Physics and Astronomy

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RELS-309. Selected Topics in Religious Studies Faculty
The course will concentrate on special issues, movements, and leading figures in the study of religion.
Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G, depending on topic.)
RELS-324. Literature and Religious Idea Faculty
An analysis of the significant themes common to works of imaginative literature exploring the interrelation
of religion and artistic creativity. Attention will be given to Camus, Eliot, Faulkner, Kazantzakis, Waugh,
and others. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)
RELS-327. Religion and Violence Dr. Rein
The turn of the twenty-first century has been accompanied by an alarming global increase in religiously-
motivated violence. Historically, religious ideas have been used to justify both war and peace, both violence
and reconciliation. This course will examine the relationship between religion and violence in various historical
contexts. Topics will include: just war doctrine, crusades and holy wars; sacrificial rituals in traditional cultures;
modern revolutionary and terrorist movements; and religious pacifism. (Formerly PHIL-327.) Three hours
per week. Four semester hours. (H.)
Note: Students who have received credit for the former PHIL-327 may not enroll in RELS-327.
RELS-328: Religious Diversity in Southeastern Pennsylvania Dr. Rein
Religious diversity and difference have become crucial political and social issues in the early years of the
twenty-first century. In this course, students will participate in an ongoing effort to understand, investigate,
and connect with the religious diversity of our region. Readings will focus on theoretical and practical
interpretations of religious diversity, primarily in a modern American context. The course will also involve
frequent field trips and site visits to religious institutions and organizations near Ursinus, including but not
limited to Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic sites. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, D.)
RELS-365. The Protestant Reformation Dr. Rein
An examination of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation through the writings of Luther, Calvin,
representatives of the Radical and Catholic reforms, and others, with attention to their social, cultural, and
political context. Topics include the crisis of medieval culture, Luther’s biography and teachings, the theology
of faith and grace, the creation of a Protestant culture, the radical reformers, and international Calvinism.
(Formerly PHIL-325.) Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H.)
Note: Students who have received credit for the former PHIL-325 may not enroll in RELS-365.
RELS-366. The Muhammad Seminar Dr. von Schlegell
Who was Muhammad? For Muslims he is the genealogical and spiritual heir to Abraham, the founder of
monotheism. This course examines secular and sacred histories of Muhammad's life from both Sunni and Shi'i
sources. We consider how he has been portrayed in the West from the Middle Ages to the 21st c. We look at
Muhammad in Islamic music, art, and poetry, and in new genres like Muslim hiphop. Primarily discussion
format, with short critical reviews and one term paper. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)
RELS-367. Islamic Mysticism Dr. von Schlegell
Sufism (Islamic Mysticism) manifests itself in multiple forms. But all Sufis share having an intense love of
God and doing mystical practices. Scholars have assumed that mystics and religious legal authorities are in
constant battle. We will reconsider this idea. Today in some countries Sufism is considered a serious threat.
Why? Readings center on Sufi understandings of the nature of the divine, miracles, dreams, and the spiritual
meanings of sex and death. Three hours per week. Four semester hours. (H, G.)
Physics and Astronomy
Associate Professors Nagy (Chair), Cellucci, Riley; Assistant Professor Carroll.
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The courses in physics are designed to give the student an understanding of the logic and structure
of physics. Methods of analysis and presentation of concepts and ideas are emphasized. Laboratory
work demonstrates the dependence of physical theory on experimentation.
Requirements for Majors
Physics Track
Students must take the following courses: CS-173; MATH-112; PHYS-121Q, 122Q, 201, 207,
209, 309, 315, 408W, and at least twelve credits of additional work at the 300 level or above.
Astrophysics Track
Students must take the following courses: CS-173; MATH-112, PHYS-121Q, 122Q, 201, 207,
209, 301, 309, 315, 458W, at least two credits of research (from 411, 412, 421, 422, 491),
and at least four credits of additional work at the 300 level or above.
Physics majors can fulfill the capstone, oral presentation, and W requirements by taking
PHYS-408W or PHYS-458W.
Students anticipating graduate study in physics or astrophysics should select additional courses
from PHYS-304, 316, 401, 405, 410, and from MATH-235, 310, 413.
Requirements for Secondary School Teaching Certification
Students must take BIO-101Q or 102Q or ENV-100; CHEM-105, 105L, 206, 206L;
MATH-111 or 108, 112; PHYS-121Q, 122Q, 201, 207, 209, 315, 408W.
Requirements for Minors
Minor concentration in physics:
Consists of MATH-111 or 108, 112; PHYS-121Q, 122Q, 201, 207, and 209 or 408W.
Minor concentration in astronomy:

Consists of PHYS-101Q, 102Q, 121Q, 122Q, 201, 301, and a minimum of three credits
of seminar from the following topics: solar system astronomy, celestial mechanics, galactic
astronomy, astrometry.
Students in the pre-engineering program usually take CHEM-105, 105L, 206, 206L; CS-173;
MATH-111, 112, 211, 310; PHYS-121Q, 122Q, 201, 207, 209. Additional courses in chemistry,
mathematics, and physics are chosen in consultation with the pre-engineering adviser. The courses
are determined by the particular field of engineering the student plans to enter.
PHYS-101Q. Stars and Galaxies Dr. Nagy
Periodic changes in the sky, physical principles of stellar astronomy, star formation and evolution, galaxies,
the creation and evolution of the universe, telescopic observations and CCD astrophotography. Prerequisite:
a working knowledge of high school algebra. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.
Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-102Q. The Solar System Dr. Nagy
Periodic changes in the sky, physical principles of solar system astronomy, the sun and planets, asteroids
and other solar system debris, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, telescopic observations and CCD
astrophotography. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of high school algebra. Three hours of lecture and two
hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours. (LS.)
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PHYS-111Q. General Physics I Faculty
A study of mechanics and thermodynamics, utilizing the principles of calculus in the presentation and in
exercises. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH-111, or permission of instructor . Three hours of lecture and
three hours of lab per week. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-112. General Physics II Faculty
A continuation of PHYS 111Q. A study of waves, electricity, magnetism, and light, utilizing the principles
of calculus in the presentation and in exercises. Prerequisites: PHYS-111Q, MATH-111 or permission
of the instructor. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-121Q. Spacetime and Quantum Physics Faculty
A study of special relativity and an introduction to quantum physics, utilizing the principles of calculus
in the presentation and in exercises. Topics will include spacetime diagrams, the relativity of simultaneity,
time dilation, relativistic kinematics, probability, quantization, and interference. Prerequisite or corequisite:
MATH-111, or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Offered
fall semester. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-122Q. Electricity, Magnetism, and Waves Faculty
A study of electricity and magnetism (electric forces, capacitance, currents, magnetic forces, induction).
Introduction to vector calculus. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS-121, MATH-112, or permission of the
instructor. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Offered spring semester. Four semester
hours. (LS.)
PHYS-201. Introductory Classical Mechanics Faculty
Vectors, vector calculus, classical mechanics, statics, kinematics, dynamics of a particle, energy, harmonic
motion, moving reference systems, central forces, chaos). Prerequisites: PHYS-122, MATH-112. Three hours
of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Offered fall semester. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-207. Modern Physics Faculty
Origins of quantum theory, physics of atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei, and elementary particles. Class work
will include experiments which demonstrate the physical principles. Prerequisites: PHYS-122Q. Three hours
per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-209. Electronics for Scientists Dr. Cellucci
Foundations of analog and digital circuits. D-C and A-C circuits, transistors, operational amplifiers, digital
electronics. Prerequisite: PHYS-112. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Offered spring
semester. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-210. Intermediate Classical Physics Faculty
Vectors, vector calculus, classical mechanics (statics, kinematics, dynamics of a particle, energy, harmonic
motion, moving reference systems, central forces, chaos), electricity and magnetism (electric forces,
capacitance, currents, magnetic forces, induction). Prerequisites: PHYS-112, MATH-112. Three hours
per week. Offered fall semester. Three semester hours. (LS with PHYS-210a.)
Note: This course will no longer be offered after the 2009 - 2010 academic year.
PHYS-210a. Intermediate Laboratory Faculty
Laboratory work (optional) for PHYS-210. Three hours per week. Offered fall semester.
One semester hour. (LS, with PHYS-210.)
Note: This course will no longer be offered after the 2009 - 2010 academic year.
PHYS-212. Classical and Quantum Mechanical Waves Faculty
The behavior of classical waves, wave-particle duality, state functions and probability densities, the
Schroedinger wave equation, one-dimensional quantum mechanical problems, prediction and measurement
in quantum mechanics. Class work will include experiments which demonstrate the physical principles.
Prerequisites: PHYS-112, MATH-112. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.
Note: This course will no longer be offered after the 2009 - 2010 academic year.
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PHYS-301. Introduction to Astrophysics Dr. Nagy
Astrometry, astronomical photometry, CCD imaging and image processing, spectroscopy. The astronomical
two-body problem, tidal forces, the Sun and planets, observable properties of stars, stellar structure and
evolution, binary stars, galaxies and cosmology. Prerequisites: PHYS-112, MATH-111; pre- or co-requisite:
MATH-112. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-304. Thermodynamics Dr. Nagy
Primarily classical thermodynamics with a brief introduction to statistical aspects. Temperature, laws of
thermodynamics, work, heat, energy, entropy, thermodynamic potentials, kinetic theory of dilute gases,
equations of state. Alternates with PHYS-410. Prerequisites: PHYS-112, PHYS-315. Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.
PHYS-309. Electric and Magnetic Fields Dr. Nagy
Electric and magnetic fields and potentials, Laplace’s equation, dielectrics and magnetic materials, Maxwell’s
equations, electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: PHYS-112, 210, 315. Three hours per week. Four semester
hours.
PHYS-315. Mathematical Physics I Dr. Nagy
Ordinary differential equations, special functions of mathematical physics, linear algebra, coordinate
transformations, vector analysis, Fourier series, numerical solution of algebraic equations. Prerequisites:
PHYS-112, MATH-112. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-316. Mathematical Physics II Dr. Nagy
Complex analysis, partial differential equations, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution
of ordinary differential equations, Fourier and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: PHYS-315. Three hours
per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-317. Seminar Faculty
Study and discussion of advanced topics or recent developments in physics. Students must consult the chair
of the department before registering for this course. Three hours per week. Three semester hours.
PHYS-318. Seminar Faculty
Same description as PHYS-317. Three hours per week. Three semester hours.
PHYS-401. Applications of Quantum Mechanics. Faculty
The hydrogen atom, angular momentum, systems of identical particles, perturbation theory, and other
applications selected from atomic, molecular, solid-state, and nuclear physics. Alternates with PHYS-309.
Prerequisite: PHYS-212. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-405. Computational Physics Dr. Cellucci
Sophisticated numerical and nonlinear techniques will be developed and applied to modern and traditional
problems in physics. Problems whose solutions are not accessible analytically will be explored through
the use of symbolic and compiled languages with visualization. Prerequisites: PHYS-315, CS-371,
or permission of a member of the physics faculty. Three hours per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-408W. Advanced Physics Laboratory Faculty
Experimental investigations of physical phenomena with emphasis on laboratory techniques and the written
and oral communication of scientific results. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the Physics track
of the major. Prerequisites: PHYS-207, 210, 212. Six hours of laboratory per week. Four semester hours. (LS.)
PHYS-410. Classical Mechanics Faculty
Dynamics of a system of particles, mechanics of rigid bodies, general motion of a rigid body, Lagrange’s
equations, Hamilton’s equations, theory of vibrations. Alternates with PHYS-304. Prerequisites: PHYS-210,
315 Three hours per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-411. Research Faculty
Investigations, of experimental or theoretical nature, pursued independently by the student. The preparation
of a summarizing report is required. To register for this course, a student must have the consent of a member
of the physics Faculty to serve as the adviser. One semester hour.
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PHYS-412. Research Faculty
Continuation of PHYS-411. One semester hour.
PHYS-421. Research Faculty
Same as PHYS-411, but more extensive in scope. Two semester hours.
PHYS-422. Research Faculty
Continuation of PHYS-421. Two semester hours.
PHYS-431. Research Faculty
Same as PHYS-421, but more extensive in scope. Three semester hours. (I.)
PHYS-432. Research Faculty
Continuation of PHYS-431. Three semester hours. (I.)
PHYS-441. Internship Faculty
A laboratory project in cooperation with industry at an industrial site, a national lab, or other appropriate
academic site, involving a minimum of 10 hours per week for one semester or four weeks of full-time work.
Before beginning the internship, the student must submit a proposal to be approved by the Physics faculty and
the on-site supervisor. Upon completion of the work, written and/or oral reports must be presented to the
department. Graded S/U. Three semester hours. (I.)
PHYS-458W. Seminar in Astrophysics Dr Nagy
Study and discussion of advanced topics or recent developments in astrophysics, with emphasis on the written
and oral communication of scientific results. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the Astrophysics
track of the major. Prerequisite: PHYS-301.Three hours per week. Four semester hours.
PHYS-491. Research/Independent Work Faculty
This course is open to candidates for departmental honors and to other students with the permission
of the departmental chairman. Four semester hours. (I.)
PHYS-492W. Research/Independent Work Faculty
A continuation of PHYS-491. Writing a major paper and giving an oral presentation are required. Prerequisite:
PHYS-491. Four semester hours. (I.)
Politics and International Relations
Professors Fitzpatrick, Hood, Melrose (Ambassador in Residence), Stern (Chair); Associate Professors
Evans, Kane, Marks.
The general objectives of the department of politics and international relations are:
1) To challenge students to evaluate their conceptions of the good life for the individual
and for society.
2) To prepare students for lives of enlightened and responsible citizenship.
3) To help students attain knowledge of the theory and practice of politics.
4) To help students develop the faculties of expression and critical thinking.
The professional objectives are:
1) To prepare students for graduate work in politics, law, and public service.
2) To prepare students for examinations required for governmental service.
3) To prepare students to be political leaders.
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