Biotechnology in Agriculture - The Freedonia Group

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Freedonia Industry Study #1339
Biotechnology in Agriculture
Study Highlights...............................................................................2
Table of Contents and List of Tables and Charts.............................4
Sample Pages and Sample Tables from:
Market Environment....................................................6
Products.......................................................................7
Functions and Markets................................................8
Industry Structure........................................................9
Company Profiles......................................................10
List of Companies Profiled........................................11
Forecasting Methodology...............................................................12
About the Company.......................................................................13
Advantages of Freedonia Reports...................................................13
About Our Customers....................................................................14
Other Titles From Freedonia.........................................................15
Ordering Information.....................................................................16
Brochure Table of Contents
Study Publication Date: October 2000
Price: $3,700
Pages: 277
Biotechnology in Agriculture, a new study from The
Freedonia Group, is designed to provide you with an in-
depth analysis of major trends in the industry and the
outlook for product segments and major markets -- critical
information to help you with strategic planning.
This brochure gives you an indication of the scope, depth
and value of Freedonia's new study, Biotechnology in
Agriculture. Ordering information is included on the back
page of the brochure.
Freedonia Industry Study
2
• US sales of agricultural biotechnology products are
projected to advance 12.2 percent per annum to $2.9
billion in 2004.
• Among specific major crops, transgenic cotton is
expected to fare the best. Cotton is relatively difficult
to cultivate and growers have thus far proved willing
to pay substantial premiums for insect-protected and/
or herbicide-tolerant cotton.
• Glyphosate-tolerant soybeans should benefit from the
expiration of Monsanto’s patent on ROUNDUP
herbicide, while corn growers are expected to plant
significant acreage of rootworm-resistant crops
beginning in 2001-2002.
• Dairy farm demand for recombinant bovine soma-
totropin will continue to grow, although to a lesser
extent than in previous years, given a weak dairy
market and ongoing culling of dairy farmer ranks.
• Agricultural diagnostics will have an excellent chance
to benefit from the controversy surrounding GMOs,
as growers, grain processors and importers seek to
determine what fraction of any given shipment is
transgenic.
• Industry participants in the field of agricultural
biotechnology include Monsanto, DuPont, Novartis
and Aventis.
* For the purposes of this study, agricultural biotechnology
refers to products derived from living organisms for use in
commercial agriculture; plants bred by conventional means,
chemically based pesticides and soil inoculants are not covered.
Veterinary pharmaceuticals outside of recombinant growth
hormones are excluded as well.
Study Highlights
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
3
Study Highlights
Item 1989 1999 2004 2009 99/89 04/99
US Agricultural Expenses (bil $) 160.7 184.3 210.0 240.0 2.8 2.6
$ ag biotech/000$ expense 1.31 8.76 13.69 17.77 -- --
Ag Biotech Product Sales 210 1615 2875 4265 50.4 12.2
Transgenic Seeds & Plants 20 1260 2315 3470 129.0 12.9
Animal Growth Hormones 80 200 330 425 20.1 10.5
Biopesticides 65 90 120 165 6.7 5.9
Other 45 65 110 205 7.6 11.1
US Sales of Agricultural Biotechnology Products
(million dollars)
% Annual Growth
© Copyright by The Freedonia Group, Inc.
Other
4.0%
Biopesticides
5.6%
Transgenic Seeds & Plants
78.0%
Animal Growth Hormones
12.4%
US Sales of Agricultural Biotechnology
Products, 1999
SUMMARY TABLE
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Order form on last page
List of Contents,
Tables and Charts
I.EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Summary Table
................................................................
3
II.MARKET ENVIRONMENT
General
.................................................................................
4
Economic Factors
.................................................................
5
Table - Macroeconomic Trends
........................................
7
Demographic Trends
...........................................................
7
Table - Selected Demographic Indicators
..........................
9
Trends in Agriculture
...........................................................
9
Table - Farm Acreage & Livestock Indicators
..................
12
Agricultural Inputs
.........................................................
12
Table - Agricultural Expenses
.....................................
14
Farm Income
..................................................................
14
Table - Farm Income
...................................................
16
Crop Planting Trends
.....................................................
16
Table - Selected Crop Planting Trends
.......................
18
Table - Crop Acres Planted by Type
...........................
19
Crop Value
.....................................................................
19
Table - Crop Value
.....................................................
20
Environmental & Political Considerations
..........................
21
Regulatory Considerations
..................................................
25
Intellectual Property & Patent Issues
..................................
28
World Market Overview & International Policy Issues
.......
31
III.AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
General
...............................................................................
35
Table - Agricultural Biotechnology Product Sales by Type
......
36
Chart - US Agricultural Biotechnology
Sales by Type, 1999
.....................................................
37
Technology Review
............................................................
37
Transformation & Transgenic Technology
.....................
38
Other Biotechnology Used in Agriculture
.......................
39
Research & Development Activity
......................................
42
Table - US R&D Spending in Agricultural
Biotechnology by Area, 1996-1999
.............................
43
Table - R&D Spending of Selected Ag Biotech
Companies, 1996-1999
...............................................
44
IV.TRANSGENIC SEEDS & PLANTS
General
...............................................................................
45
Acreage
...............................................................................
46
Table - Transgenic Seed Acres Planted by Type
.............
47
Chart - US Transgenic Crop Acreage, 1996-2009
.........
47
Sales
................................................................................
48
Table - Transgenic Seed & Plant Sales by Type
..............
49
Cereal & Feed Grains
.....................................................
49
Acreage
.......................................................................
50
Table - Transgenic Cereal & Feed Grain Acreage
........
51
Sales
............................................................................
51
4
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Freedonia Industry Study
Table - Transgenic Cereal & Feed Grain Seed Sales
....
54
Oil Crops
........................................................................
61
Acreage
.......................................................................
61
Table - Transgenic Oil Crop Acreage
......................
63
Sales
............................................................................
63
Table - Transgenic Oil Crop Seed Sales
...................
64
Fruits & Vegetables
........................................................
69
Acreage
.......................................................................
69
Table - Transgenic Fruit & Vegetable Acreage
........
71
Sales
............................................................................
71
Table - Transgenic Fruit & Vegetable Seed Sales
.....
72
Cotton & Other
.............................................................
77
Acreage
.......................................................................
77
Table - Cotton & Other Transgenic Crop Acreage
.....
78
Sales
............................................................................
79
Table - Other Transgenic Seed Sales
........................
79
V.OTHER AGRICULTURAL
BIOTECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS
General
...............................................................................
85
Table - Other Agricultural Biotechnology Product
Sales by Type
................................................................
86
Chart - Other Agricultural Biotechnology
Sales by Type, 1999
.....................................................
86
Animal Growth Hormones
.................................................
87
Table - Recombinant Animal Growth Hormone Sales
....
90
Biopesticides
.......................................................................
90
Table - Biopesticide Sales by Type & Function
..............
91
Bioinsecticides
.................................................................
92
Table - Bioinsecticide Sales
..........................................
94
Other Biopesticides
.........................................................
95
Table - Other Biopesticide Sales
..................................
95
Biofungicides
..............................................................
96
Other
..........................................................................
97
Table - Other Agricultural Biotechnology
Product Sales
.........................................................
99
Other
................................................................................
99
Agricultural Diagnostics
..................................................
99
Miscellaneous
...............................................................
101
VI.FUNCTIONS
General
............................................................................
105
Table - Agricultural Biotechnology Sales by Function
.......
106
Chart - Agricultural Biotechnology
Sales by Function, 1999
............................................
107
Crop Protection
...............................................................
107
Table - Biotech Crop Protection Product
Sales by Function & Type
.........................................
108
Weed Control
..............................................................
109
Table - Biotech Weed Control Product Sales
............
110
5
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Insect Control
..............................................................
110
Table - Biotech Insect Control Product Sales
............
113
Disease Control & Other
.............................................
113
Table - Biotech Disease Control & Other
Crop Protection Sales
.............................................
116
Livestock Health Promotion
............................................
116
Table - Biotech Livestock Health Product Sales
............
118
Crop Enhancement
.........................................................
118
Table - Biotech Crop Enhancement Product Sales
.......
119
Delayed Ripening Crops
..............................................
119
Other
...........................................................................
121
Chemical Production & Other Functions
.......................
123
Table - Chemical Production & Other Functions
of Agricultural Biotechnology Products
......................
125
VII.MARKETS
General
............................................................................
126
Table - Agricultural Biotechnology Sales by End User
......
127
Chart - Agricultural Biotechnology
Sales by End User, 1999
...........................................
128
Field Crop Farms
.............................................................
128
Table - Field Crop Farm Market For
Agricultural Biotechnology
........................................
131
Livestock & Dairy Farms
.................................................
131
Table - Livestock Farm Market For
Agricultural Biotechnology
........................................
133
Produce Farms
.................................................................
133
Table - Produce Farm Market For
Agricultural Biotechnology
........................................
135
Other Markets
.................................................................
135
Table - Other Markets For Agricultural Biotechnology
.....
136
Greenhouses & Nurseries
............................................
136
Miscellaneous
...............................................................
137
VIII.INDUSTRY STRUCTURE
General
............................................................................
141
Table - US Agricultural Biotechnology
Sales by Company, 1999
...........................................
143
Market Share
...................................................................
144
Chart - US Agricultural Biotechnology
Market Share, 1999
...................................................
145
Competitive Strategies
.....................................................
148
Financing Trends
............................................................
150
Valuation of Companies
..................................................
151
Distribution & Marketing
...............................................
152
Manufacturing Requirements
..........................................
155
Licensing & Related Agreements
.....................................
156
Table - Selected Cooperative Agreements
.....................
159
Mergers & Acquisitions
...................................................
170
Table - Selected Acquisitions & Divestitures
................
171
Company Profiles
.....................................................
173-277
Order form on last page
Market Environment
6
The Market Environment Section
discusses factors influencing agricul-
tural biotechnology, including agricul-
tural trends and regulatory consider-
ations.
This information provides you with an
understanding and an analysis of the
climate in which the agricultural
biotechnology operates.
MARKET ENVIRONMENT
Intellectual Property & Patent Issues
As part of a basic strategy intended to gain competitive advantage, companies act
to protect their intellectual property. Particularly in cutting-edge areas like
biotechnology, which involve large capital investments in research, development
and marketing, companies are highly reluctant to enter into risky ventures without
assurances that novel products could not be appropriated unfairly by competitors.
Over the last 30 years, the US judicial and legislative systems have greatly
strengthened the patent protections afforded plants and other biological inven-
tions. No such protections were provided by the original Patent Act of 1790:
plants and animals were regarded as “products of nature” and therefore not
patentable. Nearly two centuries later, the US Supreme Court ruled in the
landmark 1980 case Diamond v. Chakrabarty that the original Patent Act of 1790
did indeed extend to genetically engineered microorganisms. Subsequent rulings
by the US Patent and Trademark Office asserted that utility patents -- the strongest
form of patent -- could be awarded for novel plants, seeds, plant parts, tissue
cultures, plant genes and for new breeds of animals (other than humans). The
overriding standard remains novelty: if a GMO hasn’t been described before and
is considered not to be obvious, it is patentable.
Ag biotech companies may have different reasons for securing patents for their
products. Larger companies seek to patent biotechnology and modified
germplasm for more traditional reasons, i.e., they do not wish to compete against
other companies selling identical products. Smaller companies -- of which there
are many in ag biotech -- may use patents as fund- raising devices. Since many of
these companies have few, if any, products on the market, a patent is an inexpen-
sive means of signaling to venture capitalists and/or investment banks that the
company has intellectual property assets of value. In addition, larger companies
SAMPLE PAGE
Freedonia Industry Study
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Products
The Product Sections provide demand
for historical years and forecast growth
to 2004 and 2009.
This information helps you:
• Analyze your company's
growth potential in
the industry.
• Outline your strategic
plans for five and ten
years out.
• Establish sales goals.
Bioinsecticides
Demand for bioinsecticides is expected to advance 6.1 percent per annum,
reaching $78 million in 2004. These products are expected to increase their share
of the biopesticides market in the short term; however, as other pesticide technolo-
gies (e.g., bionematicide, biofungicide) advance, bioinsecticides will grow less
rapidly.
Bioinsecticides include any of a number of products derived from naturally
occurring organisms with insecticidal properties. To an increasing extent, demand
will be bolstered by consumer concerns regarding the safety of genetically
engineered crops. Growth will also be spurred by increasing concerns about
potential threats chemical insecticides pose to the environment and worker health.
Moreover, most chemical insecticides are not species specific; they kill all insects
in a given area, even beneficial ones, whereas bioinsecticides can be more easily
targeted to specific pests and can co-evolve as the targeted pests evolve resistance.
More than 80 percent of the sprayable bioinsecticide market is accounted for by
products based on the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Bt bacteria
produce a protein which is poisonous to insects, creating ulcers within the stomach
lining and eventually killing any insects which ingest it. More than 600 strains of
Bt with species specific toxicity have been identified and many have been
successfully applied to a large number of pests, including black flies, sunflower
moths and mosquitoes.
Sprayable Bt’s growth has the potential to be severely constrained by two factors.
First, sprayable Bt directly competes with transgenic Bt crops (e.g., corn, cotton)
which incorporate Bt genes in their genomes and can therefore make Bt toxin an
effective and inexpensive substitute for Bt spray; moreover, unlike transgenic Bt,
typical Bt sprays are not stable under protracted exposure to ultraviolet light or
rain. Second, although resistant insects have not emerged on a significant scale
thus far, even manufacturers admit that they eventually will. When that happens,
the problem will likely be addressed via additional transgenic forms of Bt that are
much more potent than most sprayable forms, although novel sprayable Bt toxins
are also under development. Despite these limitations, sprayable Bt has already
recaptured some of the market it lost to transgenics in the late 1990s; sprayable
Bt’s perceived advantages include:
7
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Order form on last page
OTHER AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY PRODUCTS
Item 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009
Total Oil Crop Value (bil $) 15.6 13.9 15.2 16.6
$ transgenic/000$ crop -- 33.4 47.0 58.1
Transgenic Oil Crop Sales neg 464 714 965
Soybeans neg 461 698 925
Canola neg 3 12 27
Sunflowers neg neg neg 1
Other neg neg 4 12
$/acre — 12.4 14.9 17.2
Transgenic Oil Crop Acre Planted (mil) neg 37.4 47.8 56.0
Transgenic Oil Crop Seed Sales
(million dollars)
© Copyright by The Freedonia Group, Inc.
SAMPLE TABLE
SAMPLE PAGE
These Sections analyze trends and consider
the threats and opportunities for each
major function and market for agricultural
biotechnology.
The information presented will
help you:
• Focus your sales and marketing
efforts on high growth areas.
• Propose new areas for development.
8
MARKETS
© Copyright by The Freedonia Group, Inc.
Produce Farms
The produce (fruit and vegetable) farm market for agricultural biotechnology is
projected to reach $91 million by 2004, reflecting an annual growth rate of 8.3
percent. Robust growth in the organic produce market coupled with ongoing
mistrust of GMOs is expected to benefit biopesticide consumption in this market,
as produce farmers seek to control pests without resorting to either chemical or
transgenic means. Developers of genetically modified fruits and vegetables are
expected to proceed cautiously, in light of wary public sentiment and the high-
profile commercial disappointment of transgenic tomatoes during the 1990s.
Biopesticides are expected to be major beneficiaries of consumer concerns
regarding genetically modified foods, especially those produced primarily for
human consumption, such as fruits and vegetables. The ability to label produce as
“organic,” i.e., grown without chemical pesticides or GM seed, has already proved
to be a major marketing advantage, as the total US organic food market has
approached $6 billion and continues to post double-digit annual growth.
Biopesticides have been embraced by a large segment of the organic farming
industry and have been growing steadily. In addition, in order to promote the
development and use of biopesticides, the EPA has established special guidelines
for their registration; these guidelines generally require less time and expense than
those required for synthetic pesticides. Despite these positives, biopesticides and
other ag biotech products marketed to produce farmers must still overcome
chronic weakness in the broader US agricultural market.
Factors determining the success of transgenic fruits and vegetables, at least in the
near term, will be somewhat different than those for other biotech seeds and
plants. Unlike genetically modified field crops, which are targeted to farmer
Item 1994 1999 2004 2009
Crop Acres Planted (million) 322 327 332 335
$ insect control/acre 0.1 1.4 2.7 4.0
Biotech Insect Control Product Sales 43 463 903 1340
Seeds neg 405 820 1220
Biopesticides & Other 43 58 83 120
% pest control 46.7 33.5 37.0 37.5
Total Biotech Crop Protection Sales 92 1382 2442 3571
Biotech Insect Control Product Sales
(million dollars)
© Copyright by The Freedonia Group, Inc.
SAMPLE TABLE
SAMPLE PAGE
Functions & Markets
Freedonia Industry Study
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Sample page from
Freedonia Industry Study
#1117 Fractional Horsepower Motors
9
Gain a better understanding of your
competition and analyze your
company's position in the industry with
information about:
• market share
• competitive strategies
• financing trends
• valuation of companies
• marketing & distribution
• mergers & acquisitions
• manufacturing requirements
• licensing & related agreements
INDUSTRY STRUCTURE
Licensing & Related Agreements
Licensing, joint ventures and research alliances are hallmarks of the ag biotech
industry as it is constituted at the turn of the century. Because the pace of
technological development is so rapid -- particularly in the fields of genomics and
proteomics -- and because the market for transgenic crops has, until recently,
experienced such torrid growth, companies have sought to secure positions in new
technologies and new markets quickly. Thus, rather than try to build every
relevant technology and resource in-house, ag biotech concerns have endeavored
to ally themselves with other companies that do possess desired technologies and/
or raw materials, e.g., germplasm. Licensing represents a variation on this theme,
where usage rights for a technology are sold by one company to another.
Licensing refers to an arrangement whereby one company permits another to use
its technology in exchange for financial compensation. The company that owns
the rights may extract licensing fees up front that permit the licensee unlimited use
of the technology, or licensing costs may be assessed on a per-use basis. One
example of the former arrangement is DuPont subsidiary Pioneer Hi-Bred’s
licensing of Monsanto’s ROUNDUP READY (glyphosate-tolerant) technology as
applied to soybeans. Thus, Pioneer has paid Monsanto a licensing fee in full and
is free to sell as much ROUNDUP READY soybean seed as it can, without owing
further royalties to Monsanto. This agreement is expected to greatly benefit
Pioneer when Monsanto’s ROUNDUP glyphosate herbicides patent expires in
2000; by this time, Pioneer will have already secured a foothold in the market for
seeds that are tolerant of these herbicides and will be able to cater to purchasers of
inexpensive, generic glyphosates. Monsanto has alleged breaches of this
agreement on the part of Pioneer; as of September 2000, a jury had found in favor
of Monsanto, although Pioneer is expected to appeal. Novartis has a similar
licensing agreement with Monsanto.
SAMPLE PAGE
(continued)
Industry Structure
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Order form on last page
The Profiles Section analyzes 32
companies active in the U.S. agricul-
tural biotechnology market. These
profiles represent a sampling or cross-
section of the types of companies
involved in the industry.
Divisions, subsidiaries, joint
ventures, etc., are discussed under
appropriate parent companies.
Sources for profiles included:
• Information provided by
key staff members in the
respective companies
• Annual reports
• 10-K reports
• Security analysts reports
• Corporate product literature
COMPANY PROFILES
Delta and Pine Land Company
One Cotton Row
Scott, MS 38772
662-742-4500
Delta and Pine Land (D&PL) and its subsidiaries are engaged in the breeding,
production, conditioning and marketing of genetically modified (GM) and
conventionally bred varieties of cotton and soybean planting seeds. Primary
geographic markets for these seeds are the US, Mexico, China and Australia. The
Company also maintains seed-producing joint ventures in Argentina, Brazil and
China. In FY 1999, D&PL had sales of $260 million, including $234 million to
the US. The Company employed 555 in FY 1999.
D&PL is involved in the agricultural biotechnology industry through the
production and sale of transgenic cotton and soybean planting seed. The
Company’s GM cotton seeds include products featuring BOLLGARD gene
technology licensed from Monsanto Company (St. Louis, Missouri), a subsidiary
of Pharmacia Corporation (Peapack, New Jersey). Seeds genetically engineered to
contain the BOLLGARD Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene express a protein toxic to
certain lepidopteran cotton pests, thereby making themselves resistant to these
pests. In the US, D&PL also markets herbicide-resistant cotton planting seeds,
which feature ROUNDUP READY genes, also licensed from Monsanto. These
GM seeds are designed to provide tolerance to glyphosate-based herbicides, used
to control various broadleaf weeds in postemergence spray applications. In
addition, the Company makes “stacked” transgenic cotton seeds, which offer both
BOLLGARD and ROUNDUP READY genes in the same seed. These GM seeds
are created using the Company’s conventionally bred SURE-GROW, PAYMAS-
TER and DELTAPINE cotton and soybean varieties. In FY 1999, approximately
80 percent of the cotton seeds sold by D&PL contained either BOLLGARD genes,
10
© Copyright by The Freedonia Group, Inc.
SAMPLE PAGE
Company Profiles
Freedonia Industry Study
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
A/F Protein Incorporated
AgraQuest Incorporated
AgriBioTech Incorporated
Agritope Incorporated
Agrinomics LLC
Superior Tomato Associates LLC
American Home Products Corporation
Aqua Bounty Farms
AstraZeneca plc
Advanta BV
Garst Seed Company
Zeneca Agrochemicals
Aventis SA
AgrEvo
Agrinomics LLC
Genoplante
Hoechst AG
RhoBio
Rhone-Poulenc SA
BASF AG
American Cyanamid Company
Cyanamid Agricultural Products
Cargill Incorporated
Renessen LLC
Chr. Hansen Holding A/S
CropTech Corporation
Delta and Pine Land Company
Dow Chemical Company
Advanced AgriTraits LLC
Mycogen Corporation
Phytogen Seed Company LLC
DuPont (EI) de Nemours
Alfalfa Technology Consortium
Optimum Quality Grains LLC
Pioneer Hi-Bred International Incorporated
Protein Technologies International
Qualicon Incorporated
Ecogen Incorporated
Emergent Genetics Incorporated
Stoneville Pedigreed Seed
ExSeed Genetics LLC
Thurston Genetics Incorporated
Florigene Limited
Genetic ID Incorporated
11
Groupe Limagrain
AgReliant Genetics LLC
Biogemma
GEMSTAR
Genoplante
Harris Moran Seed Company
Limagrain Genetics Corporation
RhoBio
SOYGENETICS LLC
Vilmorin Clause & Company
MEDTOX Scientific Incorporated
Millennium Pharmaceuticals Incorporated
Neogen Corporation
NovaFlora Incorporated
Novartis International AG
Pharmacia Corporation
Cereon Genomics LLC
Monsanto Company
Renessen LLC
Research Seeds Incorporated
Alfalfa Technology Consortium
Forage Genetics International
Savia SA de CV
Bionova Holding Corporation
DNA Plant Technology Corporation
Empresas La Moderna SA de CV
Seminis Incorporated
VPP Corporation
Strategic Diagnostics Incorporated
Thermo Electron Corporation
Verdant Brands Incorporated
Consep Incorporated
Companies
Profiled
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Order form on last page
12
Freedonia does not just collect and reprint
data; Freedonia develops data. Our analysts
thoroughly investigate an industry by
extensively interviewing key industry
participants and analyzing information
from sources such as associations, govern-
ment and trade literature. Once this
research is complete, Freedonia establishes
one set of forecasts. All writing, editing
and forecasting is done in-house to assure
quality and consistency. In cases where
data does not exist, Freedonia develops the
data based on input/output ratios, bills of
materials and flow charts. The following
chart summarizes Freedonia's methodology:
Forecasting Methodology
Extensive Interviews
• Key participants
• Industry experts
• End-users
Proprietary
Electronic Database
• Trade publications
• Government reports
• Corporate literature
• Online databases
. . . and many others
Methodology for
Biotechnology in Agriculture
Freedonia
In-house Research
• Quantitative forecasting
• Industry structure & market
share analyses
• Product analyses & forecasts
The Freedonia
Economics Group
Consistent framework
of economic indicators on . . .
• Total Oil Crop Value
• Crop Acres Planted
• Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
. . . and many others
Freedonia Industry Study
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
13
The Freedonia Group, Inc. is a leading international industry study/
database company.
Since 1985, Freedonia has published over 1,500 titles covering areas such
as chemicals, coatings and adhesives, building materials, plastics, industrial
components and equipment, health care, packaging, household goods,
security, and many other industries.
Freedonia has produced a wide variety of titles, including:
• Pharmaceutical Chemicals
• Biotechnology Pharmaceuticals
• Industrial Starch & Other Corn Chemicals
• Amines
Because Freedonia is a reliable information source, our forecasts are cited
in numerous publications such as The Wall Street Journal, The Financial
Times, Chemical Market Reporter and Chemical Week.
About
The Freedonia Group
In-house operations
Because all of our staff work at the same location, interaction
between analysts and departments provides a strong system
of checks and balances.
Consistency
Our Economics Group develops indicators that are used by
all analysts. Therefore, every Freedonia study is based on a consistent
set of economic assumptions (GDP, total oil crop value, total acres
planted, etc.)
Reliable forecasts
Because all of our forecasts consider the environment in
which a product or industry is operating, as well as threats
and opportunities to the market, Freedonia forecasts are
reliable indicators of future performance.
One-on-one interviews
All studies are produced by conducting interviews with key industry
participants and end-users.
Proprietary electronic database
Freedonia’s analysts can tap into an extensive in-house electronic
database containing corporate literature (including private company
information), trade publications, government reports and many
other sources of information.
Advantages
of Freedonia Reports
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Order form on last page
About Our Customers
Freedonia's clients include major US and international companies in
the manufacturing, services, consulting and financial sectors.
Typical purchasers of Freedonia studies :
• Key Executives
• Corporate Planners
• Market Researchers
• Financial Analysts
• Information Centers
• New Product Developers
• Merger & Acquisition Specialists
Since 1985 we have provided research to customers ranging in size
from global conglomerates to one person consulting firms. More than
90% of the industrial companies in the Fortune 500 use Freedonia
research to help with their strategic planning.
Some of Freedonia's customers in the agricultural biotechnology
market include: DuPont (EU) de Nemours, BASF AG and
Cargill Incorporated.
14
Freedonia Industry Study
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
Biotechnology in Agriculture -
Private Companies Report
Most firms active in the $1.6 billion US agricul-
tural biotechnology industry are privately-held
and/or start-ups, the top two of which had total
revenues of at least $25 million in 1999. An ad-
ditional 21 such companies had total sales of at
least $25 million, including revenues not related
to ag biotech. This report profiles over 100 pri-
vate US ag biotech companies (e.g., Cargill,
EDEN Bioscience). The report also includes
market shares, recent acquisitions and IPOs, co-
operative agreements, and industry forecasts.
#1349. . . . . . . . . 11/00. . . . . . . . . . $3,200
Industrial Starch &
Other Corn Chemicals
Corn-derived chemicals demand in the US will
exceed $3 billion in 2004, boosted by polylactic
acid as it becomes more competitive with prod-
ucts derived from petrochemical feedstocks. In-
dustrial corn starch will remain the largest prod-
uct, while better growth opportunities lie with
organic and amino acids and polyols. This study
analyzes the $2.5 billion US starch and corn
chemical industry to 2004 and 2009 by product,
function and market. It also presents market
share data and profiles key industry players.
#1312. . . . . . . . . 8/00. . . . . . . . . . $3,500
Other Titles
From Freedonia
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these or other Freedonia titles,
please contact us at:
The Freedonia Group, Inc.
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Amines
US demand for amines will exceed two billion
pounds in 2004. Stronger than average gains will
be registered by specialty amines used in gas pro-
cessing and plastics; diethanolamine and
monoisopropylamine used in pesticides; and
ethyleneamines used in chelating agents. Deter-
gents and cleansers will remain the largest US
market, particularly for fatty amines and ethanola-
mines. This study analyzes the US amines industry
to 2004 and 2009 by product and market. It also
evaluates market shares and profiles key firms.
#1283. . . . . . . . . 6/00. . . . . . . . . . $3,700
Agricultural Chemicals -
Private Companies Report
Eleven private US producers had total ag chemi-
cal sales of over $100 million in 1999, with an-
other eight generating at least $50 million. In
addition, 17 other private firms had total sales of
$50 million or more, including products other
than ag chemicals. This report profiles 120+ pri-
vate companies (e.g., Cargill Fertilizer, Cenex
Harvest States, CF Industries, Farmland Indus-
tries, Royster-Clark, Wilbur-Ellis) and lists them
by product and location. It also reviews acquisi-
tions and forecasts industry demand.
#1313. . . . . . . . . 8/00. . . . . . . . . . $3,200
Biotechnology Pharmaceuticals
US demand for biotech drugs will grow almost
13% annually. Gains will be driven by new prod-
ucts as continuing advances in biotechnology en-
able drug researchers to develop safe and effec-
tive medicines for conditions not adequately
treated with conventional pharmaceuticals.
Faster regulatory review will also benefit de-
mand. This study analyzes the $15.7 billion US
biotech drug industry to 2004 and 2009 by type,
technology and application. It also presents mar-
ket share data and profiles leading companies.
#1338. . . . . . . . . 10/00. . . . . . . . . . $3,700
15
World Agricultural
Biotechnology: GMOs
Global demand for transgenic seeds (genetically
modified organisms or GMOs) will grow 13% an-
nually to nearly $3 billion in 2004, mainly in the
US, Canada and Argentina. New entrants in the
GMO market will include China and Brazil. Corn
will remain the dominant transgenic crop, with
cotton growing the fastest. This study analyzes
the world market for GMOs with historical data
for 1996 and 1999 and forecasts to 2004 and
2009 by function, crop and key country. It also
evaluates market share and profiles key firms.
#1217. . . . . . . . . 3/00. . . . . . . . . . $4,600
World Amino Acids
World demand for amino acids will grow over
5% annually, driven by burgeoning applications
in animal feed, pharmaceuticals and nutraceuti-
cals. Lysine will lead gains as it finds greater use
in chicken and pig diets. Asia/Pacific will remain
the leader in production and consumption,
largely due to it’s huge MSG market. This study
analyzes the $5.7 billion world amino acids in-
dustry to 2004 and 2009 by product, market,
region and 17 countries. The study also evaluates
market share and profiles key firms.
#1264. . . . . . . . . 5/00. . . . . . . . . . $4,500
Biotechnology in Agriculture #1339
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