Rankings or Profit? Establishing Your Business Goals

deliriousattackInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

4 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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Rankings or Profit? Establishing
Your Business Goals

I find that there are many companies online that believe that the right
mix of keywords, technical tricks and tactics will result in great
rankings, which in turn, will result in good business. Nothing
could be
further from the truth.

High rankings do not equal profits.

Nothing replaces a good
business plan. Having your business goals in place and a proper
understanding of what will create a profitable business is where an
online business starts.

This ch
apter
focuses on

the importance of creating clear business
goals. Whether you are an individual business owner, marketing
manager, or entrepreneur, you have to start by establishing the
goals for your business. Everything falls into place as a result of
es
tablishing your priorities.

Web Design by Alice

Search Ranking
s

Are Not a Goal

Web Design by Alice

Many websites are caught up in what I like to call “Alice in Wonderland
web design.”

I liken the strategy to the exchange in Disney’s famous movie
between A
lice and the Cheshire Cat:

Alice:

Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go
from here?

Cheshire Cat:

That depends a good deal on where you
want to get to.

Alice:

I don't much care where . . .

Cheshire Cat:

Then it doesn't matter which way you go.

Alice:

so long as I get
somewhere
!

Cheshire Cat:

Oh, you're sure to do that, if you only walk
long enough.

Too many companies continually add pages, products and press releases to
their websites with no thought as to the direction, strategy or primary pur
pose of
their website. There is no specific business goal or visitor goal. As a result, our
visitors wander through the content without a clear direction or goal as to what
they should do

all because the business has not defined
its
purpose.

On the outset
of my seminars, I always ask the attendees what their goals
are. What

is the #1 business goal? And, what is the #1 visitor
goal? I’ll

never
forget that one attendee spoke up and said that her goals were too
simple. When

asked what the goals were, she answe
red: “Make money, sell
shoes.” I

was
ecstatic. This

is exactly the type of goal that every business owner or marketing
manager should have readily in their
mind. The

simpler it is, the easier it is to
communicate throughout the company.

The goals need to b
e written down, displayed and advertised throughout the
organization. These

are the operating principles of your website, and every
decision about your online marketing strategy needs to be evaluated and measured
according to those goals.

Every page of the

website needs to be evaluated according to those stated
goals. If

a page does not reflect those goals, then it needs to be
changed. If

images,
content and design do not reflect those goals, then they need to be
changed. If

the
primary call to action on th
e page does not reflect the goals, then it needs to be
changed.

If the goals are not clear, then the organization of the website, its content
and design will go off focus, and the visitor may never take your intended actions.

Getting people to your website

is one task, but getting them to do what you want
keeps you in
business. Too

many businesses focus on the acquisition of visitors to
the website and ignore measuring the factors that make a business successful.

Lack of Goals

Shows

in the

Design

Being invo
lved in website development projects for almost 15 years, I’ve
seen any number of website design strategies, and have become convinced that
most companies design websites backwards.

The typical method of designing a
website is to retain a web design compan
y which then uses a graphics designer to
produce a few versions of what your website should look
like. Essentially

the
entire process is comprised of an artist looking at your current site, creating a
pretty picture of what they think your site should look

like, and the company
selects which pretty picture will be the basis of their new website.

This is
b
ackwards.

The

website must be an extension of the business goals and support
those goals with every
page. This

means that before any design is created, the
purpose of the site, the focus of the content, and the goal of the visitor need to be
established and developed into a marketing
plan. That

plan will determine how the
website should look and feel, but more imp
ortantly
, how it should
be organized.

In Part IV the content will go deeper into
i
nformation
a
rchitecture and
the
u
ser
i
nterface, both of which are critical for good usability, building a successful
marketing presence and as a nice side benefit, good ranki
ngs.

In this chapter
, the
point is to focus on the purpose of design, which is to enable your website visitors
to know who you are, what you do, why you are the best choice, and how to take
action. If

those elements are not immediately available because of

the “prettiness”
of the website, then you have lost
your
visitors
.

A great architecture with clear navigation

and

obvious and readable clusters
of content and links that help to answer the visitor’s questions do more to enable
good rankings and good usabi
lity than an artists’ initial vision of a
website. The

artist, while a critical part of the design process, should not be the architect.

I liken
it to moving into a new office
building. I

hope that the building was designed and
built by the architect, and
not the
artist. The

architect understands the foundations,
weights, human factors and logistical
layouts. The

artist will add the touches
which make the building human and connect with the tenants on a different level.

The same is
true for
your website; an

information architect will scope the website
with a knowledge based on research, human factors, and business
principles. Once

that part is established, then the artist can be used to create a look and feel on top
of the established architecture and busine
ss goals of the website.

Lack of Direction

Becomes Evident in Marketing

The problem with unclear business goals isn’t limited to site design; it
extends to the entire organization’s view of
marketing. From

content to function,
from blogging to the entire
social media gambit, a lack of stated goals becomes
more and more evident.

In no other area is an organization

s lack of business focus more evident
than in social
media. If

the marketing message is not clear, then it becomes even
more diffused by the many reflections in each social media application.

When
companies build a blog mainly because they heard it will increase their rankings,
they neglect to make it a sales or acqu
isition
tool. I

find that the vast majority of
business blogs neglect to integrate their business massage or their website into the
blog. The

blog is developed as a stand
-
alone presence, and the marketing message
is lost, simply because the purpose was not

established
prior to the practice.

I was reviewing some articles on analytics when I caught
the

DM

News
Special
Report on Analytics
August 14, 2006

(
http://www.dmnews.com/cms/lib/6502.pdf
)
. I was impressed at the
amount of information contained about the
business case for analytics, all coming
from some very intelligent people. The great thing was the consistent thread of
thought throughout the entire report: Analytics is growing


and it’s more than
web stats


it is marketing intelligence. Unfortunately,

the gold mine is sitting
untouched, as many businesses are unaware of the untold riches sitting just a few
feet away.

However, this grabbed my attention more than anything else in the report:

“Web analytics works best when measurement expectations
are
clearly defined in advance, not after the fact or on an ad
-
hoc
basis.”


Eric Peterson

This is not only the essence of analytics; it is the essence of business. How
can you expect a business to succeed when there are no measurements along the
way to provide

correction and guidance?

I cannot count the numbers of marketing
managers that are overwhelmed in their jobs and have no clear measurement
expectations. The

reports
they request

have only to do with the “window
-
dressing”
of visitors, and nothing to do wit
h the bottom line profitability of the
website.
Those

marketing managers are the ones nodding their heads in agreement
whenever I show that
quote. They

understand the circular path of reporting
random events, rather than focusing on a specific goal and mea
suring according to
that goal.

If businesses were to simply state their goals and to measure website
performance according to those goals, the improvement would be
revolutionary.
Before

there can be any improvement,

the first step
:

is to
set a well
-
defined

business goal. T
hose who practice
goals
-
setting are
those who

tend to

succeed in
business. The same is true of websites. They must have a goal, both for the owner
and the visitor. Unless that goal is declared, there is no way to determine success
or failu
re.

The only way to sift through the mountains of data, the hundreds of
charts and graphs, the pages of “Top 10” lists, is to have a specific set of goals to
measure. By measuring against specific goals, the data will suddenly fall away as
you remove what
is not necessary to the overall goals. Good analytics programs
allow you to strip away the stuff you don’t want or need to see. They allow you to
focus in on the key indicators that are relevant to your site’s performance.

Bottom Line: If you don’t have cl
early defined goals for your online
marketing strategy, then no amount of analytics will assist you in making the right
decisions.

Lack of Consistency
B
ackfires with

Social Media

It becomes very evident in the social media marketing, the companies that
do
n’t have a clear vision or goal of how they want to be perceived or their primary
purpose. It

results in Faceb
ook pages that are bland; Twitter messages that are
overly promotional, rather than conversational; and YouTube accounts that
contain a 20
-
minute
employee training video from 1977.

Without a clear goal and
strategy, the rush towards social media becomes one
with
a directive of: “We need
to be there!” Rather than evaluating “What can we do
there?” The

social media
message becomes disjointed, as there

is no clear message, and the purpose
becomes lost.

Non

goal
-
oriented

social media presence
s

also tend to be stand
-
alone, as
they neglect to drive visitors to a particular
destination. As

businesses rush to get
into social media, they forget to take visito
rs back to the primary website in order
to fulfill their goal.

Companies see social media as a confusing and overwhelming
necessity, especially when consultants are constantly extolling the many virtues of
social media
reach. However
, their hesitation is
j
ustified. So

many
companies
question the time involved and the results returned
. Time

management is tough
enough already, so what will Twittering a few hundred times a month do for a
company?
The answer is that different social
-
media outlets bring differen
t results,
so businesses

need to focus in different ways

to use

each
channel.

Simply
throwing time and interns at new social media will not produce results.

The social
media efforts need to be tied into the company marketing strategy, so that a clear
messa
ge is always consistent.

T
he famous Marshall McLuhan

mantra
, “The Medium is the Message”
means that you cannot treat all social media the
same. Each

social media channel
is completely different, and so the message and tactics used need to be adapted for
ea
ch medium.

Many companies are more suited to a YouTube strategy, as they
need the visual video medium to better communicate their unique
advantages.
Other

businesses that require a pulse on early adopters and masses of opinions find
Twitter to be an ideal (primarily) text
-
based
tool. Dell

tech support is a great
example of this, as Twitter allow
s

Dell to find those early adopters and touch them
as soon as a

user tweet
s

a
complain
t

about their Dell
computer. Within

minutes, a
Dell rep is in contact with
the user
(
I say this based on

personal experience)
. This

strategy does not work in a YouTube environment, only in the fast, text
-
based
world of
Twitter.

Face
book provides a safe method of reaching fans and allowing them to
take part in your marketing.

Volkswagen
, for example,

allows fans to upload
pictures of their VW vehicles, and there is a strong sub
-
group of classic Beetle
fans.

The conversation on VW’s ma
in Facebook page is primarily fan
-
driven, and
at the time of this writing, there are over
175
,000 fans.

The photo gallery contains
over
1,700

pictures, again, mostly uploaded from fans.

Volkswagen

is able to
utilize Facebook’s fan interactions, which to pl
ays its strength of creating a loyal
customer base that reaches back for decades.

Y
our company does not have to spread efforts among all of the social
media services if it doesn’t make
sense. Find

what works, what spreads your
message the most effectively
and focus on that channel.

However
,
developing a
strategy that works for your company

requires that your business goals be clear
and concise, and that social media will assist those goals, rather than becoming a
goal in
itself. If

a business is clear in
it
s
message before delving into social media,
then
that business is

most likely able to retain that message and adapt it to the
media. Otherwise
, as is so common, businesses try social media, are not able to
adapt their strategies to
it
, and the
masses
end u
p controlling their message and
draining their time.

I appreciate the companies that know enough to slow down and ask
questions. Be

aware of the time invested and develop a
strategy. Make

sure that
strategy fulfills the goals of the
business. Without

takin
g the time to coordinate
your message across a variety of media, your efforts will be disjointed and
discouraging.

Again, it all comes down to the basic principles of
clearly defining
your
goals. What

do you want to accomplish, how will you accomplish it,
and
what do you expect visitors to
do? When

the goals are
established
, measurement
becomes clear, and a clear strategy will emerge.

Search Rankings Are Not a Goal

Leads,
sales,

and subscriptions are
goals. Rankings

are one of many
means

to those goals
.
T
hey are an influence, but not the measurement of success.

T
oo
many businesses think that as soon as they have a few keywords ranking number
one in Google, they will be
successful. In

reality, there is much more to being
successful, such as designing what c
ustomers will see on the other side of the
search
results. If

your website doesn’t reflect the quality implied by your rankings,
then visitors won’t stick around to contribute to your success.

Great rankings won’t support a bad business
model. Gaining

rank
ings for
your website is a goal to have, but it is not the immediate path to
success. There

are many websites that are having great success without ranking for one or two
“winning” terms. This is where I like to refer to

visibility
rather than
rankings. I

would rather have hundreds or thousands of terms ranking well than a single term
in the top
spot. When

evaluating the traffic patterns of
visitors,
the broad
search
terms

(like “cars”, “cameras” and “computers”

tend
to bring

in a lot of visitors, but
not
c
onversions
, which is more of a factor in success than rankings.

Rankings Do Not Equal Sales

In the same way that more visitors do not equal more business (
u
nless you
are an ad
-
supported website, in which case some of this does not apply, but
the
principles

of expanding rankings
visibility

still applies.

T
he

key is to measure the
factors that directly contribute to
success. Of

course, rankings and visitor numbers
are good factors, but they are not the
only

contributions. Unless

there is also a
factor of qual
ity or accomplishment tied to those visitors, then you have only
succeeded in part of the equation.

This goes back to the account that I
related

in
Chapter 1
, where my website
ranked
highly

in multiple search engines for many terms, yet the sales came from

a direct
link. The

decision to invest time and money in rankings and search
referrals would have been the wrong decision, as that was not the direct cause of
profits.

This is the point where we realize the principles of marketing and
,

even
more,
d
irect
m
arketing,
apply also
to online
marketing. There

is a difference
between
visitors

and
qualified visitors
. Finding

the qualified visitors and investing
in those channels will provide a better use of time and resources than the scattered
“shotgun
approach.” M
ore

doesn’t equate to
better.
Better

is better.

Your Rankings Reports
A
re Wrong

In later chapters I will cover analytics and measuring your business goals,
as the task of building an equation of rankings, visitors, effectiveness, and goal
completion will p
rovide a better analysis of true success in your marketing efforts.
Take your marketing beyond the rankings and find the true factors in your success.
Otherwise, you could be wasting valuable hours in optimizing and rankings for
words that don’t work for y
ou. But now, I would like to outline a few examples of
why rankings reports are outdated and the wrong measurement for success.

Ranking
-
Report Software

Search
e
ngines do not like ranking
-
report software.

Period.

Software
-
automated
search
queries drain resources and bandwidth, and inflate ad
impressions, which are used to compute quality for pay
-
per
-
click ads. Therefore,
Google is particularly aggressive about blocking repeated queries from the same
computer or business
. Google would rather

keep advertisers happy than serve
overly aggressive
search marketers

who check their rankings incessantly.)

In order to satisfy marketers who need to check their rankings, search
en
g
ines have allowed access via an
API key

(Application Programming Interfa
ce).


It is a code that tells the search engine who is accessing the database and the
program accessing the data.

This allows the search engine to direct automated
software using the API to specific dataset and resources.
Without

utilizing the API
key for
the reports, you could be
temporarily
blocked from accessing the search
engine.
(
Google in particular is aggressive about these types of programs taking
resources awa
y

from
its core service of serving search results to “real” searchers
.

When Google detects

that too many searches have been requested from the same
source and at regular intervals, it

simply shut
s

down
your
access
.

Y
ou get a page
that nicely tells you that you are
blocked from further access, as

the result of too
many automated queries, either
from a computer virus or other software program.
)

If

you do use the API key to check rankings, what will be immediately apparent
is
that the
results from the rank
-
checking software will show rankings for your
website that are not consistent with the
live
r
esults.
It

is
more accurate for a client
to simply open a browser and search for words and rankings
manually.
Having a
som
e
one
run a rankings report,
to share with others
is
inaccurate by nature
.

Be
sure to explain to anyone involved the expectation
s

that
the results from automated
rank
-
checking software may be different that what they will see in their own
searches.

However
, rank
-
checking software is good for checking trends at the
outset of a project
.

Tracking
large jumps in rankings

after optimizing mult
iple
pages of your website is the best use.

Tracking the movement in rankings
is
unreliable
when

tracking small changes (a move of a webpage from a #5 ranking
to a #3 ranking).

Personalized Search

With the advent of
users
creating accounts
with
the search

engines,
personal search histories have been
accumulated.
Personalized search is important
to the search engines
in
many ways, not the least of which is personalized
advertising that can be crafted solely for you, based on your preferences, search
history

and associated accounts.

Personalization will affect search results

based on
your past searches, location of your access, your click
-
through rates and other
behaviors.

After all, the search engines are attempting to provide the best, most
relevant results

to searcher, and using
a person’s
search history will enable the
engine to adjust the results as necessary to create that personal relevance.

As a
result, the rankings you see may differ from those your neighbor sees, simply
based on your
interaction with

the search engine.

I expect this
practice
to continue
to grow as the line
between
privacy and advertising
desires
becomes increasingly
blurred. Many

people choose to give up privacy in order to receive more relevant
advertising, and do not see the risks.

Results

Promotion

Google
recently

instituted a
search
-
results
feature called promote results

(Figure 3.1
).

It’s

simple. If

you like one result over another, simply promote the
result

by clicking the up
-
arrow button next to a result
.
That moves the result t
o the
top of the page, where it will appear whenever you search for the same keyword
.
M
any webmasters see this as a means to affect
rankings
, but if
it does

so at all
, it is
on a very minute
scale.
.

Figure 3
.1
: Promote

results

[f03
01.tif]

I have seen
resul
ts

promotion

used very effectively by marketing managers
that are able to go into their boss’
s

computer and promote their website for
specific search
terms. That

way, to the boss,
the company seems to be ranking #1
,
so

he leaves the

marketing department

alone, and stops demanding to know why
the website is not ranking first.

This is a good illustration of ranking results being
misleading!

Multiple Search Engine Data

Centers

Each search engine has data centers located all over the world.

This
makes
it eff
ective to serve the millions of simultaneous searches that take place
all of the
time.

For efficiency, each search engine query is routed to the most appropriate
data center, which will return results based on its snapshot of the search index.


Your co wor
kers may be sitting right next to you, send the same search query, but
will see different results because the query was sent to a different data center.
Data

centers are consistently being updated, and it is very easy to see different results,
usually only

within a few rankings, from a search of different data centers.

Regional Weighting

A New Yorker searching for the term “Zoo” on Google is
likely
to get
results that show the Bronx Zoo as being the most relevant
result. A

Google
searcher in Southern Calif
ornia will see the San Diego Zoo as number 1. Regional
searches are being weighted and slowly
implemented
by the search engines
.

Obviously, this doesn’t work with
all
terms, as
many
are world
-
wide in scope.
However,
within the past few years,
Google has, ,

placed a heavy emphasis on
local results, maps
,

and business
listings. Offering

searchers local based results
creates more advertising inventory, and also connects users to locally
-
based
providers. Intentional

or not, Google is turning the world market ba
ck into a local
market. Locally
-
based searches provide a more relevant result to a local searcher.

Social Network

One of my recent searches turned up a surprise, as Google rolled out
another Beta program that affects the search results.


Google showed arti
cle
s

from
friend
s

of
mine

in the first page of results

(Figure 3.
2
)
. The

reason that
my friends
w
ere

in the
first page
was because I was logged in, had a Google Social Profile,
and Google was recommending other friend’s article as a result of our social
profiles being linked.

Without being logged in to my Google account, my friend

s
article
s

would not have appeared

in the first page of results.

Figure 3.
2
: Google Social Circle Beta, showing connected friends


articles

[f030
2
.tif]

Continual changes like th
is Social Profile Suggestion Beta program show
the direction that a search engine like Google is
heading. Google

is integrating
social recommendations, multimedia,
personalization,

and regionalization as a
way of customizing search results specific to a
pe
rson. The

more information you
provide to Google through your account, the more Google can customize your
search results. The days of gaining the #1 ranking in Google, and knowing that
everyone searching will see that #1 ranking are over.

Set
Better Goals

The typical duties of an online marketer working with no established goals
are simple:

1.

Open the analytics panel.

2.

Take the numbers of

unique visitors, total visitors and other “important”
numbers
and copy them
into a report.

3.

Distribute
the report.


Then one of two things happen
s
:



No one reads the report.



Someone reads the report and wants to know why visitors are down
from the previous
month. Then

the analyst spends the rest of the week
attempting to bring some reason or excuse for the visitor numbers.

This is what I call hamster
-
wheel analytics

(Figure 3.
3
).

Figure 3.
3
: Hamster
-
w
heel analytics

[f0303.tif]

©iStockphoto.com/ohiophoto


With hamster
-
wheel analytics, there
is

no progress made; only reporting of
past
performance. Even

then, the past performance is usually limited to the larger
numbers gathered from the
report. If

the goal of the website is to increase visitors,
then wonderful

report
vis
itors. However
, there should at least be some kind of
analysis of effective visitor sources that can provide insight to future campaigns.

If the goals are to
sell
products, generate leads, gather subscriptions
,

or
meet
other action
-
based goals, then measur
ing
total visit
s and visit
or
s is an
incomplete picture of the actual business of
marketing. It

is equivalent to a brick
-
and
-
mortar store owner counting walk
-
ins rather than
receipts. You

can’t
make
money

based on walk
-
ins, and you don’t stay in business lo
ng without analyzing
receipts.

Too many marketing managers get locked into this endless cycle of
reporting numbers that change consistently based upon hundreds of factors
:

s
easonality, search engine changes, website changes, email campaigns and press
relea
ses are just a few of the factors that can affect website
traffic. Unless

a
marketing manager is
measuring the goals of the business
,
[AU: It’s not really the
goals that are being measured, but rather the performance in light of these goals,
correct?

DE]
t
hese factors will be external and rarely included in the “big
picture” view of why things change.

Mike Moran, author of
Search Engine
Marketing Inc.

(IBM Press, 2005)
, wrote
,


If you say to yourself that you are working on search
optimization because you b
elieve it will make you money, that’s
not a business, that’s a religion. Instead, put search on the same
footing as every other business decision and optimize your
business instead of your search campaign.

Mike and I see eye to eye on
this. Measuring

your
business goals through
analytics is not just about numbers
;

it’s about improvements, processes,
experience, and planning. You don’t have to be doomed to repeat the same failed
campaigns. History teaches powerful lessons, and analytics are a primary tool fo
r
learning those lessons.

To get started, ask yourself the following questions:



What is
my

primary business goal?



What is the visitor goal for my website?

List the revenue generating
actions
that visitors can take on your website.

Consider
e
verything from
direct sales to leads, newsletter subscriptions, downloads, registrations,
contact forms, etc.

The most definitive step in analyzing the goals of the
website are creating those goals and understanding the value of each
goal.

Calculate

t
he Value of a Lead

E
ven lead generation websites need to establish the value of a
lead. Think

of the valuable business intelligence you could have if you were able to calculate
the value of your leads from different sources
:

trade shows, direct mailings,
website or sales
call
s. If

you were able to calculate out the return and see the value
of each lead source,
you’d be able to

adjust your marketing strategy to go after the
best source of profitable leads.

I learned this lesson in
telemarketing. It

was the worst two weeks of my

life. In

college, I took a job at a local telemarketing firm for some extra Christmas
cash. I

was
miserable. I

hated to interrupt people’s dinner time and try to sell them
something they didn’t need, want, or ask
for. Making

30
-
40 or more cold calls in
an

evening created more than enough “no’s” than I could
stand. I

didn’t enjoy this
job that paid me a measly six dollars an hour.

However, across the cubicle, was
an
employee who loved his
job. He

happily made his calls, was extremely cheerful and felt that
he had the greatest job
in the
world. I

finally had to ask him what made this job so wonderful, as I was
languishing in misery.

He explained that he made $3.50 every time he picks up the
phone. Well
, that got my
attention! I’m

making $6.50
an hour

and he i
s making
$3.50 for every
call? Why

was he getting paid so much? And what kind of
payment plan is that?

He
explained.” If

I make 50 calls a night, I know that on
average, 10 people will
listen. Out

of those 10 people, I average 2 people that will
make a
com
mitment. If

I average those
numbers for

a week, then I will get a
bonus. If

I average those numbers for the month, I get another
bonus. Add

in the
top closer bonus, and I average $3.50 for each phone call . . . .”

I was
stunned. I

saw the call as the
probl
em. He

saw the call as already
-
earned value, which
contributed directly to his success.

Calculating the value of a lead can provide an amazing insight into
measuring success on the
website. I

find that as soon as marketers place dollar
signs next to their
website reports, it gets interesting, and people take notice.

Measure According to the Goal

Strangely enough, while most businesses are focused on making money
with their websites, they settle for reports that focus on data that does not provide
recommenda
tions for
improvement. I

am generally surprised at the level of data
that businesses will settle

for
.

At this point, I like to paraphrase on
e

of Socrates


famous sayings

as
, “the
unexamined website is not worth
hosting.” Unless

a business is reporting business
value focused on continual improvements, the site is in a state of
stagnation.
Problems

go unaddressed, and the website underperforms.

I’ll address analytics in
greater detail later the book, as well as
the dangers of the
“typical” reporting cycle.
At this point,
though, you should
write down your goals for your
website. Write

down the current and potential conversion points, and assign value to them, or at
the very least, a means of developing value in the near future.

Pri
mary goals:

1.

What is the business purpose of your website?

2.

What is the primary action that you want visitors to take?

Secondary goals:

1.

If visitors do not take the primary action, then what do you want them to
do?

2.


List supplementary conversion (visitor action) points that contribute to
your business, marketing, or building your email list.