Behavior Preferences - Sage Leaders

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14 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

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MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com


Ten Commandments of Typewatching


1.

Life tends to support our preference
s
, making us even more distrustful of our non
-
preferences

2.

Your strength maximized becomes a liability

3.

Typewatching is only a theory; it takes real life to validate it

4.

Typewat
ching is only an explanation; it's never an excuse

5.

The whole is greater than the sum of its parts

6.

Typewatching is only one lens through which to view human personality

7.

To be effective, typewatching must begin
s with the
self before apply
ing

it to o
thers

8.

Typewatching is easier said (or thought about) than done

9.

Don't blame everything on your opposite type

10.

Typewatching can't solve everything


E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P = Pe
rceiving

How one interacts with world &

where to direct energy

(way prefer to receive stimulation & en
ergy)

Kind of information one naturally notices

(way one prefers to gather data)

How one makes or

prefers to make decisions

Whether one prefers to l
ive in a more structured
way (making decisions) or in a more

spontaneous way (taking in info)

Ask
s

"How do I affect
this?"

Ask
s

"How does this

af
fect me?

Look
s

at situation &
want
s

to determine
exactly what is going on

Look
s

at situation &
want
s

to kno
w what is
means & what its
consequences might be

Make
s

decisions that
make sense logically

Make
s

decisions based
on how much they care
or what they feel is right

Seek
s

to regulate &
control life

Seek
s

to understand life
rather than control it

75% American

people

25% American people

75% American people

25% American people

50% American people

50% American people

50% American people

50% American people

No gender differences

No gender differences

No gender differences

No gender differences

2/3 men

2/3 women

N
o gender differences

No gender differences

Energized by being with
other people

• Know a lot of people

• Count many among
"close friends"

• Like to include as
many people as
possible in activities

• Prefer
generating
things with group
ra
ther than
by yourself

Energized by spending
time alone

• Enjoy peace & quiet
of having time to
yourself

• Private time too easily
invaded
-

develop
high concentration
power

• Need to "recharge"
alone after socializing
with a group

Trust what is certain &
concr
ete

• Find most satisfying
those jobs that yield
some tangible result

• Rather work with facts
& figures than ideas &
theory

Trust inspiration &
inference

Step back; apply
imper
sonal analysis to
prob
lems

• Able to stay cool,
calm & objective in
situa
tions when
everyone else is upset

• May argue both sides
in discussion simply to
expand intellectual
horizons

• Pride yourself on your
objectivity despite fact
that some people
accuse you of being
cold & uncaring

Step forward, consider
effect of action
s on
others

• Consider a "good
decision" one that
takes others' feelings
into account

• Will overextend self
meeting other
people's needs

• Do almost anything to
accommodate others,
even at the expense
of own comfort

• Wonder "Doesn't
anyone care a
bout
what I want?" yet have
diffi
culty actually
saying this to anyone

Are happiest after

deci
sions have been
made

• Have a place for
everything & aren't
sat
isfied until
everything is in its
place

• Thrive on order

Are happiest leaving
their options

open

• Don't like to be
pinned down about
most things

• Tend to usually make
things less than
definite from time to
time, but not always
-

-

it all depends

MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com



E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judgi
ng

P = Perceiving

Like
s

being center of
attention

• Need affirmation from
friends/associates
about my idea/actions
(who I am, what I do,
how I look, etc.)

Avoid
s

being center of
at
tention


Prefers to have the
focus on others

Like
s

new ideas only if

have practical

applica
tions

• Believe that "if it ain't
broke
n
, don't fix it"

• Don't understand why
some people have to
try to improve every
-
thing

Like
s

new ideas &

concepts for their own
sake

• Tend to thing about
several things at once

• Ofte
n accused of
being absent
-
minded

Value
s

logic, justice, &
fairness; one standard
for all

• Rather settle a
dispute based on what
is fair & truthful rather
than what will make
people happy

• Don't mind making
dif
ficult decisions

• Can't understand wh
y
so many people get
upset

Value
s

empathy &

h
ar
mony; see exception
to rule

• Put yourself in other
people's moccasins

• Likely to be one in
meeting who asks,
"How will this affect
the people involved?"

• Won't hesitate to take
back something
you've

said that you
perceive has offended
someone
-

-

as a
result are accused of
being wishy
-
washy

• Prefer harmony over
clarity

• Embarrassed by

conflict in groups or
family gatherings
-

-

try to avoid it or
smother it with love

H
as a "work ethic"


work
first, play later

(if there's time)

• "know" that if every
-
one would simple do
what they're supposed
to do (& when) the
world would be a
better place


Has

a "play ethic":

en
joy now, finish job
later (if there's time)

• Turn most work into
play
-

-

if it can't be
made into fun it

probably isn't worth
doing anyway

Act, then think

• "Look" with mouth
in
s
tead of eyes

Think, then act


First thoughts are
hidden and perhaps
not conveyed

Value realism &
common sense

• Think

that fantasy is a
dirty
word

• Subscribe to notion
that "seeing is
believing"

Value imagination &
innovation

• Seek connections &
interrelatedness be
-
hind most things
rather than accepting
them at face value

• Always asking "What
does that mean?"

• Don't understand why
so

many people can't
follow your directions

• Get irritated when
peo
-
ple push for
specifics

• Rather fantasize
about spending next
paycheck than sit &
balance checkbook

Naturally see flaws &
tend to be critical

• Enjoy proving a point
for sake of clari
ty


N
aturally like to please
others




show appreciation
easily

Set goals & work toward
achieving them on time

• Wake up in morning
& know fairly well what
your day is going to
be like

• Have a schedule &
follow it & can become
unraveled if things
don't

go as planned

Change goals as new
info becomes available

• Are easily distracted
-

-

can get lost between
front door & car

• Love to explore un
-
known, even it it's
something as simple
as new route home
from work

• Change subject often
in convers
atio
ns
-

-

new topic can be
any
thing that enters
your mind or walks
into the room

Tend to think out loud

• Don't know what you'll
say until you hear
yourself

Think things through in
-
side their heads

• Rehearse
things be
-
fore saying them
(pre
fer that other
s do
same)

Like to use & hone
established skills

• Would rather do
some
-
thing than think
about it

Like to learn new skills;
bored easily after master
skills

• Like figuring out how
things work just for
sheer pleasure of do
-
ing so

May be seen as
heart
le
ss, insensitive, &
un
caring

• More firm
-
minded
than gentle
-
hearted


May be seen as over
-
emotional, illogical, &
weak

• Often accused of
taking things too per
-
sonally

Prefer knowing what
they are getting into

• Don't like surprises, &
make this known

to
everyone

• Accused of being an
-
gry when you're not
-

-

only stating opinion

Like adapting to new
situations

MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com



E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P = Perceiving

Easier to "read" & know


Share personal
information easily

• Are approachable

• Easily engaged by
friends & strangers
alike

Are more private; prefer
to share personal info
with a select few

• Have been called shy

• Come across as
somewhat reserved &
reflective

Tend to be s
pecific &
literal; give detailed
de
scriptions

• Prefer specific
answers to specific
questions

• Are very literal in your
use of words, often
take things literally

• Find yourself asking
(& being asked) "are
you serious or is that
a joke?"

• Find i
t easier to see
individual trees than
forest

Tend to b
e general &
fig
urative; use
metaphors & analogies

• Believe that "boring
details" is redundancy

• Prone to puns & word
games

Consider it more
import
ant to be truthful
than tactful

• If disagree wi
th
people would rather
tell them than say
nothing & let them
think they're right

Consider it important to
be tactful as well as
truthful

Are product oriented
(emphasis is on
completing task)

• Keep lists & use them

• If do something that's
not on list,

may add it
just to cross it off

• Like to work things
through to completion
& get them out of the
way (even if you know
you're going to have
to do it over again
later to get it right)

Are process oriented
(emphasis on how task
is completed)

• Don't pl
an a task, but
wait & see what it de
-
mands

• People accuse you of
being disorganized,
al
though you know
bet
ter

• Don't believe that
"neatness counts",
even though would
prefer to have things
in order

• What's important is
creativity, spontan
eity,
&

responsive
ness

Talk more than listen

• Somewhat
dominating in
conversation

• Get bored when can't
actively participate in
conversation

Listen more than talk

• Perceived as "a great
listener"

• Feel that others take
advantage of you

• Believe th
at "talk is
cheap"
-

can make
you suspicious or
irritated

Present info in a step
-
by
-
step manner

• Like to hear things se
-
quentially instead of
randomly

• Read magazines from
front to back

Present info through

leaps, in roundabout
way

Believe feelings a
re
valid only if they are
logical

Believe any feeling is
valid, whether it makes
sense or not

• Feel that "love"
cannot be defined;
take great offense at
those who try to do so

Derive satisfaction from
finishing projects

Derive satisfaction from
starting

projects

Communicate with
enthusiasm

Keep their enthusiasm
to themselves

• Do not get ideas out
forcefully

• Resent those who
blurt out things you
were just about to say

Are oriented to present

• Like to concentrate on

what you're doing at
moment



Generally don't
wonder about what's
next

Are oriented toward
future

• Find future & its
possibilities more
intriguing that
frightening

• Usually mor
e excited
about where you're
go
ing that where you
are

• Believe that time is
relative
-

aren't late

unless something has
started without you

Are motivated by a
desire for achievement
& accomplishment

Are motivated by a
desire to be appreciated

• Enjoy providing
needed services to
people although find
that some people take
advantage

See time as a fini
te
resource & take
deadlines seriously

• Are always waiting for
others, who never
seem to be on time

See time as renewable
resource & see
deadlines as elastic

• Depend on last
-
minute spurts of
energy to meet
deadlines

• Usually make
dead
line, althoug
h
may drive everyone
else crazy in process

Respond quickly; enjoy
a fast pace

• Read, talk, listen to
TV /radio at same
time oblivious to
distraction

• Phone calls are
welcome interruptions

Respond after take time
to think things thru

• Like stating

thoughts
or feelings without in
-
terruption

• Allow others to do
same in hope they will
reciprocate







Prefer breadth to depth

Prefer depth to breadth







Focus on specifics of the

situation at hand; seek
to organize people &
events

Focus on inner

meanings
-

use own
objective cri
terion to
understand the world

Prefer facts

See implications

Very logical

Care about what deci
-
sions mean in human
terms



MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com



E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P

= Perceiving

Characteristics:

• Expressive

• Speak more loudly

• Speak more rapidly

• Overstate & repeat
points

• Use more nonverbal
communication

Characteristics:

• Reserved

• Often what to "hush"
others

• Tend to hesitate,
thinking befo
re
speaking

• Often understate a
point

• Appear more aloof &
reserved

Characteristics:

• Trees

• Tend to examine an
events or experiences
various components

• Like to understand a
process by looking at
it sequentially

• Focus on "what is" &
fin
d "what can be" un
-
settling

• Impatient with fanciful
schemes

Characteristics:

• Forest

• Tend to look for
meaning of event or
an ex
perience

• Randomly gather
information & fit it into
a theoretical model

• Focus on "what can
be" & find "what is
"
de
pressing

• Impatient with many
details

Characteristics:

• Head

• Seek objective clarity

• Tend to apply their
decisions more
uniformly &
consistently

• Look at cause &
effect of a decision

• Prefer to understand
feelings

Characteristics:



Heart

• Seek harmony with
people

• Usually situational &
subjective

• Show more concern
for how people will
feel about a decision

• Prefer to experience
feelings

Characteristics:

• Rigid

• Remain more focused
on task or topic

• Built
-
in ti
me clock

• Tend to get locked
into one method

• Tend to offer decisive
opinions on most top
-
ics

Characteristics:

• Flexible

• More easily move
from subject to
subject, sometimes to
point of appearing
scattered

• No innate sense of
schedule

• Ca
pable of generating
alternatives to any
situation

• Often prefer to
answer a question
with an
-
other question

Key Words:

• Sociability



Interaction

• External

• Breadth

• Extensive

• Multiple relationships

• Energy expenditure


External events

• Gregarious

• Speak, then think

Key Words:

• Territoriality



Concentration

• Internal

• Depth

• Intensive

• Limited relationships

• Energy conservation

• Internal reactions

• Reflective

• Think, then spe
ak

Key Words:

• Sequential



Present

• Realistic

• Perspiration

• Actual

• Down
-
to
-
earth

• Fact

• Practicality

• Specific

Key Words:

• Random

• Future

• Conceptual

• Inspiration

• Theoretical

• Head
-
in
-
clouds



Fantasy

• Ingenuity

• General

Key Words:

• Objective

• Firm
-
minded

• Laws

• Firmness

• Just

• Clarity

• Analytical

• Policy

• Detached

Key Words:

• Subjective

• Tenderhearted

• Circumstances

• Persuasion



Humane

• Harmony

• Appreciative

• Social values

• Involved

Key Words:

• Resolved

• Decided

• Fixed

• Control

• Closure

• Planned

• Structure

• Definite

• Scheduled

• Deadline

Key Words:

• Pending

• Wait
-
&
-
se
e

• Flexible

• Adapt

• Openness

• Open
-
ended

• Flow

• Tentative

• Spontaneous

• What deadline?

MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com



E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P = Perceiving

Resolving Conflicts:



Conflict = something
to be examined out in
the open


Tip
-

Stop, look, &
listen

Resolving Conflicts:

• Conflict = internalize
so can reflect on that
took place


Tip
-

Express yourself

Resolving Conflicts:

• Conflict = literally
hears what's
said


Tip
-

There's more to
conflicts than just the
facts

Resolving Conflicts:

• Conflict = figuratively
hears what was meant
or what she thought
was meant


Tip
-

Stick to the
issues

Resolving Conflicts:

• Conflict = any
discussion,
conversatio
n or
debate when win/lose
is the only perceivable
possible outcome


Tip
-

Allow some
gen
uine expressions
of emotion

Resolving Conflicts:

• Conflict = exists
when we have four
sets of
opinions/feelings,
ideas/experiences, &
we're trying to reach
con
sensus


Tip
-

Be direct &
co
nfron
ta
t
ive

Resolving Conflicts:

• Conflict = anything
that enters their world

• Strive for control, e.g.
motto is "stay on top,
be in charge, & above
all, don't lose your
cool"


Tip
-

You're not
always right

Resolv
ing Conflicts:

• Conflict = always
seek alternatives &
don't say what they
always mean


Tip
-

Take a clear
position

Type Resistors:

• None

Type Resistors:

• Reluctant to reveal
themselves in their
need for privacy

• May object out of fear
of be
ing "exposed"

• Result may be closet
typewatchers
-

-

doing
it but not sharing it

Type Resistors:

• Quest for immediacy
cause to resist
because it is
theoretical & abstract

• Without being able to
see its positive & im
-
mediate applicability,
they will

quickly be
-
come bored with it

Type Resistors:

• None

Type Resistors:

• Leery of the "soft"
sci
ence of psychology

• Unless can prove
objectively its validity
& reliability, may be
brushed aside as too
touchy
-
feely

Type Resistors:

• Initially resistant

be
-
cause it "puts people
in boxes & takes away
their individuality"

• Prefer not to engage
in activities that have
any chance of hurting
others' feelings

Type Resistors:

• None

Type Resistors:

• Prefer to find alter
-
natives to everything,
may be resis
tant if
they find 16 different
personality types to be
too limiting

Problem Solving:

• Talk through with
someone else or even
no one in particular


Problem Solving:

• Take external input
of others to some
private space where
can re
flect &
contempla
te in
ternally


Problem Solving:

• Trust the facts &
ev
i
dence

Problem Solving:

• Need to know all al
-
ternatives have been
considered & various
schemes have been
drawn to cover every
aspect of the situation

Problem Solving:

• Keep everyone
aware of

the potential
con
sequences of any
given action

Problem Solving:

• Bring reality of how
the process affects
people

Problem Solving:

• Solution
-
oriented,
sometimes premature
-
ly

Problem Solving:

• Massage a problem
& generate new prob
-
lems even aft
er decid
-
ing on a course of ac
-
tion

Time:

• Is to be overpowered
& used


Procrastinate

when it
comes ti
me to be
quiet, reflective &
in
trospective


Tip

-

Avoid having to
share everything

Time:

• Is spatial, a concept


Procrastinate

when it
com
es time to get up
before a group to
share info or when
asked to work/play as
part of a larger group


Tip

-

Don't stay inside

Time:

• Is now; there is no
time like the present


Procrastinate

when it
comes time to engage
in fantasy & fanciful
thinkin
g or thinking
about the future


Tip

-

Remember that
there's more to time
than minutes & sec
-
onds

Time:

• Is possibilities; there's
always time for one
more thing


Procrastinate

when it
is time to engage in
projects that involve
detail


Tip

-

Be
realistic

Time:

• Is an object; resource


Procrastinate

when it
comes to
interpersonal aspects
of life


Tip

-

Consider others'
time

Time:

• Is relational &
inter
personal


Procrastinate

when it
comes time to tackle
jobs that involve little
inte
raction or negative
inte
g
ration with people


Tip

-

Define your
boundaries

Time:

• Is to be scheduled &
controlled

• Procrastinate when it
comes time for fun,
leisure & relaxation


Tip

-

Keep in mind
that time is not always
of the essence

Time:



Can be adapted &
added to

• Procrastinate when it
comes time to make a
final decision about
something


Tip

-

Try to focus

Stress:

• Need chance to ex
-
press; opportunity to
talk & share

• Stretch by taking
notes or writing in a
journal, concent
rated
reflection time

Stress:

• Need chance to write,
reflect, & meditate

• Stretch
by having an
extemporaneous
dis
cussion or sharing
of something personal

Stress:

• Need specifics
spelled out carefully &
a good experiential
event

• Stretch by fant
asizing
to music or imagining
& discussing the un
-
known

Stress:

• Need chance to add
to design with their
own imagination & an
op
portunity to connect
learnings to their own
experience

• Stretch by
experiencing world of
senses; doing some
detailed assi
gnment,
even things like
proofreading or
bookkeeping

Stress:

• Need opportunity to
analyze situation, to
confront things &
challenge then; often
they like a win/lose
reward

• Stretch by
experiencing
powerlessness or lack
of control; exploring
world of
nonverbal
communication

Stress:

• Need affirmations & +
rewards, a happy
learning climate, see
-
ing value of what's
being learned for
themselves & others

• Stretch by learning
for sake of the idea
itself, with no other
use or reward; doing
some objecti
ve
analysis & sticking to
conclusion, even it is
against their personal
values

Stress:

• Need agenda,
schedule, plan,
handouts, & charts
like this one

• Stretch by having no
agenda for some part
of course, just winging
it & not following
schedule & t
hen to
see if something posi
-
tive can result

Stress:

• Need room to move,
to know there are
reward even if
assignments aren't
completed or
deadlines are missed;
opportunity for self
-
pacing & self
-
determination

• Stretch by
contemplating some
of the ma
terial on time
& without changing it;
not wandering down
extraneous paths

MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com





Goal Setting requires three things:

1.

Being in touch with your own typological preferences & non
-
preferences

2.

Respecting the differences in others

3.

Making accommodations &
modifications in your own behavior that can facilitate the goal
-
setting process


E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P = Perceiving

Tips:

• Put it in writing

• Practice listening
skills

Tips:

• Give Es "thinking
space"

Tips:

• Don't immediately
dismiss "fanciful"
ideas

• Try to see "big
picture"

Tips:

• Pay attention to
pitfalls

• Don't ignore present

Tips:

• Consider the "people"
side of the equation

Tips:

• Don't be afraid to bi
te
the bullet

• Don't take things per
-
sonally

Tips:

• Listen to alternatives

Tips:

• Focus on closure

Goal Setting:

• Allow others time to
think about what
you've discussed. It's
not necessary to fill all
silences with words.

• Practice liste
ning to
ideas & suggestions
about goals as well as
thinking a bit before
you react.

• Put goals into writing
before the meeting to
give those who need it
a chance to mull them
over.

• Try saying "Let me
try to recap what
you've just said to
make sure

I've heard
it correctly.

• In a group setting
make sure everyone
has the chance to ex
-
press his or her opin
-
ions. But everyone
needn't speak to ev
ery
issue.

• Remember that si
-
lence doesn't always
mean consent.

Goal Setting:

• Let E's speak the
ir
minds without always
holding them to what
they say.

• Commit yourself to
sharing more than just
your final response.

• Don't keep silent by
assuming your
thoughts are too trivial
to say out loud. Let
the process be the
judge.

• At the very lea
se
develop some
nonverbal signals
-

-

nodding your head,
smiling, whatever
-

-

to

indicate your assent
or dis
sent.

• Try saying, "I would
normally keep this to
myself, however, let
me share that the goal
in its present form
seems a little weak."

Goal S
etting:

• Allow others to make
suggestions that seem
farfetched; don't
dismiss them too
early.

• Similarly allow for
oth
ers to ramble on
for a while. While
their ideas may not
make sense initially,
they might later on.

• Keep in mind that the
ve
ry idea of goal set
-
ting involves ponder
-
ing the future. You
might prefer to get
busy actually doing
something, but that
time will come.

• Try saying, "I think
this may be pie in the
sky, but let's talk it
through."

Goal Setting:

• Remember the de
-
t
ails. Far
-
reaching
goals can't be attained
without a step
-
by
-
step
plan.

• Keep in touch with
reality. While it's
tempting to dream the
impossible dream, it's
important to use prac
-
tical understand
-
able
language.

• When giving feed
-
back, try to be s
pe
-
cific. Try saying, "I
agree with points one
& three, but let's con
-
sider this idea for your
second point." Avoid
generalities like "Let's
take another look at
the draft."

• Similarly, when seek
-
ing feedback, avoid
generalities like "What
do you thi
ng?" in favor
of specific requests:
"I'd like some feed
-
back on items one &
four."

Goal Setting:

• Pay attention to
points of view that
seem on the
schmaltzy side. It's
okay for people to feel
good at work.

• Keep in mind that
how you work together

as a group is a
important as what you
accomplish.

• Try saying, "How will
this goal affect the
people who must carry

it out?"

• Not everyone appre
-
ciated a healthy
discussion or
aggressively pursuing
a point for the sake of
the ar
gument. That
will

cause some of
your team members to
drop out of the
process.

• Reaching a goal isn't
worth pursuing if you
alienate everyone
getting there.

Goal Setting:

• It's okay to disagree.
A lot of learning can
be accomplished
through a healthy
discussion.



While harmony is im
-
portant, every issue
can't always be re
-
solved with everyone
feeling good.

• Not every word
spoken about a
sugges
tion you make
is di
rected personally
at you. Nor are the
goals you suggest
your per
sonal
responsibility.

• Try
saying, "This goal
makes sense on the
bottom line, & there
-
fore personal differ
-
ences should be set
aside."

• Goals can be
reached even if
everyone isn't in total
agreement.

Goal Setting:

• Allow time for a vari
-
ety of opinions to be
discussed; don't

set
tle
on the first good idea
you hear.

• Remember than not
all goals can be
reached immediately,
nor should they be.

• Don't assume that
those who disagree
with your goals aren't
committed to them.
Some people have a
wonderful ability to
adapt.



Try saying, "That's
okay for now, but let's
wait before we make a
final decision."

Goal Setting:

• Try to settle on
some
thing & live with
it awhile before
redesigning it.

• State what you think
about a goal as
directly as possible.

• Making a

firm
decision & sticking to
it isn't the end of the
world.

• Remind yourself that
some goals can be
reached one day at a
time. The small,
short
-
term
accomplishments are
as important as the
bigger ones.

• Try saying, "It's a
closed issue. Let's
move

on to something
else.

MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com


Time
:

1.

People procrastinate around their nonpreferences

2.

Recognize that everyone has a natural need either to control time or to adapt to it

3.

Don't try to change people


E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuiti
ve

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P = Perceiving

Time:

• Is to be overpowered
& used.

Time:

• Is spatial, a concept.

Time:

• Is now; there is no
time like the present.

Time:

• Is possibilities;
there's always time for
one more thing.

Tim
e:

• Is an object, a re
-
source.

Time:

• Is relational & inter
-
personal.

Time:

• Is to be scheduled &
controlled.

Time:

• Can be adapted &
added to.


NF

SJ

NT

SP

Time:


Assets

• Sensitive to people & their time

• Give people all the
time they need

• Time oriented toward others' needs

• Time is useful for finding life's purpose



Liabilities

• Difficulty saying no

• Feel guilty if they don't give others time

• Neglect own time needs

• Waste time searching for self

Time:


Assets

• Good at time management

• Most grounded in sensate realities

• Most realistic

• Able to throw things out



Liabilities

• Rigid about schedules

• Hooked on responsibility

• Can't relax

• Hate to wait for others

Time:


Assets

• Time is conceptual, impersonal

• Time is part of a bigger system

• Time is a tool to accomplish things



Liabilities

• It is enough just to think it through without
taking action

• Time is in the mind only

• People'
s needs may suffer

Time:


Assets

• Can meet immediate needs of a situation

• Flexible & pliable

• Handle emergencies well

• Adaptable about scheduled changes



Liabilities

• Efforts get scattered

* Change directions often

• Ther
e's always tomorrow

• Bowled over by the moment


• Ethics = refers to the moral judgment you exercise in the day
-
to
-
day arena in which you live your life

• Morals = customs that have been handed down to us in our society; ake morals & set them ag
ainst daily living (ethics) & from that develop a value system

• Values = personal interpretation of society's customs

• Integrity = congruity between my values & ethics & the responsibility that accompanies that congruency


Ethical Behavior

• Onl
y ethical behavior for which you can be responsible is your own

• Your perception of someone else's ethical conduct may be more a reflection of your own value system that a reflection of

that person's
behavior


Confronting Ethical Issues

• Listen & l
earn

• Consider the source

• Do something about it


MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com


Typewatching Key Points:

1.

Lea
r
n your four letters as way of describing yourself to others




Validate profile




Select few people who know you well; ask them to read profile you've chosen; ask f
or feedback on it
-

-

how accurate it is in describing you, ways it is most accurate/most inaccurate




Keep monitoring your own behavior through daily experiences & feedback from others

2.

Mind your Ps & Js




Last letter is P = nature to generate alterna
tives; contribution to workplace is creativity & dynamism; decide by process of elimination




Last letter is J = nature to moan about everything, even things they like & want to do; give new idea
s

using hit
-
&
-
run technique

3.

Take some shortcuts
-

-

tempe
raments = NF, NT, SJ, SP


NF

SJ

NT

SP

Workplace Strengths
:

• Ability to persuade & cooperate

• Team builders

Workplace Weaknesses
:

• Over
-
personalization of organizational
problems

• Tendency to carry grudges

Workplace Strengths
:

• Strong s
ense of responsibility & duty to the or
-
ganization

• Organization's backbone

Workplace Weaknesses
:

• Rigidity & narrow focus on meeting rules &
regu
lations

Workplace Strengths
:

• Ability to think systematically & strategically

• Natural analys
ts

Workplace Weaknesses
:

• Tendency to make things more complex than
nece
s
sary

• Im
patience with incompetency

Workplace Strengths
:

• Ability to do a variety of tasks with ease

• Sense of urgency when situation demands it

Workplace Weaknesses
:



Disinterest in routine

• Lack of a sense of the big picture


4.

Do what you can do
-

-

If alone in your organization, observe two pairs of preferences which exhibit themselves most readily in workplace: E
-
I & J
-
P


E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

J

= Judging

P = Perceiving

Workplace:

• Under pressure to fill silences

• Pull thoughts & ideas from others

• Generally feel need to keep others motivated

• May be developing habits that more I col
-
leagues are pleased to let you do


Back off

-

Monitor your behavior, stop filling
those silences

• Compete with others for air time & no one
seems to be listening to one another

• Up to you to recognize that this group of Es
is all talking with little listening


Stop talking & start listen
ing

-

play traffic cop
in conversations directing others to talk, lis
ten
& summarize

• Try not to fall into natural preference to join
the E competition

Workplace:

• Enjoy some of the more private conversations
with only one or two others

• Reali
ze that not everyone is getting involved
in the discussions
-

may be an I group

• Some good ideas are probably not getting
ex
pressed


Draw others our

-

express more of your own
observations about the group process

• Leave fewer things unspoken &

don't
assume that silence means consent

• Shut out of the action & fatigued after only a
few moments with your colle
a
gues

• Likely they are Es


Stop talking & start listening

-

may take some
effort to do so

• Suggest whole group take three mi
nutes of
silent ref
l
ection & then share thoughts on is
-
sue

Workplace:

• Stressed because others seem to be too disor
-
ganized & easygoing about most things

• Group is likely made up of Ps


Don't try to change them

-

pick one or two
things about wh
ich you can negotiate some
structure & organization

• In a constant game of one
-
upmanship about
deadlines, closure, neatness, & rules

• Group is likely Js


Try to loosen up

-

insert humor & spontaneity
into the day

• Even a few simple & un
planned

diversions
can ease rigidity that may plague group of Js

Workplace:

• Stressed because everyone else seems so
rigid, concerned about deadlines & disinterested
in having any fun on company time

• Group is likely made up of Js


Don't try to change

them

-

show them that
you can & do meet deadlines & that you
under
stand that these are necessary, albeit
not controlling of your life

• When appropriate, help them plan some kind
of diversion that will lift everyone's spirits
without excessively disru
pting the day

• Js are capable of having fun on company
time
-

-

if it is well organized & on schedule

• Thrilled with the exciting ideas being shared
with others but few things seem to get done

• Group is likely Ps


Stop frittering & do somethin
g

-

push group to
see at least one idea through to completion

• Take it upon yourself to help group establish
a schedule
-

-

& keep to it



MBTI
Summary

to Types

& Typewatching

Developed by Vikki G. Brock, Call Me Coach & SageLeaders.com


5.

Think
in
opposites
-

view a situation through the eyes of your opposite preference or type


E = Extroverted

I = Introverted

S = Sensing

N = Intuitive

T = Thinking

F = Feeling

J = Judging

P = Perceiving

Opposites:

• Count to ten &
maybe say nothing

• Trust someone else
to say what you
thought of saying

• If not said, let matter
drop

• Listen, listen,
listen

• Maybe even repeat
what's been said be
-
fore adding your own
thoughts

Opposites:

• Blurt out a response,
saying something with
no intent of measuring
its worth or meaning


Deliberately

waste
some words & be a bit
redundant

• Repeat: Be

a bit re
-
dundant. Say it again,
Sam

Opposites:

• Try to back off & let
your imagination run
wild

• Generate ten positive
possibilities about to
-
morrow or next week


Opposites:

• Try to experience as
many sensory events
as you can crowd into
five
or ten minutes

• Taste, touch, smell,
see, & hear the world
around you without
trying to find any
meanings in any of it

• Experience the mo
-
ment

Opposites:

• Before making a de
-
cision think about the
other person's point of
view

• Actually use th
eir
words & ask yourself,
"How do I feel about
what's happening?"

Opposites:

• When disagreement
erupts, try not to res
-
cue one side or an
-
other

• Push against the sit
-
uation
-

-

argue for the
sake of arguing

• If voices are raised,
no matter what
, do not
become intimidated

• Keep saying to your
-
self, "It's only an ex
-
change of ideas, it's
nothing personal"

Opposites:

• Try just to let things
happen

• At least once a day
try to let one thing that
bothers you go unat
-
tended

• Work on appr
eciating
that it may never be
taken care of

• Ask yourself, "Will
any of it make a differ
-
ence a year from
now?"

Opposites:

• Try to finish at least
one thing of some im
-
portance, even ahead
of schedule, if possi
-
ble

• Cover bases &
promise yourse
lf not
to be distracted until
you reach your goal of
the moment