3x optional 30-credit modules from the History list below OR

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History: Single Honours


Level 1


For further details, please consult the History Handbook



Level 2


Compulsory 30
-
credit module:


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPGN
-
30
-
2

The Theory and Practice of
History

None

None


O
ption modules:


In addition to Theory and Practice, you must choose
:


3x optional 30
-
credit modules from the History list below

OR

2x optional 30
-
credit modules from the History list below AND optional 30 credits from a
different field



Module Code

Mod
ule Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPGR
-
30
-
2

Religion, Politics and Society in
Early Modern Europe

None

None

UPHPGL
-
30
-
2

Men and Women in Imperial Britain,
c.1700
-
1800

None

None

UPHPGX
-
30
-
2

Crime and Protest, 1750
-
1930

None

None

UPHPGQ
-
30
-
2

Problems of Power: US History,
1776
-

present

None

None

UPHPHC
-
30
-
2

Politics and Society in Ireland since
1750

None

None

UPHPH
P
-
30
-
2

Britain’s Second Empire: The
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-
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-

-
O



Themes in
the Social and Political
History of Fascism
: Europe
, 1890
-
1945

None

None

UPHPHF
-
30
-
2

International History 1914
-
1945: The
End of European Dominance in
World Politics

None

None

UPHPLN
-
30
-
2

Public History: Representations of
the Past, 1400 to the present

None

None



2

Level 3



Compulsory module:


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPKC
-
30
-
3

History Dissertation

UPHPGN
-
30
-
2

[
OR

Co
-
requisite

UPHPHG
-
30
-
3
for Erasmus
students only
, if
they have not
taken an
equivalent
module as pa
rt of
their Erasmus
studies]

None


Core modules (Special Subjects):


Select
one

level 3 Special Subject which will be linked to your history dissertation:


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPLX
-
30
-
3

The

English Reformation
:
The Tudor State, the
Church and the People,
c.1529
-
1603

None

None

UPHPKQ
-
30
-
3

Crowd, Disorder and the
Law in England,1730
-
1820

None

None

UPHPKG
-
30
-
3

The London
-
Paris
-
Berlin
Triangle: International
Relations 1933
-
1940

None

None

UPHPLA
-
30
-
3

The Spanish Ci
vil War,
1936
-
39

None

None

UPHPKT
-
30
-
3

Politics and Violence in
Twentieth Century Ireland

None

None

UPHPLB
-
30
-
3

American Foreign Policy
during the “High Cold War”

None

None

UPHPLC
-
30
-
3

War, Culture and Society in
Twentieth Century Britain

None

None

UPH
PKU
-
30
-
3

Charity, Children and the
Poor in the Nineteenth
Century

None

None

UPHPKY
-
30
-
3

Britain, the Slave Trade and
the Atlantic Legacy

None

None







3

Option modules:

Select two level 3 History option modules


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Exc
luded
Combinations

UPHPJC30
-
3

The Collapse of Empire and
Colonial War: British and
French Decolonization

none

none

UPHPKB
-
30
-
3

The
Cold War World
, 1945
-
1991

None

None

UPHPSC
-
30
-
3

The Dark Years: France
1934
-
1945

None

None

UPH
PJL
-
30
-
3

Global Business: R
ampant
Capitalism or Income for
All?

None

None

UPHPLL
-
30
-
3

Tsars and Commissars:
Russian Foreign Policy

None

None

UPHPJ
S
-
30
-
3

Culture, Authority & Crisis:
England and its neighbours

None

None

UPHPJF
-
30
-
3

Crime in America:
Organization and Control


None

None

UPHPLM
-
30
-
3

History in the Public Space

UPHPLN
-
30
-
2

None




4

History: Half Award


Level 1


For further details, please consult the History Handbook



Level 2


Compulsory modules:

There are no compulsory or core modules at this stage for Joint Honou
rs students


Option modules:


You must take TWO 30
-
credi
t level 2 History modules from the following list:



If you wish to take UPHPKC
-
30
-
3 (History Dissertation) at level 3, you
must

take
The

Theory and Pract
ice of History

at level 2


Module Code

Module
Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPHC
-
30
-
2

Politics and Society in Ireland since
1750

None

None

UPHPGX
-
30
-
2

Crime and Protest, 1750
-
1930

None

None

UPHPGQ
-
30
-
2

Problems of Power: US History,
1776
-

present

None

None

UPHPHB
-
30
-
2



Themes in th
e Social and Political
History of Fascism: Europe, 1890
-
1945

None

None

UPHPHF
-
30
-
2

International History 1914
-
1945: The
End of European Dominance in
World Politics

None

None


5

IMPORTANT NOTE:
Joint Honours Students taking History &
Politics
; History and

Criminology
; History &
Sociology
; or History &
International Relations

may also
choose the following option to complete their 60 Level 2 credits in History:


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPH
P
-
30
-
2

Britain’s Second Empire
: The
Transformation from Empire to
Commonwealth, 1820
-
1965

None

None




Level 3


Compulsory modules:

There are no compulsory or core modules at this stage for Joint Honours students


Option modules:


You must EITHER take TWO level 3
History
option module
s

OR


UPHPKC
-
30
-
3 (History Dissertation) plus one History special subject module (to do this
combination yo
u must have passed
The

Theory and Practice of History (
UPHPGN
-
30
-
2)

at level 2



Level 3 Option modules


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Exclu
ded
Combinations

UPHPSC
-
30
-
3

The Dark Years: France
1934
-
1945

None

None

UPHPJL
-
30
-
3

Global Business: Rampant
Capitalism or Income for
All?

None

None

UPHPJF
-
30
-
3

Crime in America:
Organization and Control


None

None



IMPORTANT NOTE:
Joint Honours Stude
nts taking History &
Politics
; History and
Criminology
; History &
Sociology
; or History &
International Relations

may also
choose

from

the following option
al modules
to complete th
eir 60 Level 3

credits in
History:



Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPKB
-
30
-
3

The Cold War World, 1945
-
1991

None

None

UPHPJC30
-
3

The Collapse of Empire and
Colonial War: British and
French Decolonization

None

None



6

Special Subject modules


History Special Subject modules

are designed to support
the dissertation in History,
and first choice will be given to students who choose to write a dissertation at Level 3.


*Those who choose to do a dissertation MUST have taken ‘The Theory &
Practice of History’ at level 2*


A Special Subject may also be ta
ken by students who are not writing a dissertation, if
places are available.


Students who are not choosing to write a dissertation may therefore also include a
Special Subject as one of their options, but should be aware that they will only be
enrolled o
n these modules if places are unfilled by dissertation students.


Module Code

Module Name

Pre
-
requisites

Excluded
Combinations

UPHPLX
-
30
-
3

The

English Reformation
:

The Tudor State, the
Church and the People,
c.1529
-
1603

None

None

UPHPKQ
-
30
-
3

Crowds, Diso
rder and the
Law in England, 1730
-
1820

None

None

UPHPKG
-
30
-
3

The London
-
Paris
-
Berlin
Triangle: International
Relations 1933
-
1940

None

None

UPHPLA
-
30
-
3

The Spanish Civil War,
1936
-
39

None

None

UPHPKT
-
30
-
3

Politics and Violence in
Twentieth Century Irelan
d

None

None

UPHPLC
-
30
-
3

War, Culture and Society in
Twentieth Century Britain

None

None

UPHPKU
-
30
-
3

Charity, Children and the
Poor in the Nineteenth
Century

None

None

UPHPLB
-
30
-
3

American Foreign Policy
during the “High Cold War”

None

None

UPHPKY
-
30
-
3

Britain, the Slave Trade and
the Atlantic Legacy

None

None















7

History Module Outlines


LEVEL 2


UPHPGN
-
30
-
2

The Theory and Practice of History


This module is a core module for single honours students who will write a dissertation at
L3 and a p
rerequisite for joint honours students, who also plan to write their dissertation at
L3 in History.


Module
L
eader
:

James Lee


Contact
d
etails
:

James5.Lee@uwe.ac.uk

Te
lephone 0117 32 84309


This is a practice
-
bas
ed module. It focuses on the process of historical research, and provides the
hinge in your degree where you move from ‘studying history’ to ‘writing history’. With a mixture of
small
-
group work and individual studies, you get hands
-
on experience of using
the skills you’ll
need to write a dissertation.

All the work on this module is linked to your other studies at Level 2, looking at how the history
you are studying on those other modules was researched and written. In the first term you
consider how to fo
rmulate questions about the past, discover how to find out about the past from
archival material and learn to situate your research within different genres of history. In the
second term, you learn how to situate your research within the existing literatu
re and how to write
up your research effectively. Throughout, the emphasis is on process: reflecting on what you
did
,
as much as what you found out about the past.

Assessment:


Regular contributions to an online portfolio plus a group presentation (togethe
r
65%); a primary sources essay (15%) and a secondary sources essay (20%).

Where does it fit in?
This module is for all historians, whether joint or single honours. If you
intend to specialise in history at Level 3, then this module prepares you both ment
ally and
manually for the special subject module and associated dissertation module.


UPHPHP
-
30
-
2

Britain’s Second Empire: The Transformation from Empire to
Commonwealth, 1820
-
1965


Module Leader
:

Kent Fedorowich


Contact
d
etails
:

Kent.Fedorowich
@uwe.ac.u
k


Telephone 0117 32 84382



This

module

will focus on the development and transformation of the British Empire from the end
of the Napoleonic Wars to its dismantlement in the period after the Second World War. The
following topics will be examined: Mercan
tilism versus Free Trade, 1820
-
1870; Nineteenth
-
Century Settler Societies; the New Imperialism, 1870
-
1914; Darwinism, Social Darwinism and
Imperialism; the Indian Raj before 1914; South Africa 1870
-
1914, the Irish Question to 1921; the
British Empire betwe
en the Wars: a survey; The British Empire between the Wars: case studies;
Policing the Empire in the Interwar Period; Recovery through Empire: Colonial Development; The
Impact of World War II on the British Empire; The Partition of India; The Palestine Man
date; The
Suez Crisis and its Impact on Anglo
-
Commonwealth Relations; Decolonization since 1947 to
1965: a Survey; Confrontation and Insurgency: Decolonization in Asia; The American Factor in
British Decolonization; The Winds of Change: Decolonization in A
frica; Britain, South Africa and
the Commonwealth.



Assessment:


Essay 1 (25
%),
Essay 2 (25
%), Exam (50%)

Where does it fit in?
This module follows on well from
Century of the Superpowers
.

8

UPHPGQ
-
30
-
2

Problems Of Power: U
S

History
, 1776
-
present





Mo
dule Leader: Mike Woodiwiss

Contact d
etails
:

Michael.Woodiwiss@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone: 0117 32 84391

The module aims to give you an understanding of the rise of the United States to the status of
superpowe
r. It will introduce you to key aspects of social, political and economic development of
the nation from the birth of the nation. It examines such significant themes and events as:

Imperialism in the American Context; The American Civil War; Western Expans
ion;
Reconstruction and the New South; Industrialization and the Rise of Big Business; Populism;
Globalism; Migration, Immigration and Nativism; Progressivism; Wilsonian Internationalism and
the Diplomacy of the Great War; The New Deal; American Diplomacy
During the Interwar Years:
American Wartime Aims, and the Diplomacy of the Grand Alliance: America and the Diplomacy of
the 'High Cold War' Period; The Cold War and Anti
-
Communism: The Civil Rights Movement ;
Vietnam and its Aftermath: From Détente to the
End of the Cold War: The Post Cold War Era: Pax
Americana, the War Against Terror and the Bush Doctrine


Assessment
:

Assessed Seminar and Written Report (20%), Essay (20%), Exam (60%)


Where does it fit in?
This module follows on from
Century of the Superp
owers
, and provides a
sound basis for study of either domestic or international history of the USA at Level 3.


Note that the number of students on this module will be
limited

to 3 seminar groups.



UPHPG
R
-
30
-
2

Religion, Politics and Society in Early Mo
dern Europe


Module
L
eader
:

James Lee


Contact
d
etails
:

James5.Lee@uwe.ac.uk

Te
lephone 0117 32 84309


After an overview of the belief system of the late
-
medieval Church, the first part of the module
surveys the m
ajor changes introduced by the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. The key
historical debates on the origin, nature and impact of reform are considered. Topics include the
connection between religious radicalism and social protest and the varied media by

which the
reformers’ messages were transmitted. This section also examines the process of
‘confessionalisation’, with particular reference to Central Europe, the course of Christianisation
overseas and the general intensification of religious violence and

intolerance in the course of the
sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The second part is devoted to a detailed examination
of a number of specific religious groups and institutions, including the Spanish Inquisition,
Anabaptists, Jews, Huguenots and

the Jesuits. The third part considers the theme of popular
religion. It introduces students to the relationship between religion and magic, the social functions

Assessment:

Essay 1 (20%), Essay 2 (20%), Document Exercise (10%), Exam (50%)


Where does it
fit in?

This module follows on from
Foundations of the West
.
It also fits well with
the other European history modules. It will prepare you for taking an Early Modern module or
Special Subject/dissertation at Level 3.



UPHPG
L
-
30
-
2

Men and Women in Imper
ial Britain, c. 1700
-
1800

Module Leader: Madge Dresser

Contact details:
Madge.Dresser@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone: 0117 32 84388

9

This module will focus on the economic, social, religious, racial, gender and intel
lectual history of
eighteenth century Britain by studying the following subject areas:

Protestantism and individualism,
Political life: a general look
,
The Libertine inheritance
-
changing
notions of sexuality
,
The Enlightenment

noble savages and pretty wome
n
,
Marriage and
Property
, Poverty, P
aternalism and the Poor Law
,
Winners and losers during the Agricultural
revolution: a gendered look
,
Consumption, gentility and empire
,

Public space, private space;
sexual politics and the city
,
Literature and the city
,
Religious revival
,
Utilitarian mentalities
,
Wilkes,
pornography and patriotism
, Revolutionary ideals
-
Wollstonecraft and Paine, Reaction and
reverence; the new domesticity.

Assessment:


Essay (25%), Article Analysis (10%), Book Review (15%), Examination (50
%)


UPHPGX
-
30
-
2

Crime and Protest, 1750
-
1930


Module Leader:

Moira Martin


Contact d
etails
:

Moira.Martin@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32

84437


This module covers a period of significant change in the way tha
t the state dealt with protest and
criminality. It looks at the changing nature of the British state and the structures of British law,
policing and punishment across almost two centuries, from the eighteenth century, with its
hangings and its pamphleteers
, through to the interwar years of the twentieth century, with
economic depression and changing moral standards.


You will get to grips with concepts of criminality and protest. The module will be organised
thematically and the major themes will include:
criminals, delinquents and disorderly persons;
public protest and demands for political reform; crime, gender and sexuality; criminalising protest,
the response of the state to political and economic challenges.


Assessment
:

Document Exercise (15%), Assess
ed Seminar and Paper (20%),Essay (40%),
Exam (25%)


Where does it fit?
This module follows on well from
The Long Eighteenth Century
, but goes well
beyond the eighteenth century and picks up some of the issues introduced in
Britain and the
World in the Twen
tieth Century
. It fits well alongside
Politics and Society in Ireland since 1750
,
and provides a good introduction for work on social policy or on eighteenth century studies at
Level 3.



UPHPHB
-
30
-
2

Themes in the Social and Political History of Fascism
:

Europe,
1890
-
1945


Module Leader:

Mike Richards


Contact details: Michael.Richards@uwe.ac.uk Telephone 0117 32 84490



This module aims (i) to introduce students to the study of Fascism in major European countries
during the period 1918 to 1945 wi
th particular reference to Germany. (ii) To set the study of
Fascism in major European countries, but in particular Germany, during the period 1918 to 1945
in a broad historical context. (iii) To discuss the historical debates surrounding the above.



Upon

completing the course, the successful student should amongst other things (i) Be aware of
socio
-
political, economic, and cultural aspects of fascism with particular reference to Germany,
although reference will be made to Italy, Spain and France. (ii) Be
able to apply a broad
perspectives to the rise and application of Fascism in Italy and Nazism in Germany, and the
French and Spanish crises of the inter
-
war period, and demonstrate a broad understanding of the
10

various definitions of fascism. (iii) Be aware

of the historical debates surrounding the content of
the module, form their own opinions, and defend them in debate.



Teaching and learning methods
: 20 Lectures/20 Seminars


Assessment:

Exam (3 hours) (50%), two Essays (2000 words each)


25% and 25%




UPHPH
C
-
30
-
2

Politics and Society in Ireland since 1750


Module Leader

Phil Ollerenshaw

Contact d
etails
:

Philip.Ollerenshaw@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32

84421


NB This module

will not offered withi
n IFP

This module focuses on modern Irish history since the later eighteenth century. The emphasis,
however, is firmly on the period from the Great Famine in the 1840s to the present day. Among
the topics examined are:

The development of sectarian conflic
t in Ulster; the origins of modern republicanism; the Act of
Union and the creation of the United Kingdom; Catholic Emancipation; the debate on the Great
Famine; patterns of migration and emigration; the Land War; urban class conflict and sectarianism
in
Belfast; unionism and nationalism; the Gaelic revival in sport and literature; the emergence of
Sinn Fein; the Ulster Crisis, 1912
-
1914 and the formation of the UVF; The First World War and the
1916 Easter Rising; the emergence of the IRA and the War of I
ndependence; Partition and Civil
War; Southern Ireland from Free State to Republic; social and political problems in Northern
Ireland after 1921; The Second World War: neutrality and participation; the Civil Rights campaign
from the 1960s; violence, polic
ing and terrorism; Belfast
-
Dublin
-
London and the search for peace
in Northern Ireland.

Assessment
:

Book Review (20%), Literature Review (30%), Exam (50%)



11

UPHPHF
-
30
-
2

International History 1914
-
1945: The End of European

D
ominance in World Politics


Mod
ule Leader:

Glyn Stone


Contact
d
etails
:

Glyn.Stone@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone 0117 32 84420


This module analyses the conduct and content of the foreign policies of the principal European
and global powers from the

beginning of the First World War until the end of the Second World
War. Attention will be drawn to differing factors that guided the decision
-
making processes in
international diplomacy in these various states. The key objective of the module is to provid
e an
understanding of the manner in which the interaction of the major powers has shaped the
contemporary international system. The module begins with the First World War focusing on the
war aims of the Great European Powers, the entry of the United States

into the war and Russia's
exit from the war followed by the Russian Civil War. There is then further analysis of the
negotiations surrounding the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 and the political and territorial
settlements that ended the First World War.
The focus of the module then shifts to two broad
subject areas: the search for international security in the inter
-
war years and the origins, conduct
and settlement of the Second World War. In addition to a broad overview of the period, each
subject area w
ill incorporate a series of detailed case studies. These include: German
-
Soviet
relations between the wars; Anglo
-
French
-
German relations, 1919
-
1933; the Abyssinan Crisis of
1935
-
1936 and foreign intervention in the Spanish Civil War, 1936
-
1939; the nature

and conduct
of British and French appeasement strategies with particular emphasis on the Czech crisis of
1938; Anglo
-
French
-
Soviet relations, 1933
-
1939; German
-
Soviet
-
Japanese relations and the Far
East, 1933
-
1941, the United States, Japan and the Far Eas
t, 1933
-
1941; German
-
Soviet
relations, 1939
-
1941; the collapse of the Anglo
-
French Alliance, 1939
-
1940; the politics of the
Grand Alliance between 1941
-
1945.


Assessment
:

Seminar Presentation and Paper (10%), Essay (20%),

Document Exercise (20%),
Exam (50
%)


Where does it fit in?
This module follows on well from
Century of the Superpowe
rs.
It provides a
very good foundation for studies in International History at Level 3.



UPHPLN
-
30
-
2

Public History: Representations of the Past, 1400 to the
present


Mod
ul
e Leader: Peter Fleming


Contact
d
etails:
Peter.Fleming@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32

84393


NB This module will not offered within IFP

The argument explored in this module is that History has a very public r
ole which is rarely
investigated by academic historians. A sense of the past is essential to most communities,
groups, bodies and institutions, which all have a use for history. In the course of the year we will
be asking several related questions about th
is. For example,
how important is this public thinking,
writing, understanding and representing of the past?

How does public history relate to History as
an academic discipline and to “professional historians”? Can public history be reduced merely to
“heri
tage”? Or is it also part of collective identity and political life? What do we mean by “heritage”
and how important is it? What do we mean by the term “collective memory”?


There will be weekly lectures (given in turn by most colleagues in the History De
partment,
addressing their special areas of expertise) PLUS weekly seminars.
Student numbers will be
limited to two seminar groups (30 students)
.


There will be some level of chronology to both lectures and seminars. There are also two broad
themes which
run through the chronological course of study: 1.
the development of notions of
12

the past
in the past

and 2.
public history,
post 1945

(particularly since 1989, a watershed
represented by
the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe
). The effects of war, and

representations of war, will form a part of the course, as will colonialism, slavery, conflict and
memory, trauma, and reconciliation and apology. Specific themes will vary from year to year, but it
is hoped that we will range across many areas of history

and the past, from ‘foundation myths and
their use in the Middle Ages’ to ‘the famine and Irish identity’ to ‘slavery and the culture and
politics of museums’ to ‘coming to terms with war’ and to ‘TV History’ and ‘the Internet and public
history’.


Assess
ment
: Literature Review (10%), Essay
I

(20%), Essay
II

(20%), Supervised Group Project
(50%)


PLEASE NOTE: This module is a PRE
-
REQUISITE for the History Placement Module (at
Level 3)



LEVEL 3



UPHP
KC
-
30
-
3

History Dissertation



Module leader: Effie Ped
aliu


Contact details:
Effie.Pedaliu@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 328 4484


Prerequisite: UPHPGN
-
30
-
2, Theory & Practice of History

The dissertation is a piece of original research. In researching and writing th
e dissertation the
initiative lies with the student: you are expected to plan and implement your work yourself.
Dissertation supervision is linked to Special Subject work. Initial preparation for the dissertation
should begin as part of your studies on ‘Th
eory & Practice of History’. Over the summer between
L2 and L3, preliminary reading around possible topics for the dissertation is advisable. Your
dissertation tutor will help you to identify a broad topic for study and the location of relevant
primary sou
rces, and will advise and encourage you during each of the stage in the process of
preparing your dissertation. You are expected to immerse yourself in archives and libraries, and to
toss exciting new insights around in your Special Subject group. Towards
the end of the second
term, you will have an oral interview based on the work you have done on your dissertation so far.
This module is your chance to make a contribution to History!


Assessment:

Oral interview (10%); 10,000
-
word dissertation (90%)



UPHPJ
C 30
-
3

The Collapse of Empire and Colonial War: British and French
Decolonization




Module Leader
:

Kent Fedorowich


Contact
d
etails
:

Kent.Fedorowich
@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone 0117 32 84382



This module provides you with a broad but critical understanding of
the key economic, social and
diplomatic processes which influenced the development of British and French imperial expansion,
consolidation and decolonization since 1918. In fulfilment of these aims you will study the
following topics: The New Imperialism,
1870
-
1914; Social Darwinism and imperialism: the impact
of World War I and Versailles on the British and French empires; the British Empire between the
Wars: a survey; the British Empire between the wars: case studies; the French Empire between
the wars: a

survey; the French Empire between the wars: case studies; policing the Empire in the
inter
-
war period; the impact of World War II on the British and French Empires; Decolonisation
13

since 1947
-
1965: a survey; Decolonization since 1947.1965: case studies; Co
nfrontation and
insurgency: decolonisation in Asia; the winds of change: decolonization in Africa.


Assessment
:

Essay
1

(20%), Essay 2 (20%)
,
Assessed
Seminar

and Paper (10%), Extended
Essay (40%), Exam (50%)



UPHPJF
-
30
-
3


Crime in America
:
Organization a
nd Control
, 1865
-
present


Module Leader

Mike Woodiwiss


Contact d
etails
:
Michael.Woodiwiss@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32

84391

The primary aim of this module is to provide students with an introduction
to the development and
control of systematic illegal activity in the United States since the end of the Civil War.
Traditionally, crime in the US has been mainly associated with the poor or with groups of usually
foreign conspirators. In this module we w
ill discuss problems with these associations and their
implications for crime control strategies and civil liberties. We will also examine white supremacist
crimes, crimes committed by persons in positions of power and influence, and international
develop
ments such as the current moves towards transnational policing strategies. It examines
such significant themes and events as:

The various manifestations of the Ku Klux Klan; Industrialisation, immigration and morality
Control; Local and federal efforts aga
inst racketeers such as Al Capone, Lucky Luciano and John
Gotti; Mafia mythology: Corporate criminality such as health and safety violations and fraud; the
Americanization of international law enforcement.

Assessment
:

Assessed seminar and report (25%), Es
say (25%), Exam (50%)



UPHP
JL
-
30
-
3


Global Business: Rampant Capitalism or Income for All?


Module Leader: Peter Wardley


Contact
d
etails
:

Peter.Wardlev@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone 0117 32

84386


What do Global Corp
orations do? And how do they do it? Does 'Big Business' determine how we
live? Are they responsible for the extraordinarily high living standards experienced in the 'West'
and for the poverty that is the only reality for many in the rest of the world? Why,

and how
frequently, do they collapse? And with what consequences?


The largest of the world's companies have incomes which exceed those of many nations and yet
their leaders are hidden from history. This module examines the nature and growth of the world

economy and the role of large enterprises. It surveys the history of the large enterprise, both
private and state owned, to establish the nature of "Big Business", and its relationship with the
state. As business history is a new, fast growing and wide
-
ra
nging discipline, there is plenty of
scope in this module for personal choice of subject: while the world of the Global Enterprise is
replete with initiative and innovation, you can always find hubris and nemesis, acclaim and
scandal.

In this module, you
are introduced to radical new thinking that challenges the dominance of
America in the history of big business, and in its historiography. You will examine the theories
advocated by academics, and especially those propounded by business historians and
econ
omists, to explore and explain the development and behaviour of "Big Business". Crucial
elements here also include the public perception of the large enterprise, its presentation in the
media (itself, often dominated by "Big Business") and the development
of anti
-
corporate
campaigns. For their presentation, each student selects a theme or topic; this can be a history of a
specific company, labour organization or national survey.


Assessment:

Essay (30%), Presentation (40%), Exam (30%)



14

UPHP
JS
-
30
-
3 Cul
ture, Authority and Crisis: England and its Neighbours, c.1348
-
1520



Module leader: Peter Fleming


Contact
d
etails:
Peter.Fleming@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32

84393


The module explores how political and soci
al authority was asserted and challenged in the culture
of the period between the Black Death and the Reformation; a period characterised by
demographic crisis, political conflict and social fluidity. In doing so, it seeks to reflect a number of
recent int
erdisciplinary approaches to these issues. Of these, the module concentrates on the
following: the role of theory and ideology in the practice of politics; the importance of chivalry
within elite secular culture; dissent within ecclesiastical culture; disc
ourses of gender and the
family. Authority


problematised, contested, reasserted


is the thread that links these elements,
from real and theoretical challenges to royal and ecclesiastical authority, in a period when kings
were dethroned and even killed w
ith unprecedented frequency, and the church came under
pressure from heresy and schism; through challenges to the authority of the landed and urban
elites, in a period of unusual social fluidity, caused to some extent by demographic collapse, the
disintegr
ation of ‘feudalism’ and the rise of embryonic capitalism, to the problematic position of
patriarchal authority in a period that has been called ‘a golden age for women’, The module
adopts a multi
-
disciplinary approach, using literature and literary schola
rship, and, to a lesser
extent, evidence from visual and performance arts, to complement a core of social and political
history. Its geographical focus is on England and its dependent territories and neighbours: Wales,
Ireland, Scotland, France and Burgund
y.



Assessment
: Essay 1 (20%), Essay 2 (2%), Document Èxercise, (10%), Exam

(50%)



UPHPSC
-
30
-
3

The Dark Years: France 1934
-
1945


Module Leader:

Martin Simpson


Contact d
etails
:

Martin.Simpson@uwe.ac.uk


T
elephone 0117 32 84528


This module examines the political, social and cultural history of France under the ‘dark years’ of
the Nazi Occupation, looking at the conflicts, divisions and ambiguities of the period, as reflected
in the conflicting historical i
nterpretations. The Occupation and the Vichy regime are approached
through a critical examination of the 1930s and the shocking 6
-
week collapse of France in 1940.
Without this context an understanding of Vichy and the ‘National Revolution’ of Marshal Pétai
n,
head of the Vichy State, is impossible. Using a wide variety of (translated) primary and secondary
sources students will engage with issues of the nature of the Vichy regime and Pétain’s ‘National
Revolution’ and explore the daily experience of the Occu
pation, looking at how attitudes towards
the German authorities and the Vichy authorities evolved and what factors might lead men and
women into collaboration or resistance.

Topics include: the historiography of Vichy; the legacy of the First World War; t
he Third Republic
and its enemies; the
Front Populaire
and the coming of war; the defeat; the founding of Vichy;
Pétain and ‘Pétainism’; the ‘National Revolution’; anti
-
Semitism; ‘collaboration d’état’; the Paris
‘collaborationists’; resistance 1940
-
42; th
e
maquis

1942
-
44; public opinion; Vichy and fascism; De
Gaulle and the Free French; the Liberation; the purges; the foundation of the Fourth Republic.


Assessment
:

Essay (25%)
,
Bibliographical Essay (15%), Document analysis (10%
), Exam
(50%)




15

UPHPLM
-
30
-
3

History in the Public Space


Module leader: Peter Fleming


Contact
d
etails:
Peter.Fleming@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32

84393


Prerequisite: UPHPLN
-
30
-
2, Public History

This module is only available to stu
dents who performed well on the Public History module at L2.
It is an exciting opportunity to participate in a placement equivalent of 20 days work experience.
This may operate as a block or blocks, or as a combination with one day per week depending
upon
the requirements of the placement organisation and the student’s academic commitments.
The placement will normally take place in the Autumn Term. Placements will take place in
environments such as local record offices (eg the Bristol Record Office), museum
s (eg the new
Museum of Bristol), community History projects (eg England’s Past for Everyone), tourism (eg
researching, producing and market testing a history
-
themed guided tour or other similar activity),
and other History
-
related initiatives (eg Victoria

County History).


Prior to the placement commencing, a ‘work plan’ is negotiated between the placement
organisation, the module leader and the student. This will normally take place before the start of
the academic year and will identify the specific role

which the student will be expected to carry
out. Whilst this may involve some general small administrative tasks, the majority of the work
experience will require the student to be actively engaged in a creative process related in some
way to the provisio
n of History to the general public (eg assisting with educational activities with
schools, outreach liaison, consumer research). The work will build upon the theoretical insights
gained during the Public History module in L2, by enabling the student to app
ly some of these in a
practical setting. Regular meetings (a minimum of three) between the student and module tutor(s)
will take place throughout the year: these may take place in the workplace, as appropriate.
Towards the end of the module there will be a

one
-
day conference, involving all students and staff
on the module, at which student presentation will be made.


Assessment
: Logbook (20%); Presentation (30 minutes) 20%; 5,000 word Report (60%)



Level 3 Special Subjects


UPHPLX
-
30
-
3


The English Refor
mation: The Tudor State, the Church and the
People, c. 1529
-
1603


Module
L
eader
:

James Lee


Contact
d
etails
:

James5.Lee@uwe.ac.uk

Te
lephone 0117 32 84309


The English Reformation is one of the most hotly debated
subjects in English history. Henry VIII’s
divorce of Catherine of Aragon and his marriage to Anne Boleyn ushered in an entirely new
religious, political and cultural era. For the first time in centuries the king of England was not
subject to the Pope and t
he Roman Catholic religion was not at the core of people’s everyday
lives. This module begins with an examination of pre
-
Reformation religion and society, before
investigating the political, religious and social progress of the Reformation from Henry VIII’
s
divorce proceedings to the Elizabethan Church settlement and the growth of Puritanism in the
early 17
th

century. In the second half of the module, we examine a range of Reformation themes,
including Reformation theology, the Reformation in towns and citi
es, the decline of popular
religious festivals. Here the focus is on the effects of the Reformation on the English people.
Throughout the course we will use a wide variety of primary sources, including private royal
letters, central government acts and cor
respondence, theological and political treatises, and
pamphlets. Visual sources, churchwarden’s accounts, sermons and wills, will be used to assess
the local impact of the Reformation and to represent the perspectives of ‘ordinary’ men and
women.


Assessme
nt:

E
ssay (25%), Document Exercise (1
5%),

Book Review (10%),

Examination (50%)

16

UPHPKG
-
30
-
3

The London
-
Paris
-
Berlin Triangle: International Relations 1933
-
1940


Module Leader:

Glyn Stone


Contact d
etails
:

Glyn.
Stone@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone 0117 32 84420


This module studies the content and conduct of Anglo
-
French, Anglo
-
German and Franco
-
German foreign relations during the period following the advent to power of the Nazi régime in
early 1933 until the fall of Fran
ce in June 1940 and its aftermath. A case
-
study approach is
adopted in the evaluation of European diplomacy in a period characterised by crisis and change
both in the domestic and international environment. At the outset there will be an appraisal of the
foreign policy
-
making process within each of the three states to enable students to identify the
centres of executive power and the responsiveness of governments to diverse structural
pressures, economic conditions and public opinion. A crucial centre of f
ocus will be the nature of
civil
-
military relations in Britain, France and Germany and the formulation of strategic policy. The
broad aims of British, French and German foreign policy will then be examined, in particular, the
appeasement policies pursued b
y British and French administrations and the hegemonial
ambitions of Nazi Germany.


A series of case studies will be presented to clarify the principal elements in the diplomatic
relationships between the three powers studied. These include issues such as
: Britain, France
and the German problem, 1920
-
1934; disarmament and arms limitation, 1932
-
1934; rearmament,
1934
-
1939; Anglo
-
French
-
Italian relations and Italo
-
German relations, 1934
-
1939; France and the
Successor States of Eastern Europe and the search f
or cooperation with Soviet Russia, 1935
-
1939; Britain, France and the appeasement of Germany, 1936
-
1938; Britain, France, Germany
and the Spanish Civil War, 1936
-
1939; the Anglo
-
French
-
Soviet negotiations for alliance and the
making of the Nazi
-
Soviet Non
-
Aggression Pact, 1939; The Anglo
-
French Alliance, 1939
-
1940;
the fall of France and Germany's plans for the invasion of Britain and the Soviet Union during the
summer and autumn of 1940; and Anglo
-
American relations during the same period.


Assessment:

Es
say (25%), Document Exercise (25%), Examination (50%)


UPHPK
T
-
30
-
3

Politics and Violence in Twentieth Century Ireland


Module Leader
:

Phil Ollerenshaw


Contact
d
etails
:
Philip.Ollerenshaw@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone 0117 32

84421


This module examines a substantial specialist literature on politics and violence in modern Ireland,
focussing especially on two periods: 1912
-
23 and 1965
-
2008. The first period covers the Ulster
Crisis to the end of the civil
war, after which violence became for the most part of minor
importance. The second period looks at Northern Ireland from the Civil Rights campaign in the
1960s down to the present day, including the impact of the Good Friday Agreement. By analysing
the c
onflict between unionism and nationalism, students should acquire extensive knowledge of a
complex and enduringly important question in 'British Isles' history. Contemporary documents,
newspapers, biography and autobiography, and audio
-
visual material wil
l all be employed to
explain the emergence and growth of paramilitary groups/terrorist organisations (e.g. the IRA,
INLA, UVF, UFF and UDA) and how they relate to political parties in Ireland. We also look at how
the ‘Irish question’ has affected British
politics and the impact of ‘9/11’ on the nature of the conflict.


We will make considerable use of participants' own accounts of their activities, such as Ernie O'
Malley,
On Another Man's Wound

and, more recently, Sean O'Callaghan
The Informer

and
Eamon C
ollins,
Killing Rage
.


If you are interested in this module but have not done much, or any, Irish history before, don’t
worry. In the first three/four weeks we will cover all the background you will need. The library
stock for this module is very good.
A key website which contains an enormous amount of good
quality, relevant, material is
http://www.cain.ulst.ac.uk


Assessment
:


Book Review (25%), Document Analysis (25%), Examination (50%)

17

UPH
PLB
-
30
-
3

American
Foreign Policy during the “High Cold War”


Module Leader:

Effie Pedaliu


Contact details:
Effie.Pedaliu@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 328 4484


This course considers the evolution of American foreign policy duri
ng the period of the ‘High Cold
War’ i.e. the period during which the conflict between the US and the Soviet Union became the
main determinant of international relations and the pivotal feature of the international system. The
course will focus on the elab
oration and development of the policy of containment and the
creation of the national security state under three American Presidents
-

Truman, Eisenhower and
Kennedy. Although the main focus of the course will be on the US, it will endeavour to approach
th
e subject matter from a global perspective so that the environment in which the US had to
operate becomes clear. The Truman Doctrine, massive retaliation, the Eisenhower doctrine, the
idea of limited war and the doctrine of flexible response will form the
backbone of the course. The
course will examine topics such as the Yalta and Potsdam conferences; the US decision to drop
atomic bombs on Japan; the Mediterranean crises; the crises of 1948; the creation of NATO; the
movement towards Western European unity
; German rearmament; the formation of the PRC; the
expansion of the Cold War to the Far East; the Cuban Missile crisis. These topics will be used as
markers to highlight American responses to the Soviet Union during the ‘high Cold War’ period
and to illumi
nate American foreign policy decisions and the means the US employed and
developed to contain the Soviet threat. Special attention will be paid to the creation of the
institutions of the national security state such as the NSC, the CIA, the OCB etc; to the

formation
of structures of ‘penetration’ as a means of intervening in the domestic politics of countries
deemed as vital for US national security; to the use of psychological warfare and intelligence
gathering; to alliance politics; to the manipulation of

international institutions.The process of
decolonisation, the emancipation of the Third World and the challenges these posed for American
foreign policy will also be looked at. Documents from American archives will be used to
supplement the students’ unde
rstanding of the issues under discussion. In assessing the role of
the United States, the course will also discuss how new documentary evidence from the former
Soviet Union, Communist China and Eastern European countries have enhanced our
understanding of
US pol
icy during the Cold War.


Assessment
:


Essay
1 (20%)
,

Essay 2 (20%),

Exam (60%)



UPHPLA
-
30
-
3

The Spanish Civil War, 1936
-
39


Module Leader: Mike Richards


Contact
d
etails:
Michael.Richards@uwe.ac.
uk

Telephone 0117 32 84490


The main aim of the module is to introduce students to the detailed study of the Spanish Civil War,
an event which was pivotal in the modern history of Spain and had a deep resonance beyond
national boundaries. The module tak
es in the military and diplomatic aspects of the
conflict to an
extent, but the main focus is on (i) the politics of the war, and (ii) the social and cultural experience
of civil war. We concentrate on the actual period of hostilities (July 1936
-

April 19
39), although
both the demise of the preceding Second Republic and the origins of Franco's New State (the
main political ‘product’ of the war) are also discussed. Specific themes include: the First Days of
War; the struggle for the land; revolution and ana
rchism in Barcelona; Catholic resurgence in the
Nationalist zone; the violence of revolution and reaction; regional nationalism; etc.


Like all civil wars, the Spanish conflict was a struggle between competing visions of the nation:
whoever won would det
ermine the future shape of Spain. The content of these visions will be
examined as will the competing aims of republicans and revolutionaries, on the one hand, and
Catholics and fascists on the other. The latest historiography will be incorporated into our

discussions about the ways in which many ‘ordinary’ Spaniards survived even though they did not
adhere unproblematically to either side. In order to do this, much primary source material (of many
18

types) will be studied and the main focus of learning will
be on seminars rather than formal
lectures. Recent dissertation topics have included: aerial bombardment in Spain; appeasement
and Spain; British trade unions and the war; Catholicism & war; the International Brigades.


Assessment
: Document analysis 1 (25%
); Doc. Analysis 2 (25%); Exam (50%).




UPHPLC
-
30
-
3

War, Culture and Society in Twentieth Century Britain


Module Leader:

June Hannam


Contact de
tails
:

June.Hannam@uwe.ac.uk

Telephone 0117 32 84390


How far
do images and memories of the two world wars still shape national identity and ways of
looking at the world? How do we remember the wars? Is it through the lens of the shell shocked
soldier in the First World War, or of women who worked in munitions and th
e armed services or of
the popular idealism of the Second World War and the building of a post war welfare state? What
are the differences between the ‘Great War’ and the ‘People’s War’?


In this module you will be able to gain an understanding of why th
e two world wars of the twentieth
century continue to exercise a fascination for the general public as well as for historians. The
module will examine the relationship between war and social and cultural change through a
number of themes. These will includ
e women, work and sexuality; masculinity, shell shock and the
body; concepts of citizenship; pacifism, dissent and revolution; social welfare and reconstruction;
propaganda and censorship; ethnicity and national identity; popular memory.


You will be able

to explore these questions using a wide variety of sources, including diaries,
images, film, poems and literature as well as official government reports and commissions. You
will also find a wealth of interesting material on the Web.


Assessment
:


Essay (
25%), Portfolio of seminar work: presentation; document analysis (25%),
Exam (50%)



UPHPKY
-
30
-
3

Britain, the Atlantic Slave Trade and its Legacy



Module Leader: Madge Dresser

Contact details:
Madge.Dresser@uw
e.ac.uk

Telephone: 0117 32 84388

This module investigates British involvement in the trade of enslaved Africans and how and why
this trade was finally ended. It also considers the British campaign for emancipation of slaves in
British territories and

its aftermath. The module covers the cultural, economic and political context
of the slave trade and slavery in Britain. We have two major microfilm collections of primary
material which students will be able to explore. Issues considered on this module w
ill include the
rise and fall of the Royal African Company; Relations with Africans in the early modern era; the
establishment of slave regimes in the Caribbean and North America; The struggle for naval
supremacy in the Caribbean; slave revolts; slave merc
hants and slaving ports in Britain; Slave
ship regimes and white sailors; Slave
-
produced commodities and the rise of luxury; Winds of
change; The secular and religious roots of abolition; The Quaker and Evangelical campaign
against the slave trade; The inf
luence of the French Revolution; the Parliamentary campaign for
Abolition, The British Caribbean and the legacy of slavery.


Assessment
:


Essay (30
%)
; Book Review 1 (10
%),

Book Review 2 (10%)

Exam (50%)



19

UPHPKQ
-
30
-
3 Crowds, Disorder and the Law in Engl
and, 1730
-
1820


Module Leader: Steve Poole

Contact
d
etails:

Steve.Poole@uwe.ac.uk


Telephone: 0117 32 84437


This module studies social tensions caused within the Hanoverian English state by popular challenge
s
to the law and to the political status quo. In this period of profound social, cultural, economic and
political change, growing numbers of ordinary men and women created and formed movements for
parliamentary reform, developed new ideas about citizenship

and civil rights, and began expressing
themselves in new languages of class, gender and nation. This module is about them; not the ‘Great
Men’ who governed the country, but the sort of people who caused the elite to lie awake at night and
check their lock
s. Methodologically we will be doing ‘history from below’ and developing research skills
for the study of popular opposition, social crime and disorder, whether it be riot, custom, the forming of
radical societies and trades unions, open rebellion, or form
al petitioning


and from attacks by crowds
on turnpikes and toll houses to attacks by soldiers upon crowds of reformers.

You will be expected to do plenty of preparatory reading, but the module is taught in two
-
hour
workshops where the emphasis is less u
pon formal lecturing and more upon archival research and
document analysis. You will use a wide range of electronic and hard copy primary sources to learn the
art of doing history from below, an emphasis specifically designed to inform and support the rese
arch
you’ll be doing for your dissertation.


How it fits in

This special subject will suit anybody with an interest in social history and in writing a dissertation on
crowds, disorderly behavior, crime, protest, punishment, radicalism, revolution and refor
m. It follows
logically from level two
Crime and Protest
, and level one
Long Eighteenth Century
, but neither are
pre
-
requisites and, depending upon availability, it may also be taken by joint honours students not
taking a dissertation in history.


Assessme
nt:
Essay 1 (supplied documents, 30%), Essay 2 (your own documents, 40%),
Examination (30%)



UPHPKU
-
30
-
3 Charity, Children and the Poor in the Nineteenth Century



Contact
d
etails:
Moira.Martin@uwe.ac.uk

Tel
ephone 0117 32

84389


The course will provide an introduc
tion to the role of charity

in the nineteenth century and consider
the particular contribution made by women in the latter half of the century. The dominant social,
intellectual and economic features

of society will be studied, particularly in relation to the
significant increase in charitable activity from the 1860s onwards. The range of charitable
endeavours on behalf to children will be examined through a series of case studies, eg children
and cri
me, the movement for reformatories etc; children and employment; schemes to provide for
children deprived of ‘normal family life’, eg orphanages and `emigration schemes; hospitals for
sick children and the provision of

education by churches and charitable
foundations.


Assessment:

Literature Revi
ew (10%), Case Study (40
%), Examination (50%)