Dragon Registration and Course Selection- Grades 10-12

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The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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Dragon

Registration and Course Selection
-

Grades 10
-
12


REGISTRATION

All families must complete or update all registration documentation before students can select their
course request. Registration documents can be obtained from the high school

office or downloaded
from the AMHS website (http://www.alco
-
hs.eu.dodea.edu/). The completed registration packet must
be presented to the school registrar by a parent with the following required documents: Copy of orders
with any extensions, Sponsor’s ID
Card, Dependent’s ID or Social Security Card, student’s shot
records and the student’s Course Selection Form.


COURSE SEL
E
CT
ION


Selecting classes is very important and requires planning and discussion between students, parents and
educators. Families sho
uld first review the
DoDEA Graduation Requirements

(page3) and
develop/review a
Graduation Plan

(also called a
Four Year Plan
) for the student. Earning a high
school diploma is the key to opening future opportunities in careers and further education. Caref
ul
planning and review of progress in high school ensures that students will be ready for the types of
challenges they will be facing after graduation. This very important planning should be reviewed
every year and can be aided by using advice of Teachers
, Guidance Counselors and Administrators.



Course Selection Sheets

must be carefully completed using the student’s Graduation Plan. The
courses selected will provide the
necessary information need for AM
HS to plan and provide
for

your
student’s education.




REPEATING CLASSES FOR GRADE IMPROVEMENT

All DoDEA students are required to have a 2.0 Grade Point Average as part of their graduation
requirements.
Sometimes it is to the advantage of a student to repeat a class because of a failure or low
grade.

Students repeating a class will have their Cumulative GPA recalculated using the most recent
grade for the class taken and credit is awarded for the repeated class. The original class name and grade
will not be removed from the student’s transcript.
















The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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Table of Contents for the AM
HS Course Selection Guide


Graduation Requirements



Requirements







Page 3


Auxiliary Educational Programs


Special Education






Page 4

Support Classes for Language Arts and Math


Page 4

Virtual School


Distance Education




Page 4

AP Courses







Page 4


Course Offering by Department


Fine Arts







Page 5
-
7

Language Arts







Page
8
-
10

Mathematics







Page 1
1
-
14

Physical Ed
ucation

and Health




Page
1
5



Career

Technical Education






Com
mun
ication Technology




Page 15
-
1
7


Computer Studies





Page
17



Engineering
& Sci
entific Technology


Page 18
-
19



Other CTE Electives





Page
20



Air

Force Junior ROTC




Page 21
-
22

Sciences







Page 23
-
27

Second Languages






Page 2
8
-
30

Social Studies







Page 30
-
34

Other Electives and Support Classes




Page
34
-
35













The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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Department of Defense Dependent Schools

Graduation Requirements

Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) o
f 2.0 is required for graduation.


MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION: 26 Carnegie Units as follows:


SUBJECT AREA REQUIREMENTS







CREDITS


LANGUAGE ARTS











4


(English 9, 10, 11, 12 or AP English. 2 credits of ESL may be substituted)


SOCIAL STUDIES











3


(Requ
ired: 1 credit of
World History, 1 credit of US History


and 1/2 credit of US Government)


MATHEMATICS
-

(class of 2016 and beyond must have 4 credits in math)



3


(Required: 1 credit of Alg

I, 1 credit of Geometry and 1 credit of higher


level math. Completion of Algebra II recommended for college preparation)


SCIENCE












3

(Required: 1 credit of Biology and 1 credit of a Chemistry or Physics course)




SECOND LANGUAGE










2


(Must be the same language. Recommend 3
-
4 credits for college preparation)


C
AREER

TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE formerly PTS)






2


(One half credit must be in computer technology class.

CTE

credits include Business, Communications, Co
mputer,

Engineering or AFROTC)








FINE ARTS












1


(art, instrument
al or vocal music,

or humanities)


PHYSICAL EDUCATION










1.5


(1/2 credit of Personal Fitness, 1/2 credit of Life Time Sports and


1/2 Physical Activities and Nutrition )


HEALTH












0.5


TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS









20


ELECTIVES












6


TOTAL CREDITS











26



The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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SPECIAL EDUCATION


Alconbury Middle

High School’s special education departme
nt serves a diverse student population by
providing programs and se
rvices for
students with disabilities.

Course offerings include resource
cl
asses in e
nglish and mathematics, learning strategies classes for skill development and enhancement,
inclusion cla
sses within the mainstream program with and without support, and a Cooperative Work
Experience program. The program includes a staff of special education teachers, counselors, nurse,
school psychologist, speech pathologist, and coordinator for the hearing

impaired, coordinator for the
visually impaired, educational prescriptions, case study committee chairperson, and educational aides
working within the school

curriculum. The RAF Alconbury

Educational Developmental Intervention
Servic
es or EDIS Clinic sup
ports the AM
HS special education program. EDIS Clinic provides services
in physical and occupational therapy programs, psychological counseling and testing for students
requiring such services.


SUPPORT CLASSES FOR LANGUAGE ARTS & MATHEMATICS


The requirem
ents for a DoDEA diploma ar
e very vigorous and demanding. AM
HS offers support
classes to help the student who needs supplemental instruction and time to succeed in language arts
and
mathematics classes offered at AM
HS. Student’ standardized test scores and

past performance will
be used to determine the need for enrollment in a support class.


VIRTUAL SCHOOL COURSES

(by telecommunications)


DoDEA Virtual School
gives students opportunities to take courses via telecommunications that are
not offered at
AM
HS

or to solve schedule conflicts. To offer these classes, the computer is used to
communicate with the
Virtual School

teacher who is station
ed at another school in Europe,

the Far
East

or Washington D.C.

The student is assigned a class period that is used

to work on assignments
and have computers available to send and receive communications with the
Virtual School

teacher.
There will be a supervising teacher working with the student during their assigned period, but this
coordinator is not the instructor
for the course. The coordinator can help with communications with
the
Virtual School
teacher, equipment problems and scheduling, but the coordinator may offer limited
or no instruction concerning course content.
Telecommunication

classes require the stud
ent to be
self
-
motivated and have disciplined work habits.

For more information about
DoDEA Virtual
School courses go to the following site:
http://www.dodea.edu/home/virtualSchool.cfm


AP COURSES


The Advancement Placement provides students with the opp
ortunity for advanced and in depth study
in selected courses. AP classes are designed to be equivalent in difficulty to classes taken by freshman
in college. In May, students have the opportunity to take the AP Exam from the College Board (the
same compa
ny that designs and administers the SAT). Based on the score of this AP Exam, some
colleges and universities have policies of granting college credit, advancement to upper level classes or
entry into honors programs. DoDDS will pay the AP test fee. Only

students completing the AP Exam
will be awarded an “Honors Grade Point” in their cumulative grade point average. Grade average of
“B” in the subject area and teacher recommendation is advised before enrolling in any AP course.


The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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ALCONBURY

HIGH SCHOOL C
OURSE OFFERINGS


FINE ARTS



ART COURSES




Fundamentals of Art 9
-
12 (Year):
The fundamental of art course
is designed as the basic entry course for the art program. The course
provides instruction in the use of the elements of line, Color texture,
shape,
and space arrangement in works of art. Students learn how to compose a
balanced, rhythmic, unified design through a series of assignments that
use a variety of two
-

and three
-
dimensional art media. Course emphasis is
placed on basic techniques of dr
awing, painting, printmaking, ceramics,
and sculpture that can be used throughout life for communication,
expression, and enjoyment.

Drawing

9
-
12 (Year or 1/2)
The drawing course is designed for students who want to explore
drawing as a means of self
-
expre
ssion. The course activities develop students’ skills in the
techniques and styles of drawing media, Students explore the two and three
-
dimensional
aspects in drawing and develop personal expression.

Ceramics

9
-
12 (Year or ½)
The ceramics course is desig
ned to provide a studio
-
oriented
experience with the study of clay. Students explore the properties of clay by making utilitarian
and sculptural forms that emphasize form, design, and craftsmanship. The course includes
instruction in clay application, kiln

management, and the historical role of ceramics in our
culture.

Painting

9
-
12 (Year or ½ )

The painting course is designed for students who want to develop
skills in one or more painting media. The media may be oils, acrylic, watercolor or tempera.
Studen
ts will receive instruction in the techniques and history of various painting styles.
Projects and exercises will help students develop the skills and understanding necessary for
personal expression. Emphasis will be placed on color theory, painting techni
ques, and other
skills appropriate to the medium.

S
tudio Art Levels I, II & III

10
-
12 (Year):
The studio art course is designed either as units of
study in various media, or as an individualized course for advanced students. Students who
would like to develop skill in several media would benefit from this course. Students can
concentrate on selecte
d media by choosing activities from a wide range of options such as
drawing, watercolor painting, acrylic painting, oil painting, sculpture, ceramics, commercial
art, creative crafts, lettering, printmaking, and mixed media.
Suggested Preparation
:
Fundamen
tals of Art



The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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.










MUSIC COURSES



Beginning Chorus

9
-

12 (Year)

Course is designed for first time students
interested in developing vocal techniques. Course will incorporate the study of
basic music theory and choral performances through vocal pedagogical training,
staff and rhythmic notation recognition, and performan
ce of two, three, and four
part choral
repertoires
. Students will be required to perform at various school
functions, community festivities, and concerts during academic year.



Advanced Chorus

10


12 (Year) Course is designed to enhance experienced
basic sight
-
singing
skills, music analysis, and vocal pedagogical techniques through the performance of 3 and 4
-
part
choral repertoire. This course may be repeated for credit.

Beginning Band
9
-
12

(Year)

The beginning band course is designed to introduc
e students to
the following: basic instrumental music techniques such as tone production, articulation,
breath control, pitch discrimination; melodic and rhythmic concepts and patterns; practice
skills and habits; solo, ensemble, and full group rehearsals;

a variety of instrumental
repertoire; opportunities for private instruction; experiences in performing; and sound practice
habits.

Advanced Band

9



12 (Year)

The advanced band course is designed to acquaint students
with advanced instrumental music ski
lls. The content includes, but is not limited to, the
following: the interpretation and analyzation of musical scores; the application of musical
nuances in playing from a score; independent performance of all major and minor scales;
advanced rhythm patter
ns; performance as a soloist and in small and large group ensembles;
a variety of music repertoire, including style, periods, forms, electronic music; intermediate to
advanced level sight
-
reading exercises; and introduction to computer/synthesizer musical
composition.




The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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MUSIC COURSES (con’t)


Guitar I
9
-
12 (Semester or Year)
The guitar I course is designed to introduce students to the
study of the guitar. The content includes, but is not limited to, staff notation and rhythm
concepts, major and minor
chord recognition, strumming and picking techniques, duple and
triple meters, listening skills, guitar styles and forms, familiarity in the playing of all strings,
variety of guitar repertoire, performance as soloists and in group ensembles, tuning and
int
onation, and guitar accompaniment techniques.

Piano I

9
-
12 (semester or year)

The piano I course is designed to introduce students to the
study of the piano. The content includes, but is not limited to, learning correct keyboard
playing positions; developi
ng listening skills; reading, writing and playing notation in bass and
treble clefs; reading, writing and playing rhythm concepts and patterns; constructing major
and minor scales with triads played in both hands; playing in duple and triple meter;
practic
ing and playing simple melodies to develop left
-

and right
-
hand independence; playing
simple accompaniments and duets; and experimenting with multiple examples of classical
and contemporary piano repertoire.

Piano II

9
-
12 (semester or year)

The piano II course is designed to further develop students’
music and keyboard skills. The content includes, but is not limited to, refining listening skills,
and reading and writing notation in bass and treble clefs; reading, writing, and playing more
co
mplex rhythm concepts and patterns, constructing major and minor scales with arpeggiated
triads and dominant seventh chords played in both hands; playing in varied examples of
duple and triple meter; playing technically advanced melodies to enhance left
-

a
nd right
-
hand
independence, playing varied accompaniment styles and duets; and experimenting with more
complex examples of classical and contemporary piano repertoire.


Humanities

9
-
12

(
Year or
Sem)

The humanities course is designed to be an integrated stu
dy of
history, literature, philosophy, the visual arts, theatre, dance, and music. Emphasis is placed on critical
thinking, creativity, and the rights and responsibilities of the individual in a society. Students explore
aspects of human behavior and human

ideals. Instructional activities will be interdisciplinary in focus,
drawing content, examples, and resources from a variety of curricular areas. Emphasis is placed on the
arts, including theater, the visual arts, dance, music, architecture, film, and tel
evision. Activities also
emphasize the cultural resources of the host nation and the diverse cultures where DoDDS schools are
located.




















The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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LANGUAGE ARTS




L
anguage Arts Grade 10

(Year)

The Language Arts 10 course is designed to strengthen
students’ skills in listening, speaking, writing, literature, and language. The content includes,
but is not limited to, outlining or mapping main ideas and details of information received
aurally or through research; using vocabulary and sentence structur
e appropriate to the
listener and the situation; understanding the importance of speech in influencing the course
of events in a democratic society; using interviewing skills; using parliamentary procedure
skills; using formal debating skills; refining tes
t
-
taking skills to meet secondary and post
-
secondary demands; writing a paraphrase, summary, or precise; writing compositions for
newspaper publication; writing a short paper using research techniques; selecting appropriate
sources of information for the t
opic; understanding and explaining the type of conflict in a
given literary selection (psychological, social, environmental); experiencing a wide range of
literary forms (e.g., short stories, novels, non
-
fiction, poetry, drama); using the media center
rese
arch facilities; and reading self
-
selected books to help students learn to view reading as
a useful and pleasurable activity.


Honors Literature
-
World History 10

(Year):

This is an integrated course for students
interested in taking 10th grade Honors
Social Studies and English. The course uses the
chronological study of world history from 1500 to the present and covers the themes of
culture, science and technology, economics, and government. The content integrates
readings and writings that focus on ex
ploring, interpreting, and analyzing literature and other
readings that extend and support the world history discussions and research. The course is a
demanding study of world history and literature, requiring students to understand, analyze,
and interpret

the connections between major historical events and the writings of the time.
Critical thinking, philosophical discussion, concept attainment, vocabulary development,
language usage, and research will be stressed. The development of discussion and
present
ation skills will focus on analysis, interpretation, and evaluation.



Language Arts 11

(Year):
The Language Arts 11 course is designed to strengthen students’
skills in listening, speaking, writing, literature, and language. The content includes, but is n
ot
limited to, developing an increasingly comprehensive vocabulary in conversation and
discussion; developing small group and large group discussion skills; inferring conclusions
from a series of oral statements; respecting the presence of dialects and reg
ional variations
in speech; writing essays responding to social, political, and literary concepts; writing
resumes; writing compositions of more than one paragraph using narration, exposition, and/
The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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or description; developing individual criteria for the aes
thetic appreciation of literature;
recognizing and understanding the use of literary and stylistic devices; dramatizing literature;
experiencing a wide range of literary works written in the United States by writers from the
major ethnic groups in the U.S.

population, including both classic and modern works; using
the media center research facilities; and reading self
-
selected books to help students learn to
view reading as a useful and pleasurable activity.

Language Arts 12

(Year):

The Language Arts 12 co
urse is designed to strengthen students’
skills in listening, speaking, writing, literature, and language. The content includes, but is not
limited to, recognizing how continued development of communication skills can enhance
one’s future career and leisur
e activities; using communication skills in preparing for career
choices; using the research skills necessary to meet the demands of post
-
secondary classes;
using computer technology, where hardware is available, as an aid in writing compositions;
writing
in a clear and personal style; responding to literary masterpieces which are the
common heritage of all people; engaging in perceptive reading and critical analysis of English
and world literature; engaging in discussions of philosophical questions as reve
aled in literary
works; and using the media center research facilities.








AP English Language
and Composition

11
-
12 (Year):

AP English
Language and Composition is
designed for students willing to accept an intellectual
challenge and is intended to
engage higher order analytic and synthetic thinking and
writing skills. Wide readings of
recognized importance and styles from diffe
rent time periods
will provide students the
opportunity to explore and appreciate trends in linguistic
styles. In addition to reading primarily
nonfiction materials, students may read poetry and fiction to
determine the impact of a writer’s
“linguistic and

rhetorical choices.” Students will write in informal and
formal contexts to become competent in their personal writing and proficient in expository, analytical, and argumentative
assignments. Evaluation and use of primary and secondary sources in addition

to learning multiple methods to cite sources
will be learned in this course. Timed responses mirroring the demands of the AP exam will be a frequent form of evaluation.
Though the system has an open enrollment policy, students should understand this is a
college class taught in a high school
classroom and is designed to culminate in the AP Language and Composition Exam. Those who are enrolled in AP
Language and Composition may expect a more intense workload; the breadth, pace, and depth of material covered

exceeds
the standard English class. This course is the equivalent of an introductory college level composition class with college lev
el
requirements. It is intended to be both rigorous and challenging. Students are expected to take the AP exam at the end
of
the course.

Major Concepts/Content:

Students will experience, interpret, and evaluate primarily nonfiction readings of recognized
importance and styles from different time periods covering multiple disciplines. In addition, the critical examination of
the
contextual relationship among graphics and visual images to text and as stand
-
alone messages will be mastered. Readings
will be challenging, complex, and rich; collegial discussions amongst the students will deepen their understanding of the use
,
struc
ture, and impact of language embodied in a work.

Course Objectives:

Students will:



Actively participate in group discussions and critique prose styles selected from a range of disciplines and rhetorical
contexts written during various time periods.



Apply
the writing process to interpret experience, evaluate, and emulate examples of high quality writing leading to the
development of “stylistic maturity.”

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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Write expository, analytical, and argumentative assignments and manipulate compositions to account for v
arying
audiences, contexts, and goals.



Use language effectively and cogently in both the personal and academic realms.



Critically examine the contextual relationship among graphics and visual images to text and as stand
-
alone messages.



Assess and incorpora
te primary and secondary sources into research projects and cite all sources appropriately.



Learn the critical skill of synthesizing information from their readings to produce a fresh perspective.


AP English Literature and Composition

11
-
12 (Year):
Major

Concepts/Content:

AP English Literature
and Composition is designed for students willing to accept an intellectual challenge and is intended to engage creative and
analytical thinking skills. Students will experience, interpret, and evaluate challenging i
maginative literature of recognized
importance. Reading and writing are approached as reciprocal processes in this course, and students will have multiple
opportunities to recognize and implement good writing and appreciate exemplary literature. What a stu
dent reads lends itself
to what a

student writes; what a student

writes enhances and extends their understanding of literature and the writer’s craft.
Students will write to understand, explain, and evaluate literature in a clear and cogent style. Although

critical analysis of the
literature is the primary focus of this course, students will have the opportunity to write creatively. Timed responses mirro
ring
the demands of the AP exam will be a frequent form of evaluation. Though the system has an open enro
llment policy,
students should understand this is a college class taught in a high school classroom and is designed to culminate in the AP
Literature and Composition Exam. Those who are enrolled in AP Literature and Composition may expect a more intense
wo
rkload; the breadth, pace, and depth of material covered exceeds the standard English class. This course is the
equivalent of an introductory college level literature class with college level requirements. It is intended to be both rigor
ous
and challenging
. Students are expected to take the AP exam at the end of this course.

Major Instructional Activities:

This course provides a “representative” background in the “deliberate reading and critical
analysis” of British and American literature in addition to re
adings drawn from several genres (poetry, drama, fiction, and
expository prose) and cultures dating from the sixteenth century to the present. This wide reading will allow students to
appreciate the linguistic changes that have occurred with the English la
nguage. Readings will be numerous and collegial
discussions amongst the students will deepen their understanding of the use, structure, and impact of language embodied in
a literary work. Wide reading will provide students the opportunity to explore and ap
preciate trends in linguistic styles across
time. In addition to reading numerous works, students will get to know a few pieces well from multiple perspectives.

Course Objectives:

Learn a personal and collective process for making meaning of a literary wor
k, connect this meaning to
other pieces of literature, and recognize thecommonality of the human experience as expressed through literature. Apply the
language and vocabulary of the discipline to explain their understanding and interpretation of a literary

work. Recognize the
environmental and historical values manifested in a piece of literature.



Identify and explain the use of literary devices and elements in a piece of literature.



Actively participate in group discussions and critique writings about lit
erature.



Apply the writing process to interpret, experience, and evaluate literary works leading to the development of “stylistic
maturity.”





The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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MATHEMATICS


Algebra I

9


12 (Year):
This course may be the most common entry level course for
students who
have had a rich and varied middle level mathematics program. It expands upon
basic algebraic concepts previously acquired and integrates those principles with everyday
life. The processes of problem solving, reasoning, communication and making connections
are emphasized. Students will use formulas, functions, and equations to describe and clarify
relationships, and will use geometry to represent algebraic relationships. Students will learn
how to write and translate expressions into mathematical forms, solv
e first and second
degree equations, and use the concept of a function to model real
-
world phenomena.


Al
gebra

I Lab

9


12

(Year) I:

This class will support and
reinforce the basic algebraic concepts taught in the Algebra I,
MAA 301, course. Students wi
ll have additional opportunities to
learn how to write and translate expressions into mathematical
forms, solve first and second degree equations, and use the
concept of a function to model real
-
world phenomena. They will
also expand their problem solving
experiences to further develop
their reasoning, representation, connections, and communication
skills.



Geometry

9



12 (Year) : The content of this course will include the study of polygons and circles.
Algebraic concepts will be integrated with the geometric concepts.
Prerequisite: Algebra I. This
course is required to meet DoDEA graduation requirements.


Geometr
y Lab

9


12 (Year): This class is a support class for Geometry students. As part of this class
the computer program Geometry Cognitive Tutor will be used to support the learning of mathematical
skills. This class is recommended for students scoring below
the 50 percentile on the Math section of
the Terra Nova Standardized Test or by recommendation from a previous math teacher. The credit
earned will count as an elective credit and will not be counted towards the DoDEA requirement of
math credits but will c
ount as an elective credit.

Concurrent enrollment in Geometry required.
This
course is recommended for any student who earned a grade of C or lower in Algebra I.


Discrete Math

11

12 (Year): This class is concerned with the mathematics of non
-
continuous
sets.


Topics covered include graph theory, combinatorics, matrices,

codes, game theory, and voting
theory.
Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry.

This course is NOT recommended for college bound
juniors or seniors except in conjunction with Algebra II o
r Math Analysis.


Algebra II

10


12 (Year): This course will emphasize power, roots, radicals, exponential and
logarithmic functions, sequences and series, statistics and circular trigonometric functions. This course
is highly recommended for any student
wishing to enroll in a four
-
year university.
Prerequisites:
Algebra I and Geometry

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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12



Math Lab III

10
-
12 (Year) This class is a support class for Algebra II and Discrete Math. This class
is recommended for students scoring below the 50 percentile on the Math section of the Terra Nova
Standardized Test or by recommendation from a previous math teacher.

The credit earned will count as
an elective credit and will not be counted towards the DoDEA requirement of math credits but will
count as an elective credit.

Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or Discrete Math required.
This
course is recommended for a
ny student who earned a grade of C or lower in Algebra I and/or
Geometry.


Algebraic Modeling

9
-
12 (Year):

Algebraic Modeling will help students understand the
connection between math and their daily lives. Students will explore Algebra 1 topics such as
li
near, quadratic, exponential and piecewise functions by modeling real world situations.
Students will identify key characteristics, represent problems algebraically and graphically,
determine lines/curves of best fit and make predictions. Concepts and solu
tions are
presented in non
-
threatening, easy
-
to
-
understand language with numerous examples to
illustrate ideas. Whether the student will go on to study early childhood education, graphic
arts, automotive technologies, criminal justice or something else, th
e student will discover
that the practical applications of mathematical modeling will continue to be useful well after
they have finished this course.

Advanced Functions

9
-
12

(Year):

This course is beyond the Algebra II level which prepares
the student fo
r college mathematics. Advanced Functions provides students an in
-
depth
study of modeling and applying functions. Home, work, recreation, consumer issues, public
policy, and scientific investigations are just a few of the areas from which applications shou
ld
originate. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software,
should be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Financial Literacy

9
-
12

(1/2 year):

This course introduces students to the mathematics and
mathemati
cal models used in various financial topics. The focus will be on the applied
mathematics, primarily algebraic concepts, surrounding finance and business fundamentals.
Students are provided opportunities to develop habits of mind while applying skills and
knowledge in mathematics to the area of Finance. Concepts related to graphical, tabular, and
algorithmic representations of functions introduced in Algebra I will be reinforced and
enhanced through the financial problems explored.

Engineering Math

9
-
12

(1/2 year):

This course is to increase student preparedness in basic
algebra and trigonometry skills as used in engineering. The objective of this course is to
increase student motivation and success in engineering through an application
-
oriented,
hands
-
on introduction to engineering mathematics. This course does not introduce new
concepts in mathematics. This course assumes that students have been previously exposed
to all necessary mathematical concepts. These concepts will be reviewed, refreshed, and
m
astered through application to engineering problems. Math topics will be reinforced within
the context of engineering application.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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13


Math Analysis

(Pre
-
Calculus)

11
-

12 (Year):

This course will involve students in units and
topics of study of operations with

functions and equations, circular functions, vectors,
applications of matrices, complex and polar coordinates, recursion, advanced proof ideas,
rates and areas, statistical interference, algebra and algorithms. Problem solving in real world
applications i
nvolving these units of study will be the beginning and focal points of lessons.
Connections will be made of graphs with equations with real world situations. Reasoning in
trigonometry, probability, discrete math, mathematical structure, and the conceptual

underpinnings of calculus is a major emphasis in this course. Prerequisite course: Algebra II

AP Calculus AB

11


12 (Year):
AP Calculus AB provides an understanding of the fundamental concepts and
methods of differential and integral calculus with an em
phasis on their application, and the use of multiple representations
incorporating graphic, numeric, analytic, algebraic, and verbal and written responses. Technology is an integral part of the
course and includes the use of graphing calculators, computers
, and data analysis software. The College Board requires the
use of graphing calculators for this course. Though our system has an open enrollment policy, students should understand
that this course is designed to be a fourth
-
year mathematics course, and t
he equivalent of a year
-
long, college
-
level course
in single variable calculus. The course requires a solid foundation of advanced topics in algebra, geometry, trigonometry,
analytic geometry, and elementary functions. Teaching strategies include collabora
tive small
-
group work, pairs engaged in
data analysis, whole
-
group presentations, peer
-
to
-
peer discussions, and an integration of technology when appropriate. All
aspects of progress in the course are measured using multiple methods such as authentic, perf
ormance, observational, and
assessment for learning (formative); group and individual projects, student presentations, and assessment of learning
(summative). Students are expected to take the AP Calculus AB Exam at the end of this course.

Major Concepts/
Content:

AP Calculus AB is a college
-
level course which differs from a high school calculus course in
terms of depth of coverage and time commitments for study. The content is organized to emphasize major topics which
include the following: (1) functions,
graphs, and limits; (2) derivatives, and (3) integrals. These topics are detailed in the AP
Calculus AB course description, which is available at
AP Central
.

Course Objectives:




Understand the major topics
of functions, limits, derivatives, and integrals.



Incorporate multiple representations of functions using graphic, numeric, analytic, algebraic, and verbal and written
responses, and understand the connections among these representations.



Construct an unde
rstanding of derivatives as an instantaneous rate of change, applications of derivatives as functions,
and use various techniques to solve problems including local linear approximations.



Understand definite integrals as a limit of Riemann sums, and as the
net accumulation of sums, and use them to solve
a variety of problems.



Develop an understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus as a relationship between derivatives and definite
integrals.



Use graphing calculators to problem solve, experiment with
‘what if’ hypotheses, display and interpret results, and
justify conclusions.



Make sense of and determine the reasonableness of solutions including units of measurement.



Develop an appreciation for an historical perspective of calculus.

Course Philosophy:

Understanding change is the basis of this course. The study of the concept of the derivative in calculus
is the formal study of mathematical change. A key component of the course is fluency in the use of multiple representations
that include graphic, numer
ic, analytic, algebraic, and verbal and written responses. Although the development of techniques
and fluency with algebraic symbolism to represent problems is important, it is not a primary focus of the course. Rather, the

course emphasizes differential a
nd integral calculus for functions of a single variable through the Fundamental Theorem of
Calculus.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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14



AP Calculus BC/
Virtual School only

11
-
12 (Year):


Students are engaged in authentic applications
involving limits and continuity, derivatives, integrals,
transcendental functions, and infinite series.


The
course emphasizes a multi
-
representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems
being expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.


The standards develop the
uni
fying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and
modeling.


Graphing calculators are required for this course as mandated by the College Board.


See
AP Courses
on Page 4
. Also s
ee Distance Education on Page 4.

P
rerequisite: Completion of AP
Calculus AB.

AP Statistics

11


12 (Year):. P
rerequisite: Algebra II


AP
Statistics provides a systematic development of the
concepts, principles, and tools of statistics with an emphasis on inquiry and critical
-
thinking skil
ls associated with the collection,
representation, analysis, and drawing conclusions from authentic data. Technology is a central component of the course and in
cludes the
use of graphing calculators, computers, and data analysis software. The College Board

requires the use of graphing calculators for this
course. Though our system has an open enrollment policy, students should understand that this course is designed to be a four
th
-
year
mathematics course, and the equivalent of an introductory, one
-
semester,

non
-
calculus
-
based, college
-
level statistics course. The course
requires a working knowledge of Algebra II, and quantitative reasoning. Teaching strategies include collaborative small
-
group work, pairs
engaged in data analysis, whole
-
group presentations,
peer
-
to
-
peer discussions, and an integration of technology when appropriate. All
aspects of progress in the course are measured using multiple methods such as authentic, performance, observational, and asse
ssment for
learning (formative); group and individ
ual projects, student presentations, and assessment of learning (summative). Students are expected
to take the AP Statistics Exam at the end of this course.

Major Concepts/Content:

AP Statistics is a college
-
level course which differs from a high school s
tatistics course in terms of depth of
coverage and time commitments for study. The content is organized to emphasize major topics which include the following: (1)
data
investigation, (2) designing and conducting studies, (3) anticipating patterns using pro
bability and simulations, and (4) statistical inference.
These topics are detailed in the AP Statistics course description, which is available at AP Central ( (
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com
).

Course Objectives:




Develop statistical thinking based on a conceptual understanding of major topics and tools of data collection, representation
, analysis,
inference, and conclusions.



Analyze and interpret data f
rom graphical displays and numerical distribution summaries, and justify conclusions.



Employ the language and symbols of statistics, and effectively communicate the formulation of questions, data collection meth
ods and
displays, interpretation of
statistical analysis, and evaluation of inferences and predictions based on the data.



Use probability as a tool to predict how the distribution of data is related to an appropriate mathematical model.



Develop an understanding of statistical inference throu
gh the use of confidence intervals and tests of significance.



Use graphing calculators and computers in the exploration, statistical analysis, simulation, and modeling of data.



Make sense of and evaluate the reasonableness of conclusions based on data.



Dev
elop an appreciation for an historical perspective of statistics.

Course Philosophy:

Understanding statistics as the science of data is the basis of this course. Statistics is the formal study of data as
numbers in a context. Students build an understandin
g of statistical concepts as they construct relationships and make connections among
the various representations of data and how data is interpreted. Although the development of techniques and fluency with grap
hic and
numeric representations to represent p
roblems is important, it is not the only focus of the course. Rather, the course emphasizes a
conceptual development of statistical thinking through the use of an exploratory analysis of real data often using technology
, planning and
implementing well
-
desi
gned studies, and engaging students in active learning.



The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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15



PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH



Health

10
-
12 (Sem):

Health is designed to provide students with comprehensive information about
contemporary health topics such as wellness and nutrition,

personal
fitness, family and social health,
growth and development, and, alcohol, tobacco and substance use/abuse.




PE/Personal Fitness

9
-
12 (1st Sem): This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and
opportunities to make personal decisions about t
heir fitness. This is accomplished through a
combination of classroom and activity experiences. Students learn information, which enables them to
plan their own personal fitness program. This course is required to meet DoDEA graduation
requirements.



PE/Lifetime Sports

9
-
12 (2nd Sem): Lifetime Sports is an activity course designed to help students
develop skills in activities they will be able to enjoy for a lifetime. A variety of sports activities are
offered. This course is required to meet DoDEA gr
aduation requirements.











PE/Physical Activity and Nutrition

9
-
12 (Sem)
This course provides a variety of
opportunities for students to experience alternative, non
-
competitive
physical activities. It is designed to enable students to develop the
mo
vement skills and conceptual knowledge necessary to implement
a

personal physical activity and nutrition

plan. Students participate in non
-
competitive physical activity and

meal planning

with pre and post physical
activity and nutrition assessments.

Stud
ents access information, obtain and
analyze data, and develop their own personal physical activity and nutrition
p
lan.
This course is required to meet DoDEA graduation requirements.
















The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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16


C
areer

Technical Education

(CTE)

Formerly known as PTS



COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY




All of these courses meet computer graduation requirements except for Yearbook Production



Computer Animation

10
-
12 (Year)
This course is designed to provide students with the instruction
and skills

to create digital illustrations, modeling and animation, character animation, digital motion
imagery, and game design. The content includes, but is not limited to, 3D modeling using
3ds Max
2010
, materials and textures, rendering, and computer animation.
Students will also create, record, and
edit digital audio, video, and photographic imagery. This course will utilize software programs to
develop animation, morphing, 3
-
D graphics, and virtual reality projects. It is recommended that
aspiring graphic desig
ners, computer animators, electronic game designers, engineers, CAD
technicians, architects, interior decorators take this course. Students will be required to plan, design,
and produce projects, develop solutions to problem solving activities, present ide
as and information
orally and in writing, investigate content
-
related occupations, assume leadership roles, and work
cooperatively.
Recommended for students to complete Engineering Drawing
& Architectural
Draw/CAD

in preparation for Computer Animation
.


Video Communications I

09
-
12 (Year):

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts
and equipment related to video production. Through a hands
-
on, project oriented approach, students
will apply knowledge on filming, composition, linear/non
-
linear insert editing, lighting, storyboarding,
audio and computer graphics/effects in order to communicate effectively using the video
communication medium. A variety of instructional activities will be used so students can successfully
apply the video c
ommunication concepts. Students will learn correct filming techniques and how to
edit video and sound in order to communicate clearly. Students will also combine digital video footage
with non
-
linear computer based editing in order to produce a video proje
ct of high quality. Computer
graphics, transitions, and filter effects will also be incorporated into video productions.
Students
will explore the historical background, and career fields related to video/film
production in order to decide if this is a car
eer field they may be interested
in.



Video Communications II

10
-
12 (Year):
The Video Communications
Seminar course will expand on the student's ability to apply concepts
and skills learned in the first course. Students will continue to refine
their vide
o production skills while completing video communication
projects at a quality level consistent with post secondary programs or
entry level in the career field. Students will construct studio and/or on
-
site editing situations and assist others with the app
lication of video
communication concepts. Students will continue to refine their video communication skills by
producing a wider variety of video productions for the school and community. Projects will emphasize
the application of both basic and advanced c
omputer based graphics and nonlinear computer based
editing.

PREPARATION: Video Communications I


The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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17



Web Design


10
-
12 (Year)
In Website Development/Management, students will design,
implement and manage a website. This is a
hands
-
on laboratory course desi
g
n
ed to teach
students the concepts, skills and processes involved in website
development and management.




COMPUTER STUDIES



Computer Applications I

9
-
12 (Sem):


The Computer Applications I course is designed to
provide the student with the opportunity to expand technology knowledge and apply various
technology applications.This course will equip the student with the necessary technology
tools for personal use, emp
loyment and advanced education.



Word Processing Software Applications
(A

M
ICROSOFT
O
FFICE
S
PECIALIST
C
OURSE
U
SING
Word)

9
-

12 (Sem)
:

Word Processing Software Applications provides students with the opportunity to
develop professional level skills in
word processing software. Skills taught include creating,
customizing, managing and organizing documents by using formatting and visual content that
is appropriate for the information presented. This may include reviewing, sharing, and
securing content.


P
resentations Software Applications

(A

M
ICROSOFT
O
FFICE
S
PECIALIST
C
OURSE USING
PowerPoint
)
9


12 (Sem):
Presentations Software Applications provides students with the opportunity to
develop professional level skills in presentations software. Skills includ
e creating and
formatting presentations, creating and formatting slide content, working with visual content,
collaborating on and delivering presentations.


Database Software Applications
(A

M
ICROSOFT
O
FFICE
S
PECIALIST
C
OURSE USING
A
CCESS
)

9



12 (Year):

Database Software Applications provides students with the opportunity to
develop professional level skills in database management. Skills include structuring a
database, creating and formatting database elements, entering and modifying data, creating
and
modifying queries, presenting and sharing data, managing and maintaining databases.

Spreadsheet Software Applications

(A

M
ICROSOFT
O
FFICE
S
PECIALIST
C
OURSE USING
E
XEL
)

9



12
(
Sem
)
Spreadsheet Software Applications provides students with the opportunity to

develop
professional level skills in spreadsheet software. Curriculum will include instruction in creating
data and content, analyzing data, formatting data and content, collaborating and managing
workbooks.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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18




ENGINEERING & SCIENTIF
IC TECHNOLOGY



A
ll of these courses meet computer graduation requirements except for Eng
ineering Design &
Technology I.



Engineering Drawing/CAD

09
-
12 (Year)

The engineering drawing/CADD

(computer aided drawing
and design) course is designed to provide beginning students with instruction and skills in drawing and
design fundamentals through the use of CADD workstations. The content includes, but is not limited
to, orthographic projection
s, pictorial drawings, working drawings for construction, manufacturing and
graphical solutions. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken by aspiring engineering
students, architects, and drafting technicians. Students will be required to plan
, design, and produce
projects, present ideas and information orally and in writing, investigate content
-
related occupations,
and work cooperatively.
Skills learned in this class will prepare students to be successful in
Architectural Drawing and Computer
Animation.



Architectural Draw/CAD

10



12 (Year) The architectural drawing course is designed to provide
students with instruction and skills in computer aided drawing (CAD) fundamentals commonly used in
the production of residential and commercial buildings. The course includes the study of

the basic
fundamentals of design, and the skills related to the production of architectural designs. The content
includes, but is not limited to, designing interior and exterior elements of structures in both two
-
dimensional and three
-
dimensional represen
tations. It is recommended that future architects, engineers,
drafting technicians, interior decorators, and homeowners take this course. Students will be required to
plan, design, and produce projects, present ideas and information orally and in writing,
investigate
content
-
related occupations, assume leadership roles and work cooperatively.
Students should have
completed Engineering Drawing as preparation for Architectural Draw/CAD
.



App Arch Design/CAD

11
-
12 (Year)
Students will work in design teams on a realistic architectural
design project. A variety of computer software programs will be used in developing a presentation of
final project solutions.


Students will be required to plan, design, and produce a project.

They will
develop solutions to problem solving activities, communicate ideas and information orally and in
writing, investigate content
-
related occupations, and assume leadership roles and work cooperatively.
The final projects will be presented to a revi
ew panel of peers for evaluation. Students will use the
Internet as one of many tools in researching their project designs. This course is recommended for
aspiring architects, designers, engineers, CAD technicians, and interior decorators. Students will be

required to plan, design, and produce projects, develop solutions to problem solving activities, present
ideas and information orally and in writing, investigate content
-
related occupations, assume leadership
roles, and work cooperatively.
Students shoul
d have completed Engineering Drawing &
Architectural Draw/CAD in preparation for
Applied Architectural Drawing/CAD
.




The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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19


ENGINEERING & SCIENTIFIC TECHNOLOGY

(con’t)


Computer Service and Support (A+)
: 9
-
12 (Year) This program is intended to prepare students for
computer support careers. Students enrolled in this course will learn how to perform shop
maintenance, repair computers, install operating systems and software, acquire employment skills, as
w
ell as operate a service and support business. The course will provide students with concepts and
skills necessary to achieve certification in PC Repair and Technical Support. This distributed learning
model of instruction provides a blend of instruction w
ith hands
-
on experiences that reflects current
industry practices. During the course, students will identify and use hand tools, PC hardware and
software, and will explore electronics theory. Installation, upgrade and repair will be explored in new
and ol
der personal computer systems. Several operating systems also will be reviewed. Successful
completion of this course should prepare the student to pass the CSS examination for certification.


Home Networking (
Cisco I
A)

10
-
11 (Year): This course prepares
students to
become network engineers and prepares them for entrance into a technology
career field or further technology study. The program includes a complete
range of basic and advanced networking concepts
--
from pulling cables
through such complex conce
pts as subnet

masking rules and strategies.

This course requires tremendou
s dedication and independence.
Students
must be self
-
motivated and have the discipline to do most of the reading
outside of class.











Business

Networking

11
-
12 (Year)
This s
econd course prepares students to become
network engineers and prepares them for entrance into a technology career field or for further
technology study. This course includes field experience in network problem solving.
Successful completion of this course

(and Home Networking) should qualify the student to
pass the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) exam.



Cisco Networking III?>




Robotics (
Engineering Design
)

9
-
12 (Year)
The

Robotics Engineering course teaches high
school students the engineering/design process using mechanisms, machines, and robotic
systems. Students progress at their own pace while studying and performing tasks
independently and in small groups. Hands
-
on ac
tivities supplemented with demonstrations,
mentorship, and study trips familiarize students with the concepts and application of robotics
technologies. Performing laboratory experiments, students will gain firsthand knowledge of
simple machines, fabricatio
n, and logic systems. Students will also learn how to program
complex robotic systems to perform a variety of interesting and useful tasks. Using robotics
as a vehicle for instruction, engineering education will engage students meaningfully thereby
increas
ing interest in the pursuit of engineering careers.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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20





Other

CTE ELECTIVES











Family Consumer Science

9
-
12 (
Sem): The
personal and family
consumer science course is designed to provide
students with basic
constructs, skills,
and competencies essential to
living in the 21st Century.
Students will explore the roles they will assume
as adults and acquire skills
needed in life. Included will be the importance
of food selection and
nutrition. Also included will be units on quali
ty of
life, personal relationships,
family living, parenthood, infant care, early childhood
development, adolescence,
courtship, conflict resolution, and personal environment design.


Culinary Arts I
10
-
12 (Year):
The Culinary Arts courses will teach the
skills required for a
career in the restaurant and food industry. This course usually consists of practical training in
the kitchen. Students will learn knife skills and basic food preparation techniques as well as
practical sanitation skills. Other topics

include: sauces, soups & stocks, elements of entrée
production, fundamentals of baking, pastry arts, nutrition and menu planning, dining room
service, international cuisine, food preservation, purchasing and receiving, catering, and
presentation & plate d
esign.

Culinary Arts II
10
-
12 (Year):

The Culinary Arts courses will teach the skills required for a
career in the restaurant and food industry. This course builds on the skills learned in Culinary
Arts I. This course consists of practical training in the
kitchen. Students will learn advanced
knife skills and food preparation techniques as well as practical sanitation skills. Further
advanced instruction in table service, baking, pastries, and management techniques are
emphasized.


















The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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21


Air Force

Junior Reserve Officer Training Co
rp
s (AFJROTC)


Aerospace Science and Leadership Education Curriculum
integrate

five
themes: Aviation, National Defense, Careers, Space, and Leadership.
Each year’s course consists of Aerospace Science and Leadership
Edu
cation.
The Aerospace Science course provides and introduction to the scientific and technical aspects of
aerospace. Leadership Education provides the experiences that will acquaint the cadets with discipline,
responsibility, and citizenship. Cadets lear
n necessary leadership fundamentals to prepare them to
assume leadership responsibilities within the cadet corps. Leadership includes engaging in Air Force
customs and courtesies, participating in drill and ceremonies, giving and receiving instructions, a
nd
acting as leaders and members of an organization.

The practical activities associated with the corps include color guard, drill team competition, academic,
orienteering, and, physical fitness clubs, incentive flights in military aircraft, an awards ba
nquet,
military ball, curriculum related field trips, and summer leadership schools (1/2 credit). Cadets will be
issued a complete Air Force uniform. Uniform wear and behavior standards are an integral part of the
course and are rigorously enforced.


C
ourse details follow.


JROTC Level

JROTC 1

JROTC 2

JROTC 3

JROTC 4

Length of
Course

1 Year

1 Year

1 Year

1 Year

Credit

1/2 Elective per
Semester

1/2 Elective per
Semester

1/2 Elective per
Semester

1/2 Elective per
Semester

Grade
Placement

9, 10, 11, or
12

10, 11, or 12

11 or 12

12

Prerequisite

None

JROTC 1

JROTC 1, 2

JROTC 1, 2, 3


JROTC 1


Aerospace Science I: A Journey Into Aviation History
.
Course objectives:



Know the historical facts and impacts of the early attempts to fly.



Know the major
historical contributors to the development of flight.



Comprehend the contributions of the U.S. Air Force to modern aviation history.



Be familiar with key events of space exploration history.


Leadership Education I
:
Citizenship, Character & AF Tradition
.

Course objectives:



Know the importance of AFJROTC history, mission, purpose, goals, and objectives.



Know military traditions and importance of maintaining high standard of dress and personal
appearance.







The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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22


JROTC 2

Aerospace Science II: The Science of
Flight
. Course objectives:



Know the atmosphere environment.



Know the basic human requirements of flight.



Comprehend how Bernoulli’s principle and Newton’s Laws of Motion are applied to the theory
of flight and operating principles of different types of en
gines



Understand the basic elements of navigation, four basic navigation instruments, and current
methods of navigation.

Leadership Education II: Communication, Awareness & Leadership
.
Course objectives:



Apply the key factors of effective communications.



Know the ways in which personal awareness affects individual actions.



Understand the key elements of building and encouraging effective teams.



Apply the key behaviors for becoming a credible and competent leader.

JROTC 3


Aerospace Science III: Exploring S
pace
. Course objectives:



Know the history of astronomy and characteristics of our solar system.



Comprehend the “big picture” of space exploration to include history of spaceflight,
organizations doing work in space, and overall space environment.



Know the

key concepts for getting from surface of Earth into Earth orbit and to other planets
and back again.



Know how spacecraft, rockets, and launch vehicles are designed and built.



Know the latest advances in space and technology.

Leadership Education III:
Life Skills & Career Opportunities
.
Course
objectives:



Comprehend specific career options.



Know the elements of a personal budget and financial plan.



Understand the requirements for applying to a college or university.



Apply the essential process for purs
uing a career.

JROTC 4

Aerospace Science IV: Management of the Cadet Corps
. Course
objectives:



Apply theories and techniques learned in previous leadership courses.



Know how to develop leadership and management competency through participation.



Apply stre
ngthened organizational skills through active incorporation.



Know how to develop confidence in ability by exercising decision
-
making skills.



Apply Air Force standards, discipline, and conduct.


Leadership Education IV: Principles of Management
.
Course obj
ectives:



Know the history and the importance of management



Comprehend the techniques and skills involved in planning and decision making.



Understand concepts of managing change, stress, and innovation.



Know the key elements of group and individual behavior
, the importance of the communication
process, and the characteristics of a good leader.



The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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23









SCIENCE


Laboratory Requirement: Students who take these courses listed below spend a
minimum of 30% of their time engaged in
laboratory exercises.



Physics Applications

9
-
12 (Year)
This course is designed to present concepts of physics in
relation to real
-

world experiences. Information is presented in an integrated approach, linking
physics with technology, social perspectives, and the history and nature of science.
The
course prese
nts a thematic approach to physics using explorations of topics. Kinematics and
dynamics are introduced by studying the physics of sports and transportation systems.
Communication and information technologies are used to examine wave theory, light, and
sou
nd. Electrical and thermal energy topics are studied within the context of the home, as
well as on a global scale. Applications of physics to health and medicine provide
opportunities to study x
-
rays, CT scans, and ultrasound. Scientific predictions, such
as those
associated with radioactive decay, Newton’s first two laws, the Law of Universal Gravitation,
and special relativity, are contrasted with non
-
scientific views in order to highlight the
characteristics of good science.


Chemistry Applications

9
-
12

(Year):
Chemistry Applications is designed to help students
understand the chemistry behind some important societal issues. Information is presented in
an integrated approach with science as inquiry, science & technology, science & social
perspectives, an
d the history & nature of science. The course integrates unifying science
concepts and processes of systems, order & organization, evidence, models & explanation,
change, consistency & equilibrium, and form & function.
Scientific inquiry and understanding
about inquiry are emphasized through practical implications and meaningful applications.
Students study basic concepts of chemistry, while integrating physical concepts with societal
issues.


Biology

10
-
12 (Year):

Biology is designed to provide students wi
th an integrated approach to
the study of living organisms, in addition to science as inquiry, science & technology, science
& social perspectives, and the history & nature of science. The course integrates unifying
science concepts and processes of system
s, order & organization, evidence, models &
explanation, change, consistency & equilibrium; and form & function.



The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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Chemistry

10
-
12 (Year):
Chemistry is designed to help students
understand the major principles of chemistry. Information is acquired
throu
gh an integrated approach, incorporating advanced topics with
science as inquiry, science & technology, science & social perspectives,
and the history & nature of science. The course integrates unifying
science concepts and processes of systems, order & or
ganization,
evidence, models & explanation, change, consistency & equilibrium; and form & function.
Scientific inquiry and understanding about inquiry are emphasized through practical
implications and meaningful applications. Topics students’ study include
s atomic theory and
structure, chemical bonding, principles of chemical reactions, molecular structure, and how
science and technology relate to chemistry.

Earth & Space
Science

10
-
12 (Year):
Earth and Space is designed to be an elective course
for student
s with a career or special interest and high motivation for an in
-
depth study of earth
or space science. It is designed to help students understand the world around them and
increase their ability to evaluate that world. Information is presented in an inte
grated
approach with science as inquiry, science & technology, science & social perspectives, and
the history & nature of science. The course integrates unifying science concepts and
processes of systems, order & organization, evidence, models & explanatio
n, change,
consistency & equilibrium; and form & function.
Scientific inquiry and understanding about
inquiry are emphasized through practical implications and meaningful applications. Topics
students’ study includes geology, astronomy, meteorology, oceano
graphy, and ecology.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

11
-
12 (Year):

Human Anatomy &

Physiology is designed to
be an elective course for students with a career or special interest and high motivation for an
in
-
depth study of human structures and functions. Information is presented in an integrated
approach with science as inquiry, science

& technology, science & social perspectives, and
the history & nature of science. The course integrates biology and chemistry using unifying
concepts and processes of systems, order & organization, evidence, models & explanation,
change, consistency & equ
ilibrium, and form & function.
Scientific inquiry and understanding
about inquiry are emphasized through practical and meaningful applications. Topics students
study includes the muscular, nervous, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, endocrine,

and reproductive systems, and genetics.

Physics

10
-
12 (Year):
Completion of Algebra II recommended.

Physics presents basic
concepts of physics in relation to world experiences. Information is presented in an integrated
approach, linking physics with techn
ology, social perspectives, and the history and nature of
science.

Physics is designed to provide an understanding of the physical laws fundamental to
all sciences. Fundamental laws of mechanics are introduced, along with measurement and
problem
-
solving te
chniques. Other topics included are wave theory, heat, sound, light,
magnetism, electricity, atomic structure, nuclear reactions, and high energy physics.



The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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AP Biology

11
-
12 (Year):

AP Biology provides an understanding of the unifying themes and fundamental concepts
and principles of biology with an emphasis on inquiry and critical thinking skills including problem solving, mathematical
reasoning, and experimental investigations. Topi
cs of study include molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and
organisms and populations. Laboratory work is an integral component of this course. Technology including graphing
calculators, probe ware, graphing and data analysis software, and biologi
cal apparatus is used throughout this course.

Though our system has an open enrollment policy, students should understand that this course is designed to be a second
year biology course, and the equivalent of a two
-
semester long introductory, college leve
l biology course. The course
requires a working knowledge of biology, and chemistry. The breadth, pace and depth of material covered exceeds the
standard high school Biology course, as does the college
-
level textbook, laboratory work, and time and effort r
equired of
students. This course provides the biology foundations for college majors in biology. Students are expected to take the AP
Biology Exam at the end of this course.

Laboratory Requirement:

Students who take this course spend a minimum of 30% of their time engaged in hands
-
on
laboratory exercises.

Major Concepts/Content:

AP Biology is a college
-
level course which differs from a high school Biology course in terms of
depth of coverage, the ty
pe of laboratory work and time commitments for study. The three topics in AP Biology that are
detailed in the AP Biology course description, which is available on AP Central (
http://apcentral.collegeboard.c
om
). These
topics and relative time percentages for coverage of each are as listed below:



Molecules and Cells 25%



Heredity and Evolution 25%



Organisms and Populations 50%

Course Objectives:




To develop a conceptual understanding of the major themes of mod
ern biology (evolution, energy transfer, continuity
and change, structure and function, regulation, and interdependence) as a vehicle to investigate the concepts,
principles, and topics of biology.



To develop and apply scientific inquiry and critical think
ing skills, through active hands
-
on participation in the asking
and answering of testable questions, and employing the components of a well
-
designed experimental investigation.



To foster scientific habits of mind including curiosity, creativity, and object
ivity; and appreciate science as a process
rather than an accumulation of knowledge.



To apply an understanding of biological knowledge and scientific methodology to environmental and social issues.

Course Philosophy:

Scientific inquiry is the basis of this course. Scientific inquiry is defined as the diverse ways in which
scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work. Scientific inquiry

also refers to the act
ivities through which students develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an
understanding of how scientists study the natural world (NSTA, 2004).

This includes active use of the well
-
designed investigation in which students: 1)fo
rm testable questions and hypotheses,
2)design and conduct appropriate investigative procedures, including the identification and control of appropriate variables,

3)organize, display and critically analyze results, 4)draw inferences, summarize results and

develop conclusions, and
5)communicate their results for critique by others. Based on the philosophy that scientific knowledge is best acquired throug
h
inquiry, the course uses a variety of techniques to promote inquiry in the classroom (ex. multiple revi
sions, high quality
questioning, synthesis, making conclusions based on evidence, etc).

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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26


Instruction is designed and sequenced to provide students with learning opportunities in the appropriate settings. They
include laboratories, classrooms, forms of techn
ology, and field studies. Teaching strategies include in depth laboratory
investigations, demonstrations, collaborative peer
-
to
-
peer discussions, and student hands
-
on experiences. Inquiry requires
adequate and timely access to the technology of scientific
investigations including computers, internet and online resources,
probe ware, graphing calculators, databases, spreadsheets, word processes and presentation software, as well as the
experimental apparatus of biology.



AP Environmental Science

11
-
12 (Year
)

AP Environmental Science provides an investigative approach to the
interrelationships of the natural world through the study of the fundamental concepts, principles, and methodologies of
environmental science, with an emphasis on inquiry and critical think
ing skills including problem solving and experimental
investigations. Topics of study include Earth systems and resources, ecosystems and energy flow, population biology, land
and water use, energy resources and consumption, pollution, and global change. L
aboratory work and field studies are an
integral component of this course. Technology including graphing calculators, probe ware, graphing and data analysis
software, and environmental sciences apparatus is used throughout this course.

Though our system h
as an open enrollment policy, students should understand that this course is designed to be a second
year environmental science course, and the equivalent of a one semester
-
long, laboratory
-
based, introductory, college level
environmental science course. T
he course requires a working knowledge of biology, chemistry and/or physics, and one year
of algebra. The breadth, pace and depth of material covered exceeds the standard high school Environmental Science
course, as does the college
-
level textbook, laborat
ory work, and time and effort required of students. Students are expected
to take the AP Environmental Science Exam at the end of this course.

Laboratory Requirement:

Students who take this course spend a minimum of 30% of their time engaged in hands
-
on
la
boratory exercises.

Major Concepts/Content:

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college
course in environmental science. Environmental science is an interdisciplinary course that embraces a wide variety o
f topics
structured around unifying themes in science. These themes in AP Environmental Science are detailed in the AP
Environmental Science course description, which is available on AP Central (
http://apce
ntral.collegeboard.com
).

Course Objectives:




To understand the fundamental concepts and principles and methodologies of environmental science as a means to
understand the interrelationships of the natural world.



To identify, investigate and analyze environ
mental issues and problems of the natural and man
-
made world.



To evaluate the relative risks of environmental issues and explore their resolution.



To develop problem solving skills, through the active asking and answering of testable questions, and employi
ng the
components of a well
-
designed experimental investigation.

Course Philosophy:

Scientific inquiry is the basis of this course. Scientific inquiry is defined as the diverse ways in which
scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based

on the evidence derived from their work. Scientific inquiry
also refers to the activities through which students develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an
understanding of how scientists study the natural world (NSTA, 2004). T
his includes active use of the well
-
designed
investigation in which students: 1) form testable questions and hypotheses, 2) design and conduct appropriate investigative
procedures, including the identification and control of appropriate variables, 3) organ
ize, display and critically analyze results,
4) draw inferences, summarize results and develop conclusions, and 5) communicate their results for critique by others.
Based on the philosophy that scientific knowledge is best acquired through inquiry, the cou
rse uses a variety of techniques
to promote inquiry in the classroom (ex. multiple revisions, high quality questioning, synthesis, making conclusions based on

evidence, etc). Instruction is designed and sequenced to provide students with learning opportuni
ties in the appropriate
settings. They include laboratories, classrooms, forms of technology, and field studies. Teaching strategies include in depth

laboratory investigations, demonstrations, collaborative peer
-
to
-
peer discussions, and student hands
-
on ex
periences. Inquiry
requires adequate and timely access to the technology of scientific investigations including computers, internet and online
resources, probe ware, graphing calculators, databases, spreadsheets, word processes and presentation software, a
s well
as the experimental apparatus of environmental science.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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27


AP Chemistry

11
-
12 (Year):
AP Chemistry provides an orderly development of the fundamental concepts and principles of
chemistry with an emphasis on inquiry and critical thinking skills includ
ing problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and experimental
investigations. Topics of study include structure of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, and descriptive
chemistry. Laboratory work is an integral component of this course. Technology
including graphing calculators,
probe ware, graphing and data analysis software, and chemistry apparatus is used throughout this course.

Though our system has an open enrollment policy, students should understand that this course is designed to
be a
second year chemistry course, and the equivalent of a yearlong introductory, college level general
chemistry course. The course requires a working knowledge of chemistry, and second
-
year algebra. The
breadth, pace and depth of material covered exceeds the
standard high school Chemistry course, as does the
college
-
level textbook, laboratory work, and time and effort required of students. Students are expected to take
the AP Chemistry Exam at the end of this course.

Laboratory Requirement:

Students who take t
his course spend a minimum of 30% of their time engaged in hands
-
on laboratory exercises.

Major Concepts/Content:

AP Chemistry is a college
-
level course which differs from a high school Chemistry course in terms of depth of
coverage, the type of laboratory work and time commitments for study. The topics in AP Chemistry are detaied in the AP Chemis
try course
descripti
on, which is available on AP Central (
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com
).

Course Objectives:




To understand the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry through the investigation of chemical phenome
na, theories and
experimental methods.



To develop problem solving skills, and mathematical reasoning, through the active asking and answering of testable questions,

and
employing the components of a well
-
designed experimental investigation.



To foster scien
tific habits of mind including curiosity, creativity, and objectivity.



To understand the interconnections of chemistry to the other sciences, society, culture, and technology.

Course Philosophy:

Scientific inquiry is the basis of this course. Scientific in
quiry is defined as the diverse ways in which scientists study
the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work. Scientific inquiry also refers to t
he activities
through which students develop knowledge and understan
ding of scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how scientists study the
natural world (NSTA, 2004). This includes active use of the well
-
designed investigation in which students: 1) form testable questions and
hypotheses, 2) design and conduct ap
propriate investigative procedures, including the identification and control of appropriate variables, 3)
organize, display and critically analyze results, 4) draw inferences, summarize results and develop conclusions, and 5) commu
nicate their
results for
critique by others. Based on the philosophy that scientific knowledge is best acquired through inquiry, the course uses a var
iety of
techniques to promote inquiry in the classroom (ex. multiple revisions, high quality questioning, synthesis, making conclus
ions based on
evidence, etc).

Instruction is designed and sequenced to provide students with learning opportunities in the appropriate settings. They inclu
de laboratories,
classrooms, forms of technology, and field studies. Teaching strategies include in
depth laboratory investigations, demonstrations,
collaborative peer
-
to
-
peer discussions, and student hands
-
on experiences. Inquiry requires adequate and timely access to the technology of
scientific investigations including computers, internet and online r
esources, probe ware, graphing calculators, databases, spreadsheets,
word processes and presentation software, as well as the experimental apparatus of chemistry.





The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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28


SECOND LANGUAGE


The main focus of Second Language Program is to prepare students to meet

the ever
-
increasing
demands of an interdependent world community by enabling them to recognize the relevance of
learning second languages, to value the importance of learning about other cultures, and to develop a
speaking proficiency in one or more langu
ages.


The Second Language Program has been restructured using the draft of the National Standards in
Foreign Language Education prepared by the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language.
The emphasis of all courses has shifted to oral proficiency

so that students will be able to develop
speaking competencies beginning in Year I. Students receive instruction during each class period in
the target language since the goal is to improve students’ listening and speaking skills with a special
focus on
communication.


Students looking to enroll in four year universities are re
commended to take three or four

years of the
same second language or two years of two different languages. Some universities prefer high school
students have two years of their second language experience sometime between 9
th

and 12
th

grades.



Mandarin Chinese I or

Spanish I

9
-
12 (Y
ear):
The foreign language

I course is designed to
teach students the basic everyday survival skills needed to communicate in Chinese
/Spanish

and will follow the 5 C’s of national and DoDEA Standards: Communication, Cultures,
Connections, Comparisons, and

Communities. This course will lay the groundwork for
building Chinese
/Spanish

language and culture skills starting at the beginning (Novice) level.
The full scope of language skills will be taught: listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing.

Grammar will form a structural basis for accurate communication. Students will
learn to pronounce and discriminate among the various tones of the language and respond to
and to imitate authentic patterns of intonation, rhythm, and pronunciation. Students
learn to
give simple oral and written information by using appropriate learned vocabulary, word order,
and grammatical forms, and to read silently and aloud with comprehension. The major oral
and written linguistic principles are presented through multiple

resources, including
multimedia, simple stories, magazines, newspapers, and computer programs that are
representative of the culture.


The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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29


Mandarin Chinese II or

Spanish II

9
-
12 (Year):
The foreign language II course is designed to
provide activities, proje
cts, and experiences that enable students to appreciate and value the
host nation’s (or target language) culture, Students are also made aware of the value of
foreign language study. Career opportunities are analyzed and students learn that the
knowledge o
f a second language can be a useful tool in international, economical, and social
situations. The major linguistic principles and language skills covered in level II include the
following: usage of singular and plural nouns and interrogative, definite, ind
efinite,
demonstrative and possessive adjectives; identifying and using the active voice in the
indicative mood; identifying and using the imperative, the future tense, all forms of the past
tense, progressives, and the subjunctive mood; identifying and us
ing subject pronouns, direct
object pronouns, indirect object pronouns, and the emphatic, reflexive, interrogative,
demonstrative, and relative pronouns; identifying and using the most common prepositions;
identifying and using comparison of adjectives; an
d identifying and using the formation of
adverbs. Students should also be familiar with short stories, essays, magazines, simple
readers, newspapers, filmstrips, films, slides, videos, and computer programs that are
representative of the target language an
d culture. L
-
8.The content of the foreign language,
level II course includes teaching students to follow specific directions given in the target
language, and to Understand main ideas after listening to presentations on familiar topics.
Students learn to s
peak in the target language using basic sentence patterns correctly, read
a variety of materials in the target language, and demonstrate writing skills in the target
language.

Mandarin Chinese III or

Spanish III

9
-
12 (Year):
The foreign language III course

is designed
to continue the teaching of interest, sensitivity, and appreciation for the host nation or target
language culture. Students continue learning to value the broadened career opportunities
open to those who have knowledge of a second language an
d culture. In foreign language III,
students review and reinforce grammatical principles learned in foreign language II. Listening,
speaking, reading, writing, and critical thinking skills become more spontaneous, and fluency
in all skills is emphasized. T
he art of translating, interpreting, and analyzing information and
concepts is stressed. Students are encouraged to think in the target language.

Spanish IV

9
-
12 (Year):
The foreign language IV course is designed to continue reviewing
and reinforcing all p
reviously presented foreign language concepts and grammar. Students
demonstrate self
-
reliance and proficiency in using proper grammar and syntax of the foreign
language. Emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills. Students read literature,
magaz
ines, newspapers, and a variety of other host nation/target language materials. They
use the host nation/target language for creative writing. Plays, films, and videos are viewed in
the host nation/target language. Critical writings of material viewed are
required. Fluency in
speaking the language and in the art of translating is continually stressed.






The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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30


AP Spanish Language,
11
-
12 (Year):
The AP Spanish Language Course is a college level course, conducted in
Spanish, which prepares students to communicate proficiently through three modes: interpretive (receptive communication),
presentational (1
-
way productive communication), and interperso
nal (2
-
way interactive communication). This course
emphasizes the five domains of learning found in the DoDEA Foreign Language Standards: Communication, Cultures,
Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. This class is interactive in nature with the expec
tation that students will be
actively engaged in all assignments and projects. Students will be assessed in all the learning domains and on major
projects. Weighted grades are calculated for students completing the course and taking the requisite AP exam.
Students are
expected to take the AP exam at the end of this course.

Major Concepts/Content:

AP Spanish Language is equivalent to fifth and sixth semester college work (3rd year college)
such as found in university level Spanish Composition and Conversati
on courses. The 5 domains of learning
(Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) involve the skills of listening, speaking, reading,
writing, and developing cultural awareness appropriate to this level of coursework. The academic
rigor for this course is high.
Authentic materials are used in addition to the required text.

Course Objectives:

By the end of this course, the successful AP Spanish Language student will:



Comprehend Spanish (Advanced level or above on ACTFL scale) that i
s intended for native speakers in a variety of
settings



Demonstrate strong communication skills (Pre
-
Advanced on ACTFL scale) in the interpersonal, presentational, and
interpretive modes



Demonstrate a strong command of Spanish linguistic skills (Pre
-
Advanc
ed on ACTFL scale) to support communication
(accuracy/fluency)



Produce Spanish (Pre
-
Advanced on ACTFL scale) comprehensible to native speakers in a variety of settings



Acquire information from authentic sources in Spanish



Demonstrate a heightened awareness

of cultural perspectives, practices, and products of Hispanic peoples.

Course Philosophy:

The Foreign Language Department intends to graduate students who are linguistically proficient and
culturally competent in a 2nd language. AP Spanish Language is for

students who wish to develop strong proficiency and
integrate their language skills.




SOCIAL STUDIES


World History 9


Civilizations

(Year)
:
The students will examine the social, cultural and
technological changes that occurred in Europe, Africa, and Asia in the beginnings of human
society through 1500 C.E. After reviewing the ancient world and the ways in which
archaeologists and historians un
cover the past, students study the history and geography of
great civilizations as well as the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and commodities.
They learn about the political, economic, social, and cultural development of Europe which
influenced
the rise of Western Civilization 500 to 1500 and the origins and accomplishments
of the Renaissance period.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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31


Honors

World History
-

Literature 9

(Year):




This is an integrated course for students
interested in taking 9th grade Honors Social Studies and En
glish. The course uses the
chronological study of world history from Ancient Civilization to 1500 A.D. and covers the
themes of culture, science/technology and society, geography, and
time/continuity and change. The content integrates readings and
writings

that focus on exploring, interpreting, and analyzing
literature and other readings that extend and support the world
history discussions and research. The themes of geography
provide the focus for preparing students to understand how
humans adapt to the e
nvironment. The course is a demanding
study of world history and literature, requiring students to
understand, analyze, and interpret the connections between major historical events and the
writings of the time. Critical thinking, philosophical discussion,

concept attainment, vocabulary
development, language usage, and research will be stressed. The development of discussion
and presentation skills will focus on analysis, interpretation, and evaluation.

World History

9
-
12 (Year):
The world history course is

designed to build on the content in the
seventh and ninth grade geographical and cultural studies by studying the historical
development of these cultures. The course continues the chronological study of ancient world
civilizations begun in grade six. Aft
er an overview of the Early Ages, the course emphasizes
the period from the Middle Ages to the contemporary world. Using the multidisciplinary
approach, world history is a balanced program, not just a history of Western Europe.
Attention is given to Europe
, Asia, Africa, North and South America. The host nation’s history
and culture are used for comparison.

Honors World History
-
Literature 10

(Year):
This is an integrated course for students
interested in taking 10th grade Honors Social Studies and English
. The course uses the
chronological study of world history from 1500 to the present and covers the themes of
culture, science and technology, economics, and government. The content integrates
readings and writings that focus on exploring, interpreting, and

analyzing literature and other
readings that extend and support the world history discussions and research. The course is a
demanding study of world history and literature, requiring students to understand, analyze,
and interpret the connections between m
ajor historical events and the writings of the time.
Critical thinking, philosophical discussion, concept attainment, vocabulary development,
language usage, and research will be stressed. The development of discussion and
presentation skills will focus on

analysis, interpretation, and evaluation.

US History

11
-
12 (Year):
Following a review of the nation’s beginnings and the
impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals, students in grade eleven
study the major events in American history in the twe
ntieth century. Building on
prior knowledge of industrialization, students analyze the emergence and
impact of accelerated technological development, a corporate economy, and
related social and cultural effects on society. Students trace the change in the
ethnic composition of American society; the movement toward equal rights for
racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major
world power. Emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal
The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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32


government and federal courts as wel
l as the continuing tension between the individual and
the state. Students consider the major social problems of our time and trace their causes in
historical events. Students analyze how the United States has served as a model for other
nations and that t
he rights and freedoms we afforded are not accidental, but the results of a
defined set of political principles that are not always basic to citizens of other countries.
Students understand that our rights under the U.S. Constitution are a precious inherit
ance
that depends on an educated citizenry for their preservation and protection.

AP US

History

11
-
12 (Year):
Major Concepts/Content:

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide
students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S.
history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college cou
rses by making demands upon them
equivalent to those made by full
-
year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials

their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance

and to weigh the evidence

and interpretations
presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at
conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay

format.

Major Instructional Activities:

Instructional activities will be provided relative to the content standards of the AP US History,
and use chronological and spatial thinking, historical research, and interpretation to demonstrate intellectual reaso
ning,
reflection and research skills.

Major Evaluative Techniques:

Evaluation will be comprised of assessments for/of learning in content standards knowledge,
historical analysis, making historical connections and social studies research skills utilizing p
rimary source documents.

Essential Expectations:

Upon successful completion of AP US History course, the student should be able to:

Upon completion of the AP US History course of study, students should be able to:



Analyze and interpret primary sources,
including documentary material, maps, statistical tables, and pictorial and
graphic evidence of historical events.



Take notes from both printed materials and lectures and discussion.



Write essay examinations, analytical and research papers



Express themselv
es with clarity and precision in oral presentations and written formats, citing sources and crediting
phrases and ideas of others.

US Government

12 (Sem):
The United States government course is a required one semester
course designed to provide students wi
th essential knowledge and skills related to the
nation’s government and its historical development. Students in this course pursue a deep
understanding of the institutions of American government. They analyze the history and
interpretations of the Constit
ution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative,
executive, and judiciary branches of government. An emphasis is placed on analyzing the
relationship between federal, state, and local governments, with particular attention paid to
impor
tant historical documents. Students compare systems of government in the world
(comparison with host nation’s government is encouraged as part of the program). These
standards represent the culmination of civic efficacy as students prepare to vote, partici
pate
in community activities, and assume the responsibilities of citizenship.


The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

[Type text]

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33


AP Government and Politics

12 (Year):
Major Concepts/Content:

A well
-
designed AP course in United States
Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This
course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and
politics and the analysis of
specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S
.
government and politics. While there is no single approach that an AP United States Government and P
olitics course must
follow, students should become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various
behaviors and outcomes. Certain topics are usually covered in all college courses.

Major Instructional Activities:

Instr
uctional activities will be provided relative to the content standards of the AP US
Government, and use chronological and spatial thinking, historical research, and interpretation to demonstrate intellectual
reasoning, reflection and research skills.

Major

Evaluative Techniques:

Evaluation will be comprised of assessments for/of learning in content standards knowledge,
historical analysis, making historical connections and social studies research skills utilizing primary source documents.

Course Objectives:

Upon completion of the AP Government course of study, students should be able to:



know important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to U.S. government and politics



understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequenc
es (including the components of
political behavior, the principles used to explain or justify various government structures and procedures, and the
political effects of these structures and procedures)



be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant t
o U.S. government and politics (including data presented in charts,
tables, and other formats)



be able to critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, apply them appropriately, and develop their connections
across the curriculum


Elective Advanced
Social Studies


Model UN

9
-
12 (First Sem): MUN

is an international relations course designed to prepare students for
participation in role
-
playing simulations at various international conferences. The major political,
economic, and cultural concerns of Asia, Africa, the Americas, Europe, and the Midd
le East will be
studied with major emphasis on assigned countries. Through research, discussion, negotiation, and
debate, students will develop plausible solutions to the collective problems of the world. These issues
include, but are not limited to, the
question of human rights, protection of the environment, economic
development, disarmament, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and the complexities
surrounding war and peace. This is a “hands on” course designed for motivated, independent l
earners.

Economics
10
-
12 (Second Semester):

In this semester course, students will comprehend the
fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools of graphing, statistics, and equations
from other subject areas to gain an understanding of the operation a
nd institution of
economic systems. Studied in a historical context are the basic economic principles of micro
and macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems,
measurement, and methods. Discussions and analyses of contemporary eco
nomic problems
and issues underpin the entire course.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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Psychology

11
-
12 (Sem):

This course provides students the opportunity to explore psychology
as the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. Areas of study include the scientific
method, devel
opment, cognition, personality, assessment and mental health, and the socio
-
cultural and biological bases of behavior.

Sociology
11
-
12 (Sem):
Students study human social behavior from a group perspective,
including recurring patterns of attitudes and
actions and how these patterns vary across time,
among cultures and in social groups. Students examine society, group behavior and social
structures, as well as the impact of cultural change on society, through research methods
using scientific inquiry.


O
THER ELECTIVE and SUPPORT COURSES



AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)

9
-
12 (Year): AVID is a program, (not just a
class), which is specifically designed to help students prepare to enter and succeed in four
-
year
colleges and universities. Th
e AVID program meets the needs of students who are serious about
college, by providing academic preparation for entrance into college, study skills for college
-
level
work, strengthening organization and time management skills, assisting in coping with coll
ege
-
prep
curriculum (rigorous courses), strengthening test
-
taking skills, as well as writing skills. Career
awareness is through guest speakers and career and cultural field trips. Interested students must meet
the criteria for participating in the AVID
program. Students must have at least a “C” average GPA as
well as middle to high average Terra Nova scores in math and written language. Students should
display good citizenship skills and attendance in school, and be recommended by their teachers. This
class may be repeated for credit.





Reading Lab 9


12

(Sem or Year) This class will improve reading achievement for students not
reading at grade level through the use of a whole group instructional model with small group rotations.
Screening tests are
used to determine eligibility for entry into this class.



Learning
Strategies

9, 10, 11 or 12

9


12 (Year)
The learning strategies course is designed
to introduce special education students to concepts that are necessary for them to function in
a regula
r classroom environment. The content includes, but is not limited to, the following
concepts: time management, decision
-
making strategies, following directions, time
-
on
-
task
behaviors, use of visual aids, organization of work site, organization of informat
ion, textbook
usage strategies, note taking, test
-
taking strategies, dictionary reference skills and
researching and locating information.

The full DoDEA Course Descriptions and Standards can be found at
http://www.dodea.edu/curriculum

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NON CREDIT COURSES


Staff Assistant

12 (Sem or Year)
Students will assist a teacher in their classroom. Staff Assistants may
be asked to file, photocopy, organize classroom materials, tutor, and run errands on the school campus.
Students receive no academic credit for this class. Students must acquire the ap
proval of the teacher
they will work for before signing up for this class.