will
be given the responsibility to explain the compact to the students and obtain the students’ signatures. The teachers will si
gn the compacts and house them in his/her classroom for use
during parent
-
teacher and/or student
-
teacher
conferences.

E. Parental Involvement: Describe procedures to allow parents to submit comments of dissatisfaction with the Continuous Impr
ovement Plan.


The following procedures will be followed for parent
dissatisfaction:




Parents that are in disagreement with the Continuous Improvement Plan will state their position to the local Title I Committe
e, Continuous School Improvement Leadership Team, and/or Parent Involvement Committee for
review.



If no amicable

solution is reached, the parent may state their dissatisfaction, in writing, to the school principal.



The principal will attach the statement to the CIP when it is presented to the LEA.



The LEA parent liaison will contact the parent for further informatio
n if necessary.



The Federal Programs Supervisor will review all steps in the process and make a determination based on NCLB and the best inte
rest of students. The parent will be contacted by the Federal Programs Program Area
Specialist and notified of the
decisions reached. This will be provided in writing, as well as by telephone or conference.


System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




F. Parental Involvement: Describe how the school will build capacity for parental involvement including how parents will be
encouraged to become equal partners in the education of their children. (See NCLB Section 1118,
requirements for building capacity in parental involvement.)

To ensure effective involvement of parents and to support a partnership among the school,
parents, and the community to improve student academic achievement, our school:


(1)

Shall provide training for parents of participating children in understanding such topics as the State's academic content sta
ndards and State student academic achievement stan
dards, State and local academic assessments, the requirements of Title I,
and how to monitor their child’s progress and work with teachers to improve the achievement of their children
. (Describe)



Vincent Elementary School will accomplish much of

this through its annual Title I parent meeting, which is held at the beginning of the school year.

The State Department of Educat
ion provides a PowerPoint to be
used by the principal and Federal
Programs Specialist for this presentation. At this time, par
ents receive an overview of the state academic content standards, academic achievemen
t standards, and assessments.
In addition, an explanation will be given regarding Title I, what services will be
offered, and how parents have the right to be involved in
their children’s education
.


(2)

Shall provide materials and training to help parents to work with their children to improve their children's achievement, suc
h as literacy training and using technology, as appropriate, to foster parental


involvement.

(Describe)





Vincent Elementary School shall provide training for parents of participating children in understanding topics such as; impro
ving their children’s achievement, literacy training and parental involvement by offering informational
parent content sessions
throughout the year. Parent content sessions are also held throughout the year in an effort to increase parental involvement
and to target parent survey results. Content sessions such as; Improving your Child’s Homework Skills, Bull
ying, Students Career Options,
Discipline, Self
-
Esteem, Informational sessions on GED classes and College Enrollment for Parents, Technology training/workshops, Parent
-
Teacher Book Studies, Literacy Nights and ETA Math Nights will be held throughout the ye
ar. These opportunities are
provided in the AM and PM in an effort to target both working and non working parents.


(3)

Shall educate teachers, office personnel, and other school staff, with the assistance of parents, in the value and utility of

contributions
of parents, and in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, implement and
coordinate parent programs, and build ties between parents and the school
. (Describe)



Vincent will continue to work with its teache
rs through in
-
services, faculty meetings, and grade
-
level meetings in understanding the importance of parental involvement and those parents are our partners. The CSI team is p
lacing special emphasis on the
need to ensure a closer connection between our s
chools identified goals and our parent involvement activities. Therefore, this year our assistant principal will be working
closely with each lead teacher to ensure that grade
-
level meetings include a parent
involvement focus. The assistant principal wil
l set the expectation that teachers work closely with our counselor and The Parenting & Guidance Committee in planning parent

involvement activities and materials that best meet our schools identified goals, as
stated in Vincent’s School Improvement Plan.


(4)


Shall to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent involvement programs and activities with other
federal programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that encourage and support parents in
more ful
ly participating in the education of their children
. (Describe)



Vincent Elementary coordinates its parent involvement program for all parents. We presently have ELL students and many of th
ese parents are actively involved in our parenting activit
ies. The Vincent Elementary Parent Resource Center located in the
library provides materials for parents to view, check
-
out, or take home. This parent resource center provides parents preventative information on pertinent topics. Flyers and memo
s are sent
home to every parent in a language that parents can understand
concerning all parent and student events offered by the school.


(5)


Shall ensure that information related to school and parent programs, meetings, and other activities is sent to the par
ents of participating children in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand
. (Describe)



Vincent Elementary School ensures that information related to parent programs, meetings and other activities is sent home to
parents in a language that parents can understand. Information is available in the parent’s home language for our ELL famili
es.
Translators are provided by the county ESL department if needed.



(6)

Shall provide such other reasonable support for parental involvement activities as parents may request
. (Describe)




Vincent Elementary School

provides reasonable support for parental involvement activities as parents may request by compiling the previous year’s data
from parent surveys and tailoring parenting events accordingly
.
Parent
needs assessments and surveys are also given at the begin
ning of the school year to gain insight into topics of interest, parent concerns, and volunteer opportunities. This data is c
ompiled and analyzed to plan for parenting workshops,
periodic parenting parties, book studies, technology training, and other requ
ested parental involvement opportunities. Vincent Elementary School’s Parenting Committee meets each month to plan and organ
ize specific events to
encourage and increase the number of parent involvement opportunities at our school.

G. Parental
Involvement: Describe how the school will ensure the provision for participation of parents with limited English proficiency
, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory students; including providing information and
school reports in a format and,

to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can understand.



Vincent Elementary School, to the extent practical, provides opportunities for the participation of parents with limited Engl
ish proficiency and parents with disabilities. V
incent presently has Spanish
-
speaking students. Therefore
accommodations are made when necessary with the help of our ELL representative. We have bilingual interpreters who are avail
able when necessary for meetings with Spanish speaking parents. At this t
ime, Vincent has no migrant
Students. Every effort is made to accommodate parents with disabilities. Vincent is a handicapped
-
accessible building.

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part VII
-

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING NEEDS RELATED TO ACADEMIC CHALLENGES Including ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY, SCHOOL SAFETY, DISCIPLINE,

RtI FRAMEWORK

AND
SUPPORTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
(Reminder: NCLB Section 1116 requires that each year
Title I
schools identified for improvement

must reserve the equivalent of 10% of the Title I school
-
level allocation made
available to the school under Section 1113. In addition, each year
LEAs identified for improvement

must reserve 10% of their allocations for
professional development).



Does the plan provide opportunities for professional development activities that are high
-
quality, effective, and research
-
based?

YES

NO



Does the plan include opportunities for teachers, principals, paraprofessionals, other staff, and parents?

YES

NO



Does the plan include required district
-
wide training for English language acquisition?

YES

NO

(Note: Professional learning activities must be linked to Alabama’s Standards for Professional Development and Alabama’s Tec
hnology Professional Development Standards,
www.alsde.edu
, Sections, Technology
Initiatives, Publications).

ACTION TEAM MEMBERS
:
Amanda Campbell, Sharee Winslett, Amy Martin, Faith Clark, Beverly Miller, Margaret Battle


WHAT WEAKNESS OR
NEED IDENTIFIED IN
ACADEMIC,
INCLUDING
ELL AMAOs OR SCHOOL
CULTURE GOALS WILL
THE PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING ADDRESS?

RATIONALE


WHAT TYPES OF
PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING WILL BE
OFFERED?



WHEN WILL THE
SESSION BE
DELIVERED?

(Please list dates of
future PD sessions, not
those that have
already
taken place.)


WHAT ARE THE
EXPECTED
OUTCOMES OF
PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING?

(Following the
professional learning,
how will academic or
cultural challenges be
impacted


what does it
look like?)

GOAL


HOW WILL PARTICIPANTS BE HELD
ACCOUNTABLE FOR SUCCES
SFUL
IMPLEMENTATION AND IN WHAT WAYS WILL
EVIDENCE BE COLLECTED TO SHOW
EFFECTIVE ASSIMILATION/INTEGRATION OF
STRATEGIES?

ACCOUNTABILITY





WHAT ARE THE
FUNDING SOURCES,
ESTIMATED
EXPENSES, AND
PROPOSED NAMES
OF CONSULTANTS
OR ENTITIES?

Example: Title
II, $....00

Dr. Verry Goode

RESOURCES

DOCUMENT CONTINUOUS
LEA REVIEW AND SUPPORT
RESULTS

MONITORING


All subgroups will be
addressed through professional
development to meet the needs
of all learners; the concept of
learning communities was
identified as
an area of system
need based on the NSDC
standards assessment
inventory.


Ongoing training in
teaching standards based
curriculum in reading,
science and math.


Training in specific
character education using
“Love and Logic” and
The 7 Habits of Highly
Effe
ctive People




Collaborative lesson
planning with AMSTI


Training in technology:
TechSteps, EPals and
Smartboard

PLC Weekly





August 11

October 4

November 1

December 6

January 18

Third Monday of each
month


15 hours throughout the
school year


August 30

October 11


To establish learning
communities that will
focus on teaching
standards based
curriculum and
differentiated
instruction in the
content areas.


To develop skills in
teaching self
-
awareness
and ownership of
learning.


To explore
Investigations w
ith
AMSTI’s certified
personnel.


To develop current
technology skills.

Lesson plans will include implementation of
differentiated instruction


Data gathered from ThinkLink, Fastt Math, Running
Records, Benchmarks and other assessments will be used
to driv
e instruction


Sign
-
in sheets and grade

level PLC notes


County and School walk
-
throughs

$80 per 7 Habits
Participant Guide.

My PDC documentation

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



All subgroups will be
addressed through professional
development to meet the needs
of all learners; the
concept of
learning communities was
identified as an area of system
need based on the NSDC
standards assessment
inventory.


Ongoing training in
teaching standards based
curriculum in reading,
science and math.


Training in specific
character education usin
g
“Love and Logic” and
The 7 Habits of Highly
Effective People




Collaborative lesson
planning with AMSTI


Training in technology:
TechSteps, EPals and
Smartboard

PLC Weekly





August 11

October 4

November 1

December 6

January 18

Third Monday of each
month


15 hours throughout the
school year


August 30

October 11


To establish learning
communities that will
focus on teaching
standards based
curriculum and
differentiated
instruction in the
content areas.


To develop skills in
teaching self
-
awareness
an
d ownership of
learning.


To explore
Investigations with
AMSTI’s certified
personnel.


To develop current
technology skills.

Lesson plans will include implementation of
differentiated instruction


Data gathered from ThinkLink, Fastt Math, Running
Records,
Benchmarks and other assessments will be used
to drive instruction


Sign
-
in sheets and grade

level PLC notes


County and School walk
-
throughs

$80 per 7 Habits
Participant Guide.

My PDC documentation

DUPLICATE PAGES AS NEEDED




























System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part VIII
-

Coordination of Resources/Comprehensive Budget


List all federal, state, and local monies that the school uses to run its program:

Example:

I. State Foundation Funds:

TOTAL

State Foundation Funds

Enter Enter #

Earned Units


# FTE’s of Units



Earned Placed




by the at the




school
school


TOTAL OF
ALL SALARIES

FTE Teacher

Units:
28.49 30.55


5.40 Federal Units


2,295,736

Administrator Units:

1 1

108,084

Assistant Principal:

0 1

86,828

Counselor:

.5 1

72,920

Librarian:

1.25 1 (.25 used to supplement library aide)

91,892

Career and Technical

0

0

Education Administrator:

0

Enter the amount allocated for use at the school for the following:


Technology

0

Professional Development

0

State ELL Funds


0

Instructional Supplies

0

Library Enhancement

0



II. Federal Funds:


Title I: Part A: Improving the Academic
Achievement of the Disadvantaged
TOTAL

$2,611,692.00

(
System total)

ARRA FUNDS

TOTAL


ARRA funds were budgeted for 1 year. Remaining funds will be carryover money for the
2010
-
1011 school


year. These funds will not be determined until the consolidated
committee meeting in November 2010. At this point, each Title I school will be notifie
d of
their remaining ARRA funds and will budget them accordingly.


Title II: Professional Development Activities
TOTAL

$833,760.00

(System Total)

BRIEF
EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING:

National Board Stipends/Substitutes





$14,000

Teacher substitutes for schools not making AYP



$23,696

Private School Professional Development (5 schools)


$1,421.20

Additional funds are utilized for class size redu
ction units ($775,000),
substitutes for class size reduction units (5,000.80), praxis reimbursement
and tutoring ($5,000), and indirect cost (9,642).


Title III: For English Language Learners
TOTAL

$270,592.00

(System Total)

BRIEF EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING:

Title III funds are not
distributed to individual schools, but are used to benefit
all English language learners in the school district. All programs that are
funded by Title III are supplemental. Programs include after school tutoring
for K
-
12 schools ($40,588), a summer progr
am for ELLs from entering
Kindergarten through 12
th

grade ($106,737.80), and summer school stipends
for students who need assistance in attaining credits to graduate in a timely
manner ($1500). Funds not utilized for direct supplemental instruction for
st
udents are used to purchase supplemental instructional materials
($27,059), to provide professional development ($35,176.96), and to
implement parenting activities ($59,530.24). Transportation for the summer
program and for after
-
school tutoring is also f
unded by Title III funds (funds
allocated in the above description of each program).



Title IV: For Safe and Drug
-
free Schools
TOTAL

Only Carryo
ver
Funds

(Determined

October 2010)

BRIEF EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING:

Shelby County Schools will not receive any new Title IV funds for the 10
-
11
year. However, we will utilize carryover funds, which will be determined
October 1, 2010, towards

the following expenditures for the system:


*Student drug testing and staff professional development and training


System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




-

Approximately 4800 students are randomly drug testing each year


-

Each middle an
d high school send at least one,
and most send three,

employees to a State workshop that introduces them to the latest trends of
student r
isky behaviors.


At the workshop
they prepare an Action Plan to
carry back to their school and implement the next school year.




-

Other ex
penditures of these funds include Pride Survey, requests from
Private Schools, and assisting the Shelby County Drug Coalition with
printing their yearly Parent magazine.


Title VI: For Rural and Low
-
income Schools

TOTAL

N/A

BRIEF EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING:




Career and Technical Education
-
Perkins IV: Basic Grant (Title I)

TOTAL

$241,069.00

(System Total)

BRIEF EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING

Instructional



Equipment R
epair and Maintenance; Travel;



Student Classroom Supplies; Instructional

Software;



Audio/Visual; Classroom Equipment; License Fees;


Registration Fees; Computer Hardware ($221,119.00)

Guidance and Counseling



Postage; Printing

and Binding; Registration
Fees (
$2,700.00
)

Instructional Staff D
evelopment


Travel; Re
gistration; Substitutes

(
$14,000.00
)

Centra
l Office Support/Supplies



Trav
el; Registration Fees; Supplies
(
$3,250.00
)



Career and Technical Education
-
Perkins IV: Tech Prep (Title II)

TOTAL

$23,559.00

(System Total)

BRIEF EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING


Instructional


Classroom Equipment; Printing and
Binding; Instructional
Software (
$12,500.00
)

Instructional Improvement



Refere
nce Materials; General Supplies
(
$3,859.00
)

Instructional Staff Development


2215


Staff
Development; Professional
Subs; (
$7,200.00
)


Registration Fees; Co
-
Curricular Transportation


Other: 21
st

Century, Learn and Serve, Even Start, School Improvement Grant

TOTAL

N/A

BRIEF EXPLANATION and BREAKDOWN OF SPENDING


III. Local Funds (if applicable)


CIP Local
Funds 2010
-
2011


Elementary Program Area Specialist
s: $25,000

Local funds are used to support teachers, reading coaches and
administrators in the elementary schools. Funds are used for printing of
curriculum maps, DIBELS testing and progress monitoring ma
terials as well as
a variety of other documents to support schools with reading, language and
math instruction. Monies are also used to provide subs for teachers who are
utilized during the school year for adjustments on curriculum materials a
nd
training.
Funding is
utilized to provide materials to reading coaches to
strengthen their coaching abilities as well as to assist them in providing
support for teachers. Examples of said items are books for book studies;
subscriptions to International Reading Associ
ation; subscriptions to Daily Café
website as well as numerous other items as needed during the school year.
Items are also purchased to support teachers who may be struggling with
classroom management or instruction. These items are typically purchased
to

remove barriers that the teacher may have in creating a stronger learning
environment for students. Additional funding is used for equipment and
supplies needed to support elementary instruction and training.


Professional Development
:
$26,500

Shelby Co
unty Schools annually designates a budget with local funds to
support professional development for all system employees.


The ARRA funds
will supplement the local funds that were designated for PD (spending is
based on federal regulations).


Selected prof
essional learning opportunities
are determined by reviewing the results of an employee completed needs

System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



assessment and student achievement data.




All new teachers are supported with an instructional orientation, and a
substitute is provided for new teache
rs to attend classroom management
training.


Professional development opportunities are provided throughout
the year for all teachers after school and during the school day. Principals
and assistant principals participate in leadership development monthly
at
administrative meetings.


In addition, they join their leadership team for
training three times per year.




Career/Tech Budget: $60,000

In order to receive Carl Perkins federal funds for Career and Technical
Education, it is mandated that each LEA
provide “Local Maintenance of
Effort” as a sign of support for CTE programs. Each Career/Tech teacher must
receive at least $300 + $3 for each student taught the previous year from
local funds. These monies can be spent by the teacher on equipment and
supp
lies that will improve and/or maintain the quality of the program. With
proration issues, most of the money is spent on necessary classroom supplies,
resources, and small pieces of equipment to keep the programs running
smoothly.


Nurses/LPN Budget:

The
state provides funds for nurses, but in order to accommodate the needs
of our students, local funds are budgeted for 21 LPNs, 7LPNs that are paid as
RNs, and .08 of a registered nurse for our system.


With proration issues, the
numbers and amounts of funds

may be revised throughout the year.


The
remainder of the budget is spent on equipment and supplies for health
rooms, travel, and professional development.


Local ESL Budget

-

$3,982,555

The local budget for ESL provides funds for ESL program supervision,

ESL and
classroom teacher support, ESL teachers, and bilingual instructional
assistants. All ELLs receive regularly scheduled ESL instruction and support.
Present staffing includes an ESL Program Supervisor, 2 ESL Resource Teachers,
.5 Family Literacy I
nstructor, 1 Bilingual Interpretive and Clerical Support
Personnel, 48 ESL teachers and 10 Bilingual Instructional Assistants
. The
remainder of the funds is

utilized to provide contracted services for
interpretation and materials and supplies for the dist
rict ELS office, to pay for
the annual English language proficiency assessment, and to compensate
itinerate personnel for mileage. With proration issues, the numbers and
amounts of funds may be revised throughout the year.


Library Media: $
78
,000

The sta
te provides funds for library media specialists and aides, but in order
to accommodate the needs of our students, local funds are budgeted for
professional development (including substitutes), Battle of the Books
materials and supplies (including 1200+ boo
ks), technology hardware and
software, and travel.




Fine Arts
: $10
,000

The state provides funds for some fine arts teachers, but in order to
accommodate the needs of our students, local funds are budgeted for
additional teachers so that art and choral m
usic are offered to all students in
grades K
-
12, instrumental music (band) is offered to all students in grades 6
-
12, and drama/theatre is offered to students in grades 9
-
12.


Local funds also
cover professional development (including substitutes), materia
ls and
supplies for art shows, choral festivals, and other special events, as well
classroom supplies as needed.




Teacher Resource Center: $10,000

In order to accommodate the needs of SCBOE employees and local
schools, local funds are budgeted for class
room production materials and
supplies, professional books and journals, professional development kits,
instructional videos, and technology hardware and software.




Student Services:


$601,044.00

The Student Services Department of the Sh
elby County Board

of Education

is
made up of three Attendance Officers, which one serves as the Coordinator
and two serve as Supervisors.


These three also serve as discipline hearing
officials as well as answer questions of and support policies regarding
enrollment, zonin
g, and athletics.


Other employees in Student Services
System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



include one

Resource Teacher who monitors
Early Warning and prevention
programs, a Behavioral Specialist who observes students with behavioral
problems, as well as conducts manifestation hearings, and
assist
s

with
placements of students ret
urning from DYS placements;
a
nd one secretary.


In addition

to these salaries and payroll expenditures, local funds are
provided for Student Drug Testing (Board

Policy JT and JTA), printing of our
Shelby County Code
of Conduct and Attendance, equipment
maintenance agreements (security system for a local school),


travel and
training for attendance services, and

professional resource materials
regarding FERPA and School Law.




Student Management Funds
-

$69,677.23

Th
e Shelby County Board of Education approves the expenditure of funds for
behavior management and at
-
risk intervention activities.


Funds issued to
each school are based upon your average daily membership as reported in
October 2009.


Based on their ADM eac
h school received $2.54 per child.


All expenditures must relate to at
-
risk learners and specific activities that
support instructional and classroom management strategies.


Some
suggested expenditures for Stu
dent Management Funds included:



before and aft
er
-
school tutoring services for at
-
risk students



substitute teachers for tutoring services during the school day



substitute teachers for personnel to attend workshops on at
-
risk topics



personnel for before and after
-
school extended study time programs



personnel for before and after
-
school detention programs



personnel for Saturday school programs



attendance programs supplies, forms, maintenance fees, scanners and
other equipment



miscellaneous medical supplies for health services



organizer bins/storage un
its for student medication



supplies for Universal Precaution kits



other items approved prior to purchase



school safety equipment


Academics First Funds: $9,000.00

These funds are approved by the Shelby County Board of Education to
support Board Policy JU.


All students involved in Extra Curricular activities are
to have grades monitored by their coach/sponsor.


At the end of each
grading period, if a student has a failing grade, the coach/sponsor is to
meet with the student and placed on probation and/or su
spend from the
activity until the grade improves.


Tutoring must be offered and Academic
First Funds are used to pay for the tutor.




Children’s First 25% Matching Funds:


$79,635.00

Each LEA that receives State Children’s First Funds must provide a 25%
m
atch.


These matching funds includes funding for Health Services to pay for
repair and maintenance of the Defibrillator machines in each school as well
as purchase any other non
-
cap equipment for Health Services.


Local funds
also pay for the

Pride Survey
taken by all middle and high school students,
SRO supplements to our Shelby County Sheriff’s Department, Helena Police,
and Montevallo Police, non
-
instructional software to support our camera
system in the schools, and funding for cameras and keypad equipm
ent in
the schools.




Section 504: $1,125,374

Students who are eligible for services under Section 504 of The Rehabilitation
Act of 1973 receive accommodations through local funding. These
accommodations/services include homebound teachers, nursing servi
ces,
instructional aide support, materials/supplies, and equipment.


Middle/
High School Program Area Specialist
: $25,000

In middle and high the funds are spent for supplies for new teachers
and instructional resources for principals and all teachers.
New
teachers are given Daily Oral Language books. Examples of supplies
purchased for all teachers include document cameras, classroom
sets of dictionaries, classroom sets of novels, calculators and
professional development books as needed. Substitutes ar
e

prov
ided for professional development training for Ruby Payne,
WOW, 4MAT, classroom management, etc.


Guidance and Counseling: $43,000

$19,000 of the budget is allotted for all 10
th

graders to take the PLAN test.
System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Other items include: contract labor

during testing season, travel
reimbursement, professional development/speakers, registration fees,
counseling resources, counseling office materials and shredding.


Other Local Funds Include:

Special Education


General Fund: $14,978

BBSST/Behavior
Resource Teachers: $15,050

Parenting: $6,455

Scholar’s Bowl/Middle and High: $7,282

Math Competition: $7,020

SACS: $14,250

School Improvement: $10,000

Gifted Education: $92,000

Academic Enhancement: $15,000

Vertical Team: $10,000








System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Shelby County Board of Education

Title I Local School Budget Form

October 1, 2010


September 30, 2011


School
Vincent Elementary








Principal’s___________________________

Signature


Teachers


$
41,731


Salary


(Kindergarten)


$
125,162

Salary


(1
st



5
th

and other)




$
36,096


Insurance ($9024 per person)








$
20,879


Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$
10,461


Social Security (salary x .062)








$
2,446


Medicare (salary x .0145)








$
286


Unemployment (salary x
.0017)








$
1,458


Substitutes for Teacher (5 minimum per teacher)





Pre
-
school Teacher


$
18,578


Salary












$
3,609


Insurance ($9024 per person)








$
2,354


Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$
1,183


Social Security (salary x .062)








$
276


Medicare (salary x .0145)








$
33


Unemployment (salary x .0017)








$
500


Substitutes for Aide (5 minimum per aide)






Computer Lab Aide


$
9,429


Salary












$
4,512


Insurance ($9024 per person)








$
1,180


Retirement

(salary x .125
1)








$
584


Social Security (salary x .062)








$
137


Medicare (salary x .0145)








$
16


Unemployment (salary x .0017)








$
400


Substitutes for Aide (5 minimum per aide)









A
fter School Tutors


$_______

Salary


for _____ tutors for _____weeks

@ $25 per hour



$_______

Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$_______

Social Security (salary x .062)








$_______

Medicare (salary x .0145)








$_______

Unemployment (salary x .0017)








In School
Tutors

$_______

Salary


for tutors for weeks @
$

per hour



$_______

Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$_______

Social Security (salary x .062)








$_______

Medicare (salary x .0145)








$_______

Unemployment (salary x .0017)



























System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Vincent Elementary


Instructional Materials & Supplies


$
2,000


Student Classroom Supplies
(Pre
-
K)

$
500


Student Classroom Supplies
(Kindergarten)





$
25,879


Student Classroom Supplies

(1
st



5
th
)








$
1,700


License Fees for Software








$
6,000


Printer Cartridges/Supplies








$
1,500


Magazines











$
1,500


Audio Visual Materials (DVDs, CDs)






$
3,000


Copies for teachers







Non
-
Capitalized Equipment


$_______

Desktop Computers

(______ computers @ $_______)




$_______

Laptop Computers (______ computers @ $_______)




$_______

Document Camera (______ cameras @ $_______)





$_______

LCD Projectors
(+ mounting equip.
)(_______ @ $_______)




$_______

Personal Response Units (
___

@ $_____)





$_______

Laptop Carts (_______ @ $_______)







$_______

Interactive White Boards (______ boards @ $_______)




$_______

Printers (______ printers @ $_______)







$_______

Wiring for projectors, room, etc.)














Professional
Development


$
1,000


Registration











$
500


Travel












$
2,000


Meals/Hotel











$
1,000


Materials (professional books)








$
3,465


Consultant











$_______

Stipends

(_____teachers x _______days x $_____ per day)




$_______

Retire
ment

(stipends x .1251)







$_______

Social Security (stipends x .062)







$_______

Medicare (stipends x .0145)







$_______

Unemployment (stipends x .0017)





$
2,000


Substitutes
(
28.5

substitutes x ____days x
$70
per day)






$
50


Retirement

(sub
s x .1251)







$
124


Social Security (subs x .062)







$
29


Medicare (subs x .0145)








$
3


Unemployment (subs x .0017)










System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Vincent Elementary

Summer School



$_______

Teacher

Salary (_____teachers x _______days x $_____ per day)





$_______

Retirement

(salary x .1251)







$_______

Social Security (salary x .062)







$_______

Medicare (salary x .0145)







$_______

Unemployment (salary x .0017)







$_______

Aide

Salary
(_____aides x _______days x $_____ per day)




$_______

Retirement

(salary x .1251)







$_______

Social Security (salary x .062)







$_______

Medicare (salary x .0145)







$_______

Unemployment (salary x .0017)






$_______

Bus Driver

(_____bus driv
ers x _______days x $_____ per day)



$_______

Retirement

(salary x .1251)







$_______

Social Security (salary x .062)







$_______

Medicare (salary x .0145)







$_______

Unemployment (salary x .0017)







$_______

Mileage

(_____miles x _____ days
@ $_____ per mile)




$_______

Materials and Supplies













Parenting


Parental Involvement (8210)


$
1,972


Materials & Supplies








$_______

Consultant










$_______

Software (STI Home, Survey Monkey, etc.)





$_______

Postage










$_______

Printing









Direct Instruction of Parents (5100)







$
1,500


Materials & Supplies








$_______

Consultant










Other Substitutes

$_______

Instructional Substitutes for DIBELS, kindergarten registration, etc.






Total Budget:

$337,032



System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Shelby County Board of Education

Title I Plan

Vincent Elementary


Principal’s Signature __________________________



Date __________________



Instructional Materials & Supplies

Student Classroom Supplies: (List)

Appropriate supplies for grade levels $1200 per grade level
-

$7,200

Non
-
fiction text
-

$10,000

Tier III refills
-

$3,000

Investigations Student Activity Books
-

$3,000

Software: (List)



License Fees for Software:
(List)




Magazines: (List)

Instructor, Mailbox, Ranger Tick, Teaching K


8, Cousteau Kids


Audio Visual Materials (DVDs, CDs): (List)


Cassette players, DVDs



Other: (List)

Copies for teachers
-

$3,000



Professional Development

Registration: (List con
ferences/workshops to attend)

5 teachers to Mega Conference



Materials: (List projected books/materials)

Books for book study/needed books


Consultant: (List)









System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010




Vincent Elementary


Parenting

Parent Involvement


Materials & Supplies: (List)





Consultant:




Software:




Postage (To be used for):




Printing: (List)



Direct Instruction of Parents


Materials & Supplies:





Consultant:











Vincent Elementary

Title I Paid Personnel

2010
-
2011


Name

Position

Grade Level

Rank

Years of
Experience


Tammy Clinkscales (.40)


Teacher


Pre
-
K




Catherine Kirkland


Teacher


Kindergarten




Margaret Battle


Reading Coach






Ashle
y Waldrop


Teacher


Fourth Grade




Brooke Hughston


Teacher


Fifth Grade




Diane Peterson (.50)


Technology Aide































System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Shelby County Board of Education

Title I Local
School Budget Form

October 1, 2010


September 30, 2011


School
Vincent Elementary




Principal’s___________________________

Signature


Teachers


$
41,731


Salary


(Kindergarten)


$
125,162


Salary


(1
st



5
th

and other)




$
36,096


Insurance ($9024 per
person)








$
20,879


Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$
10,461


Social Security (salary x .062)








$
2,446


Medicare (salary x .0145)








$
286


Unemployment (salary x .0017)








$
1,458


Substitutes for Teacher (5 minimum per teacher)





Pre
-
s
chool Teacher


$
18,578


Salary












$
3,609


Insurance ($9024 per person)








$
2,354


Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$
1,183


Social Security (salary x .062)








$
276


Medicare (salary x .0145)








$
33


Unemployment (salary x .0017)








$
500


Substitutes for Aide (5 minimum per aide)






Computer Lab Aide


$
9,429


Salary












$
4,512


Insurance ($9024 per person)








$
1,180


Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$
584


Social Security (salary x .062)








$
137


Medicare (salary x

.0145)








$
16


Unemployment (salary x .0017)








$
400


Substitutes for Aide (5 minimum per aide)






After School Tutors


$_______

Salary


for _____ tutors for _____weeks

@ $25 per hour



$_______

Retirement

(salary x .1251)








$_______

Social Security (salary x .062)








$_______

Medicare (salary x .0145)








$_______

Unemployment (salary x .0017)








In School Tutors

$_______

Salary


for tutors for weeks @
$

per hour




$_______

Retirement (salary x .1251)





System: Shelby County


School:

Vincent Elementary





July 13, 2010



Part IX


MONITORING/REVIEW DOCUMENTATION
TO SUPPORT THE CSI PROCESS: Please use this section to document your monthly CSI reviews through leadership team meetings, a
ction team meetings, walkthroughs, data
meetings, etc. During
your reviews, your action teams and /or SLT can use these reviews to discuss the implementation of strategies, effectiveness,

concerns, and any other areas that need to be addressed. This page must be completed and

turned
in at
Principals’ Checkout in Jun
e 2011.


INITIAL REVIEW /DEVELOPMENT Target Date: August Purpose:
Review assessment data to develop plan or make plan adjustments to existing plan.


Date ________________________________


Pr
incipal Initials______________


LEA initials ______________ Other ___________________


COMMENTS*(
Required
)




*Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 1 Target Date: September Purpose:
AMENDMENT
-

Incorporate recommendations from school, LEA and/or SDE.


Date ____________________________
____


Principal Initials______________


LEA initials ______________ Other ___________________


COMMENTS*(
Required
)


* Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 2 Target Date: October

Purpose: IMPLEMENTATION
-

Provide documentation/evidence of improvement.




Date ________________________________


Principal Initials__________


LEA initials ______________ Other ____________


COMMENTS*(
Required
)


* Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 3 Target Date: November

Purpose: IMPLEMENTATION


Provide documentation/evidence of improvement.


Date ___________________________
_____


Principal Initials____________


LEA initials ______________ Other: ________________


COMMENTS*(
Required)





* Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 4 Target Date:

January

Purpose: IMPLEMENTATION
-

Provide documentation/evidence of improvement.


Date ________________________________


Principal Initials______________


LEA initials ______________ Other ___________________


COMMENTS*(
Required)


*Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 5 Target Date: February
Purpose: IMPLEMENTATION
-

Provide documentation/evidence of improvement.



Date ________________________________


Principal Initials______________


LEA initials ______________ Other ___________________


COMMENTS*(
Required)


* Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 6 Target Date: March

Purpose: IMPLEMENTATION
-

Provide documentation/evidence of improvement.


Date __________________________
______


Principal Initials______________


LEA initials ______________ Other ___________________


COMMENTS*(
Required)





* Use additional pages, if needed

REVIEW 7

Target Date: April
-

May

Purpose: REFLECTIONS/PROJECTIONS


Evaluate each goal, strategy, and action for
continuation, revision, or removal.


Date ________________________________


Principal Initials______________


LEA initials ______________ Other ___________________


COMMENTS*(
Required)


*Use additional pages, if needed

Use information from Reviews to Evaluate the plan and to update the plan for the
coming year.