Writing Mode # 3: Narration and Description

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29 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 4 μήνες)

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Writing Mode # 3:
Narration and Description

Narrative

tells

____________
___

to make a point

Descriptive

uses _____________ images to create a picture


Why
are we studying two modes in a single unit?

In most cases, these modes of writing are used
____________ to
provide a detailed account of a memorable _____________.


What
is the primary purpose of narrative/descriptive writing?

Quite simply, to
tell a story.


Your purpose

may simply be to _____
_____ your readers.


What are some secondary purposes

of

narrative/descriptive
writing?

1. To make a complic
ated subject more ______
_______ or
concrete.

Example: You tell a story about a shooting incident as part of
your discussion on gun control.

2.

To analyze a deeper _____
_________ or a theme.

Example:
You tell a story about your recent trip to the Olympics
as part of an essay detailing your newfound patriotism
.

3.
To bring _____
______ to a societal problem.

Example: You tell a story about working with homeless people in
an urban area in order to make
people more aware of poverty in
the United States even though you aren’t posing a formal
argument about it.

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What makes effective narrative/descriptive writing?

1.

Consider your _____
_____.
In order to know what details
need to be included, you will need to consider your target
audience’s background. The less familiar your audience is with
your subject matter, the more basic detail you need to include.

2.

_____
______ should be clear.

While

narratives do not
include “thesis” statements or thorough explanations of what
your story means, you should still have a central focus.

3.

________
_______ is key.
While not all plots are presented
in chronological order, all narratives include a coheren
t
sequence of events. Otherwise , it is not a narrative.

4.

_________
______. Don’t tell.
The most interesting stories
bring the story to life by vivid description rather than
explanation. One way to accomplish this is by including
dialogue.


Other con
siderations:



Tell the story from

a consistent _____
_______________.
Personal narratives will typically be told in
_______________________
.



Consider the ___
_____ of your story. This should be varied
to focus on the more important and interesting aspects o
f
the narrative.


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Writing Dialogue


Dialogue, as you probably know, is what happens when two or more characters speak to one
another.
We

experience dialogue all the time in our everyday lives.


In writing, dialogue should do one, if not all, of the
following:

1. Reveal characters’ relationships to one another.

2. Move the story forward.

3. Increase the tension.

It should also include proper indents and punctuation (see the example
s

below).


Example:
Dialogue that shows the relationship between chara
cters:

"What's the capital of Spain?" Jerry asked, pausing over his crossword puzzle.

Susan looked up from her book and rolled her eyes. "Madrid, duh."

"Why are you so sarcastic all the time?” Jerry slammed his pencil on table. He looked
like he was goin
g to cry.

“I don't thi
nk I can take much more of this,
"

Susan mumbled.


What do we learn about Jerry and Susan’s relationship through this dialogue?


Example:
Dialogue that moves the story forward:

The phone rang, and Jerry picked it up.

"Hello?" There

was a moment of silence on the other end.

"Is this Jerry Simmons?" a male voice asked.

"Yeah. Who is this?" The man paused. Jerry could hear him take a deep breath.

"Jerry, my name is Dave. I’m your brother.”

"If this is a prank, it isn’t funny,” Jerry sa
id. “My family died a long time ago."

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“Not your whole family,” Dave said.

Jerry hung up the phone.


How does this dialogue
move the story forward?


Example: Dialogue that increases the tension:

"Dave!" Jerry shouted. "We've got to get away from here! The
building's gonna blow!"

"We've got to go back!" Dave screamed.

"Why?" Dave pointed at the roof. "Susan's still up there!"


How does this dialogue increase tension in the reader?

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Dialogue Tags Other Than “Said



Acknowledged

Admitted

Agreed

Answered

Argued

Asked

Barked

Begged

Bellowed

Blustered

Bragged

Complained

Confessed

Cried

Demanded

Denied

Giggled

Hinted

Hissed

Howled

Interrupted

Laughed

Lied

Mumbled

Nagged

Pleaded

Promised

Questioned

Remembered

Replied

Requested

Roared

Sang

Screamed

Screeched

Shouted

Sighed

Snarled

Sobbed

Threatened

Warned

Whimpered

Whined

Whispered

Wondered

Yelled

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