Unlike autonomous robotics, remotely controlled systems (telerobotics) still depend on human intelligence and perception. It is important to ensure that the human-machine interface is adequate for the task. As behavioural scientists, we can determine how such technologies should be developed to best match the perceptual and motor abilities of human users.

electricfutureΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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My research has considerable potential for application in the following fields.

DESIGN OF ROBOTS AND AUTOMATED NAVIGATION VEHICLES:


The algorithm and model generated from my studies that work so effectively to explain the neural
computation of impen
ding collision can be implemented in robotic design and in
prototyping new vehicular
systems
with automatic navigation capacities. In fact, I am collaborating with Dr. B. Frost in Queen's to
work on a US patent application for our own design. The visual
information generated from this device
about the direction of the movement and time to collision with external objects will complement the
information calculated through stereoscopic video cameras, which are typically used in modern robotic
design. Fewer
computational resources are required than for the calculation of absolute distance
information from stereoscopic cameras.

TELEOPERATION


Unlike autonomous robotics, remotely controlled systems (telerobotics) still depend on
human intelligence and percep
tion. It is important to ensure that the human
-
machine
interface is adequate for the task. As behavioural scientists, we can determine how such
technologies should be developed to best match the perceptual and motor abilities of
human users.


Our resea
rch on virtual reality will touch some of the important issues related to this field. For example,
critical visual information should be presented to the human operator in a rather natural display to facilitate
human
-
machine interactions. We can evaluate

the effectiveness of different kinds of display systems (e.g.,
monoscopic vs. stereoscopic viewing). We will also evaluate the effect of temporal delay in
communication between a human operator and robotic end
-
effectors in the remote site. With the time

delay, operators will not be able to use real time visual information; instead, visual information that is
"remembered" or "predicted" will be used to control their motor action.

DESIGN OF FLIGHT OR DRIVING SIMULATOR:


Flight simulators, which produce
a profound illusion of self
-
motion, are often used for the training of
pilots. Our research will provide important insights as to what components of the visual display are critical.
For example, most flight simulators today simulate the approaching movem
ent through presentation of
image expansion of the larger objects (such as a terrain) but do not simulate the size increase of the
individual texture elements inside. Whether this mismatch of the image expansion will create a
misjudgement of time to colli
sion will be one of our research projects.


My research also has potential to improve quality of life, human health.


Psychophysical research has shown that people can be blind for motion
-
in
-
depth in certain parts of their
visual field, while their static
stereo vision remains intact. This demonstrates the existence of independent
visual systems for motion
-
in
-
depth. While we know a lot about the visual processing of static distance, we
know very little about the visual processing of motion in 3D, which is

critical for action in our daily life,
such as avoiding obstacles, walking, driving, and navigating through the environment.


These specialised functions of the visual system are not normally evaluated by the conventional
examinations of visual function.

Research in this field will certainly help us develop a set of standardised
tests, to screen visual motion deficits and ultimately reduce accidents among drivers or pilots who lack
acuity for visual motion in depth or are impaired in certain parts of thei
r visual field.


What we learn through our research can also be used to train human observers to use visual information
more effectively. Children, for example, could be trained to be better observers in high traffic situations (in
fact, this has been d
one in England where children are trained to use time
-
to
-
collision as a cue when
crossing the road). Similarly, pilots and athletes could benefit from training in time
-
to
-
collision
assessment, and motion blind or impaired individuals could be trained to o
vercome their deficits by
actively using the part of the visual field that is intact.


Research has also identified the involvement of the visual motion system in various perceptual and
cognitive deficits, such as dyslexia. A deeper understanding of visua
l motion processing will increase our
knowledge and eventually facilitate diagnosis and the development of effective rehabilitation techniques.