Graduate Employability Award

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29 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

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Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

1

Graduate Employability Award

Introduction


The CBI / NUS Survey Working Towards Your Future identified eight key attributes, skills
& knowledge that will help graduates get a job (
CBI

/ NUS Report

-

http://www.nus.org.uk/Global/CBI_NUS_Employability%20report_May%202011.pdf
). By
completing this Award, you will be showing prospective employers that you have
evidenced those eight skills


Self
-
management, Teamworking, Business & Customer
Awareness, Problem Solving, Communication, Application of IT, Application of Numeracy
& Leadership.


But more importantly, it shows employers that you have thought about and invested
time in your career. And that you can articulate the skills you’ve develo
ped whilst at
university in the employers’ language about how those skills are relevant to the role they
are offering to fill.


There are
four

elements to the Award which will be covered by completing the
four

parts
of the assignment:


1
. Self assessment o
f skills & gaps to be filled (personal skills’ audit)

2. Customer & Business awareness

3. Project

4. Elevator Pitch


Completing the Award


The assignment requires
each box to be completed. The word count target gives an idea
of how much evidence is
expected, but is purely a guide


each Project, for example,
may mean some boxes require more or less evidence. If more evidence is required, an
Appendix reference is given to prompt you, for example if you need to show screen
grabs.

The Award should take
around 30 hours to complete; the project element


planning & completing
-

should take around 20 hours, but this will vary by project.


The command words in each section (eg identify, describe, explain, analyse & evaluate)
have specific meanings


see Appe
ndix A for an explanation
.


Research, and other work, for the Project can be done as a team, however the evidence
presented for assessment must be your own work; there is a requirement for evidence of
team work, however, ‘team work’ does not mean ‘group wo
rk’.


You will be asked to refer to the free resources available to support the award. These can
be accessed through
https://advance.ediplc.com/ePortfolio/Login


This is an example of a completed Award workbook.







Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

2





1.
You

-

Self assessment of skills &
gaps to be filled


For this section, you will need to think about a job you are considering and an industry
you might like to work in. All employers will expect potential employees to be familiar
with their industry/sector
. T
he principals behind this
research activity can be applied to
any industry

or public sector role
; therefore it doesn’t matter if you are unsure about the
industry/sector you want to work in at this stage. Data in this section will not be shared
outside this project

(ie won’t be mad
e public)
.


It is important that the industry/sector/job chosen as the focus of your research offers
sufficient data to complete the required research eg a company’s Annual Report. You will
be asked to gather and generate sufficient evidence through this
type of information.


Much of the information required for this section will be available through internet
research, however, it may be necessary to use other sources of information, for example
journals and other resources.


Note: Completing the ‘self ana
lysis questions’ in the free resources will help you answer
these questions


the link to these is in the ePortfolio.


Your name

William Dane


What
course

are you
studying?

BSc Molecular & Cellular Biology; University of Bath


When you graduate, what
sector
s
/industr
ies

are

you
considering

work
ing

in?

Research (academic or commercial)

Pharmaceutical


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1A
Employment
statistics


1.1
Summary of
employment statistics for
alumni

from your course



What does the data you
have found tell you?

Target Wordcount


100 plus Appendix

Stats from UoBath aren’t available, but a similar
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The data shows just how many research
-
oriented
companies there are and how varied the possible
careers are. One of the things I need to think abou
t is
whether I’d prefer to work in a large company or a
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.

1.1





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

3

hospital
-
based research jobs as that was one area I
thought would suit me; this is due to more small,
private companies tendering for this kind of w
ork
according to a couple of industry contacts.

1.2
Summary of
employment statistics for
graduates within your
chosen field



What does the data you
have found tell you?

Target Wordcount


100 plus Appendix

Research scientists from Biological
Sciences have
good record of finding positions, but they tend to be
fixed contracts which follow funding. The field is
diverse, but examples of stats from various sources
are in App 1.2.

The data shows that I have a reasonable chance of
securing a PhD oppo
rtunity funded by the MRC as
they offer 1200 jobs. The data is encouraging for a
career in research, though they don’t give details of
salaries. Further research suggests private companies
pay more than public ones which use a formal
payment scale.

App
.

1.
2


1B
Employability in the sector
s / industries

1.3
What
are the entry
routes into
this
sector/industry?

Target Wordcount


50

Most are job
-
specific roles advertised via scientific
media (New Scientist, Nature). This is because centres
gain grant funding

for specific tasks. Larger
pharmaceutical companies have a number of graduate
entry routes; few participate in the Milk Round, but
many offer summer internships.


1.4
Summar
ise

any
subject
-
specific

skills
required by
graduate
employers in your
discipline

and related areas?

Explain
three of the eight CBI /
NUS skills that might be of
particular importance.

Target Wordcount


200

Skills Research Scientists need from leading
pharmaceutical company (source: University of Kent)



Intelligent



Attention to detail
but also able to see the larger
picture.



Prepared to do repetitive tasks.



Able to work independently, with little supervision.
Make your own decisions. Self motivated.



Problem solving skills. Ability to keep persevering
when things are going wrong.



Creativ
ity



Great enthusiasm for their subject



Presentation skills



Teamworking



Computing Skills



Time Management/organising skills



People skills



Report writing/documentation of experiments



Laboratory experience and good technical skills

Communication, Problem
Solving, Teamwork


Communication.
"Multi
-
tasking and time management




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

4


skills are essential for a research scientist. Communication
and presentation skills are also very important. You also
need to be able to write well. For post
-
docs the process of
making
application for funding can be stressful but is an
essential part of the job."

Source: above article.

Problem Solving. The comment from list above
suggest that scientists rarely have a Eureka moment


perseverance is required to keep going when results
are
n’t what you expect or want.

Teamwork. Collaboration is crucial in research, but it’s
a competitive world so important to ensure that
contributors feel valued, part if the team and that
their contribution will be recognised (in publications
etc).


1.5
What
are the

possible
interests, working style and
personality
of graduates
who are
successful in
getting the
type of
job you
want
?

Target Wordcount


200

Research scientists must have a First or 2.1, so those
who do well in their degree tend to be more
su
ccessful; partly this is because if you don’t like the
course you are unlikely to want to carry on in a similar
field afterwards. Their working style is to work hard
and diligently. Diligence is very important because
sloppy scientific work is quickly disc
overed and
confidence in its author lost.

These type of people on my course have a variety of
different interests both regards science and outside
work; we also have students who like statistics & will
look for causal relationships between seemingly
unconn
ected events. And we have students who will
happily spend hours perfecting analysis techniques to
ensure consistency in their results. The small number
of commercial scientists I’ve met share a similar
diversity of interests in both their work & outside.
P
ersonality
-
wise, all those interested in a science
-
oriented career have patience, attention to detail & an
inquisitive mindset; we have often joked that we
would make good detectives because much of our
work is finding answers to problems through
methodica
l analysis.


1.6
Complete the self
analysis questions in the
free
resources (Link

via
ePortfolio
)
.

State your own
skills & attributes from this
analysis

Target Wordcount


25

Main strengths are problem solving and numeracy.

Weaknesses was identified as
Teamwork.


1.7
How do your skills
compare to those required?

And w
hat skills do you need
Target Wordcount


1
50

Numeracy is important in scientific research and I am
strong at this. Likewise problem solving


you need to





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

5

to develop?

be methodical and show

resilience when a line of
enquiry you follow is a dead end.

Being a research scientist can be seen as a group of
individuals loosely bound together by a common goal.
Much of the work we do is individual, but it’s
important to share and collaborate with ot
hers as
collective minds can solve problems. It’s this area of
collaboration & teamwork that doesn’t come naturally
to me that I need to work on.

Specifically I need to work on how I relate to other
team members to ensure they feel valued. I may
come
across as quite assertive. I also get nervous
presenting to large groups; I need to do this more
often to give me confidence and maybe find someone
to advise me on my technique.

1.8
How do your interests,
working style and
personality compare with
the so
rt of graduates who
have been

successful in
getting the
type of
job you
want?

Target Wordcount


100

My interests are varied but include team sports
(volleyball) where you rely on other people to do their
bit to ensure the team succeeds; this is similar t
o
research projects where you often rely on colleagues
to collect and analyse samples to a high standard.

My working style is collaborative


I much prefer
working in teams & sharing data. My worst temporary
job was one I ended up sitting on my own.

One of

my personality traits is attention to detail; I
like to do things thoroughly. I’ve helped out with
some DIY jobs around the house and I like to use the
right tools and measure everything carefully.


1.9
What resources did you
use to find this
information? (List)

Target Wordcount


50

Nature.com offer an excellent skills review service to
check if you are suitable for a career in scientific
research.

DSM’s careers section stresses the importance of
teamwork & collaboration.

UoB’s career section
links to around 40 sites which
give advice about a career in science; best one I
found was
careerinscience.co.uk
.



1C
Jobs available

1.10 Identify different
vacancies, suitable for new
graduates,

available in
the
industry

that you want to
work in.

Target Wordcount


25

plus Appendix

A screen grab in app 1.4 shows a three page of jobs
from different sources.

App

1.10

1.11
Are any of them the
type

of job that you would
like to do
?

Target Wordcount


50

My main issue will be trying to focus on which specific
area I’d like to work in. So far I’ve been concentrating




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

6


on diseases and working to discover new drugs to
solve some of the world’s major diseases, but having
looked deeper into it, there may be other

avenues to
explore that better match my interests.

1.12
What resources did
you use to find th
is
information
?

Target Wordcount


50

Main sites are New Scientist & Nature. Also many
Universities publish their jobs in the careers section of
their websites.

More commercial roles are found in the general job
sites like Total Jobs, Reed, Monster.









Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

7


2.

Customer

& Business awareness


The CBI / NUS survey highlights understanding customers &

organisational objectives as
very important. In order to gain employment in your chosen field, it is crucial to
understand the world you’re moving into.


You will need to conduct research into
a selected
industry
, and organisation,
show
ing

understanding

of key issues and concepts such as customers, competitors and the key
drivers for the industry
/organisation
.


The industry can be commercial, not
-
for
-
profit or public sector. This could be the
industry/sector that you want to work in, that you used in Sec
tion 1, however, you may
use a different industry.


It is important that the industry and organisation chosen as the focus of your research
offers sufficient, freely available data/information to complete the required research, and
generate sufficient evid
ence, eg financial data & reports. It can be a small business, but
they will need to let you see accounts.


Complete the following summary of your research findings; your full research
findings should be included in the appropriate appendices


2A
Sector kn
owledge

2.1
Summarise the key
characteristics of the

industry
.

Y
ou should
consider

factors

including

the
size and value
of the industry, the types of
organisations within it, and
their

geographical spread
.
The products & services
they offer.

Target
Wordcount


100 plus Appendix

Pharmaceutical sector. Some very large, multinational
companies (Big Pharma is defined as Rev $3bn or
research $500m). But also some very specialised
companies


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Target Wordcount


100 plus Appendix

Four key factors
evaluated

in App 2.2:

1.

Cost & length of drug research

2.

Ability to patent & keep patent

3.

Litigation

4.

Demographic

App.
2.2

2.3 How will these

factors
affect the industry in the
future
?

Target Wordcount


200

The above four factors will continue, but two factors
which are set to affect the industry are political and
economic. There is increasing political pressure from
the west who have access to drugs to allow the
developing world who cannot afford them to be
offered lower
-
priced drugs, This causes two problems,
one the obvious one of lower revenue per unit, though




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

8


this will be offset to a degree by higher volumes, and
the subjective nature of price setting (who is deemed
poor enough to benefit from discounts b
ecomes a
moral judgement). Secondly a grey market where
discounted products from developing countries find
their way back into Western markets eroding prices.

Increased longevity increases costs to individuals or
governments who subsidise health services;

people
expect drugs to help them whatever the cost. These
increasing healthcare costs come at a time of
economic slowdown in the West whose populations
are aging the quickest, and are therefore often
economically inactive. In other words higher costs for
the West who can ill afford it and who will have to
ration healthcare thus creating moral issues which
may be directed at the pharmaceutical industry.


2.4
What other factors are
likely to affect the industry
in the future?


Target Wordcount


50

Another

factor which may become more important is
the impact of piracy, namely companies in countries
which turn a blind eye to patent infringement. So far
this is mainly digital goods and luxury brands, but
with the high costs of drugs, the problem is likely to
grow.




You need to choose one company or organisation from the industry/sector, and conduct
more specific research relating to them


2B
Company / organisation research

2.5
What company or
organisation is the research
is based on?

Lonza
-

http://www.lonza.com


2.6 Summarise the key
characteristics of the
organisation; include size
(eg
staff
turnover),
locations & organisational
type (eg public / private
sector, Ltd or plc)

Target Wordcount


100

Turnover in 2011 2.7bn Swiss Francs
(£1.8bn). Gross
margins were 19%, with net margins 10% after
expenses. Debt was 2.6bn CHF, but much of that was
related to an acquisition in 2010. They employ 11000
staff.

They have offices globally, including China & Brazil,
but most of their staff are em
ployed in the USA.

They are a plc based in Basel Switzerland and listed
on
the
SIX Swiss Exchange and a secondary listing in
Singapore.


2.7 Describe

the main
characteristics of the
competitors to your chosen
company?


Target Wordcount


100 plus Appendix

Lonza is a medium sized pharmaceutical company, so
it competes with the 19 Big Phara companies in App
2.1. It doesn’t have any consumer brands, so it only
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Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

9

those 19. It also competes with many other medium

sized companies as well as some specialist companies
that operate in its markets. It has seven divisions (see
App 2.4). The one I will focus on is the BioResearch
.


2C
Customers

2.8 Describe

the
organisation’s
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Target Wordcount


200

For the Bioscience division, they sell to centres who
run drugs tests & clinical trials. This can be hospitals &
clinics who need to run biopsies through equipment to
identify tumours etc. It can be research depts
who are
running investigative research projects to find new
ways of treating diseases. It can be high
-
volume drug
testing companies who mass scan medical samples.
Lonza provide the kits, processes & materials to allow
their customers to test for the presen
ce of certain
chemicals or anti
-
bodies etc.

For example, a university / hospital
-
based research
project could be looking for ways to traet a particular
type of cancer. Cancer drugs can be quite blunt, ie a
cocktail of drugs are used in the hope that one wo
rks.
By applying Lonza kits on sample cells collected from
patients, the scientists can measure how effective
their new treatments are in halting or killing the
cancer cells. This type of research is going on world
-
wide on a variety of illnesses.



2.9 Wh
at are the key things
that affect the satisfaction
of
the
organisation’s
捵獴omers
?

Target Wordcount


2
00

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diseases are very rare so opportunity to collect fr
esh
sample cells is limited). It’s therefore vital that the
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Target Wordcount


25
0 plus Appendix

Lonza & competitor websites (Perrigo, Royal DSM,
Covance). Also company profiling website
App.
2.10




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

10


hoovers.com



2D Financial Analysis

2.11 Evaluate the

Company/Organisational

performance
.
This should
include
analysis o
f

their
financial results
,
and should
use formulae in a
spreadsheet package.
Financial results can be
found in their Annual
Report.

Target Wordcount


100 plus
Excel document in
Appendix

On the face of it, the 2011 results looks positive with
income up 9%, expenses down 8%. However,
compared with investor expectations, the
shareholders don’t feel the performance was good
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App.

2.11

2.12
What res
ources did
you use to find this
information
?

Target Wordcount


25

plus Appendix

Annual report on Lonza website

FT.com

(quote in App 2.12)

App.
2.12








Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

11

3. Your Project


This programme

requires you to undertake a
P
roject
and then present a report on that
project.

Ideally your project will be
relevant to

the sector that you would like to work in
when you graduate, and that this is the same sector that was the focus of your industry
research, however it can be any suitable project.

Your Project must:




Have
defined objective(s) (SMART)



Have an action plan to achieve those objectives (with timings)



Must be completed over
a period of time which allows time to collect enough
evidence (suggestion is 20 hours over
four weeks
)



Involve min two other people



Include s
ome leadership



Have an end
point when objectives can be reviewed


Examples of a suitable Project include:



Delivering a netball coaching programme to a local school



Running an online auction to raise money for a charitable cause



Completing a conservation
project in a community space


Other suitable projects include an in depth research project for an organisation, an
experiment, designing or manufacturing an item, running a small business, a personal
challenge, a work
-
based activity.

To pass the qualificat
ion, you will need to complete the boxes which gives the assessor
an overview (ie Executive Summary) of your Project. If required, you will need to include
full evidence in the Appendices. Evidence can be a discrete piece of evidence (written,
image or vid
eo). If you refer to evidence in the Appendices, you should ensure each
paragraph is numbered; part of the requirements are to ensure the assessor can easily
find the evidence you are presenting.


The presentation of the Project will also be used as eviden
ce of Communication skills;
that includes spelling, punctuation & grammar.


Research, and other elements of the project can be done as a group, however the work
presented here must be your own work.



3
A
Project
Summary


Title

/focus of project

Dissection

for Sixth Formers


Project aims/goals

To enthuse Sixth Form Biology students in the subject
through a short course of animal dissection.


3.1
Milestones

&
measures

to track achievement

Target Wordcount


25

plus Appendix

It will be run in one school for Year 12s over a five
week period. Key measure is to count how many of
the participants say they are considering doing
App.

3.1




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

12


Biology at university; target is to increase this by
10%. Also to increase those saying definitely by 10%
.

Timetable is in App 3.1

3.2
Define goals and
identify the relevant
milestones to achieve them

Target Wordcount


25
0

The goal of the task was to delivery five after
-
school
sessions of dissecting five different mammals over five
weeks. The plan

was to complete within one half
-
term
to ensure some continuity; schools prefer clear,
simple timetabling. The sessions would last a
maximum of 90 minutes including any clearing up
(which was part of the course), but because they were
Sixth Form who didn’t

need parental permission and
could leave as soon as it was finished, they could
finish earlier if necessary.

The first milestone was finding a school to work with.
The plan was to run the programme starting in
February (post half term); this is after the
Unit 1
exams in January, but before the start of revision
lessons post Easter. I identified six local schools &
contacted them via email the first week back after
Christmas (having found the email of the Head of
Biology before the break). I discussed with
three of
them on the phone, then visited my preferred option
to meet the Head 7 Head of Biology. Agreement was
reached by 20
th

Jan


schools tend to work on a quick
decision basis.

The second milestone was the first session. This was
scheduled for a Tuesda
y which fitted in with the
school’s activity schedule & my lecture timetable (and
I play sport on Wednesdays). The session started at
3.45 which gave us 15 mins to set up after the last
lesson ended.

The final milestone was the last session and review of
t
he pupils involved. The last session was kept a bit
brief to allow for a 15 minute feedback session. This
was the penultimate week before the Easter holiday.


3.3
Define the problem and
the information required to
develop a solution.


Target Wordcount


100

The problem is that very few schools have the
equipment or will to complete animal dissections as
part of the study of Biology.

Figures from the Biology Society show that all 3800
Secondary schools with Sixth Forms offer Biology A

level. But of these, they estimate that only 10% run
practical sessions in dissection. It is very hard to
verify this figure as there is no formal reporting, but it
is based on anecdotal evidence collected by the
Biology Society.

The reasons given are par
tly logistical (obtaining
animals at a reasonable cost), but also teachers not
feeling the extra effort to run dissection justices the





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

13

benefit to pupils, particularly when there are videos
which show it in so much clarity & detail.


3.4
Apply innovative
and
creative techniques to
problem solving

Target Wordcount


25
0
or

Appendix

I considered a number of ways of achieving the
objective (to increase number of students considering
a Biology degree) before choosing the dissection
project. A table of five
innovative solutions together
with Pros & Cons of each can be found in App 3.
4

App.

3.4

3.5
Develop solutions to a
problem and justify the
selection of your chosen
solution

Target Wordcount


25
0

Task: Identify a school who meets the three main
criteria


local, can get min 15 attending throughout
the course, 50% planning to go to University (any
subject but are doing a Level 3 Biology course (eg A
level / BTEC National). Consideration was given to
trying to reach more disadvantaged pupils, but the
aim of

the project is to get more people choosing to
study Biology so if I can reach disadvantaged pupils
that will be a bonus but not part of the three main
considerations.

Devise a five
-
week, after school dissection class of
one hour. Use material that they ar
e unlikely to have
worked with before. Initial thoughts are rats, frogs,
poultry, insect, unusual plant, but this will be worked
out with the teacher. There will be three UoB students
to support (min of two per session), plus the teacher.
The dissection wi
ll be in pairs unless the school can
pay enough for each

learner
; the dissection
equipment will be loaned from the UoB.

Reason for choosing the dissection project is that I
feel strongly that Biology is a doing subject and
passion can be encouraged through

the students
becoming fascinated with the human body as I was.
This project was the only one that involved the pupils
actually doing something rather than watching.

To overcome its main weakness that it only hits a
small number of pupils, I plan to treat

this as a pilot;
if dissection appears to work exciting the pupils to do
Biology at Uni, I’ll look at ways to scale it up. For
example we could run these classes at UoB labs and
invite local schools to attend. Or devise kits &
programmes for other Univers
ities to roll out
nationwide.





3B Project Review

3.6
Reflectively evaluate
Target Wordcount


25

plus Appendix

of around 500
App.




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

14


your performance of a task
and identify your strengths
and areas for development

(this is a key task that requires considered

reflection)

Logistically it all went very well and to plan. My
strengths were in self
-
management, namely ensuring
we had all the right equipment & supplies available at
the right time. Time
-
keeping was a weakness as I cut
things a bit tight and was caught

out once in the five
sessions which meant the session wasn’t as successful
as it could have been.

3.6

3.7 I
nterpret feedback and
identify positive actions to
improve performance

Target Wordcount


25

plus Appendix

of around 200
(this is a key task t
hat requires considered reflection)

The Biology teacher loved our enthusiasm which was
clear to the pupils. The area for improvement was in
the planning


we had to change the structure of the
sessions into smaller chunks, something we could
have chatted
through with the teacher if we’d had
chance.

App.

3.7

3.8
Analyse and interpret
data to support the decision

making process

Target Wordcount


15
0

My aim was to encourage pupils to consider doing a
Biology related degree at Uni. In terms of numbers
this
was hard to do with a small sample, but if half the
group of 15 were going to Uni, then my target was
two additional people to consider a course (ie do
proactive research into courses & institutions). I did a
short questionnaire at the start and then after
wards.
Of the 18, two were already looking at Biology
degrees, two thinking of science degrees. After the
course, the two who were thinking of science degrees
were now actively looking closer at Biology
-
based
degrees, plus two additional pupils. Success.

I
t was impossible in the timescales to see how many
of those turned into applications and ultimatley offers,
but any scaled out project would need to measure
there stats to assess the value of the course.





3C
Self Management

3.9 Thinking about your
project, how well did you
manage the project?



d
id it run to time?



did you achieve
everything you planned
to do?



give an example of
when you had to
manage your time
effectively, and how you
did this

Target Wordcount


100

The two main tools were a to
-
do li
st and a priority
ranking. I used a 1
-
5 rating for each for urgency and
importance. For example ordering the animals from
the farm was important so got a 5 (no animals, no
dissection), but their turnaround was next day so only
a 2 in the urgency rating. Or
dering disposable aprons
was an urgent 5 when I found out they were needed,
but we worked without them on the first session so
importance only a 3.

I tried a date column, but didn’t really need it for a
獨潲t⁰roje捴i步⁴ i猠慮dne⁴ 慴⁨ ppened e癥r礠





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

15


w
eek.



3D
Teamwork

3.10 Thinking about your
project,
how did you apply
your
team working

skills?



How well did you work
with others, and how
did you include other
people

in planning,
delivery & review
?



What communication
methods did you use,
and how
effective were
they
?



How did you get
everyone to

co
-
operate?

Give an example of
how

you w
ork
ed

effectively in a
team
,

respecting
individuals cultural and
differences in background

Target Wordcount


100

Whilst this was my project, I had two friends who to
ok
it in turns to help. The delivery team was therefore
two students plus the teacher. I lead the sessions, a
student friend went round & gave advise & help where
required while the teacher did the same but with a
firmer tone to avoid any horseplay. The on
ly real
difference in the team was that the teacher was older,
more experienced with young people and commanded
the respect of the pupils


f⁴ ok⁦ull⁡摶慮t慧e o映
th慴.



㌮ㄱ⁇i癥⁡ e硡浰le o映
how

you⁡
灰p
ied

negoti慴ion⁡ d⁰ r獵ssion
te捨cique猠to re獯l癥
proje捴⁣h慬lenges

Target Wordcount


100

The Head of one school I didn’t choose in the end was
concerned about the impact of bringing ‘animals for
experiments’ into his school. A reasonable concern
慮dn
e he needed reassurance that this wouldn’t
bring⁡ i浡l⁲ight猠慣瑩vi獴猠or 捯浰l慩nt猠i映it⁷慳a
慧慩n獴⁴se⁍ 獬s洠晡ith⸠

cor⁴ e⁦ir獴sobje捴conⰠ䤠f獥d⁴ eine⁴ 慴⁴ e⁕o䈠
u獥s
慮i浡l猠bred⁴ enilled潴⁨慲med⁷ ilst⁳till
慬i癥


eg 獡浥⁡ 慮im
慬猠景re慴F⸠䤠fho睥d 獯me
獴慴i獴i捳⁴ ⁳ho眠瑨慴⁴here⁨ 猠never⁢ en⁡ 礠
prote獴sover⁥du捡瑩on慬⁡ i浡l⁷ r欮⁔h慴⁴ e慲ge獴s
慮i浡l⁷ ⁷ uld⁢ ⁵獩ng⁷慳 愠r慴.

For the second, I used a statement from the UoB’s
re獩dent⁍ 獬s洠捬eri挠睨o⁳慩d⁴ 慴
as they weren’t
being⁥慴enⰠ䵵獬i浳⁣慮⁤ 獳e捴⁡ci浡l猠睨i捨c
haven’t been killed in a Halal style. He checked this
睩th⁡ 捯uple映hi猠捯lle慧ues…⁷慳⁨ pp礠睩th⁴ e
慮獷sr猠to⁨ 猠捯n捥rns.


㌮ㄲ⁈o眠摩d⁴ 慭work
捯ntribute⁴ ⁴ eutco浥m
o映the⁰ o
je捴c


Target Wordcount


25
0

The Biology teacher was very important; he gave
practical assistance in planning & delivering the
session and then used his experience as a teacher in
understanding the motivation & personalities of the




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

16


class. This ensured
the dissections were completed
and the pupils learnt what was set out in the learning
objectives. For example, if he disagreed with
something I’d proposed, he would throw a gentle
question in to get me to think about why we were
doing something. He wouldn’
t give me the answer,
but by posing a question, I would invariably do as he
was thinking all along. One such exchange was when I
was suggesting using a hen as one of the animals to
dissect. He just asked how the class might react when
they next had a chick
en meal, particularly some of
those who may have eating disorders (he knew at
least one of the pupils had self imagine issues).

The role of my student friends in the team was very
important when maintaining motivation. There were
times when it all seemed a

bit too much hassle, when
logistical issues seemed too high, when we couldn’t
get the university of let us use their animals; my team
mates kept me going with supporting comments,
though not necessarily suggestions to resolve the
issues. They just showed
great confidence in me that I
would find a way and reminded me how much impact
I could have on some young people if we completed it.
It kept me going.

3.13 What
challenges

were
there, if any, in ensuring
the team worked
effectively? How were
these overc
ome?


Target Wordcount


100

Dealing with your friends in a semi
-
serious project can
create difficulty. In this case, there was nothing
major, but because they know you, they sometimes
for example cancelled a catch up meeting at short
notice when somethin
g more interesting came along.
They didn’t let me down during the school activity
time, ie they turned up on time and contributed
fantastically.

I overcame the cancelled meeting issue by arranging
short meetings straight after lectures when I could
grab th
em. By having more frequent, but shorter
meetings (ie a chat over a cup of coffee), they were
more likely to attend.



3E
Problem Solving

3.14 Thinking about your
project, how did you apply
your problem solving skills?

Specifically, how did you
use an
innovative and
creative approach to
tasks/challenges
?

Target Wordcount


100

One of the pupils hands couldn’t stop shaking in the
晩r獴⁳e獳ionⰠ獨e⁷ 猠ju獴⁴so rvou猠慢out⁩n獥rt
the scalpel into the rat’s abdomen. Touching pupils is
not⁡汬o睥d⁳o⁷e
couldn’t help her hold it to steady
her.⁁e捴crer⁨ d 睡wned ⁴ 慴⁴ i猠睡猠煵ite
捯浭on⁡ d⁴ 慴⁳he⁨ d⁲e慤映愠獩浰le nd…
rh祴y洠me捨cique⁴ 慴⁷慳 獵捣e獳晵f⁩ ⁳o浥
獣hool献⁆ r⁴ e⁦ir獴⁷ee欠獨s 獴s睡w捨cdI⁢ t⁴ e
景llowing⁷ e欠睥⁵獥d
thi猠te捨cique
 礠獴sdent





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

17

friend did a one
-
to
-
one to get her started). It was
essentially about a imaginary piano drill to get the
fingers loosened up and the tension out of them; the
musical bit was to fill the mind with positive music
vibes rather than
emotions about dead animals. So
between my lecturer, myself and my friend who
helped her with it, her fear was overcome and the
following week she did the exercise herself.




3F
Leadership

3.15 Thinking about your
project, how did you apply
your
leadership skills?



Target Wordcount


25

plus Appendix

of around 300
(this is a key task that requires considered reflection)

Key role of a leader is to ensure the objectives are
met using the resources available. The team in my
Project were the
volunteer helpers, the teacher &
Head and my role as leader was to ensure all did the
parts they needed to deliver a five week dissection
course.

Three key qualities are strategy (being able to see the
bigger picture), empathy with team (being able to
pick

up vibes & acting where necessary) &
communications (two
-
way, so listening as much as
talking).

App
3.15

3.16
How would you
describe your leadership
style
?

How did you provi
de
leadership for the project?


Target Wordcount


200

Classic theory suggest
there are three different
leadership styles, authoritarian, democratic & laisez
-
faire. Authoritarian, important in some situations like
emergencies & the field of battle, wouldn’t have
睯r步d⁨敲e⁰rin捩pall礠be捡cse⁷e⁷ere⁡汬
癯lunteers


it⁷慳 i浰orta
nt⁴ ⁢ ing⁰ ople⁡ ongⰠ
both礠friend猠睨o⁷ re⁨敬pingⰠthe⁴ 慣aer 睨o
睡猠杩癩ng⁵ ⁨敲⁡ ter
-
獣hool⁴ 浥m⁴ e⁈e慤⁷ho
睡猠wponsoring⁴ e⁰ oje捴⁡cd o映捯urseⰠthe⁰upil猠
睨o⁷ere 捯浩ng⁩n⁡ ter⁳捨ool.

䱡i獥z
-
晡fre慹⁨a癥⁢ en⁡灰ropri慴e⁩映it

睥re⁡
慲tr 捲e慴i癥⁴祰e⁰ oje捴c⁷ ere⁴ e⁦ree⁦low映
ide慳a慮d⁷慮dering晦⁩nto⁴慮gent猠i猠de獩r慢le⸠坥
捯uld⁡汬⁨ 癥⁷慮dered⁩n⁡ dut映the 獥獳ion猬
pi捫ed⁵ ⁦ro洠睨ere⁷ee晴晦⁡ d⁩t⁷ uld⁳till
h慶a⁷or步d.

周i猠proje捴⁲equired
so浥mt祰e o映order…⁳tru捴creⰠ
p慲ti捵l慲l礠with⁴i浥mc慬e猠C 獡set礬 獯 f⁵ ed 愠
de浯捲慴i挠le慤er獨sp⁳t祬e⸠cor⁥硡浰leⰠf⁤ 獣u獳ed
the⁡扩lit礠C⁴ 浰er慭ent映the⁰ pil猠睩th⁴ e
te慣aer⁢efore 獥le捴cng⁷ i捨⁡ci浡l猠to⁵獥⸠坥




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

18


agreed the most suit
able day. I agreed a timetable of
help from my university friends. I suggested how the
Head may overcome any objections from parents, but
these were only suggestions as he could use whatever
arguments he felt suitable. The only area which wasn’t
open to de
bate, particularly during the sessions, was
from the pupils; delivering the session required a
more authoritarian style. This was not something I
was used to (though obviously it’s the normal style in
most school lessons), but it helped keep order & keep
t
o time.

3.17
What are your
strengths
of leadership
and
what ar
eas are there for
improvement?

Target Wordcount


2
00

I believe my strongest skill is in communication. I’m
not shy, so not afraid to ask for help or ask for things
that will achieve the obje
ctive quicker. For example,
the cost of providing the animals was relatively high
and the school said they couldn’t afford more than a
token gesture. So I had to plan an approach to my
Head of Faculty with good reasons why she should
give me £200 for this
Project. I arranged an
appointment to see her and planned how I was going
to sell the idea. I practised on a friend, got some
photos of the school, got a quote from the teacher. I
talked to a friend on a business course to ensure I
could talk the commercia
l side effectively.

One observation I wasn’t expecting was made by a
friend while I was practising to see the Head of
Faculty: I was a bit pushy, bordering on aggressive!
One example was that I used my finger to point a lot
and that my hand gestures can be

a bit too
enthusiastic which cause a virtual barrier. I also used
questions which suggested someone would be foolish
to disagree, ie they weren’t really questions at all,
rather pressure
-
inducing comments. To be
democratic, I needed to tone down the asser
tiveness
element.



3.18
How

effective was
your leadership?


Target Wordcount


200

Strategically, I feel I can usually see the objective &
plan tactics that will achieve that objective


in my
Project I had several Plan Bs in case we had to change
course, a couple of alternative sessions in case
something went wrong with the original sessions
planned and plans to involve other team mates if
someone dropped out. I was also thinking of how this
pilot could help understand how to roll out nationwide,
s
o that if I did have to change course, the revised plan
would include understanding this issue of scalability.

Tactically, I was pleased that I was able to deal with
the two different types of team mate in different





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

19

ways, namely I could cajole & keep my st
udent
friends on board using informal and emotional
methods. And I was professional & organised with the
school staff; I relied heavily on the expertise of the
teacher, but by being organised, punctual & keen, he
was happy to support the project. The harde
st part
was playing the role of teacher with the pupils


learning how to lead / teach a group of teenagers is
something it’s difficult to pick up in six weeks!



3G C
ommunication

Along with teamwork, communication skills are also universally required
when working in
any role, in and industry/sector. You need to show evidence of your use of communication
skills during your Project.

3.19
Which were the main
audiences you had to
communicate with
. What
were the main
characteristics of these
audiences and

how did you
adapt
how you
communicated to address
these

different audiences
?


Target Wordcount


200

The first audience was the school to encourage them
to participate in the programme. The language used
was emotional and focussed on the main beneficiarie
s
namely the pupils. Schools can be very quick
-
moving
organisations; for short term tactical issues like mine,
they make a decision and then implement it straight
away. So the communication had to reflect this quick
decision nature, ie no long discussion p
apers, just
simple bullet points of the pros & cons. They had to
believe in me, so I had to come across as someone
who would do as I said.

Contacting schools is best done via emails they are
often teaching so can’t take phone calls. This means
e浡il猠浵獴s
be 獨srt… e浯瑩on慬l礠eng慧ing⁴ ⁧慩n
慴tention…⁡ tion.

周e other⁡ dien捥⁷ s⁴ e⁰ pil献⁔hey⁥硰x捴ed⁵猠
to⁢  步⁴ eir⁴ a捨crsⰠtelling⁴ e洠睨慴⁴ ⁤o⁩n⁡
獥rie猠o映獨ort⁩n獴su捴con献 f 捯n獩dered⁴r祩ng⁡ 獴祬e
浯mei步⁷ ⁨ ve⁡ ⁵ i癥r獩t
礬⁩e⁡ ⁩n癥獴sg慴i癥
獴祬e⁥ncour慧ing⁵猠瑯 thin欠景rursel癥献⁆or 愠
獨潲t se獳ionn 愠灯aentiall礠di晦i捵lt⁴ pi挠li步
dissection, I didn’t think this appropriate, so
捯浭uni捡瑩on⁷慳 in⁡⁴ 慣aing⁳t祬e⸠fn⁴ e⁦in慬
獥s獩onⰠf⁴ ied⁡⁢ t ref

慮⁩n癥獴sg慴i癥⁴ neⰠ
en捯ur慧ing⁴ e洠mo⁰ 慮⁴ eir睮⁤ 獳e捴con⁷ i捨c
睯r步d⁷ ll⸠卯pthi猠獴祬e⁷ uld⁨ 癥⁷ rked⁡ ter
the礠h慤⁢ 捯me 捯n晩dent⁩n⁷ 慴⁴ e礠睥re⁤oing.



3.20 Explain how you used
five of the 7Cs of
communication during your
project

Target Wordcount


200

1.

Concise


the⁷or歳heet猠景r⁴ e⁤ 獳e捴con
needed⁴ ⁢ 捯n捩獥Ⱐ獩sple⁡ d⁥慳a⁴ re慤
Eie慲ge⁦ontF⁳o⁴ ey⁣ould⁦ollo眠瑨e洠muring




Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

20


the activity.

2.

Concrete


the instructions for the first four
activities were
unambiguous. The last activity
allowed some flexibility.

3.

Correct


the approach to the Head asking
permission to run the programme was very
clear of the proposed dates, times & what we
proposed to do. I had checked various Health &
Safety guidelines to che
ck what precautions
were needed at various age groups.

4.

Complete


beneath the pupils instructions on
every activity were advice about scalpel
technique, pinning out and brushing. They may
not need them each week, but they were there
if needed without clut
tering up the instructions.

5.

Courteous


it can be very daunting walking
into a school as an adult. Pupils expect teachers
to behave in a certain authoritarian way which I
found quite difficult. Being myself, I tried to

treat pupils like adults (all were 16
+) and therefore
went out of my way to be courteous.

3.21 How effective was
your communication and
how did you evaluate this?
In what ways do you need
to further develop your
communication skills?


Target Wordcount


300 (this is a key task that
requires considered reflection)

Measuring effectiveness of my communication to the
school is very difficult; did schools not reply to my
invitation to participate because my message was
poorly communicated or because they sim
ply didn’t
want to participate in the project? For each of the six
schools I targeted, I found out the relevant teacher,
got their email address where possible and sent them
at 3.30pm (teachers skim read emails sent during the
day, I’m told). It fitted on
one page, didn’t have any
attachments and had a timely call to action. I had
three next day, positive responses, one negative two
days later and I had to resend the other two who
quickly replied negatively. At the end of the project, I
did ask the teacher
about how effective my
communications to the school were and he replied
they were “fine”; analysing quality of sales messages
didn’t come very easily to him. He was more
forthcoming about the quality of my communication
with the pupils as he is experienced

in that area.

My communications with the pupils improved over the
course of the six weeks, particularly my written
worksheets. It was fairly easy to evaluate how good
the worksheets were by seeing how many & the type
of questions they asked. The type was
too small, it
was too wordy and the language too complex. I also
expected them to be able to figure out what to do
after reading the work sheet. The teacher stepped in
to clarify the first week, but by the second week I was
better; I also arranged a demo t
o show them what to





Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

21

do rather than reading about what to do. By week six
(albeit the pupils were now more experienced), there
were very few operational questions.

I need to further work on understanding my audience;
so far I feel confident with educational

audiences, but
have no experience of commercial or business
audiences. This will be important for my possible
career when presenting a case for funding. I plan to
do another project next year and will make that more
commercially
-
oriented. I will then have

a chat with
some of the business lecturers if I feel I need help
with that.

3.22 Describe how your
communication during your
Project differed from
academic
/ university
communications

Targ
et Wordcount


100

In terms of tone of communication to the
staff &
pupils at the school, it didn’t differ at all. I treated
pupils as adults as much as possible and the language
I used was the same as university (defining any
unusual words just as my lecturers do).

The main difference was in the clarity of instruc
tion
which was direct and unambiguous


with young
people doing an activity using very sharp scalpels
when they have not done it before. Doing dissection in
the university labs, we are invited to complete
background reading and decide for ourselves how to
approach the activity; this was felt unsuitable for
young inexperienced biologists.



3.23 Apply & analyse an
academic presentation in
terms of the 7Cs

Targ
et Wordcount


150

In a research simulation exercise, we were given
three compounds to measure the
efficacy and
reducing malignant cells (ie see which one kills the
cancerous cells most effectively). The technique was
straightforward


apply the compounds and run
through a luminometer which measures cell death
through light. The key point of the exercis
e was how
to present the findings to get them published in a
trade journal (ie where they would be subject to
scrutiny of academics).

The key C was Coherence; we had to present a clear,
logical sequence of how the experiment was
conducted whilst keeping it

as Concise as possible.
This is a difficult skill


to include only those important
parts that show the experiment was thorough and
reassured the reader of the accuracy of the data
collected.

It needed to be concrete of course
-

the accuracy for a
scient
ific experiment is crucial.






Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

22


3.24 Your Development
Plan. Having completed
your Project, describe the
three most important
actions you will take to
improve those skil
ls you’ve
identified as needing

development

Targ
et Wordcount


200

Leadership. I was
concerned before the Project that I
would find it hard to motivate others. I did find it hard
as there wasn’t a lot in it for my helpers other than
doing me a favour really. Looking at how others do it,
I think I have to work on my confidence


the key to
this will be preparation, ie thinking of all the
objections teammates may come up with and having
thought about answers beforehand rather than
making it up on the spot.

Communication (presentations). I still felt nervous in
front of the class at the end of

the activity, despite
knowing them by name and being able to joke with
them. Having spoken to a number of seemingly
confident people, I think the only way to improve is
practise; I intend to volunteer for much more public
speaking.

Business & Customer Awa
reness. I realised when I
was doing the research how un
-
commercial I felt. For
example, I didn’t realise how many subsidiaries Lonza
had, the significance of being based in Switzerland, of
buying & selling companies & how that affected staff. I
have starte
d to read business & economic news and
plan to enrol on a small business workshop run by our
Careers’ Office.




4
Elevator pitch


A useful tool when preparing for a job application or interview is to produce an
‘elevator pitch’, with yourself as the
‘product’ being pitched.


An elevator pitch is a short summary used to quickly and simply define a product,
service, or organisation; it should last approximately thirty seconds to two minutes,
reflecting the idea that it should be possible to deliver the
summary in the time span
of an elevator ride… An elevator pitch may be presented in oral, written, and video
formats.


Considering your own
‘strengths and marketable skills’/attributes,

create

an elevator
pitch that could be given to a prospective employer
.


4.1
Elevator pitch

Job
-
specific Strengths: Problem solving, methodical

Relevant Skills: Written Communication & Self
-
Management


“I love solving problems, particularly scientific ones
be捡cse⁷ ile⁴ ere⁡ e⁳ometi浥m ob癩ou猠solution猬
fi步⁴ ⁦ind⁴
he⁢ 獴⁳olution⸠cor⁥硡浰leⰠf⁤ d⁡
proje捴⁩n⁴ e⁓ 硴x⁆ r洠mo⁤ 獣o癥r⁴ e 獴se晦i捩ent
睡礠瑯⁰ ri晹⁷慴er 晲o洠愠mo捡c⁳tre慭
 t⁨ d⁦慲m
-
b慳ad 捨c浩捡c猠in itF⸠䉯iling⁷慳 theb癩ou猠





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solution, but that was energy inefficient and not much
help

in countries where energy is expensive. So I
devised a reusable filter which can be dried, shaken
and reused; it had a higher initial cost than boiling,
but after two weeks was cheaper.

I remember I worked all night to test one prototype


I couldn’t let
it go. I wouldn’t say I’m obsessive, but
as I said, I like solving problems.


University has been particularly good for me to learn
how to structure & formalise research. I’m far more
methodical, and with so much equipment available,
has allowed me to
really explore alternative solutions.
It’s also allowed for some great collaborative work


sharing my methods with others has taken us on
some fantastic tangents, most dead
-
ends, but what a
great journey.


My career goals are to make a difference. Maybe I
’m
an idealist, but if I can be involved in contributing to
breakthroughs in discovery, particularly if it helps
improve people’s lives, then that would get me out of
bed in the morning. And if that makes a profit, then
that’s fine by me; I may be an ideal
ist, but I’m a
realist that nothing gets done unless it hits the
commercial imperatives.







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Appendices


Appendix 1:
Self Assessment of Skills


1.1: Summary of
employment statistics for course alumni

Graduate Destinations

Each year, every

university in the UK contacts all UK and EU graduates to find out what
they are doing on a specific date, approximately six months after graduation. This is the
Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

The following analysis is based on

the data supplied by

52 Biology BSc Honours

graduates
from Newcastle University who responded to our survey.

2011 Newcastle University

Biology BSc Honours

Graduates



85%

went into work, study or a combination of both.

Some of those took on voluntary or
unpaid work to

gain experience in the not
-
for
-
profit
sector.

Others were unavailable for employment, which includes those who took time out to
travel, were ill or physically unable to work, or caring for dependants.

The

8%

assumed to be unemployed includes

those with jobs arranged to start after the
date of this survey.

The classification 'other' can refer to a range of individual circumstances, for example, EU
students who return to their country for national service.

Explicit refusals are where leavers se
nd back the questionnaire marking it as a refusal,
write a letter stating not to include them, or verbally state on the telephone that they do
not wish to be included in the survey.

Of those in employment,

55% were in graduate
-
level jobs.

BSc Biology provi
des a
platform to further specialise in the scientific sector. As such, some graduates take a
break from their studies in temporary non
-
graduate level employment to earn money to
fund their further study. See below for detailed examples of further study op
tions taken
by our graduates.

£17,900

was the average salary of all of the graduates who supplied us with salary
details.

Career Choices

The broad range of scientific knowledge gained whilst studying Biology BSc Honours has
led most of our graduates to pur
sue careers within the scientific sector. Many choose to
Appendices





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directly apply the technical skills they have developed in commercial or medical laboratory
based positions, in areas such as biotechnology, electrophoresis, microbiology, and
quality control. Others

secure employment in environmental work, or undertake specialist
study in areas such as conservation, animal behaviour, and environmental consultancy.
Some combine their scientific background with the transferable skills they have developed
to secure furt
her study in environmental business disciplines such as Renewable Energy
Enterprise and Management.


Studying Biology has equipped our graduates with a range of transferable skills which
they are able to apply outside of the scientific sector. Some choose
to capitalise on the
numerical and analytical skills they have developed to work in financial roles such as
credit control. An enhanced ability to understand and explain complex information clearly
has enabled some of our graduates to pursue careers in tea
ching. Others apply their
teamworking, presentation and time management skills to work in business and
commercial positions.

Below are examples of our 2009
-
2011

graduates' employment and further study
destinations.

Graduate Employment

Job Title

Employer

Assistant Technical Officer

Health Protection Agency

Biotechnologist

Lonza Biologics

Business Consultant

IBM UK Ltd

Business Development Manager

Tangible Benefit

Central Laboratory Operator

Procter and Gamble UK

Clinical Capillary Electrophoresis
Product
Specialist

Helena Biosciences Europe

Commercial Graduate

AB Agri

Environmental Health Adviser

Forth Sector

Environmental Management Assistant

AVK

Field Trials Officer

i2L Research Ltd

Graduate Management Trainee

VION Food Group Ltd

Laboratory

Assistant

Quantum Specials Ltd

Medical Laboratory Assistant

NHS
-

North East Strategic Health
Authority

Quality Control Analyst

Merck Sharp and Dohme Ltd

Technologist

Winchester Growers Ltd

Further Study




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Course

Institution

BDS Dental Surgery

Newcastle University

Graduate Diploma in Law

Other UK institution

MBChB

The University of Manchester

MRes Animal Behaviour

Newcastle University

MRes Cancer

Newcastle University

MSc Bioscience

The University of Leeds

MSc Biotechnology

Newcastle
University

MSc Computer Science

University College London

MSc Environmental Consultancy

Newcastle University

MSc Industrial and Commercial Biotechnology

Newcastle University

MSc International Business Management

Newcastle University

MSc Renewable Ener
gy, Enterprise & Management

Newcastle University

MSc Wildlife Conservation & Management

Newcastle University

Petroleum Geochemistry

Newcastle University

PGCE Secondary Science

Newcastle University

PhD Cancer
-

Tuberous Sclerosis

Other UK institution



1.2:
Summary of
employment statistics for graduates within your chosen field

Medical Research Council:

Supporting scientists



Around 5,700 research staff are supported by the MRC, either employed directly in our institutes
and units or funded through
grants and fellowships.



We spent £86m on training awards for postgraduate students and fellows in 2011/12, including
those in the MRC’s own institutes and units.



At March 2012 there were around 1,900 MRC
-
funded PhD students and around 400 MRC fellows
in hi
gher education institutes and MRC research establishments.

Guardian Grad Stats (2011)

19680 graduated in Biological Sciences with 90.6% defined as employed or in further
study.


1.10 Job Search

Use mouse to enlarge to see detail





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Appendix 2:
Customer & Business awareness


2
.1:
What are the key characteristics of the sector?


Reve
nue
Rank
2008
[4
8]

Compan
y

Coun
try

Total
Revenues
(USD

millions)

Healthcare
R&D
2006
(USD

m
illions)

Net
income/
(loss)
2006
(USD

m
illions)

Employee
s 2006

1

Pfizer

USA

67,809

7,599

19,337

122,200

2

Novartis

Switzerl
and

53,324

7,125

11,053

138,000

3

Merck & Co.

USA

45,987

4,783

4,434

74,372

4

Bayer

German
y

44,200

1,791

6,450

106,200

5

GlaxoSmith
Kline

United
Kingdo
m

42,813

6,373

10,135

106,000

6

Johnson
and
Johnson

USA

37,020

5,349

7,202

102,695

7

Sanofi

France

35,645

5,565

5,033

100,735

8

Hoffmann

La Roche

Switzerl
and

33,547

5,258

7,318

100,289

9

AstraZenec
United
Kingdo
26,475

3,902

6,063

50,000+





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a

m

10

Abbott
Laboratorie
s

USA

22,476

2,255

1,717

66,800

11

Bristol
-
Myers
Squibb

USA

17,914

3,067

1,585

60,000

12

Eli Lilly and
Company

USA

15,691

3,129

2,663

50,060

13

Amgen

USA

14,268

3,366

2,950

48,000

14

Boehringer
Ingelheim

German
y

13,284

1,977

2,163

43,000

15

Schering
-
Plough

USA

10,594

2,188

1,057

41,500

16

Baxter
International

USA

10,378

614

1,397

38,428

17

Takeda
Pharmaceut
ical Co.

Japan

10,284

1,620

2,870

15,000

18

Genentech

USA

9,284

1,773

2,113

33,500

19

Procter &
Gamble

USA

8,964

n/a

10,340

29,258


SUM


497,519

70,843

110,077

1,342,700




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AVERAGE


24876

3542

5504

67135


2
.2:
Summary of the factors that affect the industry now.

1.

Cost & length of drug research (investment). The industry needs a pipeline of new drugs, but the costs of
this R&D are vast, partly
because of the volume of testing that needs to be completed before the drugs
are deemed safe for use. This can take several years. The success rate is also low, so considerable sums
are wasted on drugs that can’t be sold.



Ability to patent & keep patent.
Drugs are generally patented for 20 years to treat a particular condition
after which they can be produced licence
-
free (eg paracetemol). To maintain a patent, drug companies
must find a new application for their drug which will allow a patent extension. I
ssues around patents are
complex & costly..

3.

Litigation. This comes from two main areas, consumers who may have suffered side effects from a drug
deemed safe and competitors disputing patents. The urgency to get a drug to market to recoup its
investment ne
eds to be weighed against the huge potential cost of damages if it subsequently proves
unsafe.

4.

Demographic

. The Western world that can afford the latest drug treatments are generally getting older
which creates new opportunities for drugs that extend life

with a higher quality.

2
.
7
:
Who are the main competitors to your chosen company?

Our Markets Are

BioResearch

Cell & molecular biology products, including quality control products for basic drug
discovery and applied research

Nutrition

Nutritional
ingredients for food and feed

Pharma & Biotech

Supporting innovators of novel therapeutics with advanced technologies

Microbial Control

Antimicrobial products for hygiene, wood and water treatment as well as materials
protection

Agriculture

Custom manuf
acturing of agrochemical intermediates and the molluscicide Meta™

Materials Science

High
-
performance materials, performance intermediates and materials protection

Personal Care

Products & services for personal care needs from formulation to preservation
and
testing

Two key competitors are
Tayco Diagnostics

Tayco, the diagnostics division of Perrigo
-
Israel Pharmaceuticals Ltd., specializes in marketing and sales of medical
laboratory systems, reagents, accessories and consumables. It also markets
self
-
monitoring medical devices for
diagnosis and treatment of diabetes.

The division operates throughout Israel to service the central laboratory, hospital, clinic, point of care and self
-
testing markets. Our activities in the medical and research fields
in Israel cover all market segments: medical
(private and public health services), research institutions and the biotech industry.

Covance (USA)

Covance is one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive drug development services
companies with more than

11,000 employees in 60 countries. Through
its
discovery
,

nonclinical
,

clinical

and

commercialization

services, Covance has helped
pharmaceutical and biotech companies develop one
-
third of all prescription medicines in




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t
he market today.

Royal DSM (Netherlands)

Royal DSM is a global science
-
based company active in health, nutrition and materials. By connecting
its unique competences in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences DSM is driving economic prosperity,
environmental p
rogress and social advances to create sustainable value for all stakeholders. DSM
delivers innovative solutions that nourish, protect and improve performance in global markets such
as food and dietary supplements, personal care, feed, pharmaceuticals, medi
cal devices, automotive,
paints, electrical and electronics, life protection, alternative energy and bio
-
based materials. DSM’s
22,000 employees deliver annual net sales of around €9 billion. The company is listed on NYSE
Euronext.

Source of competitors:
hoovers.com (part of Dunn & Bradstreet)

2.
10
: What resources did you use to find this information?





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2
.
11
:
Evaluation

of Company/Organisational

performance


eg targets & success measures
“.
This should include analysis o
f

their financial results
.




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Formulas available in uploaded spreadsheet.

Summary: Financial statements from large organisations like Lonza are difficult for
inexperience investors to analyse. Lonza is particularly complex as it is both multi
-
national
and uses a series of subsidiaries (the figures above are UK subsidiaries). Rea
ders will also
need to appreciate the nature of the industry in that investments in medical solutions are
highly risky with many products failing to be launched as they don’t work; the complexities
of writing off these type of investment costs also add com
plexity.

For example, the 2011 results look good; income is up 9%, expenses are down 8% yet
they still fired their CEO in Jan 2012 for poor results!




2.12
What res
ources did you use to find this information
?

FT.com 25.1.12:


In a brief statement, the

board hinted Mr Borgas had accomplished the task of
repositioning the group, but Lonza now needed a boss with stronger operational skills

“In the challenging years ahead, Lonza will enter a period of focus and improvement on
the return of capital,” said M
r Soiron.

Lonza, which has a record of ditching chief executives, has come under severe
pressure after surprise order cancellations hit its custom manufacturing business
because of lower
-
than
-
forecast capacity utilisation rates, leaving expensive plants
op
erating below ideal levels.

The group, which exports the overwhelming bulk of its output, has also been one of
the

biggest victims of the soaring Swiss franc
. Last summer, Lonza reached a
groundbreaking deal with workers at its core Visp plant. Staff agreed to work longer
Income Statement Lonza Group Ltd
2011
2010
2011
Income
£m
£m
% change
% of Income
Income from investments
£153
£136
13%
81%
Called investment income because they refer to subsidiary companies (c50)
Interest income
£25
£31
-19%
13%
Interest rates have fallen
Other financial income
£10
£7
43%
5%
Other income
£2.0
£1.1
82%
1%
Total Income
£190
£175
9%
100%
Expenses
Personnel
£9.0
£9.2
-2%
10%
Relatively low cost as it's mainly group staff - scientists included in financial expenses
Other admin
£5.3
£5.4
-2%
6%
Interest expenses
£28.5
£24.5
16%
31%
Loans can be used for tax efficiency
Other financial expenses
£46.4
£43.7
6%
50%
This is mainly the support of tehir subsidiaries
Taxes
£2.1
£1.9
11%
2%
Other expenses
£1.5
£1.4
7%
2%
Write-offs on propoerty, plant & equipment
£0.5
£0.4
25%
1%
Write offs on loans
£0.0
£14.8
-100%
0%
Total Expenses
£93.3
£101.3
-8%
100%




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hours for no extra pay to boost productivity and counter negative currency factors.
Similar
arrangements have since been instituted by a number of other Swiss exporters
suffering from currency headwinds and high domestic costs.





3
.1:
Milestones/measures

Dissection Project Milestones





Start
date

Days

Recruit schools




Research to find contact

5.1.12

1


Email

6.1.12

1


Book appointment

13.1.12

1


Meeting

20.1.12

2


Decision

27.1.12

1

Organise Logistics




Book transport

2.2.12

1


Arrange loan equipment

3.2.12

1


Order & arrange payment for animals

3.2.12

2

Delivery




Agree delivery system with teacher

10.2.12

1


Prepare & Print Worksheets

12.2.12

2


Rehearse!

14.2.12

1


Lessons 1
-
6

21.2.12

6

Review




With teacher & head

10.4.12

1


3
.
3
:
Apply innovative and creative techniques to problem solving


Pros

Cons

Open Day at Uof Bath

See what a uni course is
like

Transport


lo睥r 浢er猠
i映獣hool⁡ r慮ge⁴r慮獰ort


See that students are
similar to them

Disruption to lessons for
UoB students


Cheap

Risk of bad experience / put
off by individuals

Video of Day in Life of
Biology student

Quick & Cheap

Lacks impact (would be like
a TV show)


Capture best bits

Not interactive


䉩olog礠i猠
愠摯ang⁳ubje捴


Easy to distribute to many
schools


School talks at many
schools

Impact


the礠could⁳ee⁷
慲e

ordin慲礠people 步
them

呡qking⁡扯 t⁂ olog礠Ee癥n
with images) isn’t as good
慳adoing⁩t


Easy to arrange

Time consuming & relatively
3. Project




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expensive


Lots of students would be
seen

Talks at various times may
clash with Uni lectures

Webcam in Lab


with
commentary where
possible

Show various activities that
go on in a lab

May be very dull if things
don’t happen for a while


Cheap, mass distribution
UK
-
wide

After school when they
could watch it is likely to
the quietest


Modern style which young
people
embrace

Not doing again

Dissection Course (5
day)

It’s a doing course &
therefore fun & memorable

Limited number of students
benefit


Do things they don’t have
resources for in school

Logistically difficult to take
equipment


Help improve their grades
through understanding

Political & cultural potential
problems


3
.
6
:
Reflectively evaluate your performance of a task and identify your strengths and areas
for development

I found a school five miles from campus which was OK as was on a bus route, but we

needed to take equipment with us (including the dead animals for dissection). In the end,
we arranged a lift there via a SU minibus and got bus back. School was in a mixed ability
area, with an established Sixth Form, and with a new, enthusiastic Head who

was very
supportive. Looking back, this was one of the keys to the success of our task; we had a
bad start (one of the Yr11 pupils fainted during the first lesson, his parent phoned up to
complain she didn’t give permission…). She was vociferous and a wea
ker Head may have
cancelled the course, but his support and the way he dealt with it was an eye
-
opener.
Being honest I chose the school because of its location, but I would definitely take more
notice of the enthusiasm of the people involved if I did it ag
ain.

Logistically, things went smoothly overall. We came across issues we had to address the
first week (like disposing of carcases, transporting dirty dissection boards, didn’t realise the
school wouldn’t have disposal aprons), but by second week these we
re ironed out. How
could we have planned for these better? Maybe a ‘customer
-
journey’ approach where we
travelled each step as if a pupil. We could have spoken to the university technician about
how circumstances may differ in a school.

The biggest surpris
e was in the attitudes of the pupils; they weren’t all very grateful for
our efforts! Some were fantastic and really got stuck into it (and these were our core
target


to turn them into Biology undergrads), but trying to be positive with the apathetic
and

frivolous was trying. How would I change the task to counter this? I would run a taster
session and try to discourage the uncommitted from returning. I wouldn’t want to exclude
anyone as we had a couple of pupils who started off messing about but turned i
nto
enthusiasts by the end.

Looking at my strengths in terms of the eight areas, I would say self
-
management was a
success; I showed good organisation abilities and perseverance when some pupils were
difficult to motivate. I showed some leadership skills w
ith my two friends who helped out;
it was leadership in a democratic style as they were my friends, with the challenge to keep
them enthusiastic when things didn’t go well.





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My main weakness was time
-
keeping. We had lecturers before we went so we were alway
s
cutting things tight to get there & set up in time. Once the minibus was delayed and we
arrived to set up just as the pupils were coming in; the difference in attitude of even the
keenest pupils when the room was set up was very surprising. The only thin
g we could
have done to allow for this (other than leaving our lecture early), was to have a Plan B with
something simple the teacher could have set up in case we were delayed, maybe even a
starter task. Changing the animal to be dissected, though, was not

something we could do
at short notice.


3
.
7
:
Interpret feedback and identify positive actions to improve performance

The school staff were very positive as they were obviously grateful we had come in there
to help their pupils. One area we had to work o
n after the first lesson was structure of the
activity; we allowed the pupils too much freedom (like we have at Uni); 16 & 17 year olds
in this environment needed more direction and we had to break the tasks down, with more
demos & questioning to get the m
ost out of the session. Running over the structure of the
lesson in more detail with the Biology teacher beforehand would have helped, ie more
preparation, but we were both busy…

What the teacher really liked was the enthusiasm we brought with us, particul
arly as we
were only a couple of years older than the pupils


she commented that the pupils asked
lots of questions about us in terms of our backgrounds & schooling to check we weren’t
from some exclusive school, but just like them! You can’t fake enthusi
asm, so it’s obviously
key to only involve those uni friends who really want to help or leave them behind.


3.15

Thinking about your project, how did you apply your leadership skills?

Three key qualities are firstly strategic ie being able to see the
bigger picture so that he
can set a course to deliver the objectives. For example, the objective of the Project was to
encourage pupils’ interest in university biology courses. The chosen route was through a
dissection course, but if for some reason we had

to stop half way through, it’s the leaders
job to change course to achieve the objective. So I could have set up a video of someone
else doing the dissections at the university labs & commentated on them.

Secondly empathy with the team. Whilst a leader do
esn’t have to be bent & swayed by the
team, he needs to be able to head off any potential problems, so knowing what the team
thinks is important. For example, one of my volunteer helpers was feeling under a bit of
pressure one week with her course workload
; she didn’t want to let me down, but I
proactively offered to ask someone else to help one particular week to allow her time to
catch up.

Thirdly communication; if a leader can’t communicate what he wants doing, he’s unlikely to
be an effective leader in
the long run. That doesn’t mean barking orders, it means being
able to articulate what the objective is, what needs to be done to achieve it and tactically
what actions need to be taken. It can also mean encouraging interaction in democratic
styles, allowi
ng others to share their thoughts.

Effective teams must have a unity of purpose. They must also be open enough that
everyone feels they are part of the team, and this is often shown by how much and how
freely they feel they can contribute, eg where disagre
ement is welcomed rather than seen
as a negative input.








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Appendix A


Definition of the common Operative
Verb
s


Describe

Give a clear description that includes all the relevant features
-

think of it

as ‘painting a picture with words’


Define

Clearly

explain what a particular term means and give an example, if

appropriate, to show what you mean


Design

Create a plan, proposal or outline to illustrate a straightforward concept or

idea


Identify

Point out or choose the right one / give a list of the m
ain features


Illustrate

Include examples or a diagram to show what you mean


Interpret

Define or explain the meaning of something (words, actions, etc)


List


Provide the information in a list, rather than in continuous writing


Outline

Write a clear
description;
give a summary of /

a general plan showing essential
features but no detail


Plan


Work out and plan how you would carry out a task or activity


State


Provide a clear and full account in speech or writing


Summarise

Write down or
articulate briefly the main points or essential features


Analyse

Identify separate factors, say how they are related and how each one

contributes to the topic


Assess

Give careful consideration to all the factors or events that apply and

identify which
are the most important or relevant


Compare

Identify the main factors that apply in two or more situations and explain

the similarities and differences or advantages and disadvantages


Demonstrate
Provide several relevant examples or related evidence which

clearly
support the arguments you are making. This may include showing practical skills


Design

Create a plan, proposal or outline to illustrate a relatively complex concept

or idea


Explain

Set out in detail the meaning of something, with reasons. More

difficult

than describe or list; it can help to give an example to show what you

mean. Start by introducing the topic then give the ‘how’ or ‘why’.

OR provide details and give reasons and/or evidence to clearly support the
argument you are making


Justif
y

Give reasons or evidence to support your opinion or view to show how you

arrived at these conclusions






Graduate Employability Award


Biology student
6
th

March

2013

39

Appraise

Consider the positive and negative points and give a reasoned judgement


Assess

D
etermine the importance, size, or value of

something


Comment

Give your view after you have considered all the evidence. In particular

decide the importance of all the relevant positive and negative aspects


Criticise

Review a topic or issue objectively and weigh up both positive & negative

points before mak
ing a decision


Draw


Use the evidence you have provided to reach a reasoned judgement

Conclusions




Evaluate

Review the information then bring it together to form a conclusion. Give

evidence for each of your views or statements i.e. a supported judgemen
t.